36 Burst results for "Wise"

Fresh update on "wise" discussed on HORSES IN THE MORNING

HORSES IN THE MORNING

01:37 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wise" discussed on HORSES IN THE MORNING

"Beautiful and wonderful Lisa wise voice. She is here hanging out for Glen today. Lisa, thank you so much for being on the show and co hosting with me. Oh, it's an honor. Thanks for having me. So you have no Internet at your house, so where the heck are you? I am at a community room that we're able to reserve on occasion and they have fabulous Internet. So it's very exciting. What is a community room? A lot of cities are little towns have a community room that groups and organizations and people can reserve just to use for meetings or other events or Internet use. So are these people here comes that lonely girl who talks to herself in the room for an hour? Because all these windows in the front, people are walking by, kind of looking at me. Like, oh, she's so lonely and there she rented the whole meeting room and nobody showed up. It's just me, I'm having a meeting with myself, so. Well, I want to talk about what's going on in your world, but first, let's get to our daily Winnie's. All right, well, we have to have a birthday Whitney, but guess what? There's no birthdays. So we're serious. I know. You know what? If you have a birthday and you're like, but it's my birthday. I would like for you to email. Usually I say send your complaints to Jennifer at horse radio network dot com. But this time send it to Glenn, because he's the birthday guy. And he didn't put your birthday in. So if you have one sorry, we'll get to it on Friday. But we do have a new auditor, Veronica Stanley. Thank you so much for becoming a part of the HR and family. And then also how exciting was Monday. I just kept going online and looking at all the people that kept donating money to an animal rescue for Betty White's birthday. Wasn't that amazing? It was so cool. I searched the hashtag that they had made for buddy's birthday. And it was so cool to see all this money being donated to all these animal charities. It was so fantastic. I heard that they're going to make that an annual event. I hope they do. I don't know who they are, but we will, by God, 'cause it'll pop up in my Facebook memories and I'll just redo it every single year. So I think it should be an annual thing. I think that's a fantastic idea. Yeah, she would have loved that. I actually reading all of the things and, you know, I'm a little emotional, especially when it comes to animals. I totally cried. Repeatedly, Chad came down from putting Lucas to bed and also messages and see how much money went donating in and I was like, and he's like, what's wrong? And I'm like, this is Betty White's birthday. It's like, what is wrong with you?.

Lisa Wise Veronica Stanley Glen Lisa Winnie Whitney Betty White Glenn Jennifer Buddy Facebook Chad Lucas
Biden Tries to Blame Misinformation for His Own COVID Failings

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:13 min | 5 d ago

Biden Tries to Blame Misinformation for His Own COVID Failings

"Biden is now underwater polling wise in his response and is handling of the Chinese foushee coronavirus. Biden gave a whole speech where he's just meandering. The whole time, but you know who the problem is he says he says the problem are people that are spreading misinformation or disinformation he calls it. He says, I want to make a special appeal to social media companies. And media outlets, please stop deal, the deal with misinformation. He's talking about our show. He's talking about the few of us that are willing to actually dive into a contrarian fact based narrative. When it comes to our entire society's handling of the pandemic. Play cut one O 9. If you haven't gotten vaccinated, do it. Personal choice impacts us all. Our hospitals, our countries, I make a special appeal of social media companies and media outlets. Please do it the misinformation and disinformation that's on your shows. It has

Biden
The Left Defends Sotomayor's COVID Misinformation

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:12 min | Last week

The Left Defends Sotomayor's COVID Misinformation

"This week, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor literally said on the bench of the Supreme Court, we've got a 100,000 children in hospitals with COVID, many of them on ventilators. And the whole world laughed at her because that's a lie. That's what they used to call COVID misinformation. I guess if you're a Supreme Court Justice, you can lie and get away with it. I guess if you're a radical wise Latina activist Supreme Court judge, you're allowed to say things like that. Where's her apology, by the way? We don't have a 100,000 kids in the hospital with COVID. We don't have kids on ventilators. The fraction of kids like 0.000001%. She lied. Do you know that the left is defending her? Here's cut 7. Listen to sunny hostin, one of the big mouths on ABC TV's the view defending Sonia Sotomayor's COVID misinformation. Well, first I just want to reframe this a little bit about justice Sotomayor because while she may not be accurate for current hospitalizations in children, she is correct that we have more children in the hospital now more than ever before. And it certainly reflects the current cases in children. Right now we have 82,843 children sick with COVID, more than a thousand children have died from the virus. And in addition, about 7.8 million children have caught COVID since the pandemic started. And so those are just the numbers. And so while fewer than 83,000 kids have been hospitalized with the virus, we have kids sick with COVID more than we ever have before. And so that's a real thing and those are real numbers. Can you believe that that woman makes probably 7 or 800,000? Maybe a $1 million a year to have a show on national TV and defend the

Covid Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor Sonia Sotomayor ABC
Jake Tapper Calls out Supreme Court Justice's Disinformation

The Larry Elder Show

01:05 min | Last week

Jake Tapper Calls out Supreme Court Justice's Disinformation

"About the assertion that justice Sonia Sotomayor made by the way I met the wise Latina comment because she gave a talk one time before she got confirmed and said that she believes a wise Latina would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't had her experiences. Not too racist. Here's what Jake tapper said about her assertion of 100,000 children seriously ill, many of whom are on ventilators. And Joan, I heard some assertions made by the Supreme Court Justices today that were simply false. One example, justice so to my said, quote, we have over 100,000 children, which we've never had before in serious condition and many on ventilators. That's just not true. There are fewer than 5000 miners hospitalized with COVID right now, seeing their on the right were showing the figures. Not a 100,000. And that includes minors who were admitted because of COVID and ones who tested positive, but had been hospitalized for other reasons. What do you make of this? Again, this is CNN, Jake tapper, as you well know. I'd love to use left wing sources in order to advance my position.

Sonia Sotomayor Jake Tapper Covid Joan Supreme Court CNN
Harvard Profresor Ruth Wisse on the Significance of Writer Saul Bellow

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:05 min | Last week

Harvard Profresor Ruth Wisse on the Significance of Writer Saul Bellow

"And I'm talking to Ruth wise, longtime Professor of literature at Harvard, now at the tikva fund, Ruth thanks for joining me. Let's talk a little bit about Saul Bellow. You knew it's all Bello. I never met Saul Bellow, but my longtime editor was his son Adam Bello, so I've gotten to know the father, so to speak through the sun. But you would agree what knew that Bella was one of the towering figures of literature in the 20th century. Do you agree with that and why? What is it that made him so important? Well, he's certainly important to me because he was my favorite writer long before I met him, that's partly because he comes from Montreal, which is where I grew up. So it was very homey. But it's also because of the kind of writer that he was, he came on the scene, I think, understanding that literature was enormously important. And I think that one of his insights was that the world was becoming more disjointed that the consciousness was being torn in a hundred directions. Well, if it was that way in his day, you can imagine how much more so it is in our day when there are so many things bombarding you. And so I think that one of the things that he felt was that the novel could really provide the most entire picture of what our human experience is through the prism of an individual. And in his writing, that individual is very often a kind of solve Bello. He doesn't choose he doesn't choose to write about a person who's different from himself, but rather some projection of himself, so that it's always a very erudite person, a good person, basically, but struggling with difficult

Saul Bellow Ruth Wise Tikva Fund Adam Bello Bello Ruth Harvard Bella Montreal
Sotomayor Falsely Claims 'Over 100,000 Children' Are in 'Serious Condition' Due to COVID

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:08 min | Last week

Sotomayor Falsely Claims 'Over 100,000 Children' Are in 'Serious Condition' Due to COVID

"Listen to good old wise Latina, Sonia show to my or spread one of the biggest loads of you know what I've ever heard about COVID included a giant heap of COVID mission. Counsel, those numbers show that all Macron is as deadly and causes as much serious disease in the unvaccinated as Delta did. The numbers look at the hospitalization rates that are going on. We have more affected people in the country today than we had a year ago in January. We have hospitals that are almost at full capacity with people is severely ill on ventilators. We have over a 100,000 children, which we've never had before in serious condition. And many on ventilators. Well, it turned out to be completely false. In fact, the CDC director herself Rochelle Walensky had to contradict the Supreme Court Justice,

Sonia Delta Rochelle Walensky CDC Supreme Court
The Disinformation Spread by Justice Sotomayor Is Extraordinary

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:11 min | Last week

The Disinformation Spread by Justice Sotomayor Is Extraordinary

"So justice Sotomayor is the only justice that's there not. It's not there in person. Jeez. She's not in person. She's remote asking questions because she says she's a diabetic and she might she's afraid of getting COVID. Now, I don't know what number she's coming up with. But here's a good rule for life. Arguments from authority need to be called out into question. So being on the U.S. Supreme Court, one would think you're aware, your wise, your smart and you are willing to look at things as they are. Justice Sotomayor in this back and forth has just set a 100,000 children are hospitalized with COVID and many are on ventilators. Now we twice this week have played the clip from Fauci that has said that's not true, okay? They come in with a broken leg or a broken hip. I want you to listen. These are people that interpret the law for you. What's legal? What isn't? Play cut 99, just a Sotomayor. Country today, then we had a year ago in January. We have hospitals that are almost at full capacity with people is severely ill on ventilators. We have over a 100,000 children, which we've never had before in serious condition. And many on ventilators. So saying it's a different variant, just underscores the fact that without without. Fauci even said that's total nonsense. I just want you to understand that is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court saying a 100,000 children are hospitalized with COVID. The power she has at her disposal and the disinformation she is spreading. It's

