17 Burst results for "Winfield Scott Hancock"

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:49 min | 4 months ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And work for graft. He's the three war leaders who won the civil war. They remain close comrades, but they're in command of what becomes the American Indian wars and the Fetterman massacre is when these Of unformed American Calvary. Men and infantrymen believe they can build forts in sight of about 1,502,000 Indians commanded by Red Cloud. It's foolishness. The Indians attack. We're using decoys that the American Army falls for Peter. They leave Fetterman with 165 arrows into him after they've killed him. Why? What did that mean to them? The mist coming in that the whites both civilians, and the military, never, for the most part, never fully understood the music, extreme mutilation of dead by virtually every Indian tribe in the West. They looked. They saw it as a indication savagery. I can't even begin to I could, but I'll refrain. The book is explicit. But that method that the Indians use and mutilation of the dead are as extreme as your imagination can imagine. On D course that the Army found that repellent. But the Plains Indians, particularly easily in Northern Plains, Indians, did not. Torture did not mutilate. Live. Enemies. They would not capture a soldier and then mutilate him. The mutilation always occurred after death, and in fact, it was a normal practice of looking for the coach of friendships. If they if they encountered a wounded soldiers in the course of the fight was Fetterman. If they had found a handful of soldiers badly wounded more we wanted whatever they would dispatch them quickly with a war club one blow to the head and killed them. And then the mutilation begin the purpose of mutilation Woz. It was a religious at the Indians believed that the souls of the enemies would follow them into the after life. Um and that, in whatever condition they were. Upon death. And immediately after death. So the Indians would Frenchness among some of the the the less revolting to the whites, at least Practices worth of safe slash the scene news. You know the muscles in their legs and their arms or toe, poke their eyes out so that when their enemies filed them to the afterlife, they would be blind. They would be lame. They would not be able to pose a threat to Indians who were enjoying eternity. And that was that was the purpose of mutilation. The dead it was not active. Of quote savagely unquote with no purpose except shit brutality, as most whites interpreted to be. It was it wasn't in the Indians. Um, way of thinking in terms of their religion, a quite rational thing to do, And I'm gonna stay with the logic and the reason because they're instances, Peter's book is sweeping. You understand? There's an enormous amount of history detail here. We'll go to a conversation once between Roman knows Roman knows the preach approaches The General Winfield Scott Hancock, a hero of the Civil war who is cruel and ignorant and believes that he can intimidate the Indians, Roman nose approaches him and for a parley in which if it ends badly, Roman nose is ready to kill his enemy. And he says to the general, we we don't want war. If we did, we would not come close to your big guns. Very sensible. Peter. Did they not believe the Indians when they told him the truth, did they not did did Winfield Scott Hancock, who is one of many generals who doesn't listen, did they not believe the Indians were telling them the truth? Hancock was one of the one of the more pathetic cases he was indeed a true civil war hero and in the eyes of many, he was equal to, if not superior, to shared in in terms of his his status as a hero of the Civil War. If you may be called it. Subsequently, he ran for president on the Democratic ticket. It was nearly defeated. So he was quite and it was a national hero, and he was a tremendous soul is tremendous, competent general in the Civil war, and I in particular was struck. By his agree GIs not only ignorance by his Unwillingness to take the time to learn their first thing about the Indians when he came west and is believed that he could bluster and intimidate his way it through any situation. And he had he had. He was surrounded by for the most part, other officers who were as naive as him, but he did have with him. A ninny in agent who understood who had witnessed sand Creek and tries his own way to prevent it. Who is cautioning him? They look, General Hancock, the Indians don't wanna fight you if they wanted to fight you. Religious wouldn't be standing here so close by that that the last thing they want to do is his fight. They they want to talk. The Hancock Um Really couldn't see that. And more importantly, he although he announced that his Republican assumption that his purpose was to go out into the southern Plains and make peace, he was quite ready, and he fully instructed his subordinates that look, we we come in peace, but we come fully prepared to make war as well. And I think he was looking for Any excuse to to show off U. S military might There He was. He was he was he had Roman knows. Essentially, we're has happened so much in the West. They were talking past one another. There are number of Indians who tell very flatly to the army what they believe and what they know. And when we come back, we'll meet two of them. One is a Kiowa chief Santana to Called Order Order of the Plains. Another one is a Cheyenne chief, Buffalo chip who speaks very candidly. You understand exactly what he means. And he's not listen to Peter Cousins. Is the author of the Wonderful new book, The Earth is weeping. It's very sad, but it is deep history deep American history that we did not have in the 20th Century, the epic story of the Indian wars for the American West on John bench..

Winfield Scott Hancock Peter Cousins Fetterman Army American Army Northern Plains Red Cloud John bench southern Plains Buffalo Santana president sand Creek
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on Parcast Presents

Parcast Presents

07:39 min | 5 months ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on Parcast Presents

