24 Burst results for "Woking"

"woking" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

03:30 min | 9 months ago

"woking" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"The that one of the problem would be at eighty might in some cases overestimate to physical activity. What the decor- ac- of the studies Decorative of this methods are report. Well reported but it seems that they might lead to slightly higher physical activity recording than the he wants. Now in certain situations for example a person might be seated in just the waving hands Not doing a. I levels of physical activity but the zero meter would the record stronger considerations so i levels of physical activity if the person is seated in not expanding much energy but at the same time that so swear and in some cases in positive aspect of of the Meters 'cause a if a child or a person is doing throwing and catching than the meters would be recording the movement at better than a waste the than the next sierra meter position the on the waste so always deputies were. The child or the person is stationary but moving. The dilemma would wouldn't be well says the by the waste. The zero meters so and As for the thai once. I guess They would be better than a than to evaluate. Also posture all aspects of the child and they are widely used to assess ooh physical activity type or Eh for example could be used to evaluate a sedan three behaviors really well because you get Time seating time lying time Woking time standing because the us also developed way to inclination of the device at this can be donald. So with the wrist accelerometers in using for example the sedan three sphere assessment developed by a roelants include leaked include a uses both acceleration in the inclination of the Meter to away to whether better the posture of the child or the person to understand whether he's sedentary or not for example and and i would you see you said that it's also advantage of the wrist won't device that it's measuring the armaments and and basically now the algorithms are kind of trying to estimate from the movement of the wrist or the acceleration of the wrist. Alexa are doing. But have you seen algorithms which.

Woking donald us Alexa
"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

05:42 min | 11 months ago

"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"Was verboten to do that. I didn't leave the republican party. It left me. That's really a very dangerous point but were there will last question. We ask all our guests to show a bit of purple which means choosing one member of each party of particular respect for whether living or dead who might be able to help in our polarized environment. Today well one guy that i liked lot covered him. Some was john. Chafee of rhode island. The evolution of this legislation was notable. Not only for what we accomplished but for how it was done it was done in a bipartisan fashion. It shows what can and should be accomplished. When we all work together are covered in both while at the providence journal and then later in congress and i thought he was an impressive man in many respects another who comes to mind if someone who just died. Carl levin who. I didn't cover that much. But i knew a little many foresee a continuation of polarization and partisanship in the senate. And say that it's naive to suggest that the next congress might come together breakout of gridlock and accomplish great things but i know senate can do better because i've seen it happen with my own eyes. And he was also they both shared. His cleverness is a democrat. Chafee was a republican. I think they both shared this independence of spirit and a respect for the national interest and their larger obligation beyond party so jillian could sure use a few moore's and maybe a few hundred more elected officials with those larger obligations larger than twitter feeds and super pacs. That's a lot but maybe we can take the slightest bit of solace from bipartisan action. That we've seen recently. I on covert relief and then again on infrastructure at least in the senate though typically there's even less bipartisanship in an election year which is coming up frighteningly soon in twenty twenty two and so much at play the razor thin democratic majorities in both houses and a lot of state legislatures and governors seats as well. We learned from thomas edsall today that backlash can swing these elections especially when democrats pushed on those identity buttons. We also heard. He currently views the democrats as the sole rational party thus having vital responsibility for turning down the heat on our discord. If you're not familiar with thomas edsall's writing. We encourage all of you to look for his new york times column. Most every wednesday. They're deeply honest clearly written and contain great summaries of some of the most important academic research out there on the roots of polarization next week. Though we're going to step away from mainstream journalism academic research into high school and middle. School classrooms around the country. Where the teaching of civics has eroded over the past few decades. This is a topic dear to us over at my day. Job with civic genius. There are a lot of efforts underway to better educate young americans on civics not just the mechanisms of government but the importance of civic involvement of all kinds whether it's volunteering mentoring and of course voting. We'll speak with four different experts on this subject. Colonel michael moffitt or republican from new hampshire who's filed legislation to civics education in my home state. Dr laura hammock a superintendent from rural indiana whose former school district won a national contest promoting civic education and the host of civics went on one. Hand a mccarthy a nick kappa. Che the team behind this popular. Npr show and podcasts. Have done as much as anyone to promote the importance of civics the past five years with two hundred and thirty episodes and counting. Some teachers have told me why it was quickly sort of adopted into schools quickly. After the show is created like forty six episodes end was because there was an absolute dearth of nonpartisan civics material on the audio waves. So teachers could play this without fear that they'd be viewed as supporting one side or the other about these very hot button topics and issues and we still strive for that. Please join us. Then and meantime subscribe to our newsletter purple principle in print which is deeply into important topics like civics. Education also helps out a whole lot. If you'd like us on. Facebook follow us on twitter and instagram and leave a review apple podcast. You'll find all these things in our show notes and at our website purple conceivable dot com. This has been robert piece in the new yet already. Impressive co-host jillian young blood for the purple principal team. Allison burn producer. Kevin kline senior audio. Engineer emily holloway director of digital ops dom scarlet and grandparent research associates and emma. Trujillo audio associate arisen. Composer is ryan dare rooney. The purple principle is a fluent knowledge production..

thomas edsall Chafee providence journal senate congress Carl levin republican party rhode island jillian Colonel michael moffitt Dr laura hammock twitter john new york times new hampshire Npr indiana robert piece Impressive co jillian young
"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

07:52 min | 11 months ago

"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"That first season episode on party dynamics. You can also say that. Maybe the defunding police Slogan that so many progresses embraced this past summer proved to be determinative with at least some of these constituents in swing districts who really do fear a return of the kind of levels of crime that we saw in the seventies eighties and nineties. In fact if you look at the polls of african american opinion african-americans are much more resistant to the defunding police. Logan then are white liberals so it could also be that this slogan backfired with some of the minority constituencies whom white democratic liberals thought. It would please. It's a zero-sum jungle out there but okay we've heard thomas edsall speak a lot about the nature of the problems within both parties and between them and we've heard some confirmation of that but what about the solutions to those problems what might turn the title polarization just a little bit. Let's hear thomas edsall address. That question of yours jillian and my own whether indie minded americans could be part of the solution if we could go extra polarization again. My favorite topic. There's so many contributing factors to polarization we talk about gerrymandering the division entreprenuers. Maybe i would call them on social media and youtube and certainly cable news. People talk about close. Primaries and a lot of states are plurality elections that you can win an election without the support of a majority of voters. I'm curious what you think is the first vital step. We could take out of this toward a more kind of common ground sort of politics. Well you know. I think even though the republicans are sort of the aggressors in pushing the polarization issues because they work for them the wedge issues of race culture and so forth at generally been ones that republicans fan profitable on election day. I think the burden is on democrats to explain that. I think the democrats remain a rational party and the republican party has become an irrational party if you want to preserve democracy and democracy in a two party system has very hard time surviving in polarized context the burden and falls on the rational party to do something to lessen it and i think the democratic party should take steps to reduce the sense of threat that it poses to many republicans to try to turn the temperature down. That's why the woke stuff that you hear actually turns the temperature up and makes people more anxious this whole the critical race theory debate regardless of what you think is right or wrong and i think one of the areas is particularly worrisome to those who have shifted to the right are the protection of religious freedoms and the idea that liberal causes are gonna require conservative religious people to adopt an perform everything in a hospital abortions or to allow abortions for example or the baker who didn't want to bake a cake that had two men on top. I think that the democrats should back away from those issues for the moment. They can be absolutely supportive of gay rights of abortion rights. But i think they need to be careful when people have deeply held religious views on these subjects not to impose their values on them. They other big area is that a lot of democratic especially in the area of race have put the cost of integration and the cost of correcting past injustices primarily on the least equipped of the whites. They have white working class. Voters are the ones who faced the biggest burdens from affirmative action and democrats have to think about those much more consequentially if they wanna make changes in society change always has costs and they have to think about one recognizing that there are costs android. Much more to figure out who is bearing the burden of those costs. Lay off the little sisters of the poor. Yes if you wanna win. We've talked a lot about democrats and republicans but most of our listeners are probably independent or unaffiliated voters and they do make up close to forty percent of the american electorate. But they haven't done so well at electing independent legislators as you know there's only a few dozen out of seven thousand elected officials in the united states. We'd like to play a clip from one of them. Laura scibilia she's an independent member of the vermont. assembly. I believe she's in her fourth term. You know i'd like to say that i really understand. The notion of organizing people organizing ideas organizing for funding for moving ideas. We'll award so i get the idea of parties and get the value of parties. But that's not me. And i think that there's value to having folks like me outside of the parties to kind of be the i don't even know what we would call it but the space in between so we're seen as kind of unaffiliated brokers in the middle. So do you think we need more of these unaffiliated brokers in the middle in washington and do you think. There's anyone currently trying to fill that role. Well i think that could be many more. And i don't care if they're personally if party members or if their independence but people who are fair minded in their view and take a broader outlook both for their own constituency but also for the state or national government depending on which they represent. I think both safe democratic members and independent members of congress and republicans and independents conservative leaning independence would be who are free of orthodoxy and can make their decisions on realistic basis would be very healthy process. We have now great pressure especially on the right but in both parties to if you are a member of the democratic party or republican party to vote with your party and i think that's an unhealthy process. Charlie crist was very popular republican governor of florida. But then when obama came down. Chris thank put his arm around obama and that became fatal thing for him to do in the republican. Primary and marco rubio beat up in part because chris was friendly to obama. It.

