27 Burst results for "Wnyc Studios"

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

05:39 min | 10 months ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

"So it's it's different ways of making loans setting up loans and all of really complex banking stuff. But it's still you know fundamentally has to do with assets so i would say that you know. Although there's been a lot of there was a lot of excitement especially in like twenty and fifteen to twenty eighteen about about having nonfinancial applications. What we've really seen. The most growth in is is kind of replicating our banking system in a in a decentralized hopefully more decentralized manner but that's actually kind of ironic because because bitcoin itself really came out of the financial collapse in a lot of people were the people who got excited about. It did so because you know it was pulling all of complexity away from from a system that it's sort of led us into demise very much through it's it's ah passively and and complexity so some people think you know we're we're just gonna building that again. What would they whole ideas to do away with the banks. Altogether as the middleman is not someone say that though there are about blockchain products that have have now are pardoning with j. p. morgan and There are all sorts of partnerships going on. And and like. I said the you know the the most active sector of the industry is is this this decentralized. Finance one of the controversies with our current version of the web lies with social media platforms. And how much data. They collect from users. Are there any movements to move social media to blockchain. Yeah absolutely i mean this is one of the first things i heard about was. We're gonna we're gonna have a centralized version of read it. We're gonna to version of twitter and the promise of those things was you know you won't be censored and you'll you'll have control of your data you know and if if anybody wants to use your data you'll either be able to say no or you'll be able to commodities it so those were very early projects And right now. I would say there. Are there multiple projects that is someone who follows very closely haven't heard of most of them And unfortunately they they are just not there in terms of usability and so they're not getting a lot of traction and I did ask somebody you know. Why why why. Why isn't this happening And they said you know it's in part because of bad user interface development but There are also just really structural fundamental weaknesses of of blockchain technology. That have not been solved. That have been a problem since the beginning. We've all known about That may it slow. Make it expensive in. So you know if you're going to have a social network on a blockchain the way it's going to work that you're gonna be paying as you go along. You know all of these things have a token embedded with in them. And so you kind of have to use that every time you want to interact with the platform and so you're you're spending continuously and Right now we just have really high Price are really high and And doing those transactions is really expensive and and it's also quite slow because they haven't figured out scaling issues with the technology and that impart has made these you know we're just not there yet. This is science friday from wnyc studios so this is in industry or technology. Really in its infancy. That has ideas behind it. That have not really been come to fruition yet. would that be coming close to summarizing it. Yeah i would say that yes And you know any any industry it takes time to get developers educated. You know this is a really new disciplined technology and in so that's part of the problem And building things things takes time. But unfortunately i do think that there are just structural problems with how a blockchain actually works that. It's it's not clear yet whether those problems are going to be solved to the point that these were actually making usable user. Friendly things can actually compete with the big always so at blockchain needs to become the version of itself. The people have promised to solve these structural problems where they transactions. Don't work very quickly it's it. It's expensive were not sure we. We trust the players in those kinds of things. Absolutely those are the two big ones It's slow and it's expensive and there are. There are some really experimental changes that are happening In the near future that people think are gonna liait those those scaling problems. But it's it's totally an open question right now and so you watch the see whether those scaling problems can be solved. Yeah and until they. Can you know you might. You might still have a platform where you can't censor you know tweets and stuff like that but i think what we're seeing. That's not enough. You know there are some people in the community for whom that is enough that status status that is a goal unto itself but You know with technology conveniences absolutely always the most driving factor. I think adoption and these are not convenient tools right now..

wnyc studios morgan twitter
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From WNYC Studios. This is come through. I'm Rebecca Carroll. I'm a writer and cultural critic. I've spent my entire career my entire life really interrogating how we talk about race and racism in this country. What are the words we use? What are the institutions that have shaped our lives? And who are the people rewriting our history? I'll talk with two of those people today to black women who are telling their stories with honesty. Verve and incredible impact. And I want to start today's show in Hollywood. Celebrities are a strange breed a privileged tribe of attractive people, many of whom live and breathe rarified air, lounging around in big houses, sifting through film scripts, project treatments or late night TV appearance requests in America. We created this cult of celebrity as a way to worship that which we desired and what America has always desired. In addition to wealth and success is whiteness. In fact, when we talk about mainstream media or mainstream popular culture, what and who were really talking about is white people. Black folks, Despite our substantial, consistently game, changing contributions to music, film, art, sports, literature and American culture at large. Have been relegated to niche markets throughout history, no matter how talented, known or productive we are..

WNYC Studios America Rebecca Carroll writer Hollywood
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"WNYC studios stepped up consumer what about nafta but when I was in Washington and next we'll bring back the knights turned heads up its residents young and an adulteress podcast host now before the story begins nobody does mention suicide contains graphic body injury since the posters please be advised that in the late nineties I'm since March has pacified by I've had one dream that dream become a firefighter but not had no idea instrument cost not take away you know my mom yells from downstairs it's seven AM on a Saturday I'm fifteen and again at seven AM on a Saturday I can surprise for you rise out of my room in under a minute what is the car more and ten minutes later we pull up to a huge yellow wooden tower in the middle of a gated area the wall is covered with overgrown so you can't see what's in our out once we get in I start to see high schoolers my age walking around in his navy blue uniforms some doing push ups and others racing each other while pulling a firefighter water home I'm so excited because ever since I was a little kid there was only one job I could ever see myself doing I just have my dad when I was a baby we had one of the most difficult problems in keeping close on this young boy we would come in he would have no diaper on and he would always have this fireman's hat on B. just naked as a Jaybird and walking around the house just as happy as he could be with his fireman's hat on so we knew early on that he was going to be a fire firefighting also runs through my bloodline my grandmother's brother was the first black firefighter in our city everyone in my family still talk about him to this day actually my dad when he was younger he was this close to becoming a firefighter like job offer in hand and everything but my mom.