Sotomayor Fauci U.S. Supreme Court Covid
Mollie Hemingway: What to Remember on January 6th

Mark Levin

00:53 sec | Last week

Mollie Hemingway: What to Remember on January 6th

"Friend Molly Hemingway who wrote this fantastic book rigged Molly how are you Great great to be here with you Well Molly January 6th It's the day to remember what exactly Well I'm Christian So actually January 6th is a huge day for us to be Mark the epiphany when the wise men came to visit Jesus So it's been kind of funny to hear everybody talking about January 6th I'm like I just wanted people to Mark January 6th But yeah I think it's amazing to see how our establishment regime is exploiting one instance of political violence while hiding nearly every other instance of political violence that we've experienced in recent years in order to weaponize our systems against political opponents and I knew today would be bad I didn't expect that they would be quite so clownish and how they went

Molly Hemingway Molly Mark
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Will Be on 'Life, Liberty & Levin' This Weekend

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Will Be on 'Life, Liberty & Levin' This Weekend

"My special guest on Sunday and life liberty and live in for the entire hour will be the governor of Florida Ron DeSantis He's an old friend We go back to the days when he was a freshman member of the House of Representatives As you know I endorsed him for governor in Florida Came down in campaign for him And he's got a reelection coming up at some point So the same forces I had been discussing tonight of course despise him because he's been a incredibly effective and successful governor And he's demonstrated that conservatism works by constitutionalism works The capitalism works so much so The during his watch Florida has flipped from a Democrat state to a Republican state It's now the third largest state population wise And one of the key states that people are coming to when they escape New Jersey New York New England when they escape the dark blue states even California You'll notice those populations aren't growing at all Except through open borders and so forth

Ron Desantis Florida House Of Representatives New Jersey New England New York California
How Kathie Lee Gifford's Life Changed at Age 12

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

How Kathie Lee Gifford's Life Changed at Age 12

"A book called the Jesus I know. Honest conversations and diverse opinions about who he is. So just for folks who don't know your biography, so you said a 12. At 12. What happened in your life at 12? Growing up, see, when you say you grew up in a home where you're culturally Jewish, your mother's. Oh, but we celebrated Christmas. Okay. But that's what I'm saying to me. We were more cultural Christian. That's most but I was aware of my Jewish Eric. But what I'm saying is to me that's most of America. Yeah. That's sort of how I was raised. I grew up in the Greek Orthodox church, but we didn't walk around saying where Jesus people or what most people in America they're just trying to raise their kids. They don't hate God, but they might not know God personally. They might have a religion but not a relationship. Right. So what happens? Well, at age 12, there was a movie. It was the first Billy Graham movie that the his association put out. And it was about a young woman who was at the cusp of womanhood. She was 14. I think 15 something like that. And she was given a choice. She had a boyfriend that was sort of a bad boy. Or she could go and walk with the lord. And Billy, even at that time, got a lot of flack for even making a movie. You know, there was so much movies of the day. Sigma movies. Radio, when you can't dance, and you can't drink and you get all these things because and to his incredible credit. And I love the man. I loved him so dearly. He knew that the devil didn't own the airwaves. So he used radio. He knew that the devil didn't own the TV stations. He did his crusades on TV. He was so wise and he listened to the Holy Spirit. And the Holy Spirit said, make a movie for next generation. It was called the restless ones. At the end of it, there was an altar call. Now wait. How did you as a 12 year old secular Jewish girl, how did you end up going to this movie? About three months earlier, I'd come home from something it was dark out and I was at the front door and I was ready to walk in. When I looked over to the left and I could see into my living room and my sister and my mother were on their knees in front of the television crying. And I thought the president had died or something like that. Uh oh. I walked in. No, they were watching a Billy Graham crusade. They had both just given their hearts to Jesus.

Greek Orthodox Church America Billy Graham Eric Billy
Dennis Prager: 'For Most People, College Makes You Stupid'

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Dennis Prager: 'For Most People, College Makes You Stupid'

"I say this with no exaggeration, no humor for most people, college makes you stupid and graduate school makes you a fool. It's not always true. There are people. Let's put it this way. Nobody is wise because of college. You can be wise if you went to college because you have somehow not let it affect you. Like hillsdale. That's incredibly rare. Yes. You're talking to the right person about college. I know that. You are a perfect example. You are the poster boy. For how much wisdom you can gain not going to college.

Hillsdale
How Democrats Can Still Deliver Some of BBB's Presents

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:47 min | 3 weeks ago

How Democrats Can Still Deliver Some of BBB's Presents

"News. Jake, good morning tries on the special report last night with Bret baier. And I made the comment that the Democrats are not gone through the 5 stages of grief yet, which are anger, denial, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. They're not even a depression yet. They're not accepting that Joe Manchin rides the wind as does Kirsten sinema. When are they going to get there? Well, it's interesting. I'm just reading some of the news this morning because as you note, we are dark this week. So I was able to sleep a little bit later than usual. David axelrod wrote an op-ed today in the New York Times saying this. It's through a retooled BBB Biden can achieve significant durable durable progress on some priorities that will benefit children and families for generations, and Democrats would be wise to celebrate and tout those games instead of complaining about what wasn't possible. That's really interesting to me. And I think a lot of Democrats are going to have to get to that place because if you could get Joe Manchin isn't suggesting as you know kind of in your opening, what you just said, and they're able to get something, which Joe Manchin is again, he is willing to do a deal. Democrats should be able to tout that and should be able to have a celebrate that. Just because they couldn't get exactly what they wanted. And yes, I understand the frustration that one senator controlled the democratic agenda. I get that. It is frustrating. But that is Congress. And that is a 50 50 Senate. And if it wasn't, so that's kind of what I think that's a very smart point by axelrod. And I think axelrod has experienced here that would be useful.

Joe Manchin Kirsten Sinema Bret Baier Ed Today Depression Jake David Axelrod Biden The New York Times Axelrod Congress Senate
Election Integrity and the Courts

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | Last month

Election Integrity and the Courts

"Good day, Charlie. Hello. I agree with you completely that voting is the top priority for the Democrats. They want federal elections so they can stay in power and have a one party system forever. They know that if they don't have this, they could lose a lot of elections over the years. I thought this was interesting. They fought hard for HR one, but it ended too easily, which I also found interesting. Why did they not push harder on it? They just let it go because it just makes sense to come back to it when people aren't paying attention. Very, very wise. It is a smoke and mirrors game if you think of it. Now my question to you is this the U.S. Constitution says the states oversee the handling of elections and electors. Say this gets passed. Can't the courts take it down since it goes against the constitution. Theoretically yes, but the courts have ruled unpredictably on issues especially recently. The courts need to be the absolute worst case scenario and even then you know you're rolling the dice of something gets in front of the courts. If we, if we go all in on just a court driven strategy, the more fooling ourselves as if we actually wanted a feat bad legislation and put good legislation. And one of the best examples of this and many of you remember, was John Roberts and his betrayal on ObamaCare. ObamaCare was basically dead on arrival ObamaCare was unlife support. Under the Obama regime, ObamaCare was not going to be ruled constitutional. Until John Roberts, in a very surprising turn of events and development out of nowhere said, you know what? Actually, it's a tax.

Charlie U.S. John Roberts Barack Obama
Democrats Lobby Manchin on Budget Deal

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:45 min | Last month

Democrats Lobby Manchin on Budget Deal

"News of the day is Joe Manchin. Joe Manchin got caught by maru rajah going to the car yesterday with Raphael warnick at his side and got asked about Bill back better. Here's what he said. No, no. In general, there's still hot talk. What do you mean you wouldn't say that when the president's not moving closer towards you? No, no, I don't think I'm asking anybody to move. I want people to understand. Where I am. And I think that that's worth getting about more of an understanding. Which is where? Where are you? Hey, you enjoyed it. I want to know how you would answer something like that. Are you anywhere to the point where you can devote yes on proceeding? I gotta check my pastor here. I can't. I can't get in negotiations like this right here. That means that means we're getting ready pass. I knew my pastor was wise. Are you anywhere? They seem to think that they can change the rules and pass voting rights along straight party lines. Do you feel that way? My discussions are good with bipartisan Republicans Democrats. The rules change should be done to where we all have input in this rule chain because we're going to live with them. Because we're going to be in the minority sometime. They're the majority back and forth. I think that's let me translate Joe Manchin for you. He likes where I fail warning. He's no dummy. He's been elected since 1982 in West Virginia. Right, Joe Manchin has been winning elections since 1982. So he got Raphael Warnock walking with him. I got to ask my pastor, it's funny funny funny. It uses up 30 seconds of the walk. He doesn't commit to anything. He's not buying Bill battery. He's not going to get a voting rights change through. Joe Manchin, God love you. Everyone pray for