"Was never returned to her anisa. Rats life was defined by the death of her mother. She tried several times to speak with president johnson before ending up the steps of the white house crying for him to listen her brother. John was also on the run for his alleged contribution to the booth murder plot. Anna was forced to sell all her property in order to cover the legal fees. Her mother's case had racked up she moved to baltimore and married. William p tanri four days after their wedding tanri was fired from his job at the war department because of his relationship with anna the election between james a garfield and major general winfield scott hancock. The supervisor of mary rats execution brought the trial and the execution of the lincoln co-conspirators back to the public. I the press hounded anna for her thoughts and a fake interview ran in several papers. Her husband tanri stated publicly that the published interview was false and contended that he his wife remained neutral though he did say that the republican party was responsible for mary. Seurat's death garfield presidency also ended in an assassination for months after he took office and developed nervous condition that lasted the rest of her life. Though she died in new york the secret service staffers and visitors to the white house say they hear pounding on the front door. Along with sobs and screams for help. The pounding gets louder every july seven. The anniversary of mary sue death but she isn't the only woman that haunts the grounds anna's counterpart is far more malevolent than the morning girl could ever be now back to the story. The white house we know today is the result of over two hundred years of building and rebuilding to fit both the needs of the president and the country. The white house was designed by irish architect. James hogan mixing colonial neoclassical and renaissance styles. Thomas jefferson designed some of his own architectural improvements when he moved in eighteen. One but much of the building was lost during the burning of washington by the british during the war of eighteen twelve. The building wasn't restored until eighteen seventeen and was renovated again. In the early twentieth century which included an expansion of the west wing and the construction of the oval office. the whole building had to be restored. During the truman administration as the brick and sandstone structure was danger of collapsing. It was first lady. Jackie kennedy who gave the white house interiors their iconic look picking an era for major room in the building including federal french empire and victorian later renovations include a bowling alley in the basement added by richard nixon and a set of solar water heating panels which were installed by the carter administration before being removed by ronald reagan presidents george w bush and barack obama would later restore and expand the solar energy elements of the building. The renovation process is not without its architectural losses. One of the most tragic is the white house conservatory which was open to the public and supplied all the flowers for events at the residence. It was ultimately converted to office space to expand the west wing. But perhaps it's for the past because more than bees seemed to buzz between the rows of fully ch- nathan loved working at the white house. It made him feel like he was an integral part of the structure that kept the nation running even if his job was just patrolling at night after a string of assassinated precedence security was even more important and with the twentieth century about to dawn. Change was closer than ever. Nathan took his duties very seriously but he also had a secret hidden within the walls at the palatial building. He had a friend that no one knew She had never told him her name. Or even how. She came to stay at the white house but the to head past many a moonlit night together in the conservatory in between his rounds each time they met she was dressed in clothes. That must have been passed down from a relative. She was far too young to be wearing the stiff hoop skirts. That had been style nearly a century earlier but she liked to stay in around in them like a tornado. Come to life. Her hair shone as if there was a lantern hanging behind her head casting a celestial glow daughter and your voice was soft and sweet lavender. Honey he could find himself drowning it. If he wasn't careful she had approached him on one of his first watches. He tried to treat her like any unaccounted for guests on the grounds but she had been kind him innocent and generous in every way with her. He wasn't an overlooked part of the environment. He was a person with his own point of view and she wanted to hear it after that it had been hard to ask for anything. She was always more interested in him than anything else. Nathan had always felt that he was incredibly ordinary but this nameless woman devoured his stories with laughs and gasps that made him feel like a hero in his own life his beloved dog. Its first school the day. He got the job. In the nation's capital they were all triumphs of great interest. He worried at first that she was teasing him but she listened with such earnestness but he found himself incapable of doubting her. He took his obligation seriously but he relished his time with her sometimes he would cut cars so we could spend more time with her but she was so patient. Twenty astor to wait. Nathan finishes preliminary rounds and headed for the conservatory. The moon cast a soft glow through the center windows while the rest of the glass room remained shrouded in mystery. Tall plants loomed menacingly overhead and had on several occasions snagged him as he moved through the space but his friend had a way of us waging all his fears usually she was already there to greet him at the entrance tonight however she appeared to be missing. Nathan wasn't too concerned. The white house was large and the conservatory was made up of winding connected enclosures. She could be just around the next bet and rather than wait for her to appear. He decided to walk the length of the conservatory. As his lantern swung back and forth in his hand. The shadows change position making. It appear that the.

white house Nathan Anna James hogan president winfield scott hancock truman administration baltimore murder Thomas jefferson John tanri new york washington William p johnson Jackie kennedy supervisor Seurat
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Which means he lists will need to cross the James River if he wants to attack it. which he does. Sticking with the efficient strategies of this movement, some union troops take transport boats. The river while military engineers building two thousand, one, hundred, the Pontoon Bridge strong enough to stand forefoot title swells of the James. On June fifteenth the rest of the army safely crosses the southbank. So the James and heads West Petersburg President Lincoln is thrilled with these perfectly executed troop movements the Illinois rail splitter since. Ulysses telegram. I begin to see it will succeed God. Bless you all. Think way to impress the boss you lists. Gt Regard. Watch, the advancing federal army with growing dread, he's only got two thousand, five hundred men to defend Petersburg and bobby doesn't even know where the Union army is right now. This is not looking good for the old creel. At six PM on June fifteenth US General Winfield Scott Hancock and William Bali Smith. Launch an attack on the thinly manned confederate lines. There men easily take more than a mile of the line and sixteen, the fifty five mounted guns. Now, at this point, these guys should have realized just how few rebels are actually defending Petersburg's impressive breast works, but they don't when field and Baldi don't really get along. When fields old Gettysburg wound is acting up and Bali is sick. So instead of pressing their advantage, these two generals let their guys can't behind the captured lines and sleep in the next morning. That gives gt time to pull in reinforcements from a nearby fort bringing his forces up to a whopping five thousand, four hundred. But. Frankly GT's just glad to have a few hours to dig a new trench for his man. The native french-speaking confederate later states. Petersburg at that hour was clearly at the mercy of the Federal Commander who had all but captured it. Gt gets a telegram off Bobby. Lee and the Virginia General immediately start shipping reinforcements to Petersburg. Across the next two days more gray clad men join the fight and George. Meade orders several attacks Petersburg's eastern defenses. But. The Blue Coats hearts just aren't in it. Their assaults are feeble and cautious. One Union commander sees what's going on. He states quote. The men feel at present great horror and dread of attacking earthen works again. Close quote old snapping Turtle George Agrees, and reports to you lis-. Men are tired and he attacks have not been made with vigor and force which characterized are fighting in the wilderness. If they had been I think we should have been more successful..

