35 Burst results for "Wolff"

"wolff" Discussed on Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

03:47 min | 9 months ago

"wolff" Discussed on Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

"Bbc and stuff and like yeah again kind of in my teens had heard it talked about a lot so it's interesting to enter into this world. Yeah like four four for enjoyment. And in retrospect it's it's very well made well done film in the moment and then i think that it's kind of it kind of slow sleight of hand in in terms of what is about more he's trying to do and it's quite at she which i think quite rare for for for horror films quite emotional rights. Quite sort of you know quite sad. Even this kind of ammo horror awesome. Yeah i like that. I kind of left an impression the coining of a new genre right we've had elevated hora dance horror so cora next. We need to have that thing piece on email. What goes you give this. Yeah i agree with david as think force across the board for me. I it stephanie. One that's ready like only kind of state at the same level of What would be respect. I have for throughout the usually when i watch things at the beginning of the year. The initial like you feel so excited. 'cause you're watching any movie but then as tigers on you might think joe has been kind of mole abusive I should have been but this is definitely one that i still think he's one of the year's best and i'm really excited to kind of see a new generation of people into the the video offseason kind of discover the delights and Not say i. They quit in the back to cosign that strong recommendation from us for across the board from me that is censor strong recommendation from the three of us for that film. Do seek thousand cinema. How chance to this weekend up next. We have another new release with nicholas cage in pig. Okay a little at a setup here about pig. A very uncommon film. I think nicholas cage stars alongside alex wolff in this tasty revenge tale about a reclusive truffle hunter who lives alone in the wilderness and must return to his past in portland in search of his beloved foraging pig after she is kidnapped so before we dive into the review section. We're going to have some wolf on pig action. You had a chat with alex wolff. Remind me that's the twins the dust of wolf brother. that's in hereditary. The one that's in paper towns. Yes say alex. And now is the older brother who's in paper towns alex in hereditary and old makes recently and is just the the nicest guy so usually when you actors is a little bit of a kind of a worried that they might be a bit bit pretentious or bits of god but he was really really great sought to say enthusiastic about his work and about nicholas. Cage loves nicholas cage and the movies. He loves the movies we were talking about. That live oldman and he was kind of just excited to be around. And i guess that's twenty three. It hasn't been beaten down by life yet but I was thrilled to discover that. He's not as sad often appears in the movies he really does kind of play. Some dark roles blessed. Well let's have a listen to this chat. The hannah had with alex. Wharf i.

alex wolff nicholas cage cora Bbc stephanie david joe portland alex oldman nicholas Cage hannah
"wolff" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

01:47 min | 10 months ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"And that's a different topic of discussion. So i do see the big positives. I just think we've go to look what comes next to make sure the mid to long-term that all these girls that are given the chance and the opportunity to actually race gone to be able to participate in or after the w. series and finally says what about your own plans and ambitions if we're thinking forward here for for susie wolff you're quite experienced now as a team principal. Is this your path for the foreseeable future or do you see yourself going into other series. Maybe even former the one one day or other branches of the sport or even into its its overall management. One wilson. formula one is enough to be a pack. Otherwise it'd be a pack and i think the family logistics needed to get to of is working for me to one is something i do not even want to consider so no. I don't see myself going that path for me. It's unfinished business right now. I have to macy's lift in informally before we come to the end of the season it would end up being. My third season informed unfortunately a bit interrupted because of couvert. But i can. I can see at that. It's been a wonderful journey. I've certainly learned an incredible amount. Because when i joined venturi it was in a completely different situation. That is now. I think there's exciting things hades for the team. You oversee have a new american owner. Who is very ambitious for the future. So very exciting. Time to hit my own personal journey. I'm someone always likes to evolve. I like to push myself and challenge myself at to keep growing so once. The season's over i can i can take stock and hopefully be proud of what we've achieved as a team and then look at what comes in the future will wish you the very best of luck in the london b. premium and in the future bill. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak to us today. Thank you very much..

susie wolff wilson macy venturi london
"wolff" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

03:13 min | 10 months ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"You're scouting an opening up the nets of who we attract to formula one to mitch from different backgrounds. I think that's hugely important. So the grounds the brown work is being done and now it's just a case of making sure that we take the actions needed to actually see the change that's on the that's on the race series themselves on the teams. Its own sponsors as well. I guess and you've taken the action. I mean your voluntary formula retail. I think i'm right in saying around about a third of the staff. A now female is that correct. Is that case of action. Speaking louder than words. Obviously it's easier for me. Because i recognize what women can bring to the table and i certainly even know being a working mother. I don't shy away from from hiring working mothers because i think the most efficient people and multitasking people. 'cause we simply have to be so of course through my you even call it positive discrimination. I've ended up debate team but that still has to be a performing team. And that's one angle where i'm quite disciplined. I've standing fu for diversity. But he's also got to be a diversity that successful so as much as it was very important for me to make sure. I had great. Ramon the team. I also need to prove that we that it that successful because in the end i'm responsible for the performance of the team and i hope with performances reassuring this year informed e that we showing that actually It works and in the end. It's about just casting the net wider and making opportunities for the women out there because there is talent and it's just making sure that that talent is given the opportunity. I will obviously one of the the big us. Ps of asphalt is that women can race equally in the same category against men. As as you did yourself so so successfully now when it started out w series had kind of mixed reviews because it wasn't bad it was. It was women in a racing in a women only series. But i do wonder that as things evolve now. The series has been getting a lot of publicity opened. The door for other women rises is the is the is the is the perception of that series changing or is it still a sort of viewed as something. That's not quite what the the women in multiple movement is really all about. What touch you. Mike you i wish i a lot more successful than actually was but i'm still or is able to look back and be proud of of what achieved thankful for all the great opportunities i had the sport isn't segregated so it's obviously challenging to take one aspect one level of the sport and segregates but i see the positive from w. series. I know there's been negativity around obviously had my opinion but my opinion is that it creates opportunity in twenty girls out there being given the chance to race which is something very positive in helping their career momentum. We've just got to be conscious of what happens next because the sport isn't segregated so if you want to become professional racing driver you want to go on to have a career in sports you need to be good enough to race against may nine women unless the sport becomes segregated. And that's a different topic of discussion. So i do see the big positives. I just think we've go to look what comes next to make sure the mid to long-term that all these girls that are given the chance.

mitch Ramon Mike
"wolff" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"By the fact that diversity such a big topic in the wider world not just in motor sport and people expect to see the environments now. And it's not good enough not diverse when i started dare to be different which is now together with goes on track. It was slightly different in that. Diversity wasn't such a big topic as it is now now. I think you simply cannot get away from the fact that people expect to see that diversity. The problem is that it's it's fine to talk about it. It's fine for there to be momentum but it comes down to the actions that we all take to actually make a difference in an. I did mention before for me now. There's so many great programs in place is so much support that we have out there. There's so much momentum and behind us that we are seeing so much great opportunities and a little bit the situation with a sensible enough of female talent and to fill the opportunity. So we're very focused. I wouldn't girls on track initiative getting into the grassroots. Making sure that we're open the sport up. Accessibility is a big topic on to make sure that the sport is seen as more accessible. And then take those very bright and towns women who are successful sport now in creating more role models rather than because it's much more than just finding the next female talent on the track. It's about making sure that whole ecosystem of motor more diverse. You mentioned that. If i goes on track program. It's a great program. It's basically scouring the welfare for female driving talent age twelve to sixteen on the winner of last year. My awoke has become ferrari driver academy member. The first female member of the academy in ferrari's first female driver informative full. She's racing now against sebastian montoya. When pablo son you know so. But also i wonder what is it. Say about the progress of the women multiple so the movement if you'd like it attracts partners now like ferrari.

ferrari sebastian montoya pablo
We Have to Keep Talking About the Movement Behind 'American Marxism'

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 11 months ago

We Have to Keep Talking About the Movement Behind 'American Marxism'

"These are two Washington Post reporters. It's another trash mouth smear job on Donald Trump. It's number one. Number three is a book called Landslide the final days of the Trump presidency. Another Attempt to smear President Trump by Michael Wolff, who was a hit man in my opinion. The book in between these two number two on Amazon is American Marxism. This is a book that many of you have already acquired. You may be scratching your head. Well, how is this other book number one Because this is what they do. It'll be a hot book for a month or two, and then I'll go away. The problem is they don't go away. That is the people who are doing this to this country. And so The overwhelming majority of you. Have posted. It have comment that you appreciate the fact. That this book was written that it that it fuses with all the events that are swirling around us. And so but But then there were a handful. Enough already enough already who just want to go by the numbers paint by the numbers and these are people who are not going to help save the country. These are people who expect everybody else to save the country for them. So I reject them. I ignore them. If I can spend 16 months of my life, writing this book in the last three months of my life talking about it. In the next several months of my life again. Trying to promote what's in the book. Then I think it's okay. That we go over some of these issues. Going a little section of the program. To try and convey What's going on? Wouldn't be weird if I wrote this book, and I didn't talk about what's in it and yet say Go form a movement. Gobi activists go to this re Chapter five. Well, What does that mean? It means nothing. It's idiotic.