WNYC studios Washington
Tony Phillips joins Broccoli Content as CCO

podnews

02:59 min | 2 years ago

Tony Phillips joins Broccoli Content as CCO

"The ladies from our new center at news dot net former WNYC STUDIOS VP and former commissioning editor for the BBC. Tony Phipps has joined London based audio production company Broccoli content as their new chief. Creative officer can help scale the company including developing international partnerships access. The three year old startup media company has to do with Pushkin to produce a new daily podcast shoot launch this summer. They're hiring for host senior producer. Associate producer producer. Pod FABS is a new website builds to help discovery calling itself the rotten tomatoes podcasting. Whatever that means podcasts are assigned to temperature using a proprietary algorithm part uses at seventy seven point five degrees whatever that means remote recording software then. Casta is removing. It's eight hour limit for free users until July to help those stuck at home French podcast hosting company. Outta have raised one point two million euro. They plans to expand across Europe. The company has twenty employees crate. Media have posted a remote podcast recording checklist to keep your quality. High Sounder has spoken to a lot of successful podcasts and have published eleven creative ways to successfully promote your podcast or ten if you discount the first one goto networking events. Not much of that going on for this piece the other day about advertising a podcast of service called Audrey might be helpful with over three hundred shows who are open to cross collaborating the UK radio station. Podcast radio is now broadcasting information about the virus and in America these Center for Disease Control and Prevention the CDC released a statement earlier today warning citizens to abstain from creating any new podcasts curing corona virus self. Quarantines we asked all Americans to stay vigilant they say and resist the temptation to unleash something on our population. Much much worse than the virus itself. It is of course from a satire website. The hard times sealink in our show notes and newsletter today in podcast news the tumble science. Podcast for cates is focusing on something kids to finding a bit worrying right now. The Corona virus kids ask questions and they got a great expert to answer them in language. Kids can understand no really. I made a version in Spanish as well. It's recommended the Immaculate Deception is the first podcast produced by UK Production Company. Something else in partnership with Sony Music. Entertainment it's disturbing true. Crime Story About Dutch fertility Dr Yang combat who appears to have fathered at least sixty children and the Los Angeles Times has launched Asian enough a new podcast about being asian-american hosted by Genu- motto and Frank Xiang and there's plenty more and all the links in our newsletter subscribe at Prod News Dot Net.

Producer Uk Production Company Tony Phipps Wnyc Studios CDC Los Angeles Times Officer Sony Music Casta Europe VP London BBC UK Pushkin Frank Xiang Audrey Cates
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 2 years ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

"But they're very hard to train because they don't care about approval. They don't care if you tell them, they're good Dogar and, you know, and they're they don't want affection. They're not particularly wanting affection. So the whole idea that they don't have the, the eyebrow raise is really interesting in terms of that. So you're, so you're saying you're huskies. Never look at you with their eyebrows. And give that I don't see that in, they do look at me, and especially when they get older, and they're more food motivated. They, you know they want food and they look at me for food, but because I've only had huskies. I'm not really sure what the eyebrow raise is. You know, but, but I think it goes along with the fact that they don't they're not. Particularly driven. By affection or approval or you know, even food until they get older. They, you know, they don't you can't you can't bribe them with anything. That's interesting. That's film. Thanks for calling K. What do you think of that? And second that, I have a husky mix, and you cannot make her feel bad about anything and she does not like to be held. So she doesn't put her her head in your lap, and raise its eyebrow, and do all those things. The other cute dogs to very often Sarah, it's interesting. Also maps on a little bit with some of the tocine research that we've been seeing that owners that report that they have a stronger bond, or relationship with their dog also seem to have a greater magnitude increase of this oxytocin. So potentially this is something that might happen. And maybe it is breed specific on my replied. Oh, this science Friday from WNYC studios, talking about dogs and their reaction to humans, and how they use those eyebrows. Here's here's an interesting tweet from Kipp, who says with regards to dog eyebrows do dogs use this with other dogs, or is it expression, only to get human attention? Wow..

Dogar WNYC studios Kipp oxytocin Sarah
Triton Digital acquires Omny Studio

podnews

02:39 min | 3 years ago

Triton Digital acquires Omny Studio

"Has acquired only studio, an enterprise podcast hosting company for an undisclosed sum. The Sydney Morning Herald estimates, the companies found you well into the millions and found at Hooper posts a bit about the company history. Kost h one thousand nine thousand nine is as you can hear underway in London. The event is sold out at it includes speakers from NPR BBC's, Brexit cast, Google news and many more. Speaking at podcast day, Neil, Carruth from NPR shared, details of up. I eighty three percent of the up first audience is forty four or younger, which is a sharp contrast with older radio. Audiences Eighty-one percent say they listened to the show every day, a more than forty percent say they've never listened to morning edition. NPR's morning radio news program before which up. I is a broadcast segment. Cows describes the podcast as quote profitable. Spotify has launched the daily drive that personalized playlists for commuting that includes music, and selected news podcasts of shareholder of podcast, host, Lipson, hold Kaynak is continuing to express dissatisfaction against the current lips board its latest finding highlights salary and bonus for some board members and came back is drumming up support for a special meeting, but it does need twenty five percent of shareholders to request one. Powell press seven point four point three WordPress. Plug ins podcasters has been released. It includes special codes to enhance. Discover ability of podcasts by Google podcasts were kit from WNYC studios release details of its salary survey into podcast pay and gender splits in the industry and funk. An audio polishing service has published a long article about resisting the loudness war, and still being compliance with major platforms in podcasts today social minds is the case, I ever dedicated social media marketing podcast, Marvel's wolverine, the lost trail gets for release on July, the WTO P and podcast. One of an answer new true crime podcast, Kohl's twenty two hours in American nightmare. Featuring a case, nightmares made of and the writer of beef and dairy network. Benjamin Partridge said podcast today, the when the BBC's started broadcasting his. Podcasts. It didn't result in an increase in audience that different people he said, and that's the latest trauma newsletter called news dot net.