Petersburg James River Gt West Petersburg Union army bobby Pontoon Bridge Winfield Scott Hancock US President Lincoln Bali James Ulysses commander Illinois Baldi William Bali Smith Commander George Meade
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Day may eleventh heavy rain turns the dusty roads and footpaths in the mud slicks. But the fighting continues as ulysses tries to figure out a way to break bobby lease lines. He sends a message to President Lincoln. I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer. Once again, unconditional surrender grant showing his steely grit. Now, Bobby Lee, and you list are both incredible commanders but they aren't super human. They make mistakes and Bobby's about to make a big one. He gets faulty Intel from his son Rooney. Cavalry. Major General who reports that the army of the Potomac seems to be on the move east toward Fredericksburg. They aren't, but bobby believes his son. Anyway. In an effort to catch list by surprise Bobby Muzy artillery currently protecting the mule shoe to attack the root he thinks the Union army is on. This leaves the critical Mule Shoe under protected when Union troops renew their assault in the predawn fog and rain at four thirty on May Twelfth. While the ever Dapper Winfield Scott Hancock attacks from the North Ambrose burnside hits the meal shoes east side. The boys in blue quickly occupied a muddy blood splattered rebel trenches. But Bobby Leeson's in reinforcements and devolve into a brutal slug best of hand to hand combat and rifle fire. Bobby Lee calls back artillery from this pointless mission as fifteen thousand more union troops joined the battle. The fighting lasts all day. Literally, some estimates have the combat ranging from eighteen to twenty three hours. Yes. twenty-three around mid-day Union troops attacked the West side of the Mule Shoe. This area quickly becomes known as the bloody angle. Here, thousands of soldiers lock horns in a desperate attempt to control hundred yards of the confederate built trenches. One trooper remembers. Quote. The flags of both armies waved at the same moment over the same breasts works while beneath them federal and confederate endeavoured to drive home the bayonet through the interstate. Close quote. Gathering darkness doesn't slow the fighting around two a m. a new sound fills the soldiers in the bloody angle with fear. A twenty two inch.

Bobby Lee Bobby bobby Bobby Leeson Bobby Muzy ulysses Union army Winfield Scott Hancock President Lincoln Fredericksburg Intel assault North Ambrose Rooney
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KGO 810

"And overwhelms Bernie's division overwhelms the badly deployed third corps and now for Winfield Scott Hancock who is my hero of the second day as Howard was my hero the first day Hancock's third corps arrives I hope I have this correct second core arrives around six PM he sees that the battles going very badly where does he did apply for professor regionally Handcock second corps was to deploy along cemetery ridge right in the rear of cemetery hill they were to be the gatekeepers to the backyard of the union position as the third corps began to fall apart and disintegrate under these repeated hammering is from long street well the second corps was there on the spot and they were the people near us so they get called upon for help and Handcock sends off one entire division he has three divisions in its core sends off one entire division under John Caldwell they go into the wheat field and art decimated there then as the evening draws on and the Confederates continue to gain ground Handcock looks around him for other units to plug up these gaps and all he can see an American the smoke is one lone regiment from his core the first Minnesota is this all we've got he says and the answer is obviously yes I'm afraid so he says to the colonel colonel called all of the first Minnesota you see those flags pointing at the rubble callers take those flags call bill doesn't I don't know why they fix bayonets and this one regiment throughs itself Pell mell and several orange when charging Confederate brigades and so great as was surprised that they actually succeed in stopping the Confederate attack so hand **** gamble pays off but at the cost of something like eighty percent casualties on the first Minnesota it is now darkness is falling and a note here the Confederate attack fails if I understand the maps and I follow your argument professor because the look their left flank has dragged behind the assault and when the Minnesota charged in there so much smoke on the battle field that you don't have a good sense of whether you're winning or losing and you get a sense of momentum that's why they fix bayonets there's not time to load and fire load and fire because a man with a band that is running out you so do I say correctly that the left side of the Wilcox Lang attacked lags behind what is this right he doesn't catch up and that's why they break off that night they were actually coming in and staggered faction Wilcox lying land right and what really stymied the Confederates what made for failure was that right then expects the next units to is left to support him and they do not that is one of their great failures of the Confederate army on the second day of the battle the controversy this night is at Meade's headquarters the armies have retired to their two sides they'll fight again in the morning Longstreet's division is now arriving in full you'll division pal hills divisions not divisions cores are still available the unions the union army's being resupplied with new to a new core arriving as well and there is a dramatic moment it would make a wonderful play at meets headquarters that night council of war John Gibbons of the it attends David Birney Newton Handcock Howard Sedgwick Slocum all representing the chords available in this fishhook status what does meet ask them professor watches Mead what to do the question is what's with them as we stay here and fight for show we fall back from this position to a position more defensible to the rear Chris what he is thinking of is the position that he had always wanted to use as a defensive position and that was played creek about twenty five miles to the southeast in Maryland and most of the corps commanders who are coming to this meeting are expecting that that's what need wants to do they're concerned that he really does want to order a retreat but when they come together and he pulls from the corps commanders are overwhelmingly opposed to retreat and Handcock again Winfield Scott Hancock puts his foot down and says this army has done enough for treating let this be our last retreat they vote from a trucker shoulders and says alright gentlemen if this is what you want then we will fight here they both from the junior to the senior that's the very end for media and media protocol invent eventually persuaded by them John Gibbons my note says that he wants to correct the position David Burney says we stay Newton I don't I I want to concentrate on new Newton says what about if they try to cut our law did meet considered out John Newton was really functioning as George meets mouthpiece he had been appointed hastily to command the evening before commander the first corps and everyone understood the John Newton was speaking for me and Newton rather timidly puts forward the idea well perhaps we should consider retreating well when all the other corps commanders compiling and on the opposite side of that proposition even Newton decides that it's probably a good idea to go along with everyone else but Newton is Newton is very much out of his class along with all the sewers they're about fifty eight thousand men they figure that they have laughed and they note Lee is coming again in the morning and as the caps of quiet down for the night the professor paints the scene which is horrible of the ambulance corps of what he describes as snakes of light man holding path lanterns weaving through the wounded who are still on the battlefield to remove what they can and get them to the hospitals the amputations are going on piles of legs and arms all night they have no good for a first aid and a man who are got shot are just left to die there's nothing they can do for them they give them opium in the morning Lee is up and he goes to Gettysburg college which at that time and time is unknown as Pennsylvania college she climbs the couple and what is the C. professor he sees the army of the Potomac on the ropes of the seven infantry corps of the army of the Potomac well most of them are a wreck the first course Iraq the eleventh corps as a record core is a wreck fifth corps is a wreck XIX corps Meade needs as reserve twelve core need needs that to hold Culp's hill that leaves only the second corps and the second corps itself has been rather badly handled an entire division is gone and of the two remaining divisions there's really only two brigades in each that are ready for combat please deduction from these observation is let's swayed in with one last blow and that will stretch the army the Potomac out on the campus and for that lead turns to an entirely fresh Confederate division which is just arriving from Chambersburg retail into his army and that is George Pickett's division George tickets personalities important here and so is the fact that there are that the division is largely made up of Virginians why is that a superior position on the third day well in large measure George pick it was well something less than the brightest boulder the military chandelier but he has endeared himself to James Longstreet and long St as his corps commander wanted to use picket in the best way possible even new ticket however would not be able to throw his division and achieve success just on their own strength Lee understands that they're going to have to be aided so a number of other units which had seen action on the previous two days are tacked on to Pickett's division and overall something between twelve and fifteen thousand Confederates are assembled to make this last great clinched fist that is going to land a blow that finishes the army of the Potomac and do it right at the nape of the army of the Potomac snack where cemetery hill and cemetery ridge joined and we're Winfield Scott Hancock has the last four brigades of his core there to receive them James Longstreet again the reluctant corps commander he has hesitation any recommends to leave that they find a way around on the right I believe they are right and cut the Baltimore road she's thinking as moot as Mead was thinking the night before what does Lee make of that suggestion he makes an instant disposal of it he leaned knows what he wants to do and he's not calling councils of war or asking people's advice he directs Longstreet to get on with the plan mostly probably in the years after the war exaggerated the degree of his descent after all he didn't want to share of the blame for what happened so it's less likely that long St have some kind of temper tantrum and did not want to obey and had to be over born most of his behavior at Gettysburg is a good deal more cooperative than you would like to lead on later but at least in the system and since he certainly did have some doubts about whether this was going to work how long does in fact cooperate he does get the units deployed he gets pickets lined up and is ready to give whatever signal has to be given for the great attacked again he writes to his artillery commanders Walton and Alexander's my note professor correct me if I have this wrong and that one too well Sander is critical because he writes you advise general ticket not to make the charge if your artillery barrage does not destroy the enemy artillery barrage so what ticket what what Longstreet ones is an artillery tool and he wants to win it before they send off pick correct that is correct the key factor is going to be can the union artillery on cemetery hill be silenced if they can then the infantry attack will succeed if it can't then the federal artillery with terror Pickett's charge before it even got all the way across the road on the other side of the line Handcock again the hero of the second day is about to be in the hot spot of the third day he's commanding what's left of his call everybody's core their pieces everywhere what is the angle professor the angle is a small line that juts out from the main line of cemetery ridge it's really just walk stone wall that former blue kind of kind of wall of former would direct to keep cattle from straying beyond his form boundaries it juts out at a ninety degree angle and runs for about a hundred yards then it turns another ninety degree angle and continue south again that angle embraced a small woodlot sometimes known as the clump of trees and that became the focus point for Pickett's charge and that's where Hancock is and that's where the sixty ninth and seventy second Pennsylvania will come back to that because there the artillery barrage goes on for forty five minutes that's my notice that how long do they think it lasted that's an approximation although bear in mind of course that almost all accounts of time at this battle and in fact in nineteen century battle are approximations.