President Trump Michael Wolff Donald Trump Washington Post Amazon Gobi
Leftist Reporters Use the Same 'He-Said She-Said' Formula to Write Books

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 11 months ago

Leftist Reporters Use the Same 'He-Said She-Said' Formula to Write Books

"But coming from the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal. This other hitman this Michael Wolff. And so how many times are we going to go through this? Oh, we're shocked and shocked at what this one said. And that was not shocked anymore. We know that this is the problem. We got it. We understand it. We? We We've lived through this We have lived through this. Anyway. You won't find me. Helping these, these reporters sell books. Not going to happen. By pulling a Statement. This one side of that one said this this is the Sort of the prototypical book that has written by these left wing reporters. And this is how they enrich themselves. I don't mean to be preachy. I'm just explaining How do these books go so high up on the, uh, on the Amazon list, and so, uh, are are placed in front of the book starts because their hype Their hype.

Michael Wolff Washington Post Wall Street Journal Amazon
Forbes' Alison Durkee Tries Spinning 'American Marxism' Success

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 11 months ago

Forbes' Alison Durkee Tries Spinning 'American Marxism' Success

"That she would comment on that? This book has had Several hundreds of thousands of pre order self. Isn't that the the story, Mr Producer But she doesn't say a word about the story. Not a word about you. American Marxism, running a spot on the Amazon chart before its official release appears to be rare. The book is one of only two on the Amazon notification charts who sells are based on preorders alone, along with Michael Pollen's This Is your Mind on plants? I don't know what the hell that looks about. The Vince book won't appear on The New York Times list or other book lists until next week, since with the exception of Amazon preorders are typically reported as part of a books. First Week. Sales and books do not appear on the bestseller list until the official release fine. Here we go. The waters and Lavin's books and their critical takes on the left. May soon be overtaken by books that instead look at the right with a critical eye. Michael Wolff's landslide the final days of the Trump presidency, and Carol Enoch and filled Rutgers, I alone can fix it. Donald J. Trump's catastrophic final year. Which featured politically damaging looks at the end of the Trump presidency are now ranked by Waters Book on Amazon's top 100 books Ranking, which is updated hourly. As of Thursday afternoon, Lennox and Rockers book was ranked number one on Amazon's list ahead of its official release on January. 20 and Wolff's book, which was released on Tuesday, was ranked number three. Levin's book was now number two on the list, while waters have dropped the number five

Mr Producer Amazon Michael Pollen Carol Enoch Donald J. Trump Vince Lavin Michael Wolff The New York Times Rutgers Lennox Rockers Wolff Levin
"wolff" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

The Red Box Politics Podcast

06:25 min | 11 months ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

"Will this. friday next. Time is matching. sit in the back. i felt. that's the world terrifying mentally. I know but i just wanted to say that. I think i think i sort of disagree with into but because i think i think beastie crisis we have to grasp about. It's not a. It's a matter of personal. I called your willpower. I think it is this kind of structural problem. And i think this report sounds great. I mean it's very very it was very jamesy in. It's like Sort of big ideas. You always get overexcited. By these things. I love the ideas of robots and fields picking weeds and completely behind that individual guitar. And i think this is probably the only way to fix the problem. I think we'd be amazed at the effect of their structural. Changes can have. I also think the sort of interesting stuff reading around at the fact that Childhood obesity although it stable thus stability is because increasing in poor children. Bit reducing enrich. Children means that. Evidently we have this evidence. That are the beastie crisis is something is not that inevitable progress through people doing things to reduce it and maybe it'll just take this with big government dimension to fix it is it is crazy is one is the majority of adults and overweight. And sort of three. And tanner obese or something has to these just absolutely you. This is just like unprecedented in human history. And i think the scale of these plans is completely know completely kind of commensurate to problem and it seems india if the government is having a lot of contortions as to where you know it's logical position lies in The nelson he coming libertarian again. Georgia georgia saying he will carefully consider the conclusions and respond with the white paper within six months. Which doesn't feel like they're grasping at too tightly. Generic was very much playing it down this morning Times ready to kathy before your coach policies. Like that and you know you go back to the old libertarian. Leaving people to do what they want. But then also having an argument about face masks and the government was has been telling us about exact house live our lives right down so when we can leave the house and is an isn't a necessary journey and all that sort of thing so this has been willing in the name of public health to take quite an interventionist approach but doesn't seem to want to do on this. Well no because you can see how wildly unpopular these proposals would be very such as society sections of society that always get the net. It reminds me of people giant. Teddy's people snaring a poor families with giant and actually the reason they've got telling because the giant entertainment so you can argue that the reason people go to the chippy and bhai comes of dying booklets fear. Fizzy drinks and give children. chocolate bars. is that because there isn't anything else very nice going on in our lives so it's really hard and this is the people particularly in. The news are new new converts to to boris johnson. It's a very kind of delicate thing. It's all very well to say the middle class way. Everybody should need brown rice and me so and organic eggs but and also of course the question of concrete essence which i think really a really really important to come into it and the idea that anything to do with cookery domestic science feeding yourself is kind of a city side subjects and you know on friday. We make scones and take them home and people need to be children. Need to be taught properly how to how to be able to feed themselves. It's a it's a really kind of basic basic thing. And i think the the shunting they do exist again crescents in schools since about two thousand fourteen but the sun to the something to the side of them for at least one generation was disaster because people literally feed themselves met todd. They've been working. They got home. they want something to eat. That's going to be instantly. Satisfying provide finlander immediately for the craving. And so they ruppees but you can't entirely blame them and you entirely penalized them. You need to be a bit clever about it. But generally i think the recommendations are great but then i would say out because i'm not the people i've just described and i think there's also an interesting point is being made on thompson breakfast. Morning is on the one hand. They want the tax base. The idea is you want the companies to formulate the food that they make all they have to pay the tax and then he's hypothecation the tax would go to support and all that sort of thing but there's a companies we formulate. You don't get any money so there's not totally because what we're seeing with lot. Fizzy drinks is when they brought in the georgia in the sugar tax. Fizzy lots of them did just take the sugar out of their drinks about. I'm boo people. Said it said it entices anyway. Let's not get bogged down in that. Because the last time. I mentioned something somebody sent us. Twix is i only treat myself in half on on a friday jibes lot you but not in the i want to talk about the call you today about how you think. The binds the ties that bind breaking down. Yes i yeah. I do This i guess is another sort of thing. Another problem that i think is the people people talk a lot about loneliness epidemic. And i guess like the epidemic. I think is something. We tend to think of a sort of a personal individual problem but is actually sort of structural problem in society and the basic with my column was that did you ever loading. This epidemic makes us think this sort of thing passing through society but actually i think these amazing statistics about leninists. That were reported last week. But hang on what i think. The number of young people say they have either one of your close friends has tripled in the last decade trust in strangest declining trust and families declining these things. Aren't this sort of isolated phenomenon. That's just seventy arrived. I think quite deeply rooted in the way society's structured in history of society. So just i mean one of the things. I meant in the column which i think is a crucial part of the loneliness. Epidemic is how mobile the population of Of our country and most western countries we take it for granted that will move around for jobs. we'll move. Cities is quite normal in in in the americas all mr rite of passage. That you'll move away. University eighty percent of students in the uk university and moving to new places basically one of the most important.

tanner georgia obesity boris johnson nelson kathy Teddy Georgia india government todd thompson americas uk
"wolff" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

The Red Box Politics Podcast

02:59 min | 11 months ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

"Let's talk about our favorite food. And how the government is going to try and take it off of apparently The view from henry dimbleby calling for sugar and salt tax to chine diverse. All into eating better food india. Will this work. How many times have you told a. Is it a problem that we don't know that we shouldn't be eating this stuff. All other forces at work. I think the main force it work in terms of suga certainly sold so i think is more to do with Junk food and ready meals. The problem with sugar is that we associated with rewards and treats and this starts really really early and childhoods. You've been a good boy has souissi and that late one link has made. It's very difficult to break. And i think if we could somehow gets the point where sweet things and puddings and pastries and chocolate bars. Want a form of rewarding ourselves than we would have a much say relationship with them so i think the psychological aspect of it needs to be taken into account because without it you will never gets away from the fact that people have sweet teeth sons. Wade sweet. tea's sweet tooths and that kind of sugar cravings very very hard to kick it. And i think sugar is addictive. It's kind of an addiction sugar so just banning people outright will make it more difficult or more expensive which will of course disproportionately effects for people who are fatter. Generally is is is kind of new three quarters right but then needs to be extra stuff on top and also. This report doesn't mention the very fattening. Effect of refined carbohydrates are wight storage which turns into starts on your body basically terms. What did you think about it because by partly award so if you've if something's gone think my eating habits something's gone well he's sort of avoid yourself with cohen is meal. If something's gone badly you commiserate yourself with some wide in knoxville. If you're very tired then you probably want to do nothing more than just somebody in a nice meal so you could basically for the reason to justify eating badly all the time as baseball it. I think so. Yeah well. I mean actually. My personal diet strachey. If listens times radio interested in that. Maybe not as friday tree day. So friday is my defer filled pastor failures. Much filled pacified as cabinet. I sort of seems to me like fresh pass. You know. I'm obsessed with it. It's like my favorite. And that's your treat on a finer. Yeah it's really filled pastor filthy vice to be. It's really bad while you were in the bath anew.