NPR Google Benjamin Partridge The Sydney Morning Herald Npr Bbc Hooper WTO London Spotify Wnyc Studios BBC Powell Kohl Neil Carruth Writer Lipson Kaynak Eighty Three Percent
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

"Oh, this is science Friday from WNYC studios. Talking about screaming and that's with Harold Gazulas. Professor of psychology Emory University. Let's go to phones, because his interesting comment here from was, it Galen and the Lake Tahoe? Hey there, go ahead. Well, I retired fantasy policewoman and I have been an all kinds of scary situations. And when it's really really scary really scary, I been barest, but I have to say, I hope I just like a monkey just like a monkey and I don't do it any other time. I wouldn't even imagine. But then when it comes out, I can't, I can't stop until the situation is either safer or something has changed. But I who are you trying to scream the you trying to swing? No, no, I'm fact the last time I did it wasn't even on the job. I was hiking in Malibu in the mountains. And I was talking way and totally relaxed going on trail and suddenly a snake snapped at me. Almost hit my, my foot my tennis shoe and without thinking I who. Hooted backwards down the trail. I didn't even know. I could do I hopped and hop and the snake when through the air, I landed under the shade of a tree. And I got quiet and I have no idea how I knew to do that because I had never done that in my life. Great story. Thanks for sharing that with us. Wow. Herald. Everyone's you know everybody likes creams, and I noticed that on the webpage, you had mooks famous scream painting right up there, which of course, everybody recognizes, I believe it's second. Only to the Mona Lisa in terms of being recognized by people. Can you can you be too afraid to scream? You know, you see that in people in, in movies or whatever. And then she was describing the she hooting. Is there a time when we're to something just close up our minds? Don't scream I believe that does happen. I do we know why that happens or is that not part of your research? No, no. We haven't been able to, you know that our research, focuses mostly on how people respond to screams, we play them through headphones. And then we have them work on a computer and, and answer questions about how they're perceiving screams and what they think the they're, they're associated with. But it's harder to study scream production, unlike in in, in the days when we were studying monkey vocalisations you go out into the field. You work with a group of monkeys. And you put a microphone in front of them, and you can record screams. Of course, you can't do that with human screams, very readily. Now you can't do that. And I wanna thank you for taking time to today, and I hope you know, how do you say all your screams are little? Well, I they're not. But still appreciate this opportunity. Thank you. You're welcome. I enjoyed a have one arrow Zuma's a professor of psychology at Emory University in Atlanta and. We'll we won't scream..

Professor of psychology Emory University Mona Lisa WNYC studios Lake Tahoe Harold Gazulas Galen Malibu Zuma Atlanta
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC studios. Snap. Just live. The paramount snapped. Some love is Joyce Lee. Floyd. Floyd was very sweet boy, I knew in junior. I have purposely blocked out a lot of junior. But I remember Floyd Floyd was the very first boy who I knew for affect what head over heels in love with me. I can always tell Floyd set because I love Joyce was carved into each one. And every time I looked up. I catch him staring at me. One time the class clown. Gerald got into an argument in front of the entire and Gerald blurted out. You felt big why don't you tell you love her name on everything except? And. And even though I couldn't see through his big coke bottle glasses and through thick bottle glass. I could see that. He lowered his head and said, nothing when I got home mother was kitchen, preparing I rushed to home without even picking up backpack backpack. Three ping about Floyd excitement out Floyd loves me. How everyone knew how to be loved. How Floyd was when Gerald exposed. Love and sadness. The junior high winter formal, wait, wait, wait, wait. What you say you? Say what you gonna do again. But you say. Something wrong. I had no idea what it was run. It by me again what you're gonna do. I'm going to ask what you ask. No, man. But Jesus for nothing. Are the youth? They wrapped in beauty and nothing. You do not choose boy. Boy, do you want to stay. My mother's advice. I'll tell you why. My mother was always the most beautiful mother in law. Great. There was this. Name this Randall who only had for my mother missed the random was the fun. Most sweetest teacher in all of Oakland. All my mama had across the rand. But every time he saw me. He thinks. And how's your, mama? What Mr. Randolph aspect question on? I told him that. My mother had taken the day off work, Mr. rambles. Any the class? He said. Crank. Cheer and mister landow around the corner the store. By the whole class eye cream on the way back to me. So you wanna go inside? And check on your mom. I wanted side and told my mother that Mr. Randall and the whole class out on from mother came up said. Mr random. Of course that.

Floyd Floyd Gerald Joyce Lee WNYC Mr. Randall mister landow Oakland rand Mr. rambles Mr. Randolph
BBC says podcast listening will quadruple by 2021

podnews

03:06 min | 3 years ago

BBC says podcast listening will quadruple by 2021

"Podcast listening will quadruple up to thirteen point six percent of all audio listening. That's according to the BBC's head of research for radio and education. Anderson winter radio days Europe today in lasagna, she highlighted how the BBC sounds app chooses mandatory signing offers better data analytics for the broadcaster and allows better recommendations, meanwhile, Ben Chapman, head of digital for BBC audio and music says that we hope that in the coming months. BBC sounds will be an international proposition referring to the app the sense of connection and ownership is far more on a podcast, then on broadcast, TV or radio. That's according to Chris Mason of the BBC's Brexit cast speaking at radio days Europe today via video adding that the podcast generates significant amounts of contact fire social media the puck. The podcast is now films for BBC television. Dino, saw fos the podcast producer also shared that. They have had over four million downloads for the podcast one hundred episodes polish men and Emily Boutin from WNYC studios. Also spoke this morning radio. Does Europe highlighting how they use audio to build community and focusing on listener episodes, which do better than well known names every show. They said is created with listener interaction in mind and iheart radio. President Darin Davis is also been speaking of radio days Europe. He said that the iheartradio at which includes podcasts has been downloaded two point one billion times. And it has one hundred twenty seven million registered users, be everywhere. The consumers are he says with the services and the products they expect Davies also said that podcasting was in new audience development tool for talk radio reaching younger audiences in other news in the US little. Snippet of interesting years from the latest Nielsen data more people listen to podcasting per week than listen to Sirius XM the figures are from quarter three two thousand eighteen and there's been more growth since what causing in Puerto Rico is at a turning point. That's according to a Dante media in a post with data from the country. The CBC reports on a new way of making your own podcast borough. The equipments from your local library a podcast platform for aerobics speakers pod, you has one funding at the university of Chicago. And is everyone happy that Google podcast is now transcribing podcasts. Some people have doubts in our podcast section today. We highlight run pods new podcast from global aimed at people new to running and seasoned marathoners alike. Bomber released episode three last Friday, it support costs focusing on the two thousand eighteen Austin serial bomber and attracting a large amount of media attention. And our friends at palled sites. Also pointers to the weekly skip. It's a podcast of hosts from it's a podcast off hosts from thousands of shows reading just brand names. We like the quip and his and that's