Bernie Winfield Scott Hancock Howard ninety degree forty five minutes nineteen century eighty percent seventy second hundred yards two days
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Boy, we've got some great guests today. First of all, we're going to be talking to Michelle Reese coming up in about nine or ten minutes, you know, throughout most of her life that was not her name that was until she got a DNA match that just left you're scratching your head. And she discovered some things about herself and her family that are breathtaking and you're going to want to hear her story coming up in just a little bit. Then later in the show in light of all that has happened with for instance, the recent bomb cyclone that hit the mid west. And of course, the hurricanes the tornadoes the fire. Here's the floods. I'm gonna talk to Mitch Goldstone. He's the CEO and co founder of a company called scan my photos, they scan like three hundred thousand photos a day. And he's got some insight about why you need to get your photos digitized and the best process to go about that in order to make sure they're preserved in the event of a disaster. Hey, if you haven't signed up for our weekly genie newsletter yet it is time. You got on it. Get to our website, extreme jeans dot com. You'll find the box right there. It's simple. It's easy. It's free. And of course, we give you a blog each week in a couple of stories that you're going to be interested in and past and present podcasts as well. So check it out right now. It's time to head off Boston Massachusetts where David Allen Lambert is standing by. He is the chief genealogist of the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org, and he's got your family. He store news. Hi, david. How are you? I'm doing good fish. How about yourself? Awesome. Where do we begin today, my friend, well smoking is hazardous Jerry health but pipe smoking from long ago may be beneficial to your genealogy recent findings with DNA inside pipe stems isn't this incredible? They're actually finding the pipes were porous people who smoke these pipes years ago left. Their saliva inside them, and we're talking like from the seventeenth century the eighteenth century the nineteenth century, and they're actually getting some DNA samples that are viable out of these clay pipes on extreme genes. Some of the pipe stems that are discussing the article online include those that were from slave quarters down in Maryland and one of them they find that genetic ancestry was back to Sierra Leone, and they're even talking about excavating a local cemetery there that may contain the remains of some of these slaves and see if they could match that up with the permission of the descendants. So it's a very interesting story. That's still developing. It really isn't. Speaking of interesting stories going across the pond, we've all heard the greatest cold-case story as Jack the ripper. Now, they're saying that they may have DNA evidence from shawl, but hopes before we go with that as a positive green light. There were people like Dr Adam Rutherford over in the UK. And it says that the shawl the providence is not certain and that it's been handled by too many descendants. So it may have corrupted the DNA, so there's a whole controversy on social media on the software. Staying tuned on this story. Yeah. Wouldn't that be something though, if they could determine for sure the identity of Jack the ripper through DNA? It would be amazing to finally put closure on that after one hundred and thirty plus years. It's amazing. Incredible. Well, we are digging into the past and lake George while they were putting it some new houses they found a cemetery not Metairie from recently. But from the revolutionary war at least eighteen skeletons have been found, and they found the revolutionary war buttons. And they believe it may come from a nearby smallpox hospital. Wow. So you may have an ancestor that died out lake George New York. They may have found him. You know, a veterans are definitely in our news a lot and one I think really touch us home. And it's a great story on extreme jeans. Gary Mark what out of Minnesota? He didn't serve in Vietnam. But he wants to honor those that did and other wars in he is now planning on doing at least a hundred funerals. He's not an undertaker. He's a bugler imagine this. He couldn't play the bugle just a few years ago, he realized playing recordings of taps at these military funerals. And he said no somebody needs to be playing live. So we started taking lessons. So he could be that guy that plays at the military funerals. And he says, you know, I'm I'm okay, he said, I don't always play perfect. But it always comes from the heart. Unbelievable while he's part of bugles across America. And they're only five thousand of these guys and they do over one hundred thirty thousand veterans funerals year while you don't want extreme jeans. I like to share with you the popular tweets that I put out there. And I just put a strange one out there on baby names, and the fun thing about baby names, we know that we have them. But where did they come from have you ever done the genealogy where you got your name? Yes. Absolutely. Not only my name. But my daughter I've got a daughter Anna whose name her daughter, Anna named after my grandmother, Ana and it goes back into the seventeen hundreds in Sweden. My name is kind of weird because I was named after my uncle Winfield. Scott Hancock, Fisher junior who is named for my grandfather. Who was the same senior who is name. Named after Winfield. Scott Hancock who lost the presidential race in eighteen eighty the year. My grandfather was born who was then in turn named after Winfield Scott, the general in the war of eighteen twelve and he was born in seventeen eighty six is that what you're talking about. I'm trying to write this all down. I need a. Interesting thing in my family. The name Henry is still around with some of the descendants of my great grandfather's brother, and I did the backwards story on that. And it goes back to a fifth grade grandfather who was born in sixteen ninety five name Henry dole Newbury never know the name came from. Well, I would like to share with you a blogger spotlight shines on McCall Aaron rule. She is out of Utah. And she has a blog called making their stories known, and she wants to tell the stories of people places and things as a family historian the touchable. Her own research engineer allergy in general for recent one which was for Saint Paddy's day was my luck of the Irish where she goes on and talks about researching the Irish and touching on her own family as well as her roots tech summary. So kind of a person who is out there at root second. This is truly the next generation of Genealogists. And I'm glad they're out there blogging. Absolutely. All right. David, thanks so much, and we will talk to you again soon. And coming up next. We're going to talk to a New Jersey woman who got a DNA test results that left your baffled and the story that has resulted is off the charts. Unbelievable. You're gonna want to hear it next. It starts in three.