henry dimbleby Wade sweet india government strachey cohen knoxville baseball cabinet
'American Marxism' Is the #1 Book Across All Sites

Mark Levin

01:12 min | 11 months ago

'American Marxism' Is the #1 Book Across All Sites

"The number to book is our pal Jesse Waters book How I Saved the World. The next three out of four books are Trump trashing books. This full Michael Wolff book called Landslide Is Number three. Frankly, we did win this election. The inside story of how how Trump lost by Michael Bender. And then the number six is I alone can fix it. Now two out of three of these hate trump trash trump traps, Trump supporter books. Written by reporters. They're written by reporters. One for the Wall Street Journal and then two at the Washington Post. And Michael Wolff is the reprobate. We all know him to be. But American Marxism has blocked them from going to the top of the list. That's because of you. And these are the kinds of books that publishers have made a fortune off of over the years since the announcement of Donald Trump running for office. Now it's our turn, folks. It's pushback time. An American Marxism is number one on Amazon. It's number one on Barnes and Noble. It's number one on every single books

Donald Trump Jesse Waters Michael Wolff Michael Bender Wall Street Journal Washington Post Amazon Barnes Noble
Brandon Wolf: The Pulse Survivor Is Optimistic About Gun Reform

LGBTQ&A

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Brandon Wolf: The Pulse Survivor Is Optimistic About Gun Reform

"Week. I can think of no better person to hear from than brandon. Wolff brandon is the survivor of the pulse nightclub shooting and since then has become one of the most visible and vocal activists in our community fighting from gun reform so on today's episode. We're going to do things a bit differently. We're going to revisit an earlier conversation with brandon originally aired on a luminary app. Just a heads up. He does she were few details about the actual shooting at polls. If you'd rather not hear that kind of thing you can scroll head about five minutes but before we do here that i we're gonna call brennan up to check in what he's been doing since we last spoke. Hello hey brandon jeffrey masters. Hey jeffrey how are you. I don't k- i think. Just okay how about you. I'm hanging in there. You know it is There's a lot going on some progress. Being made some challenges. But i'm hanging in there. Thanks you said there's a lot going on and on the morning that we're taping this just for context for everybody this week. We've been in the middle of the derek chauvin trial for the killing of george floyd of you days ago dante. Right twenty year old was killed at a traffic stop last night. Video was released of adam toledo thirteen year old shot in chicago. And this morning we learned about a shooting at a fedex. Facility in indianapolis eight were killed there and seven were injured on top of all of that. Is this epidemic of violence against trans people. Most recently to trans women in north carolina. My home state were killed. Jada peterson and one still unnamed. That makes fourteen trans people that we know of that have been killed just this year. That is almost one a week so when we talk about going numb is that unavoidable for self-preservation or is there a better way to look at it. Well i think it's a great question. And i appreciate you sort of laying it out like that because we're just talking about the things that that are happening right now in this moment really in the last week or two right but this is sort of a drumbeat of violence that is pervasive in american

Wolff Brandon Brandon Brandon Jeffrey Derek Chauvin George Floyd Adam Toledo Brennan Jeffrey Jada Peterson Dante Fedex Indianapolis Chicago North Carolina
Texas COVID restrictions: What are the rules for face masks or face coverings?

Charlie Parker

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Texas COVID restrictions: What are the rules for face masks or face coverings?

"Leaders have released a new public health order to comply with the governors and a covert restrictions. Judge Nelson Wolff says area businesses will still be required to post their mask policy. Whether they have one or not, We think it's important to the person coming to that business. You know whether they're entering a safe environment or not, and let them make that decision. Wolf added that those who continue to require face coverings will have the full backing of the city and county. He said customers who refused to comply with the mask policy can be reported to authorities. In addition to the end of the mask mandate, all businesses in the state can open at 100% capacity.

Judge Nelson Wolff Wolf
How Fashion Can Leverage the Audio Appeal of Clubhouse

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:44 min | 1 year ago

How Fashion Can Leverage the Audio Appeal of Clubhouse

"Earlier this year. Silicon valley became obsessed with a new app called clubhouse and audio bay social network where people can spontaneously jump into different chat rooms to together launched amid the pandemic since day one. The app has attracted the kind of funding controversy and hype that's ruffled feathers and made headlines. The social audio space is booming. Investors are piling in and recently twitter revealed that it's launching. Its own take on social audio space. That's currently being dominated by clubhouse one of is super users is none other than virgil abloh. Louis vuitton men's artistic director and creative director of off. White virgil joins us at voices twenty today from chicago alongside clubhouse founder paul davidson who is in san francisco. Welcome to you both. Thank you so much. Glad to be here liquors lurk whereas going and run. Get to see you again. Virgil i'm gonna. I'm gonna start with paul. Because i think everyone in the silicon valley world has heard of clubhouse but you know there are people watching who may not yet have understood what this is. So in the first instance. I'm gonna ask you the question you know. Why do we need another social media. What is it that clubhouse offers to the world. That isn't already out there. Yeah happy but that one slight correction the clubhouse house with my friend row on Clubhouse it's a new type of social network. That's based on voice where people around the world come together to talk. Listen and learn from each other about topics ranging from fashion to retail music and sports and social justice. It's sort of like hallways of this conference anywhere where it's all on your phone. There's no video but you can. You can reconnect with people you can learn or you can just be applying the wall and i think that connection is an inherently human thing. We're wired to connect invoice is a very different medium. We've seen it grow recently because of things like airpods and smart speakers an in-car integrations of this technology. But but it's it's in some ways the oldest medium in the world right. We were talking long before we were writing or taking photos or shooting videos but in the world of social media. It's a new thing and we find that allows people to connect in a different way you have all of the fidelity and authenticity and bids an asks an emotion. But you don't have any of things zaidi of video worrying about what you look like. Or how messy your houses and so it creates a different type of experience that is more about connecting with people in and having conversations than about getting likes or follows or projecting a certain view of yourself to the world. So we think it's a pretty different experience in what's out there right now. Burs let me let me turn to you. Because as i mentioned in the intro you've become a clubhouse super user and they might conversations of the. I know you're a busy guy. We were talking michael wolff earlier today. Who says like the average person is spending thirteen hours a day on their technology devices. You know why are you carving out time and you're very busy schedule to use clubhouse what do you get out of clubhouse. That's different from what you can get elsewhere. It's one of those things where i rationalize it like this. I'm in the design community. Which basically means that. I'm a part of the uber. Small percentage of people that get to dictate web pants. You wear next year. Look like you know like. I have an opinion. I'm in a part of a collective that decides. What the in like a trend for your car or your your interior of your home. They look like you know that's to me. Take that as a huge responsibility. This is like shelving away all the things like the fun side of the job or something like that. So i think it's a part of my responsibility of my craft to be knowledgeable to know what's going on in the world like if i locked myself in my studio and i sit in a place where i think from my sort of like shielded view of the world. This is what i think. The impact the lives of others. I think that's the wrong path. So when clubhouse comes around which i believe is a is a forward thinking concept from amazing people with great hearts and good vision. Like it's a no brainer. You know. And i project that out and so my friend told me adjust carballo from heist. Nobody was early user of clubhouse and he was like. Hey this is something i know you'd be into. You should try it out. And that's how. I became a user. An i've been a fan of the operation ever since two other quick. Things said that. I might add one. That because it's audio you can multitask and so it takes advantage of a lot of found time. it's not something where you're staring at a screen and just scrolling for hours and doing nothing else. People are using it while. They're walking while they're driving while they're in bed at night while they're folding laundry while they're doing all sorts of other things and the second thing i'd say is a big goal for us is to ensure that when people spend time on clubhouse it is time well-spent where were they can spend spend time on it enclosed the app at the end of the session feeling better than they did when they opened it because they deepen friendships. They've met new people they've learnt. It's a participatory different experience than than sort of scrolling screen purely consuming got it so virgil let me take it back to you for a minute. Your as you said your top designer in the industry now you can dictate what pants or as we'd call trousers in. Hey what you'd wear. Trousers wear next season. But what do you think. Fashion brand louis. Re tong could use or learn from clubhouse. How could fashion brands make use of this tool. They've found different ways to use instagram other other social media apps. But you know what could a fashion brand us clubhouse for you know. This is just something that i was just like reflecting on an essence. Obviously there's this in the fashion industry. There's hyper sort of like attention. Paid towards digital space. You know e commerce web impressions content photos videos data when at the end of the day. You know it's an extreme metric and tool to engage. And i think with the with the advent of clubhouse sort of refocusing on audio. It's it's an interesting case. Study and seeing like making sure that brands have something to say. You know you when you can't escape to creating an image that looks like fashion so then people consume it as fashion or a video. That looks glossy looks like moving. Image of fashion ambience. Like i for one. Think it's a like a new landscape to hear what brand about you know without the use of image or without that the the adjacency to say a product within that image. Like what do you have to say. And that becomes compelling as a fashion industry when we can use our voice to create engagement. Yeah that's that's really interesting because of course it's like second nature for the fashion industry to communicate through imagery. But how does how does a fashion company communicate through sound. I don't know paul if you have anything to add their think it's such an interesting contrast when you're talking about the fashion industry right. I mean extensively. Fashion is visual. It is curated. this is literally the opposite. You can't fake. You can't have a social media manager post the clubhouse right you're talking and the community aspect is a really big part of it. Because it's so participatory in your calling people from the audience here engaging with the people that care about your brand you have people in the industry sourcing creatives for shoots and and and talking about trends in what's happening in the news it's just a. It's a very different experience. So i love the fact that virgil has it enjoyed using the product because on its surface that contrast is just so fascinating to me like the division curated versus the the raw and intimate. Yeah all all the conversations that i have hosted or been part of on clubhouse related to fashion imron in a weird way. Have been more in depth than than interviews or sort of regular format sort of media. You know because the audience is getting to hear what they can't see on instagram too. Many characters to type. Obviously none of us are person like me. I'm not media trained to be able to like sound by. Have my ideas go through instagram. So that people exactly get the nuance and a medium like like clubhouse is where as a designer i can talk about the inspiration that i only usually talk about press