thomas edsall jillian Logan republican party democratic party Laura scibilia youtube vermont assembly united states national government washington republicans congress Charlie crist obama florida Chris marco rubio
"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

08:44 min | 11 months ago

"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"The late. Nineteen ninety s in the early two. Thousands i've depended on his work. He and a guy named howard rosenthal the of this thing which is called. Dwi nominate which measures the degree of polarization especially in congress and attracts have much republicans in congress moved to the right and democrats moved to the left and when trump came along. They moved even faster to the left. So that there's been a sort of a counter pattern in. The democratic party led by white liberals and fairly affluent white liberals moving sharply to the left especially on cultural and racial issues so the divide or sort of who's to blame for the divide it goes both ways and it's not One where solely republicans move near the right. It's one of us. Democrats in recent years moving to the left. But keith's work with rosenthal is foundational. This is a terrible statistics but have we seen a tiny blip in the other direction recently. Are you surprised at all that. The bipartisan infrastructure. Bill seems to be proceeding through the senate. Rei i'm very surprised to the truth. And i don't understand. The republicans strategy especially mcconnell strategy has been basically destroy anything democratic at all costs a matter. What sort of a universe. Oh nuclear policy whenever a democratic bill comes. Try chopping off. The head is fast. You can just kind of focused compromised that our colleagues have been hashing out could not contrast more sharply with a multi trillion dollar reckless toxins and spending spree. That democrats hoped around through on a party. Line vote later this year. I don't fully. I don't claim to understand why he's allowing. This is because it is a big victory. For biden and biden i think as long as biden can maintain some momentum in his agenda which this action on this bill helps him do. He retains his centrality in the american political debate and increases his probability of being able to survive with the fewest possible losses. In twenty twenty two. I perhaps go into twenty twenty four and win. Maybe that's thomas edsall veteran reporter on us politics and longtime op. Ed columnist for the new york times and like a lot of political observers. He was taken aback by the recent bipartisan. Vote in the senate approving the one trillion dollar infrastructure package which has now moved onto the house for an olympic level tug of war. I can hear bridges and ports groaning even louder but another interesting point edsall speaks to. Is how polarizing identity politics can be something we've heard from so many guess and something we encounter all the time it civic genius people can find common ground on policy but sprinkle in some divisive identity does and that is when tribal hell breaks loose. So we asked thomas edsall about identity politics within that really broad democratic party. He writes about which stretches all the way from socialist to centers pragmatists. What's interesting with the democrats. Is that the moderating force among democrats has turned out to be black democrats for years. Centrist democrats basically accused the party of moving too far to the left on racial issues but now it turns out black democrats south carolina. Democrats particularly jim clyburn. Most importantly have been the forest sort of restraining. The democratic party on these woke issues which are the ones that are much more problematic and trying to keep the party. I don't more centrist down the line economic and healthcare set of themes. I'm gonna tell something. I've been black a long time. I don't know of any black people that i've been in politics. Look comfortable with socialism another single african american woman defunding police and tell me that's not what they mean. When they're saying well soundbites kill you if that's not what you mean. Don't say it turns out black. Democrats are a force for moderation not for extremism. And that's a big change so going back to your very prescient book. Two thousand six building read america. You wrote one reason. The democratic party has so much difficulty. Making a populist appeal is it. Structurally not a populist organization it's dominated by well educated culturally liberal liberal relatively affluent white elite presiding over rank and file. That's forty six percent minority. That was two thousand five or six or so. Do you think that is still the case. Today it's even more. So i think a fair amount about this that the democratic party which was known as the party if the work men and women back in the franklin roosevelt. Truman kennedy era now really has become the party of the upscale. The party of the successful not the party of the beleaguered and struggling. But the people who don't suffer the most and it's created a an alienating in the party pushing voters of the working class away and not just white working class hispanic and black voters who have some conservative leanings. Have been shifting away from the democratic party and they hispanic vote is very important as the last election showed with defeats of democrats in florida and south texas. Anadyr ocean of black support really could threaten a lot of other districts and places around the same time he wrote about the republicans. The gop is developed capacity to seek out victory by slim margins in a majority of closely contested elections. It's likely to continue this pattern. So in light of the twenty twenty elections where the blue wave was anticipated. You had a pandemic. you had a recession. You had an unpopular president. There is no bluewave. Could you say that yet again. The gop kind of eked out an unexpected victory. Well i think the two thousand twenty success of the republican party down. The ticket was more due to trump's unexpected appeal to a lot of voters who turned out in large numbers. Much more than expected and certainly much more than pollsters expected in the woollen run the republican party at the whole infrastructure that the republican party has has received much more support from especially it's toner base than the democratic party in the republican party and the business community generally there's been a real recognition that having republican control of state governments for example and even city or town governments county governments. That can be very important. In terms of reducing regulation lower tax rates. Diminishing the power unions all the things that republicans wanna get and especially the business community for its bottom wants to achieve and democrats have allowed this core infrastructure to decay and a road in a way that is hurt the party overtime and has made it very basically week and you saw what happened in two thousand ten and two thousand fourteen. When wave elections helping republicans occurred republicans had this infrastructure in place and they won legislative seats all kinds of look down ballot victories. All across the.

democratic party thomas edsall biden howard rosenthal congress senate jim clyburn Dwi rosenthal republican party mcconnell edsall keith Truman kennedy the new york times Anadyr ocean olympic Bill
"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

07:56 min | 11 months ago

"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"Audio from her season. One guess jeff cava service. He's the widely respected historian at the niskanen center. An author of rule ruin on the demise of moderate republicans. Moderate republicanism took a nasty hit in nineteen sixty four. When barry goldwater the very conservative arizona. Senator became the gop presidential nominee. And that was significant. Not just because a conservative for the first time sees the nomination but also because barry goldwater was one of the few republican legislators in congress to vote against the nineteen sixty four civil rights act and that had long standing in permanent repercussions but really the problems begin worse with newt gingrich in nineteen ninety-four election and moderates have really been marginalized in the party at this point. Which is odd thing isn't it. The republican party moves right over time opening up an opportunity for democrats to possibly convert some moderate republicans and maybe some right-leaning independence but so many democrats particularly house move even further left. It makes zero sense until you think about the psychology of that situation and what we call affect of polarization which is another great element in edsall columns not just politics. But the psychology that makes seemingly mysterious policy positions so popular and so politically potent. Polarization is nothing if not complex and i think we can safely say that. Today's guests thomas. Edsall is a great interpreter of that complexity and a major conduit between mainstream journalism and really important scholarship. You cite a lot in your writing a lot of academic research annum wondering if you can think of a few of your favorite relatively recent really incisive studies from the past few years that you think americans should familiarize themselves west. I think there's a woman who just moved from university of maryland to johns hopkins university. Lilliana mason who is written about affective polarization. And i thought she was really been apart near on that front once. We are in a group. We'll think our group is the best and we think that the other groups are less good and if we're in competition with those groups we begin to hate them although along with her. There's a stanford scholar shanto e anger who also has been a pioneer in this field. This is the field where instead of polarization by issues they are finding polarization by personal animosity or support for your team and opposition to the other team. Regardless if issues political attitudes on are characterized by the deep sense of. Ill will the problem is that it has now spilled over. It is far. It extends far beyond the political domain. Already prejudice is now characterizing daily into personal. Their work has been breakthrough work. The same is true with jonathan. Hate who is now at the nyu school of business. but he's a social psychologist. So the worst number of political parties to have in a country is one. Okay that's terrible but the second number is two and that's what we have in the united states. He is tops in his field. But i'm really going to neglect people by doing. This is another woman. Julie wants w. r. o. n. s. k. i. at the university of mississippi who was been very insightful about political animosity this narrative especially within american politics is that authoritarianism works in our society because it splits people across the parties. And i really should mention. Also ashley giardina j. a. r. d. i n. a. duke who really established the reemergence of white identity as a factor. What i'm interested in understanding. How many white americans in the united states are responding to the us becoming far more racially diverse than it was in the past and so part of the phenomenon that i'm talking about and i'm uncovering as the fact that they're a sizable number of whites in the united states. Today who feel a sense of identity or attachment or solidarity with their racial group and that solidarity matters for how they view the political world in recent years some whites have developed a sense of being white as opposed to as being the norm and that's was crucial to the emergence of donald trump. This idea of effective polarization became very important as a way to explain why this intense animosity to democrats that emerged in white working. class communities. Trump has provoked while he basically tapped into areas at people. Psychology and make up had not been recognized as insignificant. In many of these feels. It may seem odd to give him credit but he really sort of lifted up the rock on america and so did there. Were a lot of pretty strange bugs floating around that people had not been looking at and they are big bucks. You can see it. On the january sixth assault on the capital but also in this there are millions of republicans who believe the election was stolen despite all the evidence millions upon millions tens of millions really and this is really an extraordinary phenomena. A whole party changed. Its point of view because donald trump arose and became the anti immigrant anti free trade. The whole party shifted gears. The evangelical community in effect abandoned its requirements that it's favored candidates live up to a high moral standard as someone who's covered politics. Since really since the mid sixties i hate to admit is just extraordinary to see this this This is bigger than the reagan revolution. It's an as may not be as big as he writes. Revolutions the civil rights women's rights. But it is a really significant development in america and speaking of historic developments another scholar. You're probably familiar with his doctor keith. Poole he created the data on congressional floor votes throughout american history. That's now the ucla vote view database. And we have an important quote here from dr pool in season. One of the show and we did that from seventeen. Eighty nine all the way to the prison day Beginning roughly around the late. Nineteen nineties and end of the two thousands. The party started separating to the point. Now where is not really liberal conservatives. Just devolved into pure hatred of the other party. I worry about the stability of our institutions because of that so that's had data scientists talking about pure hatred. which is a little worrisome. Did that hit you about the same time. It hit dr pool in.