David Allen Lambert Jack Winfield Scott Henry dole Newbury Scott Hancock Mitch Goldstone Michelle Reese Anna Boston Dr Adam Rutherford lake George smallpox hospital CEO Maryland New Jersey New England Massachusetts George New York Aaron
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KGO 810

"Command Sheridan Sherman and Sheridan work for grant, visa-free war leaders who won the civil war. They remain close comrades. But they're in command of what becomes the American Indian wars. And the Fetterman massacre is when these uninformed American cavalryman and infantrymen believe they can build forts in sight of about fifteen hundred two thousand Indians commanded by red cloud. It's foolishness the Indians attack using decoys at the American army falls for Peter. They leave Fetterman with one hundred and sixty five arrows into him after they've killed him. Why what did that mean to them? The the the the whites both civilian and the military never for the most part never fully understood the the music extreme utilization of dead by virtually every Indian tribe in the west they look they saw it as a indication savagery. I I can't even begin to I could. But I will refrain the book is explicit. But the method that the Indians youth and mutilation of the dead are extreme as your imagination can imagine. And of course, it the I found that repellent but the plains Indians. Particularly the northern plains Indians did not torture denied mutilate. Live enemy. You say would not capture a soldier and then mutilate 'em to mediation, always occurred after death. And in fact, it was a hour practice. Look the coach of for instance, if they if they encountered it when we were soldiers in the course of the fight was settlement if they had found a handful of soldiers badly wounded mortally wounded, whatever they would dispatch them quickly with a war club one blow to the head and kill them. And then the mutilation began the purpose of mutilation was it was a religious at the Indians believed that the souls of their enemies would follow them into the afterlife. And that. In whatever condition. They were. Upon death and immediately after death. So the Indians would for instance, in some of the the the less revolting to the whites at least practices were to say slash the scene. Us loss was in their legs and their arms to poke their is out. So that when their enemies filed them to the afterlife, they would be lame. They would not be able to pose a threat to Indians who were enjoying attorney. And that was that was the purpose of mutilation, the dead. It was not an act of of close savage unquote with no purpose except Shiva retali- as most whites interpreted to be it was in the Indians way of thinking in terms of their religion, a quite rational thing to do. And I'm going to stay with the logic. And the reason because there are instances Peter's book is sweeping you understand there's enormous amount of history detail here. A while go to a conversation once between Roman nose. Knows romano's preach approaches, the General John Winfield Scott Hancock hero. The civil war who is cruel and ignorant and believes that he can intimidate the Indians from knows approaches him and for a parley, and which if it ends badly Roman is ready to kill his enemy, and he says to the general we we don't want war. If we did we would not come close to your big guns, very sensible. Peter. Did they not believe the Indians when they told them the truth? Did they not did did Winfield? Scott Hancock who is one of many generals. Who doesn't listen did? They not believe the Indians were telling them the truth. Hancock was one of the one of the more pathetic cases. He was indeed a true civil war hero. And in the eyes of many he was equal to if not superior to Sheridan in terms of is is that is the hero of the civil war. If you may recall it subsequently, he ran for president on the democratic ticket was narrowly defeated. So he was quite an he was a national hero. And he was a tremendous tremendous competent general civil war. And I am particular struck by he's a Regis not only ignorance by his unwillingness to take the time to learn the first thing about the Indians when he came west and his his belief that he could bluster and intimidate his way through any situation. And he he he was surrounded by for the most part other officers who were as naive as him. But he he did have with him. An Indian agent who understood who had witnessed Santa creek, and and and try his own way to prevent it. Who is cautioning him saying, look general Hancock, the Indians don't wanna fight you. If they wanted to fight you their villages wouldn't be standing here. So close by the last thing, you wanna do is his fight. They wanna talk. Hancock. Really couldn't see that. And more importantly, he. Although he announced that his Republican Simpson that his purpose was go out into the southern plains and make peace. He was quite ready. Fully instructed his subordinates that look we we come in peace, but we come fully prepared to make war as well. And I think he was looking for any excuse to to to show off US military might there. He was he was he was he Roman nose essentially, whereas happened so much in the west they were talking past one another. There are a number of Indians who tell very flatly to the army what they believe and what they know. And when we come back, we'll meet two of them one is a Kiowa chief Santana called order order of the planes. Another one is a Cheyenne chief buffalo.