BBC Europe President Darin Davis Head Of Research Emily Boutin Ben Chapman Anderson Wnyc Studios Nielsen CBC University Of Chicago Dino Chris Mason United States Google Austin Davies Puerto Rico
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I wonder if the police catch me after I murder, my good friend Ray, what do they simply allow foreigners to resolve conflicts? Slay you. Oh. I think he's really mad. It's funny, man. It's funny. Just be mad at yourself for being so stupid. Today on snap from WNYC studios. The grand losers. Amazing stories from real people. With their own understanding of how the world works when it was the Washington. Flailing in someone else's river. Step. Jeff. For our first piece. It just goes to show that with a stranger invites his home, always say, yes steps Joel Rosenberg has the story. At the end of a long country road about an hour. Drive outside of Minneapolis, Mark with his wife Alice in a small house on a lake. Great. Thanks for coming. It's raining when I get there, which makes the house feel even cozier than it already is. But I haven't come for the ambiance, shall we? Begin the tour. Sure, you can see immediately here in the entryway space is a precious commodity in this house. So I feel compelled to feel every square inch with art art. That's why I'm here. One of my favorite pieces when you come into the house here is this model Yanni.

Ray WNYC studios Joel Rosenberg murder Yanni Washington Jeff Minneapolis Alice Mark
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That you're the public in public radio because without you. We could not provide any of this programming polish human from WNYC studios produces all of our podcasts here at WNYC. She is joining me on this Monday morning to encourage you. Join us to join the WNYC community. I am here. Richard to join you on the radio. I am from the podcast division. And all the podcasts at all the radio and everything we do the equipment, the people that are reporting comes from members comes from you who are listening right now who decided to make the choice and go from a listener to a member. And it's always good to sort of. Remember like, what do we mean? What does the money go for? And when you listen to WNYC, you might hear these announcements that NPR is supported by member stations, and you've been hearing NPR reporting all morning, well, just to give you some perspective. That means WNYC pays NPR about three point five million dollars a year to bring you programs like morning edition and all things considered. And I'll just do the math rope. That's about nine thousand dollars a day. Wow. You are running you NPR programs, and it's worth it. Every dollar is worth it. It's money. Well, spent you hear reporters just this morning from Brazil from Venezuela from Turkey from Alabama all that reporting costs money, and it costs money. Thanks in large part. Art to you listener funding has the largest source of funding. So think about what you're comfortable spending, whatever dollar amount, it is it doesn't matter. It just matters that you join now the numbers eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine to when you go online at WNYC dot ORG. You can also pick any one of a number of thank you gifts..

WNYC WNYC studios NPR Richard Alabama Brazil Turkey Venezuela nine thousand dollars five million dollars
"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm I replayed or this is science Friday from WNYC studios. How you know the book is so richly full of details and sequence. It is like you've put a page Turner together. How difficult was that to be able to reconstruct the story of everything that happened in sequence? That's a very good question. It was pretty tricky because there were quite a few when I started reporting on it to more than twelve years ago. There were a few English language a cancer. What it happened, but they were either largely technical for. Although a big holes in the story, and the and as I began talking to people I discovered that there were low of things that were wrong in those cans. So really what it was. It was a matter of finding both individuals who could tell me what really happened at specific instances in the story, and in finding documentation do could help either back that up Phil other holes in the story. Where people in Russia, helpful when they ended they put any roadblocks up for you, or they know somebody say when he opened up this little drawer. I've got some files you might. Well, I I mean, I had a lot of help from from people in Ukraine, and specifically I had a lot of help from. The channel museum in Kiev. The the the the deputy director for science of museum provided me with a huge amount of not only documents. But also, you know, handwritten then was photographs pieces of documentation, let telegrams the stuff li-. And at one point she did site me after I'd have to I'd spent several weeks basically convincing her ball. I wanted to do was was possible. Because initially when she told me when I told her about it. She just said we nobody could do this simply impossible to tell an objective and complete account of everything that happened. And then at the end of one meeting she said she'd apparently come round to this idea and she did. And she said, she literally reached into a drawer, and she said, well, if you're serious about this before you leave I'm here that you might might take his is useful. And it was like a three inch Manila find her which was the original interior ministry, working record of the accident from the police station preppy that they'd kept from the they pull the twenty six to may the sixth, and it was all handwritten notes and typed reports and footnotes written by KGB officers on it like a lot of the other documents that had been kept at the time had been intended to be destroyed both to limit the spread of contamination. I think the spread of information about what had happened, but the officer who was charged with disposing event thought himself with this actually might be historically important. So I'm just gonna take it home. Hang onto it. And and he kept it in his garage for several years, and then after the fall of the Soviet Union and the revolutions in Ukraine brought it to the museum and gave it to Anna the museum and said, hey, this might be see you probably the first one to see following. I think well, I certainly one of the first people 'cause she'd kept it in her desk drawer says, she was she understood how important that was. Yeah. In her desk drawer, not somewhere down the hall. This is stuff you have to protect. I was only allowed to photograph it in her office. It did it never left the room. Anybody else know until? That she handed this over to you. All right. We're gonna take a quick break and talk lots more about to focus. A it's a great book. It's called a midnight insure noble. The untold story of the world's greatest nuclear disaster. Adam Higginbotham as Hickinbotham Higginbotham Higginbotham. That's what I thought is here with me our number eight four four seven two four eight two five five you can also tweet us at scifi lots of tweets coming in. We'll go to the phones when we get back after the break. Stay with us. I'm oh, this is science.