barry goldwater jeff cava niskanen center gop Lilliana mason shanto nyu school of business america edsall Edsall ashley giardina newt gingrich johns hopkins university Senator university of maryland arizona congress university of mississippi donald trump thomas
"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

08:11 min | 11 months ago

"woking" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"Almost all my career of what happened to the democratic party. When i was a child the democratic party was the dominant party. Still was the party of franklin roosevelt. And harry truman. That's thomas edsall. The refreshingly objective affable airtight op ed columnist for the new york times with five decades of experience reporting and analyzing us politics but the rise of the conservative movement on the right and the decline of liberalism on the left. Have been a preoccupation of mine for forty years or more. Even i hate to admit half a century of hyper partisanship has transformed both parties. And it's a privilege to have thomas edsall here to help explain that for us. This is the purple principal a podcast about the perils of all that polarization. I'm robert peas and another great privilege today. The introduction of our new co host jillian young blood former hill staffer who also worked in the bloomberg administration and currently serves as executive director of civic genius. This is a nonprofit promoting civic awareness and bipartisan problem. Solving jillian great to have you back on the show and this time for many episodes. Have i've been officially promoted from the guests seat to the co host chair. You've just uttered coho speech so that is now official and perfect. Timing for this interview jillian. Because i know you've read your share. Sheriff thomas edsall over the years. Yeah absolutely. he's one of the really great columnist out there today. And i've learned so much from reading him over the past decade. Let's get right into it with thomas. Edsall contributing op. Ed writer for the new york times author of five books on. Us politics columbia journalism school professor and national reporter for the washington post for twenty five years prior to joining the new york times. He's long on research short on dogma and hugely insightful with regard to partisanship and polarization and that's indie music to the ears of purple principal listeners. Concerned about both parties. The dynamics between them and our great big somewhat shaky democracy thanks again. It's so great to meet you. A longtime reader first time caller. So if i could just start by asking you. A lot of columnists are very clearly on the left. Very clearly on the right and to your credit. I have no idea so. I'm curious if you could just tell us a little bit about how you think of your audience who you're writing for the new york times. Audience is pretty liberal. In that sense. I am writing for an audience that is to the left and to some extent. But not entirely. I try to direct column towards the problems that the left has so our shows about polarization. You've written extensively about structural politics and the polarities between the left and the right thinking of one column where you said that the far left is the republicans greatest asset. Can you explain that dynamic a little bit. You can argue to a certain extent that the republican party has been new reactor to democratic initiatives. The democratic party has become the party of rights has been that way since the civil rights movement women's rights movement really starting in the mid sixties and sometimes democrats go too far and push the envelope to a point that is not acceptable to the general public. And that's when the republican party can step in very effectively politically. I'm not talking about the morals who's right or wrong. It gives the republican party a very effective tool to portray the democratic party and its candidates as people who go over the edge who push things. Too far in that sense woke democrats. Who would push the democratic party. Quite far to the left are a real benefit to the republican party. Giving them just what they need. Do you think that the flip side is also true is the far right. A great asset to the left european clearly trump and the excesses. He and his supporters have undertaken particularly. The denial of the truth of the past. Election are gonna be. I think central issues in the the next few campaigns will see whether or not that really tells. What's intriguing really. Is that a party. That is delusional. Republican party at this point could actually and his the favored to win control of the house. And it's a fifty fifty shot in the senate. As an assets liabilities of the left with woke democrats are as bad as much more serious liabilities on the right. Where there's a real both the denial of truth and acceptance of ally and a growing willingness to accept authoritarian governance. they're not equivalent but politically. They have to become equivalent. It seems that identity is both cause and consequence of this polarization to some extent. And one thing that you wrote about pretty recently. A few months ago that i really appreciated was a piece about how actually americans have a lot of common ground on policy. You cited some data from voice of the people from dr steven call who've worked with before who's been on the show for more in common. That wrote a really interesting report on this. And i'm curious like how do we get back to. Can we get back to or create a space where americans can talk more about policy and less about identity this very hard once. The problem is that people have a mesh their identities in their partisanship. It's not just that you're a democrat or republican but if you're a democrat. You're pro choice if you're a republican you're aj abortion your tend to be if you're orthodox religious. You tend very much to be republican. If you're an atheist you tend to be dem quite strongly to be a democrat. These divides have shaped people's views. So that their whole sense of who they are gets wrapped up in being democrat or republican. And when that happens it turns the opposition into an enemy. So we're one of the few two party systems in the world and that kind of intrinsically promote some of this polarization. I think there's been some discussion particularly from the never trump wing of the republican party saying that it's time for a third party. We need one. There's no other way around this. And also i think from some more centrist democrats and independents. Do you think that that is quixotic. Do you think a third party is possible here. I think there certainly is room fro third party and there are constituencies that could be brought together to form of third party in a two party system. Like we have though. It's very hard to do that. They're only people who've done it lately at all with even minimal success or people who are one very rich and two they have personalities that are very assertive and the other problem. Is that for third party to form. A presidential candidate can run as a third party candidate possibly like ross perot. He got nineteen percent of the vote but to be a real party. You gotta have candidates up and down the line. You gotta have senate candidates in house candidates. That's a much. It's a huge proposition to really do it as a party. We really structurally in every way built.

thomas edsall democratic party the new york times republican party robert peas jillian young bloomberg administration jillian Sheriff thomas edsall harry truman franklin roosevelt Edsall the washington post dr steven hill columbia Ed thomas senate Us
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 1 year ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Am I Drinking Too Much How Do I Stop Drinking Janet Gourand Worldwithoutwine Alcoholic Alcohol Free Alcohol Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
"woking" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"woking" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Sours Woking down the street one day. A man came to me and asked me my name. You know what time it is? Yes, I do. It is 5 10. Well, Ray it's Friday, 12 I mean the fourth day of December. It's the 12 month. You and I will wake up eventually E had Tonto I had to bring in my TV closed this morning, so I had to carry too much stuff already worn out. But, um, because we're taping a TV interview with Orient Samuelson today That I think it's 10 or 10 30 this morning. News nation. Oh, Orient, of course, celebrating 60 years here and taking a well deserved Break at the end of the year, and so will be we talking Orient and then I'm not sure when they're going to play that on news nation, but good morning. Hi, Ari. It'll be nice to see him. Haven't seen him in a while. So he's coming in. He's coming in. Yeah, we're gonna do we're gonna do the interview. Next door here. Great. Yeah. So you're going to spruce up a little bit? Yeah, Yeah, I brought in the field. I dusted off the old anchor anchorman outfit for this. Yeah, because you know, warrior look immaculate. No question. I can't be. I can't be seen on TV with Orient. Looking like a radio guy. Man. Uh, see Somebody sent me a message. And oh, you know what? And by the way, there's ah, a Nordion Samuelson TV interview that I did with him on Channel 11. Why was on Chicago tonight? And we did those Friday night show half our interviews and back in, I think was 2003. We had orient on as a guest, and I completely forgot that. I had done that. And now the wttw post that control him drugs that help people can see that It's not on our website, is it? It is not yet to watch the video. You have to go to the WTTW website. Robert Feeder, had a link to it in his blood yesterday. Yeah, I don't. I don't remember a lot. Ah, lot of things I have said or done in broadcasting anymore. Somebody sent me a message that they were watching CNN and Chris Cuomo. Used the term Re trump Lincoln's describing Fans of Donald Trump, who are not necessarily aligned with the mainstream Republican party anymore. And then so somebody wrote me. I think they sent me a Facebook message saying, Hey, Chris Cuomo stole your your term. And I thought about that. I use that term. And then this guy messaged me. He said. Yeah. You said that You said that four years ago on some show. Re trump looking. So I've got my law firm working on a suit Now they were gonna file against Chris Cuomo for stealing that. So the Dewey Cheatham and Howe team is on it. I hope they don't put me on the understandable because I can remember saying that, but Apparently, I did. I don't know. This could get expensive, Bob. They're gonna have to go through hours and hours and hours of tape. Yeah, That's right. You know what happens when that happens? Yes, I do. I don't want to think about it. I can't even point them to the show. I said that on so we may have to drop the case unless Rudy Giuliani wants to pick it up. We have a prize for the first caller. As always here if you want to try for that, between now and 5, 30 A lot of good stuff here on the swag list. Color number one will win. 312981 72 100. If you got a few minutes to be and holds, you can try now through 129817200. And what else did I wanna mention here? Right off the bat today? Nothing. Okay, Think. We'll talk about said We'll talk about this soul in Casper thing during the morning. I can't quite figure that out. But I think that well, we'll talk about the little while anyway. Right now, let's talk about other things going on in the sports world. Also what's going on.