Scott Hancock John Winfield Scott Hancock Peter Sheridan Sherman Fetterman American army US Cheyenne Simpson Santana Santa creek romano attorney president
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Custer's low class rank would result in like an obscure posting in the army Custer was lucky enough to graduate as the civil war broke out. And that was basically all hands on deck. Sure show. He just pressed him out there. So in April eighteen sixty one Custer joined the union army's cavalry and actually proved himself there a competent reliable soldier in battle such as the first battle of bull run Manassas Virginia in the battle of Gettysburg. I'm gonna do a future topic on the battle of Gettysburg just saying that shows up a lot, but keep this so customers to several times despite having no direct command experience, but Custer did become one of the youngest generals in the union army at age twenty three his relentless pursuit of the army. Northern Virginia is often partially credited for helping to end the civil war. Okay. So Custer twos. Credit? He wasn't afraid of getting his hands dirty. Unlike many other generals, he led his men from the front instead of from Bihar. Hind and was often the first to plunge into battle in February eighteen sixty four Custer, married. Elizabeth or Libby bacon. She wasn't initially impressed with him and her father judge Dana bacon, disapproved of Custer as a match because he was just the son of a blacksmith. It wasn't until well after Custer had been promoted to the rank of Brigadier General that he gained the approval of judge bacon and the go ahead to marry Libby. Join six yeah. In eighteen sixty six he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in charge of the seventh cavalry unit and went with liberty Kansas to fight in the plains Indian wars. So the Great Plains and the mid nineteenth century. They were last real native American holdout in America. So settlers were colonizing the far west before this award happen, but not too many actually settled in the planes due to its weather, and, you know, large native American population. Sure, they were scared of them at that point. But after the civil war far west became scarcer and the US government granted ten percent of planes land to settlers and railroads. So basically a confrontation between the plains Indians. Against the settlers and the government forces beat was inevitable. Yeah. Of course. And I'm saying plains Indians because they referred to themselves as the plains Indians as group, otherwise I'm trying to say Americans this. It's excellent. We try and be respectful of all all people places and things. Yes. So by the eighteen sixties most native Americans had been forced onto reservations or outright killed vowing to avoid the same fate the plains Indians settled in for a long fierce hold out in hopes of squashing, the native Americans livelihood. The government allowed the roads to kill scores of buffalo herds in order to lay railroad tracks. They also urged hunters to kill as many buffalo as possible without any oversight. And they encourage trains to stop. So passengers could get off and massacre. Buffalo work. Yeah. Yeah. The more that the whites needlessly slaughtered the buffalo the anger the native Americans grew. Yeah. Some stage brutal tax on settlers in railroad workers without regard to age your gender and to the native Americans the railroad represented an end to their livelihood since from Linnea. They'd relied on the free roaming buffalo to surf. Oh my gosh. So by the time Custer arrived on the scene in eighteen sixty six the war between the army and the plains Indians was like really in full force Custer's first assignment was helping Major General Winfield. Scott Hancock carry out. What was essentially a shock-and-awe campaign to overwhelm the native Americans at the end of the campaign custard. Deserted his post and join his wife at Fort Riley, Kansas like like he was out there fighting, and then he was like, I'm gonna head home..

Custer Great Plains union army America Gettysburg Kansas Libby bacon Virginia Buffalo Northern Virginia Fort Riley Bihar Hind US Scott Hancock Dana bacon
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KGO 810

"The union army's being resupplied with new a new core arriving as well and there's a dramatic moment it would make a wonderful play at meets headquarters that night council of war john gibbons of the attends david birney newton hancock howard sedgwick slocum all representing the cores available in this fishhook status what does meat ask them professor what does mead want to do the question he puts them as shall we stay here and fight or shall we fall back from this position to a position more defensible to the rear of course what he is thinking of is the position that he had always wanted to use as a defensive position and that was paid creek about twenty five miles to the southeast in maryland and most of the corps commanders who are coming to this meeting are expecting that that's what need wants to do they're concerned that he really does want to order a retreat but when they come together and he pulls them the corps commanders are overwhelmingly opposed to retreat at handcock again winfield scott hancock puts his foot down and says this army has done enough retreating let this be our last retreat they vote from shoulders and says all right gentlemen if this is what you want then we will fight here they vote from the junior to the senior that's the voting for mead and mead protocol invent eventually persuaded by them john gibbons my note says that he wants to correct the position david birney says we stay newton i don't i i wanna concentrate on newton newton says what about if they try to cut our line did consider that john newton was really functioning as george meade's mouthpiece he had been appointed hastily to command the evening before command the i corps and everyone understood the john newton was speaking for me and newton rather timidly puts forward the idea well perhaps we should consider retreating well when all the other corps commanders compiling in on the opposite side of that proposition even newton decides that it's probably a good idea to go along with everyone else but newton is newton is very much out of his class along with all this others there are about fifty eight thousand men they figure that they have laughed and they know lease coming again in the morning and as the caps of quiet down for the night professor paints the scene which is horrible of the ambulance core of what he describes as snakes of light men holding lanterns weaving through the wounded who are still on the battlefield to remove what they can and get them to the high hospitals the amputations are going on piles of legs and arms all night they have no good for a first aid and a men who are got shot are just left to die there's nothing they can do for them they give them opium in the morning lease up any goes to gettysburg college which at that time is unknown as pennsylvania college he climbs the couple and what does he see professor he sees the army of the potomac on the ropes now the seven infantry corps of the army of the potomac well most of them are a wreck the first cores iraq the eleventh a ereck third cores ereck fifth a wreck six core meet needs that as reserve twelfth corps meet needs that to hold cult sale that leaves only the second corps and the second court self has been rather badly handled an entire division is gone and of the two remaining divisions there's really only two brigades each that are ready for combat lease deduction from these observations is let's weighed in with one last blow and that will stretch the army.