Turner Hickinbotham Higginbotham Higg WNYC studios Ukraine channel museum science of museum Manila Kiev KGB deputy director Russia Soviet Union Phil officer Anna the museum twelve years three inch
"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on Science Friday

"Jason. Hey, John happy to be here. Maybe you can just very quickly. Tell us about the story because I know it's a very convoluted story, but this case that you started following in some of the twists and turns. That take us to to the science. He is it's a very sprawling case that that literally spans the country and more than three decades. But one way to get into it is to think about it as a as beginning with one missing persons cases. So a woman of the name of Lisa growing up in southern California thought for years that she had been abandoned by her father at a young age. But because of an unrelated murder case that happened while she was in her twenties. She and police found out that that person wasn't actually her father. So you have a situation where she and police had kidnapping case that was sort of decades old. But now they have the questions of who was she and where did she come from? And what was her real name and her who was her real family? And so the quest to answer those questions in a strange meandering way lead all the way back to New Hampshire and to some other mysteries. Along the way. I'm John dean Cosker this is science Friday from WNYC studios. And we're talking with Jason moon, the host of the bear brook podcast. So Lisa this missing persons suggested to law enforcement that they use genetic testing websites the the kind that anybody can use. Maybe you can explain the process though, that police go through genetic testing in genealogy to identify someone. He is. So one thing that's really important understand is is that if you have your DNA on say, ancestry dot com or twenty three and me police don't have access to that. They can't just go in and look around and try to find suspects. So what happened was is? There's a another website called Jett match that is sort of a nonprofit, you know, sort of built by two guys at down in Florida who were just genealogy enthusiasts. And it's it allows for more sharing of of the genetic information and people will turn to jed match to run more advanced searches on their on their DNA to look for. For distant cousins, and the like and also because it allows you to compare tests from different companies. So if I tested on twenty three and me, and you John tested on ancestry dot com. Instead of one of us having to buy another kit and and spend to a tube. And wait the couple of weeks to get a results to compare each other. We could just take our data to jed match, and this was a.

John dean Cosker Lisa Jason. Hey Jason moon WNYC studios kidnapping New Hampshire murder California Jett Florida three decades
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Co production of the New Yorker and WNYC studios. Welcome to the New Yorker radio hour. I'm David Ramnik of all the reckonings to come out of the metoo movement. So far the case of the R&_B star are Kelly has been glaring omission for years. Allegations of abusive followed R Kelly for three decades and to be clear, it's not the story of a star just hooking up with a groupie Kelly has been accused of something like running cult women have said that they were kept in his home as prisoners abused physically and emotionally a sex tape emerged and was viewed around the country. And it seemed to show that Kelly was molesting a minor. He was tried in two thousand and eight and acquitted Kelly has denied everything and by and large his fans and everyone around him have stuck by him. That may finally be changing because of a six part documentary called surviving R Kelly which just aired on lifetime. A Georgia DA is now investigating Kelly and there were protests last week. It is record label covered on WNYC news. We are tired. We are tired of the news cycle moving on ignoring the gray testimony stories, and fights lack survivors, we we believe last survivors. We believe survivors. I believe the New Yorkers Jilani Cobb wrote this an expose typically indicts the character of its subject surviving R Kelly indicts public that knew of his character. And did nothing about it. A public that constructed an elaborate architecture of denial and has chosen to live in it. Gilani Cobb sat down to talk with dream Hampton, the documentaries producer just want to start with a basic question. Which is who is our Kelly. He is both a beloved songwriter and singer who I'm from Detroit. And he is someone who made music for black people in the midwest. Who do this thing called stepping who have loved R&_B, even as hip hop came and went maybe hypothesis still here. I don't know. But he's also a man who has had an open secret. And we've known this man is for a very long time in terms of him being a predator. You and I in the same age range. And so you were one of the first people in our generation that was really kind of carving a niche is a music journalist, and one of the notable things about it has been you're writing on specifically these questions of misogyny, and sexism, and the way that patriarchy is operatives in popular culture. And a wondered what were you thinking about when lifetime approach you, quite frankly, I'm not a real like, I like cooking shows and home I like home network, but I I don't watch Buta Murray. And I thought they were gonna do some silly reenactment thing. And when they told me that they were interested in a more serious approach something that they've never done before. I thought it was a time that I can redeem myself for a profile I had done of R Kelly in vibe magazine of two thousand where are just kind of wrote about his process. This was post his marriage to Eliya. But pre Jim dear God is writing about all of his predatory behavior. Lawsuits about him. I felt so wack about how that happens like my article coming out in November. And then Jim's reporting coming out in December that I never wrote another magazine profile on an artist again. He.