Virgil Abloh White Virgil Paul Davidson Carballo Virgil Silicon Valley Zaidi Michael Wolff Louis Vuitton Paul San Francisco Chicago Twitter Tong Imron Instagram
Mega deal: Indians trade star Lindor, Carrasco to Mets

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Mega deal: Indians trade star Lindor, Carrasco to Mets

"The Mets have landed shortstop Francisco Lindor and pitcher Carlos Carrasco from Cleveland the next part with infielders Andres Jimenez said Ahmed Rosario right hander Josh Wolff an outfielder idea green a two time gold glove winner Lindores a career to eighty five hitter and his average twenty nine homers eighty six RBIs in twenty one steals the six major league seasons Carrasco was one of the game's best comeback stories overcoming leukemia to re emerge as one of the A. L. steady starters Rosario was the Mets mainstay the last two seasons and Jimenez should majorly ability following his recall last year I'm Dave Ferrie

Francisco Lindor Carlos Carrasco Andres Jimenez Ahmed Rosario Josh Wolff Lindores Mets Cleveland A. L. Carrasco Leukemia Rosario Jimenez Dave Ferrie
Supreme Court dismisses Trump allies' challenge to Pennsylvania election

C-SPAN Programming

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Supreme Court dismisses Trump allies' challenge to Pennsylvania election

"Now, late this afternoon, the Supreme Court refused to hear the Trump Allies challenge to the Pennsylvania election, according to Use a Today's Richard Wolf quote. The Supreme Court refused Tuesday to stop Pennsylvania from certifying President elect Joe Biden's victory in this state, despite allegations from allies of President Donald Trump that the expansion of mail in voting was illegal. The action by the nation's highest court, which includes three justices named by President Trump. Caymus states across the country are locking in the results that will lead to next week's electoral college vote by there one sentence denial the justices left intact to ruling by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. That again is Richard Wolff, writing in USA Today,

Richard Wolf Supreme Court Pennsylvania President Trump Joe Biden Donald Trump Electoral College Pennsylvania Supreme Court Richard Wolff Usa Today
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
Wolfgang Van Halen ‘Prepared for a Wave of Hate’ When He Releases Solo Debut

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Wolfgang Van Halen ‘Prepared for a Wave of Hate’ When He Releases Solo Debut

"Van Halen. Is it picking sides in the unending debate about whether? Van Halen is better with David Lee. Roth or Sammy Hagar Woolsey was born in ninety one during Sammy's tenure with the band, but started performing with Van Halen after his dad and uncle reunited with Diamond Dave. In two thousand, seven Wolff who's long awaited debut solo album is on the way, explained his balanced view of the van Halen catalog over the weekend and reply to a fan question about the Hagar era, this was on instagram. He said I'm not a purist. It's all great. The same guy wrote all the music kind of dumb not to give it a chance if you like one or the other so much.

Van Halen Sammy Hagar Woolsey Halen Wolff David Lee Roth
Trump tries to stop books about him

The Book Review

04:39 min | 2 years ago

Trump tries to stop books about him

"Going on with the Book Business Right now? So this has been a fascinating time in publishing the last couple of weeks. We've seen kind of an epic clash building between the trump administration and the trump family and one publisher in particular. Simon and Schuster. This has happened several times during the course of this administration, the trump administration has threatened lawsuits against various publishers for producing alls or books that contain damaging information about the president most memorably it was Henry Holt when they published fire and fury by Michael Wolff, when they got a cease and desist letter from the president's personal lawyer. They decided to put the book on sale early. It sold incredibly well so. So the latest is Simon and Schuster of course released John Bolton's book this week, and that was something that trump administration tried very hard to prevent from happening. They told him he had failed to go through the necessary steps to get security clearances and remove classified information, and they finally asked a judge to prevent his publishers Schuster from distributing the book. The judge denied that although John Bolton himself may eventually have to forfeit some of his prophets, which were substantial. He reportedly got a two million dollar book deal, so that clash was playing out just in recent days in the book just went on Sale I. Think they've they've distributed two hundred thousand copies according to some of the legal filings. Filings and at the same time than Shuster is preparing to publish a very explosive, potentially explosive I should say I, haven't read it book by President Trump's niece Mary trump and just this week. President Trump's family sought a temporary restraining order to try to block publication of that book by Mary Trump which is called too much never enough. How my family created the world's most dangerous man, so the title suggests that this is not going to be a positive book. It's scheduled to be released by Science Schuster on July. Twenty eight th. The book is finished its edited, but they're starting this process earlier I think with the Bolton Book. They came in pretty late in the game with the effort. Effort to prevent distribution. The books had already shipped retailers had them news organizations had them all the information started leaking out a few days before publication, so the effort to kind of contain the damage came pretty late, and it was pretty toothless as far as preventing the information from getting out so in this case they have a little more leeway, but again I think the legal precedent is very very hard to preemptively prevent information from coming out, so it's going to be another tough battle for them. This has been a really eventful year for Simon and Schuster I. Mean I, they were put on sale right, and then very suddenly they're chief executive officer. Carlin really died of a heart attack. And all of these incredibly explosive books are coming out. Is the company doing well? At a time when a lot of publishers are struggling to break through the news cycle Simon and Schuster is creating the news cycle. So that's kind of extraordinary, you know the John Bolton Buck has been number one on Amazon for Awhile Mary trump is close behind it, and they have more coming in the pipeline that are I. Think certain to be bestsellers including I, think most significantly. Significantly another book by Bob Woodward his previous book about the trump administration, which was titled Fear Sold Millions of copies, and again caused a lot of consternation, the administration and he has a sequel to. That's coming out this fall. I don't believe it's titled Yet, but it's about the administration president has said he spoke to Bob. Woodward for this book, so it'll be interesting to see what. What secrets remain for more to find out given all of these dulls that have come out I was speaking to some people in Washington like Robert Burnett who a famous Washington lawyer who represents a lot of politicians and has been around for a long time and. His observation I thought was interesting. It's just you know the volume of books that have been that have come out during. This administration is quite unusual. It's it's fairly typical for there to be a wave of of memoirs. Tell all I was inside the room kind of books to come out the years after the presidency when people can reflect, and there is no longer the the political pressures of the day were a reelection campaign for example, but the revolving door in the administration today has been moving so quickly. People Cycle in and out and I think that his accelerated the rate of

President Trump Science Schuster Simon John Bolton Bolton Book Bob Woodward Chief Executive Officer John Bolton Buck Publisher Washington Shuster Henry Holt Michael Wolff Amazon Carlin Robert Burnett
Man charged with arson of Minneapolis Third Precinct station

WBZ Afternoon News

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Man charged with arson of Minneapolis Third Precinct station

"Acquire a man from St Paul's been charged with setting fire to a Minneapolis police station twenty three year old Brandon Michael Wolff is charged with aiding and abetting arson related to a fire set may twenty eighth at the Minneapolis police department third police precinct the criminal complaint says wolf was recently fired from his job working security admin arts hardware store after bragging on social media about taking things from the precinct when police arrested what they say he was wearing body armor and had a police duty belt with handcuffs ear piece baton and knife during an interview wolf allegedly told police he was at the third precinct may twenty eighth and push a wooden barrel into a fire knowing it would help the fire continue

Brandon Michael Wolff Arson Wolf Minneapolis Abetting
2020 F1 season: No reverse grids for double-headers