Joe Manchin Maru Rajah Raphael Warnick Bill Raphael Warnock West Virginia
Dads Are Important Too

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | Last month

Dads Are Important Too

"My wife and my daughter left this week and they had to do something work wise So I couldn't go with them but they went up to Orlando There's one of the hotels up in Orlando put together this winter thing It's really amazing And it just was packed but my wife likes to go every year and bring my daughter I have a 9 year old Amelia Who I love obviously she's my daughter So Sunday my wife is headed back and I was busy trying to get the Monday show ready And she sends me a text and I look on the phone She's like look what I found in Amelia's suitcase Keep in mind she's 9 And she sends me a picture and a picture was of a picture I had taken with my youngest daughter like three years ago when she was like 6 or 7 at one of those daddy daughter dances So my youngest daughter had taken the picture and packed it with her because I wasn't going to be there and I got to tell you man it was like one of the most emotional moments of my life I know it seems sorry still got a little bit of lung thing going from whenever I get emotional I think cough after the rona Come out of the remnants one of the gifts that leaves you But I was really touched And it got me thinking that you know how important you know daddy's art of their daughters It's just not the same I mean listen we love moms You know raised by single mom Work obviously women and all the jobs I'm at and it's great You know more power great women power great through it Knock yourself out I love it It's not a knock on motherhood my mother was great It's just you know dad's very important too

Orlando Amelia
 Heavy rains in southern Indian state kill 17, dozens missing

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Heavy rains in southern Indian state kill 17, dozens missing

"Every dozen people have died and dozens more are missing due to heavy rains in southern India the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh has been hit by intense comments the several days sparking massive floods the death toll rose up to several people were killed when a building collapsed a dozen people died this heavy floods washed away the bus they were on such a rescue methods the missing passengers continued but officials warned that the state's death toll will most likely get wise reaches in dams and tanks of course the the flooding in competitive districts leaving hundreds of villages moons and many residents rains in southern India and this time when the sun usual well that the country has seen a prolonged monsoon this year experts

Andhra Pradesh India
Rittenhouse Trial: Everything You Need to Know With Jack Posobiec

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Rittenhouse Trial: Everything You Need to Know With Jack Posobiec

"You what Jack pasovic from human events daily human events dot com with in partnership with turning point USA TPU USA dot com. Was beyond the head of the curve. He started the curve Jack on his Twitter and his telegram was saying we are two weeks out from the rittenhouse trial. One week out from the rittenhouse trial. He's been on top of it the entire time and he joins us now, Jack. His good friend and a great American and he is smart, and he's on top of the ball. Jack, can you hear me? Yeah, I can hear you just fine, Charlie, and I appreciate you actually picking up on that. I can tell, wow, it's like Charlie is actually following this because this was something that a lot of people have been sleeping on the fact that this case was coming up, it was getting closer. It was getting closer. Of course, news of the day is something that always is going to take precedence. But I knew that this case would be a seminal moment in American politics and American culture here in the 21st century for a variety of reasons. So thank you. I appreciate you following the coverage like that. Well, it is well earned and well deserved. You know, you're doing great work. You hit home run after home run and you've been on top of so many different things. And if I could keep you the whole hour, I'm going to because I got a lot of want to ask you and ask you about Bannon and I want to ask you about all sorts of stuff. Yeah, we actually can we're good time wise. I can do that. All right, so let's start with Kyle, though. Just kind of recap yesterday for some people watching and then also where are we at right now? Juries deliberating, what's the feel on the ground? What's going on Jack? Quite literally, the jury is out, right? The jury has gone out, so we've got the composition has been reported by the Kenosha news of the jury to keep in mind that we've been able to watch a lot of this trial based on the live stream, but the one aspect that you couldn't see on any of these live streams was the jury. Now I had the ability to talk to a source who was in the room for the entire trial, this past weekend. And he told me that it seemed as though the jury seemed to be maybe not necessarily in Kyle's favor, but they seemed to have gotten a bad impression by the actions and the condescension and the tone from these prosecutors. It really seemed like the prosecutors had turned it into a personal vendetta rather than a finding of truth or a finding of justice in the community. It seemed like it had become very politicized. And it seems as though the jury was not interested in that that it kind of turned them

Rittenhouse Jack Pasovic Jack Charlie Bannon Twitter Kyle Kenosha
The Dinkins Effect Kicks in With the Biden-Harris Administration

The Dan Bongino Show

03:31 min | 2 months ago

The Dinkins Effect Kicks in With the Biden-Harris Administration

"David dinkins for those of you who don't remember the dinkins effect is this and it's kicking in right now with the Biden Harris administration He was the first black mayor of New York City He was a Democrat Eric Adams who's the mayor elect now about to take over for de Blasio is the Democrat as well Is going to be the second black mayor of New York City Again I don't give a damn about their skin color but the left is obsessed with it And is a part of the story The left media in New York He left this media which is basically all of the New York media There was radical left as you'll get They were obsessed with this story about dinkins being the first black man I mean it never stop It was like they didn't want to talk about it It was like dinkins was some caricature of a human being they wanted to be It was all about race so if they never want to talk about who think kids was what he wanted to do it was all about this historic but it just went on and on and he was lionized David dinkins Now again his skin color doesn't matter to conservatives but liberals are obsessed with it Everything to them is skin color The problem we think is was he was just terrible He was just a really awful mayor He was really genuinely bad Crime went through the roof The city economy tanked We had the bond market ready to leave Wall Street head over to London It was a disaster It was a mess This I don't think I can describe to you and paint a picture An awful enough terms How bad the city was during the David dinkins era It was so bad he managed to lose to a Republican many of you know Rudolph Giuliani To have a Republican when the mayorship of New York City which was like 8 to one Democrat the Republican Was an earthquake like we'd never seen before But when you saw and you lived the city and lived in the city Folks it was awful It was in a matter of if your car was going to be stolen Forget about broken into 8 cars were just stolen all the time It was like you came outside and you were actually stunned your car was still there You were like oh my gosh 7 days in a row I still got my car This is crazy It was that bad If you walk down the streets in the 7 5 precinct the three two you know certain areas and even in Staten Island It wasn't if you were gonna be mug that was gonna be like am I gonna lose one tooth or 7 Like am I gonna take a beating on this one or you just give up your wallet We need a matter of fact when you got mugged at the bus stop and people used to steal anything from you Money they'd steal like I used to buy wise potato chips Some guy combined ripped the bag out of your hand like that's just the way it was You didn't even file a police report It was just like expected Hey what happened at a Dan Hey mom my mom's name is Judy Hey Jude I didn't call it Jude I called her mom Hey Jude Yeah I came home They stole my wise potato chips in ten bucks Oh that's it Oh great awesome Only ten bucks today That's how bad the city was How does this relate to Harris Biden Because despite the fact that David dinkins became a God to the left being the first black mayor of New York City Folks things got so bad And turned around so quickly when Giuliani got an office that even the left wing media had to eventually say to themselves it's not because they wanted to do the right thing It's because they wanted to save the liberal movement and the Democrat party They eventually had to acknowledge that dinkins was just

David Dinkins Dinkins Biden Harris Administration Eric Adams De Blasio New York City New York Rudolph Giuliani Earthquake Judy Hey Jude London Staten Island Harris Biden Hey Jude Jude Giuliani Democrat Party
Sen. Rand Paul Blasts Fauci Over 'Gain-of-Function' Research, Calls on Him to Resign

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | 2 months ago

Sen. Rand Paul Blasts Fauci Over 'Gain-of-Function' Research, Calls on Him to Resign

"So Rand Paul has been in my opinion. The best senator to cross examine foushee. He has been clear, confident, wise, courageous, we're going to play cut one O 7 here. Where Rand Paul who's actually a medical doctor puts Fauci on the ropes. Play cut one O 7. Putting to the framework and guidelines. So what you're doing is defining away gain of function. You're simply saying it doesn't exist because you change the definition on the NIH website. This is terrible and you're completely trying to escape the idea that we should do something about trying to prevent a pandemic from leaking from a lab. There's the preponderance of evidence now points towards this coming from the lab and what you've done is changed the definition on your website to try to cover your ass basically. That's what you've done. You've changed the website to try to have a new definition that doesn't include the risky research that's going on until you admit that it's risky. We're not going to get anywhere. You have to admit that this research was risky, the NIH is now rebuked them. Your own agency has rebuked them. But that thing is, is you're still unwilling to admit that they gained a function when they say they became sicker. They gained in lethality. It's a new virus. That's not gain of function. According to the definition that is currently operable. You know, senator let's make it clear for the people who are listening. The current definition was done over two to three year period by outside bodies, including the NSA, BB, two conferences by the national academy of science engineering and medicine on December 2014. Now let's I want the whole clip because there's another part where he asks him to resign, but we can get to that. So Rand is focusing on Fauci, saying that you're changing the definition of the facts, you change the definition of gain of function research. You've changed the definition of the vaccine. This is one of the only tricks they know. Let's play cut 78 Rand Paul's very clearly. It's time for you to resign. Play cut 78. To try to define a way what's going on in Wuhan until you accept it until you expect responsibility. We're not going to get anywhere close to trying to prevent another lab league of this dangerous sort of experiment. You won't admit that it's dangerous. And for that lack of judgment, I think it's time that you