union army
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"John batchelor this is the john batchelor show the murder is nonstop the violence the noise the gunshots through and through men do not survive got shot some shots in the civil war eighty five percent i believe is the the kia sixty five percent in the chest they amputate immediately because they don't or don't understand sepsis they don't have thermometers the battlefield is strewn with men who are dying slowly and they can't even been rescue them do this is all happening while the battles going on around them at the same time there are moments in the professors book that are unrelieved har as hood who has struck down that day as his division comes out of the woods and overwhelms bernie's division overwhelms the badly deployed third corps and now for winfield scott hancock who is my hero of the second day as howard was my hero the first day hancock's third corps arrives i hope i have this correct second corps arrives around six pm he sees that the battle is going very badly where does he deploy professor originally handcock second corps was to deploy along cemetery ridge right in the rear of cemetery hill they were to be the gatekeepers to the backyard of the union position as the third corps began to fall apart and disintegrate under these repeated hammerings from long street well the second corps was there on the spot and they were the people nearest so they get called upon for help and hancock sends off one entire division he has three divisions in his core sends off one entire division under john caldwell they go into the wheatfield and art decimated there then as the evening draws on and the confederates continue to gain ground and cock looks around him for other units to plug up these gaps and all he can see in the and the smoke is one lone regiment from his core the first minnesota is this all we've got he says and the answer is obviously yes i'm afraid so he says to the colonel colonel call of the first minnesota you see those flags pointing at the rebel colors take close flags colville doesn't bat an eye six that's in this one regiment throws itself pell mell and several orange on charging confederate brigades and so great as the surprise that they actually succeed in stopping the confederate attack so handcocks gamble pays off but at the cost of something like eighty percent casualties on the first minnesota it is now dark kness is falling and a note here of the confederate attack fails if i understand the maps and i follow your argument professor because the their left flank has dragged behind the assault and when the minnesota charged in there is so much smoke on the battlefield that you don't have a good sense of whether you're winning or losing and you get a sense of momentum that's why they fixed bayonets there's not time to load and fire load and fire because a man with abandoned is running at you so do i say correctly that the left side of the wilcox lang attack lags behind what is this right he doesn't catch up and that's why they break off that night they were actually coming in and staggered fashion wilcox lying then right and what really stymied the confederates wouldn't made failure was that right then expects the next units to his left to support him and they do not that is one of the great failures of the confederate army on the second day of the battle the controversy this night is that meade's headquarters the armies have retired to their two sides they'll fight again in the morning long streets division is now arriving in full you'll division pal hills divisions not visions cores.

John batchelor murder eighty five percent sixty five percent eighty percent
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"I looked at them i looked at the hike comparison is no they just liked your name and it's funny you mentioned that my my name's scott actually came from my grandfather who was winfield scott hancock fisher and he was named for winfield scott hancock who ran for president in one thousand nine hundred eighty the year grandpa was born and winfield scott hancock was a civil war general who had been named after winfield scott the general from the war of eighteen twelve and the civil war you since i'm indirectly named for davy jones now we'll have to find out where he got his name from that's right well i'll tell you sometimes when you're young you can find things on the beach and whatnot thirteen year old boy out in germany found with an amateur archaeologist what he thought was a piece of aluminum with a metal detector and it turns out it is part of the danish king bluetooth hoard of treasure that's been found area over forty three hundred square feet has been dug up now and the danish king harald grimace and known better as harry bluetooth rained around eighty nine fifty eight to nine eighty six and he was the one responsible for bringing christianity to denmark incredible what a thrill for that kid the problem is now for him it's all downhill from there that's true everything's gonna be pull tabs well every week la just spotlight a blogger and this blogger spotlight goes to our friend and colleague gina philibert ortega who is an author and researcher instructor on focus on genealogy and women's history but her blog is on family ephemera so cookbooks are what you'll find on their old cookbooks and really fun recipes.

scott winfield scott hancock fisher winfield scott hancock president davy jones harald grimace gina philibert ortega instructor winfield scott germany denmark researcher thirteen year
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"The civil war and even what happened after the civil war after the civil war in the south the majority of the plant that slaves were owned by african americans they owned them yeah big it was a huge transition that we had to go through and what led up to the civil wars very complicated but it's similar to what we have going on today california doesn't like was going on and the rest of the country and they would like to succeed and as for hundreds of reasons why is dodgers worn as a whole myriad of reasons why so it's it's very complicated when you're not getting along going back to some of these older storage you look at the relationship between the uh the northern general winfield scott hancock and the very famous southern general thomas stonewall jackson they were the closest of friends they both vied for the same woman's and uh they were room he's at west point they were tighter than tight often jackson who had a problem would math when asked hancock to complete the map assignments for him at two west point and and them into bobby lee and hancock would do that because they were such great bodies and then because of all of this turmoil and where they lived defending those states it put them on opposite sides there's so many stories like that of the battle of gettysburg was interrupted the most horrific terrible battle was interrupted when one particular northern general and again i think it was winfield scott hancock may have been another he was wounded in the groin it at gettysburg was allowed to go cross the battle line and visit the confederate camps to say goodbye to one of his closest friends and other general was mortally wounded they shut the whole damn battle down gettysburg wait a minute we're going to allow this man to do this say goodbye to i forget the names of one of you would know i mean ththat's just how different things were back then it was truly brother against brother is terrible terrible this is came j analysts cairn in the camden news center straight ahead aboard your business next gritted under fire i mirrored bettiah tomorrow.

civil war african americans california dodgers winfield scott hancock stonewall jackson bobby lee gettysburg camden news center ththat
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You are living your life independent of the lord we live in a time when a person is considered sophisticated if he or she ignores the savior and left sit this manger croston empty grave we're surrounded by supposedly wise men who courier just to disregard seeing guilt in their consequences those are the latest opinions but truth in the most recent public opinion polls are not the same if the world tells you that you are okay just the way you are down deep inside here's the nagging voice which says it is and so if you spend your dis trying to convince yourself that heaven will be yours without the senior in because you were good enough you are wrong terribly tragically terminally wrong it is by god's grace not ourselves that we are saved and that might friends is the truth jesus was crystal clear when he shared that he is the way and no men comes to the father but by him the public opinion polls may encourage you to refused to believe that truth but jesus remains the only way the only possibility for salvation god is made jesus blood that we should on the cross of calvary is the only means whereby you can be for you would have seen any ease the righteousness of christ that must be applied to you if you desire to be in heaven fraternity my friends before i finish i'd like to read a list of names some of them will be familiar to you most or not here's the list aaron burr charles pink name dewitt clinton rufus king henry clay william crawford lewis case linfield scott john freeman john belgian breckenridge stephen douglas church mcclellan ratio seymour horace greely samuel tilden winfield scott hancock james blaine james weaver william jennings bryan in no my question is whether those named him in common with a number of things all of these men were presidential candidates in the.