Box of Neutrals

02:56 min | 2 years ago

2020 F1 season: No reverse grids for double-headers

"Talked about this last week, but it's been confirmed now that reverse grids will not be happening at the double header this year because Toto Wolff is not into them. He's apparently the only dissenting voice that required unanimity and Formula One fell one short as a shame authority I thought he would be an all for that. You know he's talked about these issues in the one where? He has provided on things for the greater good. Decisions that may not necessarily be the best for for his team, so in this instance. Sort of gone against that one little bit hasn't even as given three reasons which we didn't have last week, so let's consider them three very specific reasons, reason number one that is formula a meritocracy and this would be a gimmick. Which look I understand on one level because it is very arbitrary, just reverse secret especially when there is such a big performance disparity I mean. Let's be honest. That means Williams is going to be starting on the front row with agreed every double header. And that does look a bit silly. When the wheels of Folding Company and they've decided. Yeah, but I, I think people are now beginning to unravel an inherent problem with qualifying represents. Your qualifying at the Front of the grid to get. Not even to get ahead. What is qualifying? Is it to get a head start on the foster 'cause, or is it basically an order of which you'll car is better than everyone. Else's so therefore you also get more of a headstart than everyone, but then I'm going to be able to catch you anyway, and then therefore you know. Come the groom furry. We don't have a spectacle of saying the best car. We. We literally say the best car being the car, and while that might be nice for Lewis. Hamilton NFL bought has depending on the time of day. It. The rest of the shark doesn't it doesn't really matter so everyone's having a bit of an existential cross whether pay a boiling it down so well. Is this entertainment or sport that we're after? Wouldn't it be? Form One, just adopt the model of trading itself as the ultimate speed comparison. They have it some grown pretty well. You do all this relations on practice actually with wile, maybe Rendu like a sprint rice ingred order not in reverse order, and then just figure out how long how much quicker the Mercedes than the red bull, how much quicker the red believes in the Ferrari and just. Just place them several laps pot, and so the idea is that on the final lap they'll end up crossing the line at about the same time, and you'll have a great. Fini the other thing is i. think everyone has caught up with the history of what qualifying is I mean people always do the direct comparison of all man as instead of had x amount of pole position. We Wanna piece on that sort of history well. Things evolve and and things change. So you know we we you capable of open open-minded Tim's of what? The one he's going to look like. Prey not the qualifying lap.

Toto Wolff TIM Folding Company Hamilton Nfl Williams Fini Rendu Lewis
"wolff" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"But again I think these are the three big ones. To that I spoke to you. Really focus on the macro economy, the big picture when the government is or isn't doing relative to the private sector whereas the first one the one that's most. Persuasive to me. Is more micro focus of the transformation at the base of society. The debates between Socialist Communist. For example throughout the twentieth century where Agai- mostly about how important is to state relative to the private, and you can see the two kinds of socialism is agreed about that for me I just to give you. How stark is. I really under well. By being told that the employer in one case is a private citizen and the employer is the other case is a public official. It's the relationship of employer employee at all that it entails that are. Focal interest. Not. The question of whether the employers state official or private person. This is jamming their transmission. I'm John Madeira I'm speaking today with professor. Richard D Wolff, who's economic update? A weekly program he hosts takes on complex economic issues and empower listeners with information to analyze their own financial situation as well as the economy at large by focusing on the economic dimensions of everyday life, wages, jobs, taxes, debts and profits. The program Explores Alternative ways to organize markets and government policies in other words I. Highly Recommend Professor Richard De Wolf's economic. Update which you. You can find at democracy at work. Dot Info moving onto our conversation. While many people say, trump is completely responsible for everything wrong, I see him as a symptom of the two party oligarchy plutocracy I also see him, and the GOP, generally as a kind of convenient decoy moderates and liberals us to keep us from noticing all the nefarious things they are doing one such example is the recent passing of so called stimulus packages that have done little to nothing to alleviate the suffering of the poor and working poor your thoughts, Professor Wolf. With what you just said I would just. I would think you perhaps another step. I think Mr Trump. Is a chameleon that is. He does whatever he things will advantage him right, and that doesn't distinguish. For most of the other folks who rise up through the ranks and common establishments, the Republican and Democratic Party I. See them as making decisions, they think. Are self-serving career wrist and all the rest. budding Saif what they're doing which does also boost their own careers, is they're? They're putting their fingers up. Seeing which way the wind is blowing and depending on where the wind is blowing they've been oriented cells and speak that way. Right that way act that way so I. See Mr Trump as a wonderful side. Of what the dominant groups in the society drink and what they want. And I think he should not be seen as the cause of hardly anything. he used a straw in the wind. And by watching the school could maybe figure out where the wind is blowing. Would we be a mistake to think that is the straw that's blowing the wind rather than the wind blowing the straw. So for me, Mr Trump. Tells me something about where? American capitalism is.

Mr Trump Professor Richard De Wolf official Richard D Wolff Agai professor Democratic Party John Madeira Saif GOP
"wolff" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"This is jamming. Their transmission I'm John Madera in today's episode. I, interviewed professor, Richard D Wolff who is professor of Economics Emeritus University of Massachusetts amherst where he taught economics from Nineteen, seventy, three to two thousand eight. He is currently visiting professor in the Graduate Program in international affairs of the new school New York City. He's he's the author of many books. Including capitalism hits the Fan Democracy at work a cure for capitalism. Capitalism's crisis deepens essays on the global. Economic Meltdown. Understanding Marxism and understanding socialism. His recent work has concentrated on analyzing the causes of and offering alternative solutions to the current global economic crisis I began my conversation with Professor Wolf with the following comments and questions. Among the first things to disintegrating culture and political discourse etcetera as meaning language, etc, words like freedom and truth and revolution have been diluted to the point of meaninglessness, so let's start with defining terms even basic once. Professor Richard D. Wolff is capitalism. What is neoliberalism? Okay, even before I do let me agree with you that the whole problem meaning is more acute, perhaps now than ever. At least in my experience. but I believe that very very much that the capitalism on about to define for you, is itself a major cause or contributor to the distortions? If Usu-. Of meaning and the inability to get beyond. The chaos of of what things mean..

Professor Richard D. Wolff professor of Economics Emeritu visiting professor professor Professor Wolf John Madera Usu New York City
Golf ready to take its first small step back with Rory, DJ, Rickie and Wolff

The Fifteenth Club

02:10 min | 2 years ago

Golf ready to take its first small step back with Rory, DJ, Rickie and Wolff

"Gamble tomorrow the tailor made a driving relief as we've been talking about the first hour Charlie Sears continues to join this it's going to be Dustin Johnson and Rory versus Rickie Fowler and Matthew what's the what was the final total Scotty on our on our fiftieth club six three counting us you guys or hi wolf and yeah which is really against the grain bin have you likely establishment you like the old guys you like DJ and Rory I just think there's more on the line for Rickie Fowler what's on the line what's on the line okay which are the unit is is going to be on their win total is going to go to FedEx points now this is a mandate exhibition with two guys at Oklahoma state you know veterans people saying you know they're you know I I don't believe I'll tell you because this is the worst news we've had in this country since nine eleven it it it's worse than nine eleven eighty thousand people have died in the last you much this pandemic this is the first bit of good news here we will well I'm just giving you my reasons first bit of good news we're gonna have our first live sports and I think let me finish here there Delbert one Rickie Fowler and Matt you off it's going to be a coming out party for Matthew Wolff and Rickie Fowler I think I think they're gonna win are we not kind of like a little confused on how they really cuts tiger in Phil's match they hijacked the whole thing tiger and Phil we heard two months ago saying there should be a big match their dates match number two they're gonna add Thoman Payton to go search for the greatest athletes of his generation ago but also a tailor made simple hold my beer we're gonna let for our guys go in you know what we're to go week before them is that not kind of well you did well I'll say this more power to him because Phil and tiger they cannot but they tried to milk it as long as they could yeah and not set a date not set the location itself but some pride in and got Seminole to boot one of the great golf for gas in this country you're gonna do great numbers regardless I want to watch this they want to watch golf golf fans want to see some real stuff happened gamblers want to gamble it's gonna do phenomenal numbers it's going to be

Gamble Charlie Sears Dustin Johnson Rory Rickie Fowler DJ Matt Matthew Wolff Phil Thoman Payton Fedex Oklahoma Delbert
Texas to Reopen Friday May 1

Charlie Parker

01:24 min | 2 years ago

Texas to Reopen Friday May 1

"San Antonio in Texas get ready to re open tomorrow kind of according to the governor phase one of the re opening of the taxes happens tomorrow may first restaurants retailers malls and movie theaters can reopen what twenty five percent occupancy all museums and libraries are it may open under the same twenty five percent occupancy interactive areas of the museum's must remain close state libraries museums will open may first tomorrow and public museums and libraries may open only if permitted by local government single person person offices can reopen churches and places of worship can reopen but they must maintain social distancing outdoor sports are allowed to resume as long as no more than four participants are playing together at one time that is why it almost eighty golf trail you cannot have a five so because only four people are allowed to be in the sense that plus five from just slows down the game get tell you should never let that many people play together one time anyway we know that social distancing must remain in effect the face mask which the governor recommended but didn't say was mandatory judge Nelson Wolff says it is mandatory is one of those things that they can't enforce it so why say it's mandatory wanted just a minute I know they they can't find you or anything but why take the chance I've got friends that still won't leave the house