Rand Paul Foushee Fauci NIH National Academy Of Science En NSA Rand Wuhan
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

02:57 min | 3 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Sort <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> look connection <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the internet <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <Silence> <Advertisement> internet. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I think <Speech_Male> that's what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i have to <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> say <Speech_Female> about that. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Male> and resisting <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> urge <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> exhaust <Silence> oneself <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> in this <Speech_Male> disorder of greater <Speech_Male> striving. <Silence> I'm <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> i've tried to actively <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in <SpeakerChange> locally <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in mentally <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> resisted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> resist <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <Silence> wearing yourself <Speech_Male> out <SpeakerChange> for <Silence> the world. <Speech_Male> It's hard <Speech_Male> i mean. I'm constantly <Speech_Male> trying <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> please many <Silence> different <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> attributes of <Speech_Male> my life like you know you're <Speech_Male> trying to earn <Speech_Male> more money. You're trying <Speech_Male> to get more <Speech_Male> exhibitions. You're <Speech_Male> trying to have more sales. <Speech_Male> You're always <Speech_Male> striving <Speech_Male> for something better and <Speech_Male> it's it's a struggle <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> on the good days <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> save that energy for <Speech_Male> your loved ones <Silence> indeed <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> ask them to screw the cap <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and as if <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this can't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> all the <Silence> <Advertisement> way down <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> if <Speech_Male> there's nothing <SpeakerChange> that we <Silence> got from this <Speech_Male> lovely <Speech_Male> thank you very <Speech_Male> much. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That's all. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I hope you have learned <Speech_Male> and enjoyed <Speech_Male> as much of this <Speech_Male> podcast as i <Silence> have in producing it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've learned so many <Speech_Male> things that i've done wrong <Speech_Male> in my career <Speech_Male> and so many things <Speech_Male> that i need to do <Speech_Male> better or <Speech_Male> more efficiently <Speech_Male> in the future. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> hope this podcast is inspired <Speech_Male> and assisted <Speech_Male> you in becoming <Speech_Male> more successful <Speech_Male> in your own creative <Silence> endeavors. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you like the <Speech_Male> podcast we would <Speech_Male> appreciate a five star <Speech_Male> rating and a nice <Speech_Male> comment would be greatly <Speech_Male> appreciated. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> would also like to thank <Speech_Male> nebulous <Speech_Male> nineteen sixty <Speech_Male> six for their <Speech_Male> five star rating <Silence> and comment. <Speech_Male> Please <Speech_Male> tell your friends to listen <Speech_Male> and subscribe. Also <Speech_Male> you can subscribe <Speech_Male> on apple. <Speech_Male> Podcast spotify <Speech_Male> or wherever <Speech_Male> you get your podcasts. <Silence> <Speech_Male> We are produced <Speech_Male> by fifty fourteen. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The audio was edited <Speech_Male> yaacob czerny <Speech_Male> and the music <Speech_Male> was created <Speech_Male> by my friend. <Silence> Pete bibey <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> thanks pete. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> The wise fool <Speech_Male> is supported in <Speech_Male> part by an e <Speech_Male> a grant <Speech_Male> from iceland liechtenstein <Speech_Male> and norway <Speech_Male> in an effort <Speech_Male> to work together for <Speech_Male> a green competitive <Speech_Male> and inclusive <Speech_Male> europe. <Speech_Male> We would also like <Speech_Male> to thank our partners hunt <Speech_Male> kastner in <Speech_Male> project republic <Speech_Male> and kunst <Speech_Male> santoni <Speech_Male> not gay <Speech_Male> in norway <Speech_Male> links <Speech_Male> to ea grants <Speech_Male> in our partner. Organizations <Speech_Male> are available <Speech_Male> in the show notes <Speech_Male> or on our website. <Speech_Male> Wise <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fool <SpeakerChange> pod <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com.

Pete bibey apple iceland europe norway
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

03:45 min | 3 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Things sharing <Speech_Music_Female> vulnerabilities <Speech_Music_Male> in failures. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> sometimes it's really <Speech_Music_Female> not the right person <Speech_Female> and the right so it's <Silence> also <SpeakerChange> about <Speech_Female> different <Speech_Male> encounters <Speech_Male> with people. <Speech_Music_Female> And how <Speech_Female> how they go <Speech_Female> who they are. <Speech_Female> We are what is <Speech_Female> happening. Disconnection <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> with another person <Speech_Male> get. Don't get me wrong. <Speech_Male> I'm waiting until <Speech_Male> there's actually <Speech_Male> a need to <Speech_Male> sell <SpeakerChange> to this glady <Speech_Male> so like when i actually <Speech_Male> have a real <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> call tears <Speech_Male> caller <Speech_Male> okay. Yeah <Speech_Male> things are shitty now. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He's now <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> holding <Speech_Male> that trump card <Speech_Male> hunt. Yeah <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> all right. So let's <Speech_Male> wrap this up <Speech_Male> any any <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> sort of advice <Speech_Male> because you're also <Speech_Male> a teacher says <Speech_Male> something that you think <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> next generation <Speech_Male> is not <Speech_Male> thinking about enough <Speech_Male> or something from your <Speech_Male> own career that <Speech_Male> you're like oh boy <Speech_Male> stay away from <Speech_Male> this thing because i fucked <Speech_Male> this thing <SpeakerChange> up. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> think i can't <Speech_Female> advise them. <Speech_Female> To be honest. <Silence> I can <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> give a lot <Speech_Male> of information <Speech_Male> and wisdom <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> look at the work <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Opinion but <Speech_Female> in some <Speech_Female> ways <Speech_Music_Female> they're feeling <Speech_Male> the world they were born <Speech_Female> into <SpeakerChange> better than <Speech_Female> me. They're <Speech_Female> doing things differently <Speech_Female> than <SpeakerChange> may <Speech_Female> and they're doing <Speech_Male> great things <Speech_Male> using the tools <Silence> that they have <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> the only advise <SpeakerChange> would <Speech_Male> be very general. <Speech_Music_Male> Just be persistent <Speech_Music_Male> people. Working <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> keep on creating. <Speech_Female> Keep <SpeakerChange> yourself motivated <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> also. <Speech_Female> Sometimes the <Speech_Female> advice <SpeakerChange> that still <Speech_Female> is true. Is that <Speech_Music_Female> not only <Speech_Female> insisting on artist <Speech_Female> is <SpeakerChange> definitely <Speech_Female> what's right for <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> you can <Speech_Female> become <Speech_Female> tura curator <Speech_Male> or a social <Speech_Female> worker <SpeakerChange> or <Speech_Male> life <Speech_Female> is is <Speech_Music_Male> big and it's <Speech_Music_Male> full of <Speech_Male> ways to grow <Speech_Male> and develop and <Speech_Female> this is true for <Speech_Female> if you're ninety <Speech_Female> five <Speech_Female> or twenty one <Speech_Female> but how to work <Speech_Female> in today's world <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> made it. They <Speech_Male> should advise me <Speech_Male> a man. <Speech_Male> I sort of feel that <Speech_Male> too. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> all right <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> thank you very <Speech_Female> much. Thank <Speech_Female> you so much matthew. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> for hosting <Speech_Female> in writing <Speech_Female> me for this <Speech_Female> honest conversation. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Female> love the wise <Speech_Male> fool. <Speech_Female> Rehab sound foolishness <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> in some wisdom. <Speech_Male> I hope to. <Speech_Male> I love that. You <Speech_Male> figured out how we <Speech_Male> got the title. S- good <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> ha. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> My dad used <Speech_Male> to always tell me. I was <Speech_Male> a sophomore <Speech_Male> and which translates <Speech_Male> from latin <Speech_Male> to to wise <Speech_Male> fool so <Speech_Male> i'm being <Speech_Male> sophomoric or <Speech_Male> to a sophomore <Speech_Female> a wise fool <Speech_Female> leo <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> wise <Speech_Male> enfold <Speech_Male> absolutely <Speech_Male> why titled the <Speech_Male> that and that's that's <Speech_Male> what i <SpeakerChange> am every <Speech_Male> day. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I know it's <Speech_Male> a sad forget <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right. <SpeakerChange> And <Speech_Music_Male> that's it. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I hope you're <Speech_Male> enjoying and learning <Speech_Male> from the podcast. <Speech_Male> As as i <Speech_Male> am. I've <Speech_Male> learned about many things. <Speech_Male> I did wrong in my <Speech_Male> career and many <Speech_Male> things. I need to put <Speech_Male> more effort into <Speech_Male> in the future. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I hope this podcast <Speech_Male> is inspired <Speech_Male> and assisted you <Speech_Male> in being more successful <Speech_Male> in your creative <Speech_Male> endeavors. <Speech_Male> If you liked <Speech_Male> the podcast we would <Speech_Male> appreciate a five <Speech_Male> star rating and a nice <Speech_Male> comment would be <Speech_Male> greatly appreciated. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I would like to thank <Speech_Male> conceptual <Speech_Male> citizen <Speech_Male> for their five <Speech_Male> star rating. <Speech_Male> Please tell <Speech_Male> your friends to listen and <Speech_Male> subscribe. Also <Speech_Male> you can subscribe <Speech_Male> on apple podcasts. <Speech_Male> Spotify <Speech_Male> or wherever you get <Silence> your podcasts. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> are produced by fifty <Speech_Male> fourteen. <Speech_Male> The audio was <Speech_Male> edited by yakub <Speech_Male> czerny and <Speech_Male> the music was created <Speech_Male> by <SpeakerChange> pete by <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male>