Chris Cuomo Orient Orient Samuelson Nordion Samuelson TV WTTW Donald Trump Woking Ray Facebook Chicago Ari CNN Robert Feeder Rudy Giuliani Dewey Cheatham Republican party Bob Lincoln Howe
"woking" Discussed on The Side Quest Inn Podcast

The Side Quest Inn Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"woking" Discussed on The Side Quest Inn Podcast

"All right. Now you're talking be interested in. Swimming and potions. Walking well, I don't really need a woking punishing unless it's like walking on water. All of Mir- people need potions, race goes both ways the story that was very sensitive of me. We can get a potion of swimming for a measly price of fifty. Oh, shoes and silver. Copper and we would have been set for life. And he said cold. Four fifty of your kidneys. WHO THE HELL Could have been worse. If you don't want anything then we'll keep moving up no I think that it would be great to get. Some of those of swimming helpful potions I think that would be very helpful. How much those all on just one sec I'm going to running find. There okay. I can't find him anywhere I'm looking for. Hopefully. Believe he sees me looking because I'm not gonNA thing they're. Looking for you. Don't know what he's looking for work. So I'm going to stay hidden zirk. You.

woking Mir
"woking" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"woking" Discussed on Space Nuts

"Is so Diluted hardly anything. However on the best observing sites in the world, it's much less than that. In Chile, the get seeing down to third of ANOC. Second. Much better than we get because that was conditions a better. So that is the measurement. There is another one that's related to that. An tells us a little bit more about the structure of the atmosphere is something that we call our north, an no characteristic size of a of a cell of warmer or cooler air. It's a measurement in it's usually measured. The owner of a mater something like that. On, a site with very good seeing, it might be much more than a meter. For somewhere like siding spring, it's probably less than a meter. is the size of a Blob of air that's going possibly. A warmer or cooler air that's going past the telescope and the reason why that's important is that we now have the ability to correct for that with this technique called adaptive optics. So you can sense actually using lasers usually, but you can sense the the passage of these blobs of air across the the Mirror of the telescope. Usually a all kinds of altitude low altitude tile ttitudes the whole thing. You can you can check that movement is an incorrect for you can essentially take out the distortion in much the same way as noise cancelling headlock headphones. The the extra noise around you as a counseling technique an now really reached a stage of perfection that's taken twenty thirty years to get there but it's enough that it makes it worthwhile building huge ground based telescopes Leah. So we've got the the giant Magellan Telescope coming up twenty three meter effectively we've got the TNT thirty meter telescope coming up we've got the LT the European extremely large telescope, which will have a mirror thirty, nine meters in diameter that will far outstrip the Hubble in terms of the detail it. We'll see because of this adaptive optics technique. So we figured out how to essentially eliminate the deleterious effects of the atmosphere. That's that's. The blurring. There is one effect that you can't get rid of though that is that the atmosphere absorbs wavelengths in particular in the ultraviolet that's been one of the great strengths of the. Telescope S- above the atmosphere, so it's very sensitive to the ultra violets. Region of the spectrum and you can't deal with on the ground. You've got to go into space for that and maybe the moon maybe. Mas. Eight, it's probably cheaper to put something in orbit around the Earth Orono bit around the sun, which was what we've been doing. But eventually when you know when humans are a woking on Mars in woking on the move, we probably will have telescopes that to..

Magellan Telescope Chile woking
"woking" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"woking" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Effectively, we've got the TNT thirty meter telescope coming up, we've got the LT, the European extremely large telescope, which will have a mirror thirty, nine meters in diameter that will far outstrip the Hubble in terms of the detail it we'll see because of this adaptive optics technique. So we figured out how to essentially eliminate the deleterious effects of the atmosphere. That's that's. The blurring there is one effect that you can't get rid of though that is that the atmosphere absorbs wavelengths in particular in the ultraviolet. That's one of the great strengths of the. Telescope S- above the atmosphere. So it's very sensitive to the ultra violets. Region of the spectrum and you can't deal with on the ground. You've got to go into space for that and maybe the moon maybe mas. Eight it's probably cheaper to put something in orbit around the Earth or in orbit around the Sun, which is what we've been doing. But eventually when you know when humans are a woking on Mars. In woking on the move, we probably will have telescopes that to. So. When we do ultimately have telescopes might be on the moon maybe on. Mars. If they do go that way, will it make much difference to APP perspective as we say things from Earth, given the skype and size of the universe will. Be Now miniscule variation. Yes Y- The sitting on Mazdas. The same was sitting on the of his father's the universe is concerned. Because even not even far enough really to see a difference in the positions of the nearby stars. There is one there's been one example those great question drew. About some two months ago new horizons, the new horizon spacecraft observed. A star which was simaltaneously observed from Earth and the the baseline of those two observations because new horizons is now I can't remember how fine seven or eight billion kilometers away. So they got a huge baseline. For for what we feel power measurement, the idea that you're looking from one position and another two to see how a star a nearby star changes relative to his background, and so some of the was both Southern Hemisphere Star under northern hemisphere observed with those observations. Remarkable could see the difference because the spacecraft is so far away from Earth. Interesting very good and Ozzy, thanks for the question. The short answer is yes. We could have just done that despise, but wouldn't have been nearly as interesting but appreciate the question thanks for throwing it up Now, let's move on to our next question from will in Phoenix. Outright. My name is. Phoenix Arizona, Arizona United.

woking Phoenix Mazdas Arizona Ozzy Arizona United
"woking" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"woking" Discussed on KOMO