aaron burr charles pink dewitt clinton henry clay william crawford le john freeman stephen douglas church seymour horace greely samuel tilden winfield scott h james blaine james weaver william jennings bryan
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"News talk six thirty and ninety seven fm wpro i'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show the murder is nonstop the violence the noise the gunshots through and through men do not survive got shot with a stomach shots in the civil war eighty five percent i believe is the uh the kia sixty five percent in the chest they amputate immediately because they don't or don't understand says uh they don't have thermometer's the battlefield is strewn with men who are dying slowly and they can't even rescue them do this is all happening while the battles going on around them at the same time there are more oh man sin the professors books at our unrelieved har as hood who has struck down that day as his division comes out of the woods and overwhelms bernis division overwhelms the badly deployed third corps and now for winfield scott hancock who is my hero of the second day as howard was my hero the first day hancocks third corps arrives i hope i have this correct second corps arrives around six pm he sees that the battles going very badly where disease deployed a professor originally hancock second corps was to deploy along cemetery ridge right in the rear of cemetery hill they were to be the gatekeepers to the backyard of the union position but as the third corps began to fall apart disintegrate under these repeated hammering was for a long straight well the second corps was there on the spot on they were the people nearest so they get called upon for help and hancocks sends off one entire division he had three divisions in its core sons off one entire division under john caldwell they go into the we field and art decimated there then as the evening draws on and the confederates continue to gain ground and kok looks around him for over you unip stood of plug up these gaps at all he can see an american the smoke is one lone regiment from his core the first minnesota is this all we've got he says and the answer is obviously yes i'm afraid so he froze.

john batchelor murder winfield scott hancock howard professor john caldwell minnesota civil war hancocks eighty five percent sixty five percent
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Life they would be blind they would be lame they would not be able to pose a threat to indians who are and you're lying turn and and i would look for that was the purpose them you know late in the dead it was not of the savvy to be on quote with no purpose except should be tell the as most white's interpreted be it was it wouldn't it in in well yeah in terms of their religion the quite rational thing to do and i'm honest i was a lot and the reason because they're instances peters book is sweeping you understand there's an enormous amount of history detail here oh well go to a conversation ones between roman knows roman knows a preach approaches they need a general job when field scott hancock if you're of the civil war who is cool and ignorant and believes that he can intimidate the indians roman knows approaches him at for a parlay and which if it ends badly roman does is ready to kill his enemy and he says to the general we we don't want or if we did we would not come close to your big guns perry sensible peter did they not believe the indians when they told them the truth did they not did it did winfield scott hancock who is one of many general so it doesn't listen do they not believe the indians were telling them the truth and was one of them one of the more i said they pieces he was indeed a true civil war hero and in the eyes of many with people to not as period to shared in in terms of the with the word you may recall that the crime he ran for president on the democratic to nearly defeated so get luke lighten it with the national hero and he was a tremendous tremendous now but in general the little work and i am particularly struck but you look regis not only ignorance.

peters civil war peter president scott hancock winfield scott hancock
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Going to whatever they were dispatched quickly with a war club on blow to the head in killed them and then the me leishman began the purpose simulation was it was a religious asked the india's believe that there and immediately follows him into the after life and that in whatever condition meant they were and that and it emilio can death so the indians would furnace missed among some of the the the the the the last revolting lights at least practices work of saying splash the the news so you know russell in there lays on their arms were going to poke their eyes ouster that when there and indy's fall down to the after life they would be blind the with the lane they would not be able to pose a threat to indians who are enjoying turn it the and that was a for that was the purpose of you know laich from the dead it was not of savages young quote with no purpose because should retaliate as the most white's interpreted to be it was it was indeed indians when you anything in terms of their religion the quite rational thing and i'm honest i was a lot to and the reason because they're instances peters book is sweeping you understand there's no warmest amount of history detail here what go to a conversation wants between roman knows roman knows a preaching approaches they need a general job when field scott hancock a hero the civil war of who is cool and ignorant and believes that he can intimidate the indians roman knows approaches him and for a parlayed and which if it ends badly roman knows is ready to kill his enemy and he says to the general we would we don't want or if we did we would not come close to your big guns very sensible peter did they not believe the indians when they told them the truth did they not did it didn't winfield scott hancock who is one of many generals to it doesn't listen did they not believe the indians were telling them the truth okay i was one of the one of them were ascetic cases he was indeed a true civil war hero and the eyes of many he was able to if not as period sheraton in terms.

india emilio russell peters civil war peter scott hancock winfield scott hancock
"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"winfield scott hancock" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Club loaded ahead in kill them and then the me leishman began the purpose simulation was it was a religious app the india's believe that the soles of their and immediately to follow them into the after life and that in whatever condition they were i'm deficit and immediately after death so the indians would prices among some of the the the the the the last revolting to the lights with least practices work to say slash to see news so you know lot holding their legs on their arms for the to poke their eyes out for that when there and and is fall down to the after life they would be blind of the with the lane they would not be able to pose a threat to the indians who are enjoying turn it and that was the for that was the purpose him you know late in the desert was not active quotes average of young quote with no purpose exception of retaliate as most white's interpret did the it was it wasn't in the indians where thanking in terms of their religion a quite rational thing to do and i want to stay with the logic and the reason because they're instances peters bookies sweeping you understand there's an enormous amount of history detail here awhile go to a conversation ones between roman knows roman knows a preach approaches fade a general job when field scott hancock a hero the civil war of who is cool and ignorant and believes that he can intimidate the indians roman knows approaches him at for a parlay and which if it ends badly roman does is ready to kill his enemy and he says to the general we would we don't want or if we did we would not come close to your big guns very sensible peter did they not believe the indians when they told them the truth did they not did it did winfield scott hancock who is one of many generals to it doesn't listen did they not believe the indians.

india civil war peter scott hancock winfield scott hancock