matthew apple
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

04:00 min | 4 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"To like train the martin to try to because this was on so it rained for a week and it had never arranged so much here before it was just pouring for we. It's a lot. I mean i'm looking at it. It looks like what four entire city blocks covered. Yeah it's shoots. It was shoots and i live also in an area. It's this much like came beside my house and like the field down below. My house with was just four of smuts Bake rocks and it took half a year to remove the charlotte tried to put it back to us. Normal less can be but it's still kind of unsolved because we don't know what's going to happen. Is it gonna rain. That's next winter what's you know. They're they kind of have to give it like a year or two to see like. Is this the new normal. Before we rebuild they're not gonna repelled where the houses left when you're not gonna be based so they have to kind of rethink the structure of the talents. Yeah right are there any topics that you wanna talk about that. I didn't ask you about that. i can't think off. I think we kind of went older. Everything okay yeah. But then my last question that i generally ask. Everybody is some advice for the next generation. I'm your own experiences. You know things basically the ideas like things you you knew when you were twenty that you now know and you're like of course that was true. Why did i believe that. Or no it when i was i was very chai and kind of insecure about what i was doing and i would definitely say. Don't be just do it. You know the altar generation doesn't know everything you know everybody's just figuring everything outs and everybody's allowed to experiment into stuff. Be creative and work. Lovely all right ed. Thank you very much kill. I hope you enjoyed this conversation. I enjoy asking stupid questions to smart people. And i've learned so many different things about what i've done wrong and what i can do better in my career and i hope that this podcast is inspired assisted you and becoming more successful in your creative endeavors. If you like the podcast we would appreciate a five star rating. Maybe a nice comment would be greatly appreciated. I would like to thank todd. F f for writing a review and giving us a five star rating. Thank utah f f. Please tell your friends to listen and subscribe. Also you can subscribe on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. We are produced by fifty. Fourteen audio was edited by yakub czerny and the music was created by pete by. Thanks pete. The wise fool is supported in part by an e grant from iceland liechtenstein and norway in an effort to work together for a green competitive and inclusive europe. We would also like to thank our partners hunt. Costner in prague czech republic and kunst centered anna in orga in norway links to ea grants and our partner. Organizations are available in the show notes where you can find more information about the podcast on instagram. At the wise fool pod or our website. Wise fool pod dot com.

martin charlotte yakub czerny pete Spotify todd utah norway liechtenstein apple iceland Costner kunst prague czech republic europe instagram
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

02:40 min | 5 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"At all. Yeah definitely all right. Well thank you so much. This awesome awesome. I've had a blast to sorry for talking about credit cards too much. Thank you worry about if you want. No no no. I really wish more people would would be aware of the problems that arise with like creative people who end up with financial problems like no. No i'm all for it. I tell you to the whole not having this one really important thing that she's got to add this one important thing about being a really bad off entire verse to not having money for a long time. One great thing is it forced me to focus on what's happening inside my body stimulation wise. Because i wasn't able to just really go gallivant around a lot. Like i wish. I could live in different places all and move around a whole lot but at the same time by staying so living in abject poverty it really forced me to focus on my own body as source of stimulation and so that's really been a big major factor in it and allowing me to go as far as i have and there's still so much more that people can do with their bodies to i think of so many different things have a big long list than i hope. I can get him down one day experiments. I want to do since just different. Sensory experiments withdrawing the possibilities is wide. Open i look forward to seeing them. Cohen thank you. You are most welcome and have a great evening. I hope you're enjoying and learning from the podcast as much as i am. I've learned about many things. I did wrong in my career and many things. I need to put more effort into in the future. I hope this podcast is inspired and assisted you in being more successful in your creative endeavors. If you like the podcast we would appreciate a five star rating and a nice comment would be greatly appreciated. I would like to thank conceptual citizen for their five star rating. Please tell your friends to listen and subscribe. Also you can subscribe on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. We are produced by fifty fourteen. The audio was edited by yaqoob czerny and the music was created by pete by.

Cohen Spotify apple yaqoob czerny pete
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

05:19 min | 6 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"It's all a cult personality. I mean it. I admire these people who do it really. Well i admire the jeff koons damien. Hirst's the bank sees all these people do but it's it's really hard because part of it is. I'm a bit of an art snob. You know like mike. My life goal is like i want to be part of the art canon. And like i want to be remembered for being a great whatever this year but sometimes you sit back and you're like fuck i just wanna make money. We think the The establishment is such. Doesn't let me why was going to ask about that. They the critics who stopped me because devaluing all the on campus. You know can do quite easily could do off soon. up this ammo. He's devaluing muggy goni. You know and i've had this conversation with professor. But he never made any money in his life he died stopping and that is funeral his paintings with changing hands for more money than it ever is last time. Well not only that. But you're not devaluing medically onny devaluing the collections of some very rich people. Who own madani. So had you in no way affected madonna. He's passed away and you know his story. His wife he was seventy is wife was twenty one nine months pregnant as she jumped out the window. Things within foyer algebra's death. But i like run when they wanna relatives they wanna be. That's very selfish to jump out the window. Nine months pregnant and the relative explained should be installed in for week for week does not why she could take care of the baby. She didn't say any future. Which is now the paintings. Even her paintings make thousands of thousands modality routinely might between five ten million up to fifty million in beneficial penny. They lived in squalor so the diesel topsy tabby Critics and they've done a lot me and were great so we know where we stand with the cure. If critics don't like you and stuff but you do sell you sell a lot from what i gather so but like who buys these kind of trying to still trying to find. The right word is not like forgeries. It's in the in the what's the word you use in the after us after the forties who who like what kind of people buy them and like. Why do they buy one of my best sellers in the galleries is larry..

jeff koons damien madani Hirst mike madonna larry
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

03:05 min | 6 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Triggers the more creativity and other solutions than maybe the most obvious. Sometimes well actually. Not sometimes. Most times i feel like the first initial idea i have is a great starting point but it's rarely the ending point..

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

08:01 min | 6 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Pretty dated at this point but yes super fascinating to pick it up again. Yeah look so. That was distant example of like a story and then starting from the y. And taking it from there. I guess one thing that i always wonder about when it comes to curator's and stuff. Okay so i guess. I don't really know a lot about you. I know you've now for fifty minutes. So the d you work at an institution and only curate there or do you do sort of freelance stuff. So what's the amount of curated and style of curiosity you do. I don't have time. maybe if i didn't have the guy and the region association and the last weekend and i would maybe have some spare time to do some freelance creating but unfortunately i don't so i wear much enjoy doing lots but i- solely do it now for mice dope for the norwegian sculpture association. Exactly okay great. I'm just trying. I've got tabs open. I'm trying to make sure i'm talking about the right place. Ingrates thank you. I tried to look professional. So the the question i always wonder about when it comes to curate stuff is how much of the pedantic stupid shit that we all want to think. He's not important is important. So what i mean by that is footfall like are you sitting there going okay. I want curate this exhibition but we need to be sure to get a big name in order to get more people through the door or we need to have a diversity of genders or diversity of ethnicities or regions. Whatever in order to attract the most people like to have grants that you have to answer to. As far as like the range of people you know gender by age by by nationalities kinds of things like that you have to answer to or is it pretty much just like we can do whatever project we want. That's a good question. I think that you or at least. I can only answer for since i haven't worked for twenty thirty years as a curator. I'm sure i have a lot to learn. And that being said i my experience until now has sort of taught me that one has to look around. Look at what's the local area around like. The context is again quite important. And so you have to see what is around you an connected to that. It's again this little bit about the y you know say sort of connected to that again. So yes i guess you could do. Of course everything you want to do. Big names small names but you do have to sort of look at the situation at the way rather than where i work at the moment. It's not in the city centre. It's his old villa from the eighteenth century. That's not really gallery is not white cube. It's actual villa returned certain spaces of that into sort of gallery spaces but they're not really white cubes and we have the mo- griffey tuesday. That in english demographics demographics exactly around us is not i mean. People is a destination in a sense. But it's quite far off the cd center and has a huge green sculpture park around it that we can full with outdoor sculptures as well if you want to but people use it as private garden. We'd barbecues and parties and baby showers and training and they use our tables are traced workouts. And so you have to adapt to where you're at and your local area. I think we have to especially with also working in public space. We have three kindergartens at least coming every day that place because they don't have any green area in their kindergarten so they use us our park as their space to play. And so that means that. If i play something out there without thinking about the kindergartens it will be. It's lost within one day and so all the artists as well when they exhibit that our place they need to take this in and work with thought they can't just make anything. Put it out in the park. And then you go like woah. So you have to take all of this in and so we program a lot according to that and also according to weather in sense because we're where we at and so the park in the wintertime is different park than when it's summertime so we need to think about light to get really easy. Early dark is all of these other things that you don't think about that you need to think about when you program and i don't think the artists think about as much that we sort of tell them and then of course some of the things you mention we do think about like diversity and we think about gender and we think about age lots. It has a long history where i work. We started just after the second world war. The sculptor society and to make all of these. You know after the second world war everyone needed to put up monuments after everyone died and so they created the society because he could col- somewhere to ask for this and we have this history and so we try a lot to combine the older generation with the super young generation and put them together since we have different spaces in rooms. That's what i love to do. And i think that is one of the things that works the most because you make a bridge between two generations and also to histories and different types of thinking. So that's a little bit of a hack that i like to use as a tool her. I've got one other question that i have been wondering about through the number of different people. I've spoken to in the scandinavian regions. Which is the there is associations and their societies. What's the difference. I don't know and i don't know why they i mean to be on this. I think most of the people when they try to translate on the go where i work they would use asssociation and dot makes most sense but for some reason at some point they decided to call it society and to be honest. I'm not really sure what happened. There okay so there's no like intentional like our society. Does this for the world and the associations do this other thing like there's no differentiation at least that's not where my knowledge life. I'm afraid that might be a rita weiss answer to this but that's for another podcast perhaps or just another person somebody else just might actually have that knowledge. It's perfectly fine. you don't have to know. Everything is literally the definition of what that's the definition of this podcast. Like you're wise about things you're wise about and your foolish about things you do. You're not wise about like totally fine. That's the goal here is. The goal is to try and like soak in everybody's wisdom so that we all become a little wiser and some of our little foolish holes in our careers and our minds sort of get filled in a little bit like. That's the idea war. It's working for me. I have gained exponentially more information. Knowledge and interest in things. Like i did not even know. Existed prior to this podcast. So yeah it's been fun last little questions. You've listened to the podcast. You know these questions. I'm sure you're prepared for these ish. I what is of course Some some three creative people that you're looking at thank you for that question. I was trying to be prepared. I want to answer something that you might not agree. Is anthony artists. But it's still very.