R Kelly Jilani Cobb WNYC WNYC studios Buta Murray David Ramnik Jim vibe magazine Georgia Detroit Eliya producer Hampton three decades
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Production of the New Yorker and WNYC studios. Welcome to the New Yorker radio hour. I'm David Ramnik of all the reckonings to come out of the metoo movement. So far the case of the R&_B star are Kelly has been a glaring omission for years allegations of abusive followed R Kelly for three decades and to be clear, it's not the story of the star just hooking up with a groupie Kelly has been accused of something like running a cult women have said that they were kept in his home as prisoners abused physically and emotionally a sex tape emerged and was viewed around the country. And it seemed to show that Kelly was molesting a minor. He was tried in two thousand and eight and acquitted Kelly has denied everything and by and large is fans and everyone around him have stuck by him that may finally be changing because of a six part documentary called surviving R Kelly which just aired on lifetime. The Georgia DA is now investigating Kelly and there were protests last week it his record label. Covered on WNYC news. We are tired other science. We are tired of the news cycle moving on the grave testimony stories, and fights lack survivors, we we we believe that survivors, we believe survivors. We. The New Yorkers Jilani. Cobb wrote this an expose typically indicts the character of its subject surviving R Kelly indicts public that knew of his character. And did nothing about it. A public that constructed an elaborate architecture of denial and has chosen to live in it Jilani. Cobb sat down to talk with dream Hampton, the documentaries producer just want to start with a basic question, which is who is our Kelly. He is both a beloved songwriter and singer who I'm from Detroit. And he is someone who made music for black people in the midwest. Who do this thing called stepping who have loved R&_B, even as hip hop came and went maybe hypothesis so here, I don't know. But he's also a man who has had an open secret. And we've known this man is for a very long time in terms of him being a predator. But in the same age range, and so you were one of the first people in our generation that was really kind of carving a niche is a music journalist, and one of the notable things about it has been you're writing on specifically these questions of misogyny, and sexism and the way that patriarchy operators in popular culture and a wondered what were you thinking about when lifetime approach to quite frankly, I'm not a real like, I like cooking shows and home, I like home network. But I don't watch Buta Murray. And I thought they were gonna do some silly reenactment thing. And when they told me that they were interested in a more serious approach something that they've never done before. I thought it was time that I can redeem myself for a profile I had done of R Kelly in vibe magazine of two thousand where are just kind of wrote about his process this post, his marriage to Eliya, but pre Jim dear God is writing about all of his predatory behavior and lawsuits about him. I felt so wack about how that happens like my article coming out in November. And then Jim's reporting coming out in December that I never wrote another magazine profile on an artist again. Buzzfeed.

R Kelly Jilani WNYC WNYC studios Cobb David Ramnik vibe magazine Buta Murray Jim Georgia Detroit Eliya producer Hampton three decades
"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Claudia rankings book citizen and American lyric was a New York Times bestseller and won many awards. She teaches at Yale and is also the founder of the racial imaginary institute, and she's published several collections of poetry and also plays. She joined me at the Cape playhouse at hunter college in New York City. We were there as part of the two thousand eighteen work at women's podcast festival. Learn New York City. Just before sorta want to say how fabulous it has to be here. And I've wanted to interview Claudia forever and just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we are together for it. And I wanna thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the. That time of your birth. You you put it in context. This way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of the sixteenth street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you're still in Jamaica those for seven years of her life, and I wonder. Did you know that that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states. I didn't know I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that that wasn't a surprise. So that when we came to the United States. My mother said. She had two things two things that she believed in any case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust people those were her to as a Jamaican coming to the United States in the nineteen sixties when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that brought a kind of flood from the Caribbean and previously must immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly. So so so whether or not she knew exactly that she knew it, and she communicated. Was was their religious background to your childhood. My mother's religious in any way, you can be religious. She goes to charity. She reads the bible as you quotes the bible. She invokes the bible. So we grew up with a real sense of going church, and I didn't always go because I didn't want my hair straightened. And if I wouldn't straighten my hair, she wasn't going to take me. So of course, what? Straightening of the hair. One of the things I remember about going to church growing up was dressing up for Easter exact couldn't is really not what we're supposed to be. Remembering. It became a kind of a moment to be public in all your beauty your sense of that. Yeah. You published citizen was two thousand fourteen right? It's funny. I thought it was more recent and to your point two thousand fourteen feels like about twenty five years ago. If feels it feels like a different world in my mind, one of the characteristics of the world of two thousand fourteen as opposed to now is that it was easier to pretend that we had made more progress than we have for some of us some not. Realities realities, and it was possible to not know or to not save that you could see that. It seems to me that one thing you were doing and citizen. You said your mother your mother, what does speak of American blacks in American whites. You have this clarity that there were different realities and experiences in that you were kind of laying out documenting giving voice to the cumulative imprint of those distinct realities and experiences. And it was an ordinary time in the subway outside your therapist's office on an airplane at lunch at a college or speaking at inner child school. In a real estate shying on and on and on. You write about this exhaustion of constantly..

Claudia United States sixteenth street Baptist churc Jamaica New York City WNYC WNYC studios founder American government Caribbean Cape playhouse Birmingham Melissa hunter college twenty five years eleven days seven years
"wnyc studios" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Winner of the national book Critics Circle award in poetry and the Penn Center USA poetry award. Claudia continues to push the boundaries of imagination. She's been awarded fellowships by the American Academy of American poets the National Endowment for the arts the Guggenheim foundations and five years ago. She was elected as chancellor, they kademi of American poets, and she happens to teach at Yale this. Fearless poet is a critical voice in discussions about race. She speaks to us powerfully through poetry, essays, lectures and short films seeking to understand American life in all its promise. Hope betrayals contradictions and fragility. Let's welcome Krista. And claudia. Two. Oh, New York City. Just before I started want to. I I just don't say how fabulous it is to be here. And I've wanted to interview. Claudia forever. Just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we all are together for it. And I wanna thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios and wanna say to you. I think we're going to focus especially on themes in citizen and the white card, but I did bring and I have those with me, and I have a couple of other books, and if you just feel inspired to read something you can. But Claudia just told me just just grab it. And but but Claudia just told me that she's working on a new book. And that that may and that kind of that that what's on your mind may be what those into this. And that's great too. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven so is correct. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the. You know that that that time of your birth? You put it in context this way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of the sixteenth street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you were still in Jamaica those for seven years of life, and I wonder did you know that circle that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states, I didn't know, I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that wasn't a surprise. So the when we came to United States. My mother said there's one thing that you must know. She had two things two things that she believed in it in case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust white people. Those were her to know as a Jamaican woman coming to the United States in the nineteen sixty s when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that that's brought a kind of flood from the Caribbean. N previously must immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly..