"Of Los Angeles, officials warn it could flare up again because of a blistering heat wave in California. Listening to ABC News. Stay connected. Stay informed. The camo afternoon NEWS Comeau news time. 30 to the Sunshine in downtown Seattle has 72 degrees. I'm ELISA Jaffe with brick grounds ice and here's what's happening. I'm see Romero were expecting an update from governor Insley in minutes on the state's latest response to the ongoing pandemic. This time, the governor will be joined by Dr Kathy Lo Fi with the state Department of Health and Dr Francis Rito of Evergreen Health in Kirkland. And when the governor's event begins, we will carry it for you Live. I'm Charlie Harder to coma. Police dog is dead and a murder suspect is critically injured. After a shoot out early this morning to come. Officers had tracked down a man they believe was involved in a killing in Lakewood last night. Both sides shot at each other. The police dog was killed. The suspect was last reported to be in the hospital with critical injuries. And gunfire in downtown Seattle, leaving one person hurt. We're told that happen about 1 30 this afternoon in the area of fourth and Pine. Seattle police say officers do have a suspect in custody. Investigators say the shooting might have been the result of a drug deal the injured man taken to harbor view with what does described as life threatening wounds. State health officials are changing the way they count negative cope it 19 tests, Health Secretary John Weisman says up to now, if you test it for Corona virus, twice or more, and the tests all came back negative. Health Department counted on Ly one negative test. In other words, if someone test negative multiple times we only report out there first negative test. Now all negative results will be counted. The change comes as repeat testing becomes commonplace. I'm Ryan Harris with ride share driver MINIMUM wage proposal, Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkin says will increase drivers pay by 30% and ensure their pay for all of their time working. Those expenses include things like gas and insurance and would be Laid on top of the proposed 16 39 and our wage, uber and lift say, to avoid being penalized by paying drivers when they're not carrying passengers. A similar law in New York City forced them to kick drivers off the app, and it drove fares up by at least 20%. Still to come on coma. Why build a bridge when you can build a living green infrastructure? I'm Corwin hate reimagining The Duwamish crossing. Come on news time. 304 And Governor Jay Ainsley has just taken a seat at the state Capitol in Olympia. And I'm goingto turn the mike on as he gets in place to begin his news briefing this afternoon. Here is the governor. Three, right? Good afternoon just returned from Woking on county had A series of great meetings with the community and health and egg business leaders and Brewster. And it was beautiful there Today. Columbia River was great people were catching fish like crazy. I had a cup of coffee and a nice park waiting for the meeting and Get a beautiful state was kind of reminded reminded of that this morning. So if these meetings I went there to listen to the community of ways that we can help get on top of the pandemic, Okanagan County We know this is a real concern. There's been a Riel outbreak in Okanogan County. It's one of the hottest spot certainly in our state. And we're very concerned about the whole state. And particularly open on county, given the numbers that they were experiencing. So I am very concerned about the health conditions there. And the ongoing responsibility of employers to care for the employees and the need for all of us. Our workers and otherwise to try to be a Team players to get on top of this pandemic. I was encouraged by some of the information I got talking to people today. I'll talk a little bit about that later. One of the things that the folks told me about. Was the need that I agree with to increase testing, and we're now sending a National Guard mobile testing unit Tokunaga. To provide increased testing. We obviously need the cooperation of people to actually get tested and importantly, When they get tested if they're positive to be able to isolate So that they don't infect their family members and other members of the community. And that means folks can't be on the job. They'll telecommute. And, of course, the agricultural industry. Most people can't do that. So The ability to support working people while they're off work. While the isolated is very important. And we talked about that this morning. Unfortunately, we have good news on that front because we have created a way to support these families. To allow them to isolate to reduce the threat of transmission to the broader community. This week, my office unveiled to funds that can help in that regard. To help people that due to their immigration status. Are not eligible for unemployment compensation or stimulus checks. The largest fund dedicates $40 million to undocumented workers. Who are impacted by covert 19 Who would otherwise be ineligible for these funds. This immigrant relief fund is going to help workers. Who are the backbone of our agricultural economy in many other parts of our body. Make sure that they do not fall behind in their expenses of their families. We know there are so many ways they're impacted. There's another $3 million we've made available through our food production paid leave program. For certain food production workers who have to stay home. While they isolate while the quarantine This fund can benefit employees in those sectors regardless of their citizenship or their immigration status. This is really important because We have heard about folks who've been Unable or unwilling to isolate, even though they're positive because they had to feed their families. So these mechanisms now we're gonna help not only their families, but the whole community. Because when people don't isolate it makes the larger community at risk. So this is something that helps Everyone in our communities to try to increase the isolation. It's effective to reduce the transmission rates. To really happy to be able to make progress in every yard. These programs are funded through the federal Cares Act dollars that have been allocated to the states. So this money originally comes from the federal government. And it's the right thing because we know covert has taken a disproportionate toll. On immigrants and communities of color serving the agricultural industry. And we know that these communities and their labours contribute far more than $40 million that were put into this fund. The nonprofit institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Estimates that these undocumented workers contribute more than $300 million in state local taxes annually just in our state. So this is the right thing to do the smart thing to do and the healthy thing to do. For everyone in our community. The $40 million fund will be distributed later this fall. Once we have secured an entity to manage the program And we're currently accepting proposals in that regard. The $3 million fund will be run through the Department of Commerce. To ensure the businesses provide sick leave. In a reimburse forthis essentially provides That the employers will be reimbursed for the sick leave. They provide their employees, so it's a pro business activity as well. I mentioned these programs comes from cares that funding Today we have distributed more than $1 billion cares act funny toe local governments. Statewide to fight the impacts of covert. In their communities. Only now are considering the next traunch that will go to local communities and local government entities. To help with them. There's a meeting this afternoon in the upcoming days to try to take the next steps in that regard. With that said, I'm joined by Dr Kathy Lo Fi of our former health today, and Dr Francis Rito, who's a doctor of Infectious diseases. Evergreen Hospital in Kirkwood. I've asked Dr Rito to join us. Because he has treated many individuals with Kovar, 19 since.

Seattle Dr Francis Rito Dr Kathy Lo Fi nonprofit institute on Taxatio ABC News governor Insley Department of Health ELISA Jaffe Charlie Harder Comeau Evergreen Health Romero Los Angeles Kirkland Columbia River Health Department New York City murder Okanogan County
Bad News For Prince Andrew As New Witness Comes Forward

Today in Focus

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Bad News For Prince Andrew As New Witness Comes Forward

"Let's move onto Prince Andrew can remind us how he started this year. He had been basically sacked from the royal family which we take subduing. He was essentially stripped of all his royal duties after his completely disastrous Newsnight interview y have you decided to talk now? because. There is no good time. To Talk, about Mr Epstein and. All things associated in Andrews Newsnight interview his big defense really aside from the fact that he of how they can't sweat and he's a big patron of the pizza. Express woking is that he didn't really know Jeffrey Epstein he claims he only knew him through his friend Glenn, bloom it through his girlfriend. Back, in nineteen, ninety nine, who an I'd known her since she. In the UK this is all Remember that it was his girlfriend. That was the key element in this he was the. Plus. One to some extent in an expert. You through a birthday party for since girlfriend then Maxwell at Sandringham. No shooting weekend a shooting weeks straightforward straightforward for choosing weekend. Despite the fact you know Jeffrey Epstein was at the Palace went to Epstein. Manson had dinner for him. He stayed with Epstein because because Andrew just couldn't find a central Manhattan hotel he's very convenient epsteins mentioned it was a convenient place to stay. I mean I've gone through this in my mind so many times. At the end of the day. with the benefit of all the hindsight that one can have. It was definitely the wrong thing to do is you say that interview was a disaster foundry and he was forced to withdraw from his rural Gt's I'm imagining heat hopes that would draw a line under the whole thing for him but then in July galet maxwell was arrested. The risks are simply too great. The words of the judge refusing bail this evening to maximum the one time girlfriend an alleged accomplice of the sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein, might saw pleaded not guilty the hearing by video link on charges she helped recruit and groom minors as young as fourteen. So she was arrested in her strange though Bolthole and a few weeks later, a bunch of documents unsealed from a two thousand fifteen civil action brought against her by Virginia. Robert Scott Free and price price whose name pops up again it's Jews You know a lot of the allegations in these documents were already known but what is new is the allegation that? Forced Virginia Robert Scott Free to have sex with Prince Andrew as a way to gather incriminating evidence against him. And then on top of that, this month of witnesses come forward claiming to have seen the Duke of York, at trump nightclub on the night he insisted in the Newsnight interview that he was at Pizza Express in woking why would you remember that? So specifically, why would you remember a pizza best birthday in being because going to pizza express in working is an unusual thing for me to do. So he obviously hit denies everything but the circle is definitely tightening around Andrew. US. Law Enforcement has said repeatedly they want to talk to him that he has been cooperative a war of words as I'm sure you know has broken out between Prince Andrew and the US authorities investigating sex offender Jeffrey. Exiting The prince claims that he has offered to help that inquired eat city times but this is something the American prosecutors deny effectively calling him a liar the palace hopefully insisted this is untrue and US law enforcement has repeated it. So this is where we are at the moment. Do you think this puts more pressure on Andrew to cooperate with the investigation? Me The idea of any member of the royal family cooperating Larry's but yes, I mean absolutely. But I mean the fact that he was saying such stuff in that interview emily weightless without realizing how terrible the sounded I mean just shows he has no sense of consequences for his actions. I'm Jay his sin said, he regrets his ill-judged Association with Epstein. But as you point out, these aren't incredibly serious allegations and yet everybody feels like his story that dozen attract as many column, Inches Harry, and Meghan. Let's I think this is the thing when talking about the role families so much tension and I've just done two is focused on Harry Megan and the stupid decisions they make in his make it actually lady Macbeth is very telling for example, the mail there's certain Cole missed the male who I'm not gonNA pollute podcast listener's ears with his name, but he is completely obsessive. Meghan. Markle. Interest. Rates. Endless combs about her I. Don't like to own Andrew or something Sierra. Let's just bear in mind that actually the royal to really be focused on is Andrew

Jeffrey Epstein Prince Andrew United States Pizza Express Maxwell Palace Virginia Robert Scott Free Manson UK Meghan Newsnight Andrews Markle Inches Harry Bolthole Larry Manhattan
"woking" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

Whores Talk Horror

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"woking" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