region association norwegian sculpture associatio villa griffey rita weiss anthony
"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

02:56 min | 7 months ago

"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

"If we just stay open to listening to what we learn with each step with her. We do it well or not. It helps inform the next step meditation teacher. Joan sutherland speaks to that. Whatever happens come into relationship with and take another step we do this without certainty that we are right indeed knowing that whatever we choose will in some way be a mistake but were willing to take step anyway to notice what happens so that what we noticed becomes part of the next step so wanna end with perhaps what is one of the most powerful statements at wise action that now ms comes for mother theresa. That's a A statement. That has really stayed with me since i had the experience of being returned her sisters. All those years ago been very mary informing and useful to me many many many times and ninety does it matter that you do great things rather small things with great laugh. What might happen if we're able to put this truly into action so let's pause for a moment. What do you know about. What brings you to life of makes you come. Alive wants relevant to keep at the forefront of your awareness about that for you. You're not sure not sure just even how the strength in deepen an direction. We have the teachings of the whole four noble truths in april path to send us in this direction peeling homeless for ourselves. And each other.

Joan sutherland theresa
"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

04:25 min | 7 months ago

"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

"What makes me come alive. And of course thurmond's pointing to is not that he'd mystic aliveness of a trip to carowinds or wine tasting tour. It's about and essential aliveness. That's totally different than the superficial world. We crave we want. It's really about learning how to take a leap of faith. Trust and a basic goodness and bringing that forth in the world is what is most needed ethical conduct mindful heartful contemplation all of the pieces of the eightfold path. Form the foundation for this kind of aliveness. So none of this is to say that every moment of our lives should be lying. Should line up on a grand scale with what's important in the world. Wise action is also about knowing when to turn inward for breast renew contemplation or even. Play time for war. Joy happiness celebration. Bees are universal human. Needs win. We practice with the factors. On april path factor. Such is wise view intentions. Mine collapse it. They are always revealing that. If we don't take care of this living organism that's aas than we simply burn out so again the this point to the analogy buddha used String tune it too tight. String breaks you tune it too loose or leave it to loose makes no sound after to just right to that place where makes its most beautiful music. Also looking at wise action is important to understand why action is not about fixing things. It's really about having the courage to act in a write. Alignment of wholeness. Even when things might seem unfixable. This is the doorway to true compassion. Learning how to deeply reckon with acceptance of reality duca the presence of duca suffering in the world and our lives without getting sidetracked by a believe that things in this moment should be different than they are. That's what opens up a radically empowering way to work compassionately with conditions in a way that matters even with problems. We won't fix such pause for a minute and consider. How often have you heard. The thought goes through your mind but people shouldn't behave that way or people should know better. You know all of those essential fights with reality. They worthless battle. If people knew better they would be doing better. If people understood another way behave that gave them the possibility of the happiness. Were all looking for some level or another. They would be doing it so the problem is not about things should be a different wave in there are the real issue is can compassionately fully engage with things as they are ramdas this way. Compassionate action is paradoxical mysterious. It is absolute yet continually changing the accepts that everything is happening exactly as it should. And it works with a full hearted commitment to change.

thurmond duca ramdas
"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

05:03 min | 7 months ago

"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

"Senate <Silence> <Speech_Male> under <Speech_Female> sin in <Speech_Female> the upstream <Speech_Female> affects <Speech_Female> and the downstream <Speech_Female> effects of <Speech_Female> all of our <Silence> decisions. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> That is <Speech_Female> a mindfulness <Speech_Female> practice <Speech_Female> and a system <Speech_Female> that wants <Speech_Female> us not to <Silence> see <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> a thoughtful person. <Speech_Female> This <Speech_Female> effort <Speech_Female> also creates <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> a constant <Speech_Female> tension <Silence> with her <SpeakerChange> work. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> cannot hurl <Speech_Female> ourselves <Speech_Female> into our jobs <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> unquestioning. <Silence> ardor <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> maiming. <Speech_Female> This constant <Silence> attention <Speech_Male> <Silence> is helpful. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Were not ever <Speech_Female> gonna get away <Speech_Female> from it. So <Speech_Female> giving up the <Speech_Female> perfection <Speech_Female> and learning <Speech_Female> to work as <Speech_Female> best as we can <Speech_Female> with the reality <Speech_Female> of the tension <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the practice <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> his translation <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> the pali term <Speech_Female> for right let <Speech_Female> Livelihood <Speech_Female> is something <Silence> more like <Speech_Female> livelihood <Speech_Female> fully <Speech_Female> understood <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and rightly conducted <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> with <Speech_Female> all of his <Silence> <Advertisement> tensions. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So there's a really <Speech_Female> powerful <Speech_Female> useful <Speech_Female> practical <Speech_Female> practice <Speech_Female> right <SpeakerChange> here <Speech_Female> in finding <Speech_Female> a wise <Speech_Female> saying <Speech_Female> compassionate <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> way. <Speech_Female> I'm living with <Silence> <Advertisement> the reality of ascension. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Female> When example <Speech_Female> of his in my <Speech_Female> own life. When <Speech_Female> i i <Speech_Female> truly <Speech_Female> truly became <Speech_Female> aware like really <Speech_Female> understood <Speech_Male> the coming effects <Speech_Female> of climate. Change <Speech_Female> that for me <Speech_Female> was partly about twenty <Silence> five years ago <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> my first <Silence> response <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> was to <Speech_Female> virtually <SpeakerChange> become <Silence> paralyzed. <Silence> <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> problem <Speech_Female> being so <Speech_Female> overwhelming <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and me <Speech_Female> unconscious <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to the fact <Speech_Female> that i was <Speech_Female> being driven by <Speech_Female> some him <Speech_Female> belief. <Speech_Female> I personally <Speech_Female> had to fix it. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I personally <Speech_Female> had to come up <Speech_Male> with the solution. <Speech_Female> I had no <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> idea. I was <Speech_Female> carrying that <Speech_Female> until <Speech_Female> finally <Speech_Female> i had to sit <Speech_Female> with the <Speech_Female> level of fear <Speech_Female> and paralysis <Speech_Female> in my life <Speech_Female> that was non-functional <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Female> us my mindfulness <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> untangle it <Speech_Female> find out what was <Speech_Female> going on in there <Speech_Female> and suddenly <Speech_Male> dawned on me. <Speech_Female> It's just crazy <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> agenda <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Male> the ego <Speech_Female> to fix <Speech_Female> climate change <Speech_Female> in the world <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> know. It just never <Speech_Female> dawned on me <Speech_Female> that i <Speech_Female> had this personal <Speech_Female> mandate in <Speech_Female> that way and it <Speech_Female> was such <Speech_Female> a relief <Speech_Female> to see <Silence> the lunacy <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and to be able <Speech_Female> to unhook from <Silence> matt <SpeakerChange> and back. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> This put <Speech_Female> my actions <Speech_Female> and my contemplacion's <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> back in <Speech_Female> the right place <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> being <SpeakerChange> in response <Speech_Female> to an issue. <Speech_Female> That a right <Speech_Female> alignment <Speech_Female> with <SpeakerChange> issue <Speech_Male> is <Silence> possible for me <Silence> <Speech_Female> to come <Speech_Female> up with actions <Speech_Female> in cares <Speech_Female> in a way that <Speech_Female> i can do <Speech_Female> in my life. <Speech_Female> That's <Silence> appropriate <Speech_Female> to try <Speech_Female> to think. <Speech_Male> I'm gonna fix <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> neurons. Just <Speech_Male> ego gone com <Speech_Male> com. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> Compass are <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> not very helpful <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> so that <Speech_Female> was very helpful with <Speech_Female> But then <Speech_Female> i had to also <Speech_Female> learn <Speech_Female> how to

five years ago first senate twenty
"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