Claudia national book Critics Circle a United States Jamaica American Academy of American WNYC WNYC studios American government sixteenth street Baptist churc Penn Center USA chancellor New York City Caribbean Krista National Endowment Yale Melissa Birmingham eleven days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Winner of the national book Critics Circle award in poetry and the Penn Center USA poetry award. Claudia continues to push the boundaries of imagination. She's been awarded fellowships by the American Academy of American poets the National Endowment for the arts the Guggenheim foundations and five years ago. She was elected as chancellor at they kademi of American poets and she happens to teach at Yale. This. Fearless poet is a critical voice in discussions about race. She speaks to us powerfully through poetry, essays, lectures and short films seeking to understand American life in all its promise. Hope betrayals contradictions and fragility. Let's welcome Krista. And claudia. Two. New York City. Just before I started I want to I I just don't say how fabulous it is to be here. And I've wanted to interview Claudia forever and just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we all are together for it. And I want to thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios. And I want to say to you. I think we're going to focus especially on themes in citizen and the white card, but I did bring and I have those with me, and I have a couple of other books, and if you just feel inspired to read something you can. But Claudia just told me just just grab it. And but but Claudia just told me that she's working on a new book. And that that may and that kind of that that what's on your mind. Maybe it'd be what those into this. And that's great too. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven always, correct. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the. That that that time of your birth. You put it in context this way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of the sixteenth street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you were still in Jamaica those for seven years of her life, and I wonder did you know that that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states, I didn't know, I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that wasn't a surprise. So the when we came to United States. My mother said there's one thing that you must know. She had two things two things that she believed in it in case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust white people. Those were her to as a Jamaican woman coming to the United States in the nineteen sixties when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that that's brought a kind of flood from the Caribbean and previously must immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly..

Claudia national book Critics Circle a United States Jamaica American Academy of American WNYC WNYC studios American government sixteenth street Baptist churc Penn Center USA chancellor New York City Caribbean Krista National Endowment Yale Melissa Birmingham eleven days
"wnyc studios" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Cloudy rankings book citizen and American lyric was a New York Times bestseller and won many awards. She teaches at Yale and is also the founder of the racial imaginary institute, and she's published several collections of poetry and also plays. She joined me at the Cape playhouse at hunter college in New York City. We were there as part of the two thousand eighteen work it women's podcast festival. Hello, New York City. Just before I start I to. I just wanna say how fabulous it is to be here. And I've wanted to interview Claudia forever and just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we all are together for it. I want to thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven so always, correct. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the that time of your birth. You put it in context this way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of this extent street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you were still in Jamaica those for seven years of her life, and I wonder did you know that certain that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states, I didn't know, I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that wasn't a surprise. So the when we came to the United States. My mother said she had two things two things that she believed in any case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust white people. Those were her to you know, as a Jamaican woman coming to the United States in the nineteen sixties when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that brought a kind of flood from the. Caribbean and previously most immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly. So so so whether or not she knew exactly that she knew it, and she communicated. Was was their religious background to childhood my mother's religious in any way, you can be religious. She goes to charity. She reads the bible she quotes the bible. She invokes the bible. So we grew up with a real sense of going church, and I didn't always go because I didn't want my hair straightened. And if I wouldn't straighten my hair, she wasn't going to take me. So of course, but. There was no straightening of the hair. After one of the main things, I remember about going to church growing up was dressing up for Easter is really not what we're supposed to be remembering. It became a kind of a moment to be public in all your beauty your sense about is. Yeah. You published citizen was two thousand fourteen right? It's funny. I thought it was more recent and to your point two thousand fourteen feels like about twenty five years ago. If feels it feels like a different world, although in my mind, one of the characteristics of the world of two thousand fourteen as opposed to now is that it was easier to pretend that we had made more progress than we have for some of us for some of not. So they're realities and there were realities, and it was possible to not know or to to not say that you could see that. It seems to me that one thing you were doing and citizen. So, you know, you said your mother your mother would always speak of American blacks in American whites. She had this clarity that there were different realities and experiences in that you were kind of. Laying out documenting giving voice to the cumulative imprint of those distinct realities and experiences. And it was an ordinary time in the subway. Outsider therapist's office on an airplane at launch at a college or speaking at inner child school in a real estate showing like on and on and on. You write about this exhaustion of constantly. Not just having experienced but asking yourself like did he say that did I hear that?.