San Antonio Texas Nelson Wolff
"wolff" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Wolff and then we'll get to don thanks for sharing thanks for taking the lead in this initiative from adding gatherings of over five hundred people will be a step in the right direction I will be reviewing your van and putting together a number of things that we're working on the county to follow up and make sure that we are apply that also to the other twenty six cities with their accounting as well as incorporated areas of bear county their number of other issues that we're working on that are particularly related to the county that we have serious concerns about sure Salazar is with us this morning and now he has to host some thirty eight thirty eight hundred prisoners every day sometimes bumping up over four thousand and that's a concern for us for people to be unnecessarily arrested that are non violent offenders revoking of probation for minor offenses and bring it in to jail just makes it even more difficult for us our district attorney Joe Gonzales is with us here this morning he's going to be reviewing the number of cases that are similar to that and making sure that we don't because I have a health hazard at our own jail with a number of people coming in that do not need to be there and we try to emphasize that many many times over the last several over the last several months we need the cooperation of the center of your priest apartment as well as the sheriff's deputies that are out on them out of their term to help us to help us to help us do that are we all set with this this morning judge Ron how who's the administrative judge for the criminal felony cases and judge I'm Gloria is with us also from that handles all the misdemeanor cases they met yesterday I believe it was and is it thirty days or sixty thirty days they will not be convening juries at the at the courthouse so what does that mean that means that there be something like two thousand last people coming into the courthouse there that that that that that will it's not an additional disregard for those servers that are working there we'll be looking at a number of work related issues are dealing with their own departments so we have to be able to share that information with you later on today so bear I thank you so much for the leadership you're taking we're very pleased with the metro health department in the partnership that they had with the county caller comments with us here this morning here's the head of our merging sea so we're all stand together United city and county we want to be sure we're getting across that message to everybody I might just be cautious you can not right here at this press conference are yeah I noticed that the get everybody a few feet away from everybody and now we know that that the the corona virus spreads because someone is within about six button problems may come to you office on surface I just everybody be cautious and we're gonna be fine here in San Antonio so thank you listen live coverage.

Wolff
Tobias Wolff: This Boys Life

Bookworm

11:00 min | 2 years ago

Tobias Wolff: This Boys Life

"This show began over thirty years ago and one of the first books that was on. This show was a book. A memoir called this boy's life. It's by my guest Tobias Wolff now the original publisher Grove has published a thirtieth anniversary edition of this boy's life. I'll tell you if you do a book show and I know you don't you. Don't get to re read the books that you read thirty years ago and so I re- read this boy's life. It's better than I remembered it even originally and I loved it originally. Tell me. Did you ever expect that your hands would be dirty? Buy this book again. Oh you never know what to expect with With a book what sort of life. It will have When you finish a book you're pretty much thinking then about the next book Elliott has a wonderful line in the four quartets. He says For us there is only the trying the rest is not our business and it it that something that Iraq had better take to heart. Will this always life? It's one of the first memoirs in this huge movement which restored memoir to respect ability. But also although you insist on its factuality it stands at the beginning of what becomes the train of auto fiction people who are writing about their lives as honestly as possible. The question is what about? The structure of the book. Turns it into readable fiction then as I was reading this boy's life what I saw again and again in each chapter was that you'd structured the events around crises and capitulation 's that allowed the book to make its way from beginning to end without seeming like a memoir seeming instead as if life itself the thing we hope is an adventure But this boy's life sees him through his mother's divorce his first and terrifying stepfather his escape from home to a prep school. He is thoroughly unprepared for and in the process allows US SOC- what goes the making of a writer's life pretty good for someone who really was at the start of a career. It was one of those books that I almost didn't choose to right at that. Sounds mystical and and and writers should avoid mystical language about their about their projects in their process but It it always seemed to me a a genre to be avoided the memoir and even though I loved some memoirs Mary McCarthy's memories of the Catholic girlhood is a great favourite of mine. Loves NABOKOV SPEAK MEMORY AND My own brothers Duke of deception. Which in fact was yet another reason. I thought that this was something that I wasn't going to do. I thought go get my family's been covered in this way so it really hadn't because my brother grew up with my father continente way from my experience growing up with my mother and we rarely saw each other but No I was Sort of in some strange way dragged kicking and screaming into the writing of this book but once I got started and and I don't mean by anybody else I mean by inner promptings But once I got started I threw everything else. Aside I found myself caught up in these memories and I suppose like many writers I tend to remember the past in terms of stories. I've told stories about my past. And there's no doubt that without my meaning to the shaping of a memory and two story involves SOM editing that that I'm even unaware of And but these-these. This is what happened this noise life was your entrance into my permanent memory. Not only that it have unforgettable beautiful cover still does. They've kept this cover But somehow or other the care with the writing is something different from the care with a story and sentence by sentence. There's so much betrayal of the care being taken this no show of stuff. It's very carefully done but not artfully done. You're concerned with the pains of this boy's life. Because Boys Life. The magazine that was for scouts was telling about every boy's life and now we were going to hear about this boy's life now too biased. Wolf can you remember at all about talking about this book on Bookworm years ago? Oh I remember talking with you about it I don't remember exactly what we talked about though. Yeah I would I loved was just as I recognized. Jewison Reiner you recognize me as a reader and subsequently you would sign your books to my best reader and I was saw flattered and honored by that and I think I want to talk to you about the relation between writers and readers because over these years between the people who've read the book and the People who've seen the movie that is very loosely based on the book There are people in the world who think they know you? How do you feel about that? I especially feel uncomfortable about it when When they think they know me because of the movie. Okay like I've had people come up to me and say Y I I read your book. And how did you know so much about your mother? Sex Life and I try to be polite but there's nothing in in the book that would lead them to ask that question. That would have been in the movie. Which as you say is very loosely adapted readers people who are readers They understand understate. You know look they understand that. We shared difficult experiences that And that's why they would read a book like this and finish it and so the kinds of conversations I have with people read it. Have been actually very gratifying to me. Often they'll say I had a you know. I had a young boy in my class. Who really seemed to be going off the rails and I gave him your book and it seemed to mean a lot to him. He felt like he had some company in the world. And that didn't have to go badly. And you know if somebody says something like that to me. It just lifts my heart and gives me fuel for the work ahead so I on the whole. I'm I'm very grateful for the way in which people respond to this book. I'M TALKING TO BIAS. Wolf on the thirtieth anniversary of his memoir. This boy's life a book that I had the pleasure to go back and reread. And you know. It's such a detailed book that on my first reading. I didn't realize how haunting it is in Hemingway's Nick Adams stories. We remember phrases. That are unforgettable. You specifically rejected. It seems to me that kind of writing for writing. That's much more detailed and to the point of the places you lived so there's a town up north called concrete. Yes that's where I went to high school. I didn't actually live concrete. Was the metropolis if you will. Where I went to high school. I lived in a little village. About thirty five miles up the Skagit River from concrete And we took the school bus down every morning and back home at night through this wind e dangerous road And and that was but that was the name of the the town where I went to Crete. High-school hundred high school scribes the dust. The cement plant left a pall of dust on everything. Sometimes it would be so thick in the air that they would have to cancel football practice and because they didn't have any concept of people wearing masks or anything but all the cars were all eaten by the lime in the cement dust and I mean it was. It was a company town The Lone Star Cement Company pretty much owned it And now the since the cement plant is closed. I've been back I went back. In fact during the filming of this and and now they errors pristine and they're these beautiful cascade mountains in the background and it's kind of a destination now for fishermen and stuff like that but it was rather squalid company town when I went to high school

Wolf Tobias Wolff Skagit River Iraq Nabokov Publisher Jewison Reiner Grove Elliott The Lone Star Cement Company Mary Mccarthy Writer Football Crete Bookworm Hemingway Nick Adams
'A distinctly American phenomenon': Our workforce is dying faster than any other wealthy country, study shows

Morning Edition

04:39 min | 2 years ago

'A distinctly American phenomenon': Our workforce is dying faster than any other wealthy country, study shows