03:25 min | 7 months ago

"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

"By the time i became a prescribing physician and had been vegetarian for many many years. By then I was a member of a still a member of physicians for responsible medicine which among other things works to end animal testing. I couldn't prescribe medicines. Without knowing that i was participating in an industry that also was causing tremendous pain in separate so of course all of these upstream and downstream chain problems of our choices affect not just our work but really all aspects of our life. There's a buddhist teacher writer named louis richards who wrote a great article in the huffington post. Put it in the the link for the community email. So if you're not on that email group and you want to get a weekly email with a little bit about what we're doing In the organization and talking about in the community groups to send me an email quickly the link to this article in there but thought it was a lovely article so he says if we have a quote unquote good job. Like you know you think you think you pull it off in having a good job my hope is mindfulness teacher. Hopefully late Gory but it doesn't solve the issue by any means saying says if we have a good job and yet refused to think about where food comes from where plastic goes why gas is cheap. And so on our spiritual practice will be undertaken with eyes wide. Shut so right livelihood no easy answer here and that doesn't mean we give up. There is a moral complexity. that's important we wrestle with with far far more intense analogy and we do this with a clear understanding clear intention to do our best while knowing it will never be perfect. Won't find the perfect answers. Another article i read was by krishnan. Cut tash tricycle article right my other the hood. He says it this way. We might resign ourselves to the fact that any profession we choose will be a messy mixture of good and bad consequences but we can still make a daily effort to maximize good minimize the bad indeed. Nearly every job gibbs daily opportunities to help people and improve the world in some way the effort to understand the antecedents and consequences of our work is also a mindfulness practice in a system that would prefer us to function on autopilot.

louis richards krishnan huffington Gory buddhist tricycle
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

03:46 min | 8 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Identity ethnic identity religious identity. Whatever that may be so in a way that kind of self segregating it has a market that you and they are almost forced to consider it even if this this may not be the most palatable thing for the artists on another level of it why not. What's wrong with her to be a female muslim artists. You see what i'm saying. It's you know. We don't put those pressures on christians and jews. Why should we put it on. Muslims and hindus and whatever else there is i find this really one of the challenges. Major challenges for the contemporary world in the west and it needs to be on the anglophone world is particularly at the forefront of thinking about these issues and it needs to be probed deeply and really unpacked and self-critically looks sat. It seems to me. I mean they're all really good point. I mean i think ultimately matt you were wrong fair enough and not just because she was female muslim whether it was a a white male you know. The personal narrative of the artist is so important because they're art is them and i think when you try and separate that loses its value and loses. Its meaning so. I think the personal narrative is so important. I don't think you should put too much emphasis on it necessarily because you don't want it to be a segregation but at the same time. A lot of these artists wouldn't be producing the work that they're making. It wasn't because of their personal circumstances whether it's a white male you know using bob laws and example a white male minimalist british artist his personal story as an outsider as a carpenter. You know working for donald judd. All of these things they inform historian they inform his art. And if you don't know his biography his arts into quite meaningless totally honest. It's part of a wider story. And you can't really can't deny it. I take the criticism that's fine. That's why this is called the wise fool. I have made many mistakes and errors in my career even in academia one of the other things that i wonder about when it comes to sexism of course because we have a representative here who is from The middle east is also the cultural differences. I of course was raised in washington. Dc in the united states. I've lived in the middle east. I now live in europe. And i find very different cultural touchstones for sexism. I don't really wanna share too many of my experiences with sexism especially in the middle east. Because i feel like. I'm gonna get in trouble or stick my foot in my mouth but have any of you seen other than kate with your australia to london. Shift any sort of cultural differences in it specifically in the arts. Did i phrase that question poorly king. It's a trap. It's really hard to deal with something. As broad as cultural differences with regards to sexism yards an art is sense of fourth. It's interesting to think that we also need to think in terms of these different historical monuments just as new. Even kate talked about say the seventeen or eighteen or the nineteenth and so.

europe london washington donald judd australia united states kate seventeen british eighteen fourth jews one muslim nineteenth middle east one of the challenges east hindus Muslims
"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

03:34 min | 8 months ago

"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

"So we are up to Why speech on the Eightfold Path. The first of the ethical factors which are wise or right, speech, right action, right livelihood. I'm just want to name these factors in general. First, they're often taught first. I did them in in the reverse order, just because that's the way I think of them as my practice is, what helps me be the most skillful in the world. But the reverse order is, is I think the way more traditionally taught and I love how Beth Roth in this beautiful article and tricycle magazine. I put the link to it in the newsletter, if you want her whole article on why speech a highly recommend it, but she she talks about the, the ethical factors in this way. Just tradition. The Buddha taught that ethical conduct is the foundation of meditation practice. And is also the ground upon which our life and our spiritual journey rest. The Pauline word for ethical conduct is Sela, s. I l a and it's it is a practice off and making ethical Life Choices that actually support. Good conditions for well-being and positive relationships in our life. I don't know about you but for me, I really grew up with a very strong concept that being ethical is what I should do in order to be good. And I love this powerful, flip of that orientation. The the Buddhist understanding of ethical conduct is very much that ethical conduct is at the root of what ultimately makes life feel good. It's really not about being a good, but if we want to align ourselves on a path, that brings true relief from suffering for ourselves and our other than others, ethical conduct is at the, at the root of that path of relief of suffering. So in the Buddhist tradition, ethics are seeing very much as gifts gifts. We give ourselves and others off again from Beth Roth. She says by undertaking, ethical trainings. We offer a supreme gift to other beings and to ourselves to give to Freedom From Fear hostility and oppression. So, that's a powerful gift. The gift of Freedom From Fear, hostility and oppression. That's a gift I want in my life off as a gift. I think, you know, everyone is likely to name that. This is what we want.

Beth Roth First first Buddha Buddhist Pauline Path
"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

05:44 min | 8 months ago

"wise" Discussed on Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

"Going away. That's causing suffering and I'm I'm actually, I'm starting to get them fight with myself about it. You know, I don't even have to go that far, don't have to wait for the fight. If it's something that needs attention that wisdom and compassion would say give some care to what's coming up. You then you lay down some money practice and you turn the caring, the way the willingness to care for this body mind heart to what needs attention. So it's never, it's never meant to be a straitjacket wisdom and compassion or always the guides to the practice. What's interesting is the more we develop this practice in the more, we kind of know how to reliably access Thursday, open-hearted focused, attention the less, those kind of things arise, that really need to pull us away. So I want to name a few challenges and then I want us to practice challenge.

Thursday
"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

03:48 min | 9 months ago

"wise" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"It could just compartmentalize it. Yes my dad is probably very good with compartmentalizing in that way. Like he like i. The closest we had to religion at home would be on christmas day. He would always be like okay. It's not from santa claus. It's actually joined the birth of christ you would little reminders like that and we would have to say grace around every night at dinner but that's about the extent he never we never spoke about biblical or theological things in the home and less. What either myself. my brother. My mother brought up the top. He would never bring up the topic. I think grace before. Dinner is a bad thing though the that moment where you bless a man in front of you there's a sacred quality to eating and breaking bread with each other as quite a nice thing. Something that we've lost a lot of a lot of the web. That i make are try and imbue some kind of sacred quality which i think is probably down to things that i've picked a growing up. I am a huge fan of sort of the at my sort of derogatory word but like pomp and circumstance of religion. Like i really love all of the formality the robes and the processes of do this can't light this candle i because it's this symbolizes this and then this other candle second like i remember being an acolyte and we had to. I think it's like we light the left candle on the altar first and then when we were going to put them out we have to do it in the opposite direction kind of thing so that you're not damaging the holy spirit and all this kind of stuff i it's i love all that stuff. The richaud yeah. I mean i did. When i was doing cocaine. I loved the ritual like cutting up a line of coke. Yeah same thing. The meditative process of doing something in a particular order over of as. I'm sure you experienced hyphen cocaine. Cocaine heroin my. When i did. Lsd mean all the different rituals of drug use as well as sort of its own little ritualistic process as well like you know. We used to do mushrooms and we would. We would go through this whole process of making it into t and like sitting around and sort of doing it the same way and a rich realistic manner. So like yeah. There are lots of different things like that a me thing. I guess that's fine. But i mean i make my tea in the morning my general t in the mornings the same way like there. It's part of the funny. I reflected on this because my wife questioned a lot of my sort of daily choices on things. I like a certain amount of rituals in a in order to allow for a certain amount of spontaneity but if if the rituals aren't there that spontaneity doesn't work like so i need some structure in order to allow for absurdity. Yeah very important. I think without gravity. You have no grace as oppositions very important to have math and is something that i tried to put into my words at to have that to have certain structures and then the perversion of those structures of the corruption. I love your vocabulary okay. So let's get into that so one of my first questions like so. I saw your exhibition. And i saw the breath of the different works in the various different techniques that you use also so i guess the first question would be sort of. How do you even come up with your ideas. My influences could come from anywhere you know it could be a conversation overheard on the bus away..