"Not a bet woman so maybe that's a good thing but if you were you might win big. So we're GONNA backtrack just a little bit and we're going to start with what happened To Daniel two days before the murders in you actually mentioned the police being held responsible at all and will be. It was more like the doctors but are actually right. So based on what happened two days before the murders in what the police could have done differently. According to an article by Syria live Daniel Gonzalez Ren Nagin school children and parents two days before he I killed but police were powerless to arrest him. Series please power to deal with mentally ill. Officers was quote a very limited but officers were found not to be negligent by an independent police. Complaints Commission report. I gotta say that one slowly getting a lot of a little bit of a tongue twister there all right. So the report found police acted quote appropriately and proportionately a following seven separate reports of a man running naked and Napa on September thirteenth. Two thousand four Gonzalez says mother Lesley savage in her partner. Stephen Harper say police could have averted the two day killing spree if they had acted on the request for Gonzalez to be detained under the Mental Health Act. The commission's report was completed in July of two thousand five following the couple's complaints. So this is almost a year after the murders two officers. Pc's fallow in Raleigh. Were called NAP. He'll just after eight. Am on September thirteenth to search for Gonzalez. Both officers who the report says were not at fault were unable to locate Daniel Gonzalez an untreated paranoid schizophrenic. Who's police file contained warnings for quote for Weapons Mental Health? Issues and officer. Safety does not identified as the naked man until later that morning when Mr Harper His step-dad visited the woking police station so officers took no further action. In two days later Gonzalez slit the throat of a woman in worthing and has attacks continued until September seventeenth when he was arrested in London. So Mr Harper said that he did go to the police expecting Gonzalez to be taken into hospital because of his mental state as had happened twice. Before and Daniel's mom said that her partner asked not to be identified because he was nervous about upsetting Daniel but he did give the address of where Daniels located made it clear that Daniel was there at the time so hey like that was him rang naked. Go to the house. He's there now take him into a hospital. Get Him treated. Here's a video uploaded to youtube. You can clearly see his face. Oh my God polaroid's that I took some photos. Here's a sketch I did. You hit a character at Disneyworld so Mr Harper spoke to Jackie door receptionist at the woking police station who has since been promoted because you know a lot of people get promoted for not doing their jobs right So now she works elsewhere but her statement is at odds with Mr Harper's and the notes that she took have been lost. Oh that's her. That's that's hopeful but the report states that Doris said that. Mr Harper refused to give his name and address. Yeah and did not want police involvement which totally contradicts. What I just said about him going to the police station and being like here's my address. This is my step son's name. He needs help. So yeah why. Would he be at the police station way if he didn't want to talk to the police? Yeah that makes to hang out rose. I just wanted to say you has doing a phenomenal job. Well of course here's some donuts. So you know. Her word against his word doesn't really add up. It doesn't really make sense. So yeah so basically. She said that he refused. To give his name and address. He did not want please involvement but was unable to recall whether the man had said Daniels back at home. So doesn't add up the report states. If police had acted their options under the Mental Health Act would have been limited and adds the policy should have been updated or at least reviewed in July of two thousand fourteen and was not so police could have thought a warrant from magistrates who have to have Gonzalez removed or contacted social worker. Who could have authorized him to be taken to a hospital? Daniel's mom did contact a mental health social worker named only as Mr. Kiza and the report but it states she described him as indifferent in passive made her perturbed an angry. I would imagine so so. She was adamant on Tuesday that a different approach on September thirteenth would have averted the tragedy that unfolded later that week. She said quote they definitely would have seen he was completely Gaga. If they add came here they would have seen. He was psychotic all right. So this information comes from hundred families dot org which is an organization that supports families who have lost loved ones as a result of killings by people at Severe Mental Illness. So these statements are made by. Daniel's mom his stepfather and also Daniel himself okay so this first statement comes from Daniel's mom every time we asked for help we were told you would have to wait for a crisis to occur before we could have the help he needed. I did not know something dreadful. What's going to happen but I was scared. This is actually a handwritten letter that Daniel wrote himself that he gave to his general practitioner on October of two thousand and three eleven months before the killing. I really do need help now. I have tried to cope on my own. Like a normal human being without help or medication but I have not managed to succeed. I was admitted to hospital in Nineteen Ninety eight under section thirty seven of the mental health. Act I do not want this to happen again so I.

Daniel Gonzalez Daniel Stephen Harper Daniel Gonzalez Ren Nagin officer Complaints Commission woking Daniels partner Raleigh youtube polaroid Napa Doris worthing London Lesley savage Mr. Kiza
"woking" Discussed on Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"woking" Discussed on Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

"Be Yours Eh. In Nuba Shield WanNa Alumni mean in leme. Niger Company News on Yahoo Soon need a team wrong in what by the Naked Nikon Hookah A. Hey what's up. I mean sharing on. Don't Tehran me Aunt Leeman right and we hold on John Phone me. Lean lean for him while I she a Yeah Yeah keep that that'd be a thing of the Wattana Mainland was a gun at the Anything he went immune one now sleeping. What's that Nine am to Wyoming Albarracin if I would be mocking him and So the Duni selling the outer set the best show Let in a Manning in In Uh speaking music and Tony says shop when Eminem says to me shoveling a the On Woking Huaneng wedding then sending meant them I mean what can I am all the UH. That's been again and.

Nuba Shield WanNa Aunt Leeman Wattana Mainland John Phone Eminem Woking Huaneng Niger Tehran leme Wyoming Yahoo Tony
Tall Stories: New Yorks streets

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:17 min | 2 years ago

Tall Stories: New Yorks streets

"We're on gun hill road in the Bronx near White Plains road you know sky go pretty open neighborhood by New York Sanders. There are some tall buildings around but street's pretty wide and most of the buildings are lower to kind of get a good glimpse of the sky. I can see several blocks away a lot of different directions. Lot of varied storefronts were passing the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church which is a big beautiful church Look back there you can see there. There's a lot of parts of the Bronx to there's a lot of bedrock I started. What is the last day of two thousand eleven? So it's been a little over seven years now checking your fund. Yeah I'm looking at my map here. And you got some woking instructions instructions I think in the pet so two thousand eleven yeah does little over seven years ago when I walked a little over ninety one hundred miles now and have have maybe a few hundred left to go the big question that everyone properly asks y you must know a bit like walking. Come on I mean why do you like what you like. You know you just do and I think it's important to sometimes. Just follow what you feel called to do without try to come up with an artificial reasons to be able to explain to people so they can go and move on with your day. I guess you could argue. That saw too precious to make you know why you're you're doing it. And it's not conventional thing to do in the sense that you know a lot of people in offices during nine to five jobs and you've decided over the last seven even maybe a little bit longer to every street of Neil Yeah at the same time over the whole course of human history. What I'm doing much more conventional than people? You're sitting in an office meeting meeting. That's very slim slice of human history that we've been sitting in fluorescent lights looking at computers. Would you like about what you've discovered in these many many years. Everything's a surprise. I mean you know you come to New York and people tell you things about neighborhoods types of people believe it because you're a new person it's in there and they seem to know they're talking about when you go out and walk in a certain area and you say oh that's not true that's not true that's not true and you realize what you could have known in the first place. which is that every stereotype about place or type of person's always GonNa be wrong just because just because of the mathematics of it you can't some thousands of people in particular certain characteristics? That's never know where so I learned early on to not expect any think so in that way you could either say everything surprising or nothing surprising because I didn't have any expectations to begin with. Yeah I mean we're in the neighborhood will win Bara that has a little stereotypes attached definitely. Yeah yeah the Bronx probably more so than any any other Any other the boroughs in New York. Lots of people who've never been here would confidently tell you a lot of stuff about how dangerous it is that kind of thing. I really knowing anything. What what do you think you WANNA learn from walking the streets? How can you put it to us? Once you do actually finish. I don't know I mean it's not really my concern to put it to use my concern to do it as well as I can. And then you know just see what happens from there can't really control What usage put to? You know. I didn't do it for particular particular use so I'm just trying to give it my all and whatever happens next

Neil Yeah New York Immaculate Conception Catholic New York Sanders White Plains Bara Seven Years
You Don't Need a Website to Start a Business