"A new study in the journal of the American medical association tests the assumptions some people have about life in America the research finds that working age Americans are less likely to live to retirement age than any time in recent history Dr Steven Wolff is the report's lead author he's director emeritus of the center on society in health at Virginia Commonwealth University thank you for being here as a pleasure I just wish it was for better reasons yeah I mean if these numbers are pretty alarming you what you were looking at life expectancy mortality across the United States between nineteen fifty nine and twenty seventeen telling what you found well what we found is that since two thousand ten all cause mortality that means the chances of dying before eight sixty five have been increasing in the United States and for the past three years life expectancy has been decreasing it's a it's a quite alarming recent trend but our study shows that it's been decades in the making starting back in the nineteen eighties is this happening in in other wealthy countries or is this a distinctly US thing that's the thing in this this does appear to be a distinctly American phenomenon there's some element of this happening a little bit in the UK and Canada but nothing on the scale of the United States life expectancy continues to climb in other wealthy nations so what are the factors here what do you think is happening well we did a pretty detailed analysis to peel back the onion and try to understand this the trend in life expectancy is being caused as you said by increased mortality and working age Americans from age twenty five to sixty four and the leading contributors to that is is the drug addiction problem drug overdoses are a major factor in explaining this trend however we also found increases in deaths from alcoholism from suicides in from dozens of organ diseases all told thirty five causes of death where mortality rates had increased in this age group so you did that's the age group abroad age group as you start to to look into to different parts of that age group I mean who exactly is this affecting the most well it's affecting everyone both young adults and middle aged adults but I guess the more alarming piece of this is the large increase in young adults we saw twenty nine percent increase in mortality among adults twenty five to thirty four and Hansen the data that even younger Americans late teens early twenties those numbers are beginning to creep up is there a geographic element to this there is exactly in fact our analysis intentionally looked at the data for all fifty states to try to locate where in the country this was happening the most and what we found was that the increase was largest in the industrial Midwest central appellation in northern New England but particularly in the Ohio valley that was like ground zero for this phenomenon we found for example that of all the excess deaths that occur in the United States due to this increase in mortality one third of them occurred in four states Ohio Pennsylvania Kentucky and Indiana those four states accounted for one third of the excess deaths between two thousand ten and two thousand seventeen why those four states do thing well that's something that researchers like myself continue to need to tease out but one very attractive explanation is the economy this is the rust belt and and the area where at the time when this decline began the nineteen eighties and nineties is when we saw a major transformation in the economy the loss of manufacturing jobs coal mines closing steel mills closing and families and communities exposed to many years of economic stresses and we think they're taking their toll on on folks health I mean I mentioned some of the assumptions that that some make about life in in America and you know I mean I think about the medical advances we've made it look like when you started looking at these numbers how surprised were you were you and your team well this is not a new subject for us so we were entirely surprised by the trend we were concerned about the scale of it the pervasiveness of it and how it's cutting across all racial and ethnic groups affecting basically all geographic settings large cities suburbs and and rural America can be reversed I think it can but we need to change our policy priorities in this country and focus more on improving the social and economic conditions for the middle class if were going to see a reversal to this trend otherwise our children are destined to you to live younger

Journal Of The American Medica Twenty Nine Percent Three Years
"wolff" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Wolff, fire, and fury, and all of the inaccuracies in his first book, who the heck is going to pay attention to him in his second book, which is due to come out on get a lot of this, the fourth of July hammering Trump. The new book is called seed Trump under fire, and I who gives us guy the time of day when there were all kinds of problems inaccuracies, even melted down during a live TV interview, and when he was called out and pretended that is earphone. Oh, I can't hear you. I can't hear anything. When he was called on the carpet for inaccuracies. What the heck is? Let me get into some of the detail on the new book, that's coming out. There's already a big huge breaking item. So in his new book, Michael Wolfe is taking a major swipe at Trump visa via claim that the molar team was readying indictments against President Trump. But then bail them back out at the last minute, guess what the Muller offices, saying they're saying what the heck is guy talking about. That's not true. Hold on. We'll get to that coming up in just a bit. Your phone calls on the what just the loaded show today. Rare earth metals, I've talked about this many times over the years. The Chinese and rare earth metals and the national security. Threaded faces. I wanna try to work that in this hour. We just have a lot of ground three hours sned on the way phone number. If you wanna get in, for anything is eight hundred eight zero one eighty nine ninety nine eight hundred eight zero one eighty nine ninety nine and the knit rolls on neck..

President Trump Trump Wolff Michael Wolfe Muller three hours
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

06:21 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

Marty wolf CEO CEO growth oriented Martin wolf executive producer murder Prichard oxytocin Paul Zaki Ben CLC David Stanford Jennifer acre Ohio professor one day
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"So she had to go back for fifth year and take a business a quick business degree, so that she could get employed. So it's very challenging today to even give guidance anymore except to a lot. The guidance is what we've just said, it's a continual learn, you know, how important is you mentioned reading a my experience has been that a lot of people still don't read and still don't learn what would be your recommendation. Let's go to the college or the early stage kind of folks, I'll important is that they do these kinds of things. Right. So I think you have to step looking at college or education is like the nine to three or the ninety four experience in the classroom. You have to look at it as a twenty four by seven. And so one is start to get exposure to people and understand what they do. So if you're interested in their careers for happen, the gaming industry, they can give you some guidance, and you can use your social media to do this to understand what was some of the courses and criteria. And a lot of young people are shocked to say, oh my God. It's computer science. I didn't know that. I thought gaming was just playing games. Number two is make sure that you are exploring internships or apprenticeship or trying to start a business or volunteering because learning is not just about the classroom. And number three is reading again can be very visual multimedia literacy is a skill. I talk about why come from the flat world you read books. We'll books let's face it. You know, they're old by the time. They get into publication many of them. So you want really dynamic you want streaming? You wanna see everything that's out there? So that you can really continue to learn. And so I encourage young people as maximize your time while you're in school and joined some of those clubs learn about leadership skills. Learn about technology skills. Get some finance skills. Get some art skills. You get a lot of these. So that you can really explore. Yeah. That's right. Get those go soak we're talking about young people. What about the older folks, what's happening with them in terms of confusion? I mean, can you imagine being fifty sixty years old and have to change jobs or have to go to new career come on? Let's help them out too. Well, yes. And in fact, that's a reality. I mean in Silicon Valley said to say, they say you're starting to wear a target on your back when you hit your mid forties because Silicon Valley firms, historically, recruit, very young people who are technology savvy. So the advice that many of my colleagues who are in their fifty sixty seventies. And eighties is start to think about early on. What are some age appropriate organizations that have people in your age range? So that when you go there, you understand you're going to see like people, so a colleague of mine, you know, Silicon Valley she's now in her seventies. She's working for a consulting firm. But before that she worked for the university in the technology department and before that. That she was in a high tech firm. And so she said you just start to look for is it healthcare nonprofit consulting firms the arts private equity, you know, even boards. There's a lot of ways that you can look for things that are age appropriate and start to translate your current skills into your next step. So we are speaking with Dr Tracy Weiland W, I L.

Silicon Valley Dr Tracy Weiland W fifty sixty years
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"Your company in your brand. They're going to refer a lot of customers intend to refer good customers. So if we can figure out who those those just right customers are then we get that this wonderful virtuous cycle of good things that happen and too many companies. Everyone aspires have customs. Like that. But to many companies go out at the wrong way, they say let's bring in as many customers as we can as cheaply as possible. And then we will educate them to become good. That's really hard. It's expensive. It's inefficient. And you're better off trying to figure out. What makes the good customers different from the not so good ones, and do whatever it takes to acquire customers like them to do it, right? From the beginning. Exactly, that's an important point get it. Right. Special much against the grain of a lot of. Yeah. Yeah. That's see. I I wanted to drive home that point acquire the customers the right customers. So and you tell the story about Michael Phelps and all that kind of stuff. We're not going to explain that. Now, we're going to have to read the book to hear about Michael. We gotta read the book this customer goodness. So okay. Let me let me let me see. I have so many notes here. Okay. So let's put it in financial terms. I guess so see LV customer lifetime value. Explain that to me, I guess maybe in dollars and cents. Explain what you mean. Talk to is dollars and cents. That's important point about it. Yeah. I it. It is customer goodness turned into a specific number. So we are going to project ahead. How long are you going to stay how many transactions are you gonna make how valuable they will be? We're gonna come up with with our best guess of your future profitability. Now. We'll never know for sure what is obviously the future is uncertain and a lot of things can happen. But we're going to come up with the best. Guess we're going to say if we look at a bunch of customers who have a similar profile a similar history as you. What does that group of you're going to be worth on average? We can do that. Amazingly. Well, a lot of people don't believe it. But we can actually come up with a number again at that micro segment level remarkably well and point of customer centrist is if we can do that. If I have that magic wand that can show me the value each customer, we would run our business differently. So we should strive to get those numbers and really use them to leverage every aspect of the business. And that's the main thing that I do is. I condemn it has come up with leading edge methods to derive these customer lifetime values and then educate companies about how to leverage them. I can't imagine anything being more important than that. You're listening to the business builders.