first question first questions christmas day one first christ santa second every
"wise" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"wise" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Thiss is the wise investor show on the wise Investor network show, Simon Hamilton, managing director at the Wise Investor Group it Baird in Reston, Virginia, been talking about how in the space of deteriorating headlines headlines that are starting to read very much like some of the headlines we read back in March. There are reasons to be position in stock. There still reasons for optimism, in my opinion, and one is just the historical precedent. Of what ensues from such a strong 65 day rally off the loads as I mentioned right before the break. This is the third biggest 65 day rally in History, I guess, at least going back to 1928. I believe if you look at the other 99 out of 10 And look it with historical precedent. Going out 65 days. Average return of 4.7% 125 days, 7.6% 250 days, 12.2% and importantly, the hit rate if you will. The number the percentage of those periods when the markets were positive 90%. Overall three time frames. So again, we expected some consolidation over the summer. We're getting some consolidation over the summer with the average stock even though the broad market bounce this week that the average stock is still down. More than 10% off of the late mid June highs. I should say. But you look a little bit further out with impatience. The president is much better. That's not a price prediction past results her no indication necessarily of the future, but there is a precedent there. What else? Well, you know, much has been written about some of the short term. Optimism in the market and we've probably all read articles has certainly have about the rise of day traders and how they're dominating the market and how they're investing heavily in the most speculative stocks, you know, sort of the knives that have fallen the furthest Saying that before. I mean, that's not exactly knew, right. I mean, I saw that in 2003. We saw that in 2009. You often see a lot of speculation in and around the bottom. The trough of bear markets again. That's not unusual. So, but I don't think that's necessarily reflective ofthe overall froth in the market. You know, one of the things that I pay the most attention to Is asset flows witnessed. The massive amount off in flows into bond funds is here record in flows between mutual funds and the data I read It's saying that close to 80 billion just through the 1st 6 months of the year has gone into bond funds. 80 billion. Meanwhile, something like 30 I think was maybe 35 billion have come out of stocks. It shows you that outside of the wildcatters most investors or position more cautiously, then they were earlier in the year, not less. So I would suggest this is a contrary in positive signal, and certainly not evidence oven over believed overhyped market. I would also say. You know, Despite the massive job losses, most consumers are actually better position than they were during the financial crisis. That sounds a little weird to say. And When we're reading all this headline data, But housing is still the most important financial financial asset in most U. S households and price sales and refinance metrics, for the most part, have actually improved recently. Particularly the last couple weeks. Now, I think Be realistic. We should expect some price slippage in areas around the country more dependent on the service economy. I mean, think about some of those Orlando's suburbs, For example, with Disney Shutter, I mean, The stories like that are going to play out across the country. But overall that financial underpinning is crucial long term support. We've also seen a significant uptick in the personal savings rate, which bodes very well. Not necessarily for the present, but for future spending measures of consumer indebtedness. Are much less negative than they were 12 or 13 years ago. That's the case today was certainly the case back in January and February. Bottom line is recoveries from I would call exogenous shocks. Rather than financial system, meltdowns or endogenous shocks attended to be more rapid. Even if we know that the recovery isn't going to uniform across industries and consumers and so keep that money. Up next. We're going to talk a little bit about earnings. Okay? Because what about them? Much has been written recently about how the market has gotten really expensive Might be even more expensive of analysts are pencilling in a rapid recovery in 2021 estimates end up being pipe dreams. I want to talk a little bit about that. Put that in some perspective, remember, if you're not a client and something I've said this morning resonates with you. Baby, and it's not getting the attention that you deserve from your financial advisor. Maybe or do it yourself, Oren, you're feeling sort of adrift in all this volatility in contact us through the site website. That's the wise investor group dot com. Set up a time to speak with us. It's also where we house the archives of the show and our midweek podcast that we post every Wednesday, so make sure you check that out. So again, stay tuned back in a few minutes. We'll talk a little bit about the earnings landscape. And while I think there may still be reasons for optimism there as well, you're listening to the wise investor show. Sound advice about your personal financial situation. Call 866758 wines for online at the Wise Investor group..

Wise Investor Group Simon Hamilton Virginia Thiss managing director Baird Reston Orlando president Disney Oren advisor
"wise" Discussed on Becoming Wise

Becoming Wise

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"wise" Discussed on Becoming Wise

"Becoming wise is supported by the fetzer institute. I've had hundreds of big conversations and my conversation partners, share wisdom. I carry with me wherever I go father, James Martin is a well known and beloved Jesuit writer and teacher. He's followed the calling of the founder of the Jesuit order, Saint Ignatius of Loyola to find God in all things he does so in twenty-first-century forms, including a wise and witty, presence on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. But everyone father Martin says has callings of okay Shen. This is not something merely for monastics and clergy. This is becoming wise. I'm krista. Tippett. I did not know the part of your story that, you know, that you didn't because you are known as a religious figure. I did not realize that you studied business in college and worked in corporate finance for GE into your mid twenties and only then were captured it seems by Thomas Merton and somewhere in one of your books, you pull out this first paragraph of no man is an island, you know, why do we spend our lives striving to be something that we would never want to be if only we knew what we wanted. Why do we waste our time doing things which if we only stop to think about them or just the opposite of what we were made for? I that that's the line that changed my life. Really? And I just thought why why am I doing that? And it felt like he was speaking directly to me, and I felt like you know business as a real vocation for a lot of people, and it just wasn't for me, and I was miserable. And I, I didn't know what I was doing. I didn't know how I could find a way out and that sentence, which really was like a thunderbolt just prompted me to just shake things up and ask myself that question I always say to young people, you know what would you want to do if you do anything that you could do it's a very clarifying question for you. And that's you know Jesus asks people that, you know what you want kind of understanding your desire, so, yeah, I love that paragraph. I go back to it a lot. I think something that really runs through all your writing. That is that, that callings invocation as opposed to mere career is not something that's restricted to monastics, absolutely. Yeah. Absolutely. Or priest or sisters, or brothers of everyone has a vocation. I mean, the most fundamental vocation as to become the person whom God created, and it's, it's both the person you already are, and the person that God calls you to be. And I think we find that out through our desires. You know what, what moves us what touches us you know were what we drawn to part of that's career. You know, but only part of it. I mean it's really who you're called to be. And that's why that question we spoke to me of. Okay shin as your deepest identity and as well. You know, being called to married life or being a lawyer or being parent, I think is vocation, saluting, absolutely. And you know, much heart vocation than being a priest frankly, we don't get up at three in the morning for, for. For feeding. You don't get any of that training just in London till we do not. I mean I love the use of were desire. Because again, I think if we do separate if we do think about, you know, vocation or calling in kind of narrow spiritual terms, which sounds very serious. Then we probably wouldn't use that language desire, that, that has to do with your desires infect being in touch with them as one kind of compass. But in fact, there is a very long and deep philosophical and theological tradition of thinking about desire and calling. Yeah. And you know, majorite and our founder said Ignatius in his classic text the spiritual exercises talked about praying for what you desire, and also praying to understand your desires, because I believe that your deepest desires the things that you're drawn to the person you're called a b are really God's desires for you. I mean, how else would God call us to something? You know, you'd think of. Married couple, that's the easiest example, you know, they're drawn to each other. It's the same in different jobs. It's the same in religious vocations. But it's also the same in the person you desire to be I think we all have a an image of the person, we want to become, you know, more loving more open more free. That's a call. It's, it's helping people understand that an recognizing it that it in a way that to tell them it's not selfish. You know, desire is not selfish. It's freeing and it opens. The possibility that this not necessarily as easy but is, you know, is it process that has joy in it? And and and heartache sometimes as we try to as we as we let go of the things that we're not called to be in the parts of our lives that are keeping us back. I mean, this is God calling you, you know, this is a process, and it's, it's alternately liberating, which is a great message for people. Father, James Martin is editor at large, if the Jesuit magazine America his books include the Jesuit guide to almost everything a spirituality for real life, and most recently building a bridge. Becoming wise is produced by Marie samba lily Percy and Chris Hegel at on being studios, which is located on Dakota land. And our theme music is provided and composed by Zoe Keating. This podcast is produced by. On studios in Minneapolis, man. Sound?

James Martin founder fetzer institute Zoe Keating Loyola Twitter Thomas Merton Tippett Facebook writer GE Dakota Minneapolis Ignatius Marie samba London editor Chris Hegel lily Percy