The Fast Growth Podcast

04:17 min | 3 years ago

You Don't Need a Website to Start a Business

"What something technology line so. If you guys don't my boss to where I come from I have EH technology background crowds did my master's denied tea and worked in many years as an. It consultant to woking in selling. It's arrestees an architect solution architect interest so that was my main role for many many years walked has ten years. Here's pretty much in that space for big companies so in a compromise on background but this is something I really want to speak to you guys off doc in most businesses we speak to or I have the privilege to talk to that town. There I believe is that they needed technology to succeed feet. They believe that they need all the things that have the world. which are big businesses are using today. They need that they must. I have it to succeed and many companies out there. They make sure that that need ease. that want is created as need ride that Fontes converted as Neat Arto the companies out there do their best to make it happen as well so that you you feel it. It's it's not a wanted to need rights DAB. We run our media company. We help people were the technology technology with the marketing we do. We do all that for people right but I'm here to tell you something totally different today. Why see technology is really good for something if you amplify what so let me explain they see if you have twenty clients and you want to take the fifth declines. Technologies can help you make it happen but if you have all to clients or if you don't have any client technology amplify that as well means that if you don't have any clients you won't have any Glenn to after that as well just just that's the way it was so big. Knowledge is really good to amplify and take it to the next level but it's not really good to begin with people out there. Who if you are in a starting stage like few thinking of doing. Give you on example say we'd want in a business right but we have never spent time and effort. He window have a team of people to do the work for us. I've never overspent a time and effort to design our own website. We have funnels Doggett on. We have finals for everything. We're on Webinars AUSE. We don't events. We have all the finals we need but we don't have episode. Why would never spend time designing that we just put it one page. They ah that's been there for a long long time. We never spent any time putting together. Show today was a day where we actually put it something together. I GONNA team together that so he said okay. Let's put something together for us so that we now look like a proper business for our. Let's let's collect everything. Let's put it testimony. O'Neil's lead put the screen shots off the campaigns. We've been running. Let's put stuff out there. Let's explain that the people there was a day when we started doubted actually work on our website. I imagine this we are full fledged agency. Rodway we provide marketing service and we just started working on our website outside so this pretty much give you a clue that you don need a website to be successful. You do not need a huge technology stuff to be successful and the number one thing you looking to do is get some clients and get them the results. That's the number one thing if you go out out and find clients and give them the result and putting one hundred percent effort in getting them the results than looking for that's what you're looking for to begin with right so go go out there sub. Some people get them. The results get the testimony and then you're going to object to put all that's right so they don't do anything before that

Glenn Woking Consultant Fontes Doggett O'neil One Hundred Percent Ten Years
"woking" Discussed on Clara Apollo's Chi Time

Clara Apollo's Chi Time

11:19 min | 3 years ago

"woking" Discussed on Clara Apollo's Chi Time

"Wow so lovely to play that track from your new album calling us hi. Let's remember why you came by firm here on she time and yeah urgency that you were talking about was also the big wakeup. Call listen to is hello hello. This is what's really happening here now and get the feeling that you kind of put your hand oppy on the earth to help with the big changes. It is all all help with that. You get a feeling that you're so you had to be here now. Wow yeah that's a good question. I'm <hes> yes i guess so we'll quite boats to say that but <hes> yeah and i know this much more i my dear as you know the emotive song crafting of india funds music wraps around my ears to lead me down a quiet pathway to the a heart touching touristy. He's such a inspiring being. I mean it's rainy incredible. Rainy woking is talk and failed it when when you see him sure yeah so have you him before a look. Now i have actually anne marie once heavy but we have we have mutual friends friends in the musical community on an interesting link with spain as the man that mixed my mycenae album. We say mixed marines best album. Stay excellent. I think we should that's great to find find these actually like a cup of tea cheers to that now yet cheese with beauty line. What what what have you. What are you drinking. I have got some parka and liquor and spamming <unk> yummy e no. I've got me kwanyan who long you ever since i've been learning about t- from the grandmaster ken kellyanne because he's a complete of ziada and has so many oris you little song puzzle these really cool with poetry thing the chinese of bum vibe behind all about how this tea was grown hi you're getting leading the whole flavors of nature coming through so getting that with your policies to that the drinking hubs actually nourishing for us and not just flavorful era she really this is another way we take care of ourselves so the right in the beginning i kind of introduced is saying that you gained and one of your tracks was going to be used by the extinction rebellion crew. How does it happen. This is the <hes> we will not be silenced track. Yeah <hes> yeah yeah. I mean i've had a few people get in touch with me around using that song and nothing yet. Let's has come a bit but i've had interest and people asking if they can use it for. I think just as kind of background music music full shiming showing what's going on in practice and things so and i'm on it that can that can be as because it feels like that's kind of what it came three to be used full even though that wasn't my intention anassa outsor- rights so so you're just froze a bit though so you didn't wasn't your intention to write protest song no larry just kind of just. It just happens yeah but it definitely feels like that. It's it's yes. I can we actually <hes> encourage the true message to get through to people when you've got the sways of manipulative appetizing and all these fake news and everything going on on how do we do this. I think what you're doing. What's leila's doing is really a very powerful way of getting the message across. The anthem hasn't greta. Tom burgess released to track as well our negative i'm thinking okay yes from this band nine hundred seventy five. I think they using using her. Some of her voice canes yet right. Just run me. This is the joy of saying in the woods unsponsored nasty and being on a life like the wild animals hearing out there is gonna have you been running around the festivals and things if you've been getting some good support and can a few and played at s- you played a bit of fields when last week <hes> left me. That was my first time votes such a nice. Thanks community of people enough me. <hes> i'm off to sweden. I'm a festival and in the end of august and i've got a slut how the light gets in stipple which i think is the biggest philosophy and music festival allowed. Apparently that's going to be two pots yeah We'll do stuff more home based and do these of lives where you can be in different countries at the same time without having to fly. Maybe you don't need a body 'cause with the edit. The energetic field we got out and connect wherever we are yeah so we just i have to look at different ways of of sharing what it is we do and maybe not have to be everywhere in person yeah yeah so if you had any the of any tips for any budding singer songwriters all poetry make us out the what would you suggest to them yeah just to follow the inspiration rainy i mean it's hard to me when i get asked this question. I find it hard to response because i feel i feel like mine. Prices quite mysterious to me. I hey tori completely put live here on the spot there and that's great. That's great <hes> <hes> but what i go furnish posing in your mystery was trust yeah yeah definitely you trust your intuition and trust also coming through you not like anybody else's he connects acne exactly yes and that's different full happy. Everyone site yeah.

ken kellyanne woking anne marie spain tori leila Tom burgess larry sweden
Chinese extradition bill spurs mass protests in Hong Kong

Today in Focus

04:55 min | 3 years ago

Chinese extradition bill spurs mass protests in Hong Kong

"Now. Hong Kong leader, Carrie, Lam has said she will not scrap a controversial new plan to allow extradition of suspects to mainland China for the first time, despite mass protests, supporters of the law say will prevent the semi autonomous city of Hong Kong from becoming a criminal refuge. But critics fear Beijing will use it to extradite political opponents to China, where their legal protections cannot be guaranteed the guardians Helen Davidson, is in Hong Kong, where organizers claim that a million people have taken to the streets. Last Tuesday, around one hundred eighty thousand people gathered in Victoria Park in Hong Kong, and that was for the vigil commemorating the Chatham and square, mascot. It was the thirtieth anniversary this year. So that was always going to be a really big event, but the opposition to this tradition Bill, which has been really increasing over the last few months in particular. It was also a really heavy presence at the vigil as well. You know, it was a reminder of the democracy that they hold onto here in Hong Kong, and what oppression in China. And by China, Ken, Maine. The extradition Bill would laugh a case by case extraditions to number of agents. Hong Kong doesn't currently have arranged with this includes mainland China. And the obvious concern that people have is that China's legal system and Justice system is not considered to be very free that it's not considered to be very fair. Whereas Hong Kong is very proud of its Justice system. And it's, it's sane is one of his assets as a diplomatic and financial hub in the west of the activists who pushing against this Bill. The low will legitimize Chinese Chinese abduction. They're looking at the multiple cases of disappearances renditions by the Chinese government of people in other countries to get them back to mainland China into face charges of, you know, various different things, which are ultimately saying, as being rich bution for their political opposition in their political activism against China no-one really trust that Hong Kong's real. Assurance that they will never hand over someone for political reasons. No one really trust that. So, you know, it's a, it's a real fear, among people in Hong Kong. And that was something that came across a lot. When I was speaking to people at the protest yesterday. I went down there about half now before it was starting. And I really struggled to get there. You know, I was on the Woking couple of blocks, but it would have taken, maybe an hour the straits fool, and it was, it was a save white t shirts everywhere, you look, social media was full of videos of jammed up metro stations of ferries that were being that were feeling up being able to get on. And everyone around me was walking very purposely towards Victoria Park. People are frustrated, but it was incredibly painful sorry, determined that this really painful events. There was at one point someone tried to agitate the crowd saying, let's jump over onto the straight, and people called him back saying no going to do this. Right. It got very light. And there are thousands and thousands of people still trying to get into the area around the legislative council midnight their permit for a protest expired and police told them that they had to move on. There was some, some k groups it said, no, we're gonna stay just sit in. We're gonna be here until Wednesday. You can't move us. This refusal escalated into clashes between police and protesters. It was quite violent that there are barricades and bottles thrown. There were several people injured, including police offices and the riot. Police really messing and I were rushing at these protests is quite systematically, to push them, further and further up the right one hundred meters and then ten minutes later another hundred maters. It was quite intimating. I think I mean no one was really putting up much resistance at that point because the offices were at numbering. Protest is at least five to one. Kong legislative council is going to debate the Bill again on Wednesday and it's looking like it will pass. In the last couple of years. Pro-democracy legislators have been expelled from parliament, they are significant minority but era minority, and they just don't have the numbers to push against this Bill, and because of that, I think people get up and we are looking now at more protests on Wednesday and further into the future as well. Helen Davidson, my thanks to her and to Francis Ryan.