Michael Phelps
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"Women's workforce, topics. Doctor wyle in was named San Francisco woman of the year in honored by the. San Francisco Business Times as the most influential woman in bay area business while and now you're on the business builders show you finally hit the big time. Yes. Exactly. Thank you. All right. So you were going to talk about your book title that book is career confusion twenty-first-century career management in a disrupted world, you begin the book? I get the whole section one is about you're talking about transitions and continuous change. And actually talk about the first second third and fourth industrial revolutions. So maybe you wanna hit on some high points of each of those. And and tell me why this is the way you started the book. Sure because you know, every time I talked whether it's corporate leaders employees employers. They always say we're going through major change, and we've never been through this before how are we going to survive? And so I said, of course, we've been through this before and society has always evolved and survived. And so I just briefly tried to explain it to the industrial revolution. So the first one is really the shift from agriculture. To really factory work. And how are we going to get these people out of the farms, and then into you know, the corporate beginning of the corporate world and the second revolution really was the transportation. You know, the railroad cars and automobiles and then the third one, of course, was computing, and that's the one that I really started my career in, you know, with the Steve Jobs of the world's PC's and mobile devices. And now the World Economic Forum calls that we are in the fourth industrial revolution. And they've been talking about this for a couple of years. And you know, it's where you have technologies have advanced so much to artificial intelligence internet of things things that people can't even understand her grapple with a lot because they can't touch her feel it and they say, oh my God. We're in other change, we won't survive. This change, you know, and yes, we will society, always evolves and serve and survives. Because human nature is always inquisitive and wants to learn and does evolve as that's why I said, you know, let me just do a recap. Of the past because it helps us indicate where the future's going just sing that to me. I'm I'm understanding why there is career confusion. So maybe go a little deeper on that obviously you felt the need and you've written several other books. You felt the need or you're compelled to write a book about career confusion. So why is this going on? Maybe go deeper on that. Sure. So I think you know, as I mentioned that the technologies are getting very confusing for people. They can't they don't really understand. What is art official intelligence? They sort of concede a little bit at Amazon echo in some of these boys are recognition devices that are coming out, but it's very hard to touch and feel like you could your mobile device. And by the way, there's more mobile devices now out in the world than toothbrushes, but somehow another we've adapted to this technology, and we're dependent on it. So I think technology is confusing people because they don't understand will the smart machines and robotics take away my job. And I always say, no, no, no, it's going to be an extension of your job. It's a teammate. Now that you need to learn to work with the second. Is that companies are changing, you know, they were very hierarchical very predictable. You will go to work. You knew your next step was to really replace your manager. And the manager would replace the. Director and the director replaced the the key. And you would stay in this one company for life. And you'd be fully taken care of now companies are saying that's not competitive. I gotta stay flats. I have to be agile. I have to be able to really compete with the forces today. Well, that makes your career very confusing because is it up or is it to the left is it to the right new I exit the firm to get ahead. So I think that was a big one. And then I would just mention that we're living longer. Researchers say that we're living to a hundred and fifteen and that babies born today, given DNA editing really they could live to one hundred fifty. So now, it's not one job for life..

Doctor wyle San Francisco Business Times Steve Jobs Director Amazon official
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"We obsess over the product you. Book cook at through some of them today on a fact, I already told you before we went on the air that the book challenged me in the sense that I couldn't go through this quickly. I needed to stop and say that's a different approach. But I love the idea of customer lifetime value. That's why really grabbed my idea grabbed my attention. I should say. So you open the book in the introduction talking about the global gaming giant electron electric arts. Why was that company kind of the right place to start your book? You know, it's not an obvious place to start. But it's incredible. What they're doing. And I have no direct involved with them. So it's not like, I'm I'm touting some client of mine or something like that. I am just a big fan of their chief analytics officer, Zachary Anderson, and the whole giant team that he's built if you think about EA until fairly recently, they were just a packaged goods company that were producing shrink wrapped things were selling them through WalMart and other retailers game. Stop and they had no direct visibility into who is playing their games or who is buying them. And they decided they needed to change that that they wanted to be more have have more of a direct relationship with the end users and to let their knowledge of those end users who they are what they're doing drive all the decisions that they make. So they've really transform themselves to be able to now not only tag and track who's doing what when and for how much money but to. Really truly have that drive. What kind of games that are developed what kind of ads they're going to come up with what kinds of people?.

Zachary Anderson WalMart officer
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"I think one of the things that happens when when I've held companies moved through, the cultural brilliance process the system is that every their culture every coat we we know this every culture of unique crate, so they they're really one person's really cultures brilliance is not another cultures brilliant. With a little bit individual like, you know, some print sure fingerprint, but there's a feeling of of energy good energy, positively what I also notice in these cultures that people can solve problems effectively. And and and for me that means we've identified a root cause we had a good discussion. We've decided who's going to do what and execute it. And then we also go back and see if it worked. So that piece, you know, and we know how many companies struggle with that. Sometimes. And then there's there's a way in which people really there's a trust that psychological safety that you know, newer is term that we were, you know, talking about lot and organizations that there that that level that people can learn because they know they're in a trust the environment, and that they're willing to give each other feedback. So just because we trust each other doesn't mean we're not going to say, do you mind? If I share some some insights with you, right? I noticed XYZ, and I'd like to share some feedback. Yeah. And this leads to and there's all kinds of documentation, I have companies who I've interviewed who are doing the kinds of things that you're describing what's not to like decrease dress. You have an ability to communicate you can fear feel free to tell the truth, you can contribute to to the future. You can look around corners and make suggestions, I wanna work there Claudette. I mean, I'm in found great, and you know. And what does that do it definitely needs to quote unquote success, and that's going to be defined in different way. You know, you're going to profitability, but the the statistics are in this this your approach absolutely has a positive effect. So again, my guest is cloud debt rally R O W L E Y her book is cultural brilliance, the DNA of organizational excellence get this before your competition gets it, by the way. What's what's the what's the memorable moment? The memorable thought you wanna drive home before we wrap up Claudette? Memorable thought I think one of the things that I notice in organizations when this starts to take hold right? Where we discussed today. Even if it's at the beginning phases is I see the light comeback on people's are people who've been disengaged. And so if you're a leader or you have, you know, even an unofficial leadership role in your organization watch for that late to come on watch for people who have maybe never shared an idea to meeting before starts to share it and capitalize on that energy. And keep it going you it's subtle, but huge. So that's the thing. I would leave people with is watch for that is so strong. Yeah. Look for the glimmers of hope if you will and capitalize keep the momentum going and the one of the ways you can do those two by cultural brilliance, the DNA of organizational excellence by Claudette Rollie Claudette. Thank you so much for being on the business builders show. Thanks so much. I really appreciate it. Thank you..

Claudette Rollie Claudette
"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"wolff" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"Gonna put you on the spot. So examples where there were clues for a long time. We read about them in the press, we saw him in the New York Times, we saw it in the Wall Street Journal, we read these stories on Facebook. And we're sitting there, especially someone like you who's a tune this insane. Like what the heck are they doing? Maybe Uber is an easy one. I don't know throw them out for discussion. What? Yeah. What what the heck were they doing? Yeah. It's it's a really interesting question because they you know, an it's worthy were outsiders looking in. Right. So I always give a cab with the we don't have all the information about what was actually going on. But based on what read about, you know, because you know, I talk about another wheel describe culture when I'm in into company. Sometimes I'll say it's like, it's like your family culture, you whether you like your family culture, you don't like it. You know, how it works? Right. You absolutely understand what you're supposed to do and not do in that culture. And so in organizations that same feeling often evolves. Where everyone knows what to say or do. But they don't you know, and they may not like it. But they know what the rules are. And so I think in a case where you see a Newburg, or, you know, you know, Papa John's Papa Johns, I think it was you know, the cases recently jerk, we're we're thinking of has gone awry, there was something going on in the culture that allowed that to occur. We might point to the leader, right? I mean, the leader is huge in the culture. Absolutely. But there was also something in the cultural makeup the water so to speak that allowed those behaviors that go on for a long period of time and made it, okay? And that's an example of how the culture can really create a situation that we nobody really wants. To use the water analogy to the problems may be there. And they're, but they're not bubbled up. They're not allowed to come to the surface, for whatever reasons, I guess, it's cultural like you've already said that they just people are afraid to speak up. They they dealt with. They won't challenge. Anything or anybody? You know, it's interesting. It's interesting cloud up because turnovers a big part of that. So obviously, I'll agree. That's smart that they're leaving the because they're unhappy with the culture for whatever reason are bullied, or you know, their stuff going on. I guess I just. Why is this continue? I guess that's just I guess is good for people like you. But what everything all the news sources and with all the things going on? And not only that. But you know, there's job opportunities everywhere. Maybe that's why there's turnover. I guess I I don't know. Why is this continuing? Well, what's going on in our organizations small in big that this is continuing? I think it's continuing because we you know, it's been allowed to this for a long time. Right. And so now now we see our the commentary on culture, and that some in the dynamics we were just talking about rain. Some of these companies probably I'm guessing I don't know five to ten years ago wouldn't have been viewed as that big of a deal necessarily. Boy. Oh now, I mean, they would have been but not as much as now. So now, we're saying so we're kind of like late to the game in the sense of saying, no, no, no, no, this is not acceptable anymore. So that I could see that we're kind of key or catching up to it. So I think over time hopefully, it will stop existing. You know, we're gonna see culture and improve improve. And I like you said it's good for people like me. But I'm also one of those people who also would love to be worked out of a job. You know, you don't need anymore because everyone else good culture. I'm with you. But in the meantime, there's a lot of opportunities for Claudette rally her last name is spelled R O W L E Y her book is cultural brilliant, the DNA of organizational excellence, and I believe this was just released on my accurate. It. It was just released. It was released in early January. But are they launch day was actually yesterday? January twenty second look for your on the business builders show. Now, you're going to go worldwide, absolutely. I'm not making any guarantees in case, you're asking. What's.

Facebook Wall Street Journal New York Times Papa John Newburg Claudette Papa Johns twenty second ten years