United States Claudia New York City Jamaica street Baptist church New York Times WNYC WNYC studios founder Cape playhouse American government Birmingham hunter college Melissa twenty five years eleven days seven years
"wnyc studios" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"wnyc studios" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Cloudy rankings book citizen and American lyric was a New York Times bestseller and won many awards. She teaches at Yale and is also the founder of the racial imaginary institute, and she's published several collections of poetry and also plays. She joined me at the Cape playhouse at hunter college in New York City. We were there as part of the two thousand eighteen work it women's podcast festival. Hello, New York City. Just before I start I to. I just wanna say how fabulous it is to be here. And I've wanted to interview Claudia forever and just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we all are together for it. I want to thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven so always, correct. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the that time of your birth. You put it in context this way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of this extent street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you were still in Jamaica those for seven years of her life, and I wonder did you know that certain that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states, I didn't know, I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that wasn't a surprise. So the when we came to the United States. My mother said she had two things two things that she believed in any case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust white people. Those were her to you know, as a Jamaican woman coming to the United States in the nineteen sixties when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that brought a kind of flood from the. Caribbean and previously most immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly. So so so whether or not she knew exactly that she knew it, and she communicated. Was was their religious background to childhood my mother's religious in any way, you can be religious. She goes to charity. She reads the bible she quotes the bible. She invokes the bible. So we grew up with a real sense of going church, and I didn't always go because I didn't want my hair straightened. And if I wouldn't straighten my hair, she wasn't going to take me. So of course, but. There was no straightening of the hair. After one of the main things, I remember about going to church growing up was dressing up for Easter is really not what we're supposed to be remembering. It became a kind of a moment to be public in all your beauty your sense about is. Yeah. You published citizen was two thousand fourteen right? It's funny. I thought it was more recent and to your point two thousand fourteen feels like about twenty five years ago. If feels it feels like a different world, although in my mind, one of the characteristics of the world of two thousand fourteen as opposed to now is that it was easier to pretend that we had made more progress than we have for some of us for some of not. So they're realities and there were realities, and it was possible to not know or to to not say that you could see that. It seems to me that one thing you were doing and citizen. So, you know, you said your mother your mother would always speak of American blacks in American whites. She had this clarity that there were different realities and experiences in that you were kind of. Laying out documenting giving voice to the cumulative imprint of those distinct realities and experiences. And it was an ordinary time in the subway. Outsider therapist's office on an airplane at launch at a college or speaking at inner child school in a real estate showing like on and on and on. You write about this exhaustion of constantly. Not just having experienced but asking yourself like did he say that did I hear that?.

United States Claudia New York City Jamaica street Baptist church New York Times WNYC WNYC studios founder Cape playhouse American government Birmingham hunter college Melissa twenty five years eleven days seven years
What is short wave? A rumored new audio app from Google.

podnews

01:39 min | 4 years ago

What is short wave? A rumored new audio app from Google.

"In the latest news what is short wave? It's a rumored new audio app from Google. Well, we still don't know for sure, but today we know what it looked like a while ago. It's a product space to on short pieces of snack. -able audio content. You'll find mockups on pod news dot net. Also some research which is more emotionally engaging audio books or films. Audible in Germany shed a study from University College London. You'll never believe the result, what he might turn a podcast network shows including brands like CNN Cartoon Network, and Bleacher report now available on Spotify PR x. also announced there quarter three, twenty eighteen preview inside jaws is profound by mandatory today. Meanwhile, Burgum stead revisited is the subject of a piece in the Irish Times pod Bain. Congratulations to them. They've been recognized with the first Latin podcast, global diversity award, Jovem pan the largest commercial radio network. Brazil jump shore of pronounced incorrectly has selected TRITON digital and Omni studio for podcast distribution and monetization and emails credited as the co, creator of the daily and caliphate is interviewed about how he got started in podcasting, and where can you go to discover new podcasts? Eric Jones has a great big list at the i. AB podcast upfront event in New York. Yesterday, there were lots and lots of announcements from Westwood One NPR mid row, wondering and WNYC studios who linked to all of those and a ton of new podcasts, including one from Jonathan Ross at pod news, dot net.

Cnn Cartoon Network New York Burgum Stead Google Wnyc Studios Eric Jones University College London The Irish Times Triton Digital Jonathan Ross Westwood Spotify Germany Brazil Omni
4% of cancers are attributed to alcohol

Fresh Air

01:21 min | 4 years ago

4% of cancers are attributed to alcohol

"Seems to be a lot of promotion and marketing of drinking to women and about four percents of all cancers to move beyond breast cancer about four percent of all cancers are attributable to alcohol and so so that's because many cancers are not easily preventable it's nice to know that there's something that's actually a preventable and if you removed alcohol you'd remove four percent of the cancer burden in the us for breast cancer i believe i saw figure sixteen percent of breast cancers attributed to present to tip drinking something to think about this we thank you both for taking time to be with us again rabin is a health reporter for the new york times and richard sates public health professor and chair of boston university's department of community health scientists in boston when we come back we if we haven't talked about bad news enough here's some bad news our annual week long celebration acephalous pieds is drawing close but it's not quite through so stay with us for a little celebration as our concluding celebration of steph hello pods will be right back after this spring am i oh this is science friday from wnyc studios support for a science friday comes from draper draper's team of engineers.

Rabin Reporter The New York Times Richard Sates Boston University Boston Wnyc Studios Draper Draper Professor And Chair Four Percent Sixteen Percent
YouTuber Allison Raskin launches fictional 'Gossip' podcast

podnews

01:54 min | 4 years ago

YouTuber Allison Raskin launches fictional 'Gossip' podcast

"The latest pod news gossip premiers on June fourteenth, subscribe now and Stitcher, apple podcasts or wherever you listen and remember, it's all fun and games until they're gossiping about you. Gossip is a new scripted podcast from Alison Raskin who's a comedian, author and YouTube, and it's launching today l. had an exclusive on the trailer. Raskin has seven hundred and fifty thousand YouTube. Subscribers and videos have been viewed more than one hundred and twenty million times.

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Wnyc Studios, Stephen Dubner and Argentina discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:12 min | 4 years ago

Wnyc Studios, Stephen Dubner and Argentina discussed on Freakonomics

"From wnyc studios this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen dubner every four years soccer teams from across the globe gather to compete for the sport's biggest trophy the world cup historically the americans have been brilliant winning three of the past seven world cups never finishing worse than third the american women that is the men's national team not so hot the us has never finished higher than eighth except for nineteen thirty the very first world cup when we finished third and this year as noted we failed to make the thirty two team field but don't worry the rest of the world the hardly notice the world cup is a staggering phenomenon the two thousand fourteen men's final germany beating argentina in brazil was watched by one billion people about ten times more than a super bowl the sport has been growing in the us among players and fans attendance at major league soccer games last year average twenty two thousand.

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Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Pickle

00:15 sec | 4 years ago

Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Wnyc Studios Curley
Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Pickle

00:15 sec | 4 years ago

Wnyc Studios and Curley discussed on Pickle

Wnyc Studios Curley