Hong Kong China Bill Kong Legislative Council Helen Davidson Victoria Park Beijing Chatham Carrie Chinese Government Maine LAM Francis Ryan One Hundred Meters Ten Minutes
"woking" Discussed on Walking the Shadowlands

Walking the Shadowlands

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"woking" Discussed on Walking the Shadowlands

"Uh? And welcome to Wilkin this yet lens. On marian. I you a person who enjoys anything to do with the unknown the annex planes the paranormal with things that good bump in the night in torture dreams, if the sounds like you thin walk in the shadow lands is the podcast for you. We cover topics like shed. I people he was like black soot wispy around the edges but deep black in the centre with glowing red eyes traffic foods phenomena. In the early history of New Zealand. So we feel that this recording is a soldier saying that he was carried from the battlefield. Reincarnation? If anciently seeking says she found a past life forum, we she posted his story. One of the Mavis of it for him was the retired far fighter in the US. I this gentleman was able to corroborate information that whose son had been speaking about right down to the finest. And smallest detail completely one hundred percent accurate. Needed experiences. What I remember is looking down at the body and say, yeah, nobody's gonna wanna live there. The being was beside me said, no, that's yours. These topics coming up now fist full if swords beginning on the thirtieth of April, the twenty ninth of April if you live in the northern hemisphere. So if you enjoyed topics like these enemy more than join us on book in the Sharon's each week as we explore the rounds of the shadows. And discover what awaits us the. Meantime, be sure check out our bleed site WWW Woking. The Chatelaine stock comb in front of us on Instagram, WWW dot Instagram dot com forward slash will in the shadow lanes. A CBS. Thanks for listening.

Wilkin Instagram Woking New Zealand US CBS one hundred percent
"woking" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"woking" Discussed on WTVN

"Knocked on your rear end where everyone responds to things like pollen differently. Well, we try to recommend especially this time of year with this crossover flu and allergy to reduce inflammation. That means eating. I not. Trigger not drinking too much, alcohol smoking, all those kinds of behaviors can increase inflammation and provide a route or an atmosphere for the viruses. Take and likewise with allergy season underway. That's going to the pollen. That's already out there. It's also really causing inflammation. So if you know that you have allergies are prone to that you make sure you get your your your flow NASA's or whatever to reduce inflammation while flu is going around still. So that you can protect yourself a little bit more from that virus heading in interesting too. I noticed you guys have an app that people can get to kind of track. The allergy season the sickness season is that correct? That's right. So we have a we have an app for iphone and for Android. Napa boise. I oughta conversa-. That allows you to deal with what your local six score is in six score is our way of measuring risk of illness across about thirty different conditions that we currently track which includes obviously fluent allergies, but also things like norovirus, strep throats Woking costs, even chickenpox. In fact, we're starting to see some chicken pox reports in Ohio as well. Very interesting Graham appreciate taking a few minutes..

flu NASA Woking Graham Ohio Napa boise
"woking" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"woking" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"I forget the exact, but she came up she came up with that. And that whole Wovlerine thing. Thing was something because when we didn't have money to shoot like the thing that I was talking about with like earlier with like the golden child and him getting out of a DeLorean like, you know, like, Mike ready, oxen. So we had to really make it short. Sweet. So that scene was written SEA actually took probably the longest 'cause I was working on it throughout. Once we shot that other wolverine seen the scene the scene of the movie that he shows the baby shower. Yet thing we worked on the longest and actually even an editing got cut down it got cut down a lot befuddles. It was it was fun because you did this like oh my gosh to superman with his with his dad kind of giving him advice, which I thought was like a really cool way in actually face. That was really important to me to you got some you've got some credit for saying spin Cal 'cause I always love Brenda sick Cal out. So that was yeah. That was really the funny thing about that was so wish shooting we have to shoot, and we use the green screen that I use to take mile additions. So when you do in like auditions as an actor you put this up almost like a reflected like how you can make like squeezed down into a circle. But but it's not like a bounce board right balance for it. Yeah. Yeah. Odor. Reflector? I'm with you. But is not very big. So we we had like a really like medium. Like medium, we had a shoot it in a medium medium close up because it just wasn't that big. And then there's the shot where he kinda like punches through the screen with his plastic knives. And. We were like we like how we going to do that. Because we don't have much. And then as my actually said, why don't we use green construction pap-? So yeah, we took like four pieces of green construction paper taped. It taped it in front held really close to the camera in the not just came through like with the knives. So this is all those things you have to do to be creative when you don't have much. No. And those are the best things was her happy accident was Ramon it that that that really surprised you all the planning in the world couldn't plan for that. That kind of led to something that you really love in the film, or or was what you just told us that happy accident moment. Yeah. That was one of. I mean, man, it was so many. I think we were just so opened creatively to just what will tell you a happy accident or something. So we're shooting. This is this is in the dinner scene with my parents come over. And I'm just there to like, basically, Michigan faces how awesome my life is now. It's it's a super super awkward out of you. Remember that scene? But like, yeah, they're all coming in my house. And I'm Woking welcoming them in you're talking about her entire family to meet care. Yeah. They'll write the podcast listeners. You know, the relationship with cure is going fine. You know, she's she's working as a designer. She comes home from a long day of work, and he surprises her with having his entire family come over. And which is the complete wrong thing to do without telling your significant other and the scene just gets worse from there. So okay. So that scene where everybody's coming in. Yes. So a so basically, I was like, oh, we don't have a dinner table. So I forgot that we didn't have a dinner table to us. And then on a my my really good friend. Who's also in the film. She plays curious curious best friend we were in our apartment. So she was like, I think I have this. And she basically. Like this this this long to like it's like desk, basically, it's like a long white desk on my oh shit. That'd be perfect that it's something stupid that Bruce would do in the other thing. We did was we ran out because in that scene. It looks like just like a normal buffet yet. Like like looked fine..

Cal Ramon Mike Woking Brenda Bruce Michigan
Working Against Gravity

A Moment of Science

01:23 min | 3 years ago

Working Against Gravity

"But I'm exhausted. I've been breath for the past ten minutes. I'll humble we take a break. Enjoy the view good idea. Dine. But why are we so tired? Anyway, we haven't covered that much distance. I wouldn't be this tired. If we were just walking on level ground like a flat road or sidewalk. So what makes walking uphill so much harder has to do with gravity. Hearst. Gravitational field is always pulling us toward the center of the earth and our feet have to exert an equal and opposite force to keep us upright. That's happening when we're just standing upright or Woking horizontally across a level surface like walking gun a flat street, but when we woke up on incline along with all the effort, we exerting to walk forward also lifting bodies against gravity. That's also the reason why walking up stairs is so much harder than walking downstairs. When we go up we have to work to overcome the force of gravity while we go down the pull of gravity makes it easier for us. So all the work. We're doing when we're climbing hill makes us us more energy, right, right? Which is why we get tired so fast, ten minutes into our high, for example. It's only been ten minutes. We'd better cut our break short and get going or we'll be out here until it gets dark. This

Hearst Ten Minutes
Haley warns U.S. "locked and loaded" if Syrian regime uses poisonous gas again

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

01:53 min | 4 years ago

Haley warns U.S. "locked and loaded" if Syrian regime uses poisonous gas again

"From executive producer jordan peele tracy morgan is back what in a new tv assuming that the new york times gritty funny comedy i just did fifteen in prison storing tiffany haddish the inner tainer you thought you'd just go wait for you to discover you got another man bouncy house don't miss tracy morgan's return to tv second chances are beautiful thing last oh gee tuesday's ten thirty nine thirty central only on tv yes breaking news tonight the us ambassador to the united nations nikki haley warning syria that the united states is quote locked and loaded for more strikes if the assad regime uses poison gas again let's go to our senior international correspondent nick payton walsh he's in northern syria for us tonight so nick what's the latest you're picking up over there this point i think there's an element of syria getting off and dusting itself off and realizing it wasn't quite as bad as they had full we've seen images on syrian state tv of the buzzer research facility in damascus the rubble there that clearly shows they won't be able to realize they were hit last night but they also claim to the homeless facility in fact was sped laws devante cross missiles now we've seen scenes of syrians out in the streets trying to show that life is perfectly normal shaw out our outside woking sauntering into work through a not shiny marvel reception room on his way into a normal day in the face a pay the points out just in the last sort of ours also some syrian observers a momentous have suggested this has been a substantial onyx thing and explains explosion near aleppo at a base of acidity often used it seems by ronnie militia unclear quite what back is we're still talking about a life back and failed ted but more broadly i think the syrian regime where we.

Tracy Morgan United Nations United States Syria Damascus Aleppo Ronnie Militia Executive Producer Jordan Peele New York Times Nikki Haley Assad Nick Payton Woking TED