2 Episode results for "Windsor Prison"

MFM Minisode 179

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

21:14 min | 4 months ago

MFM Minisode 179

"This is exactly right. Nights out the critically acclaimed blockbuster film that audiences love is now free to prime members on prime video win renown crime novelist Harlan dies on the night of his eighty fifth birthday detective Ben Benoi blunk arrives at the state to investigate and everyone's a suspect starring Daniel Craig's Chris Evans and onto army knives out now streaming exclusively on prime video blockbusters delivered all summer long. Hello. And welcome to my favorite martyr. The mini sewed. We read you your stuff. We read your e mail. They're your stories? Yeah, finally you gotta say. I sure okay hail. The whole world is a shit. Show right now, so I figured you'd enjoy a bit of a pallet cleanser I. Swear got all of the emails I read this week. It feels like that's what everyone is doing. Every single one was either lighthearted or just kind of like search. It's it's very nice. I think that's a good idea for people to just have have an escape. Maybe since we're doing fucking as lately like for next week, everyone consented and lighthearted stories I mean just do a whole episode of light hearted stories sure next week and then. We'll be lighthearted. A please donate money, black lives matter, and also they'd really huge amazing. marches in Brooklyn and Angeles for Black Trans lives because. The fucking government just passed a law that put so many trans lives at risk horrifying. Please read up if you don't know anything about it. It's really frightening medical people. Can T deny care to trans people. If they so choose, it's no longer illegal. It's absolutely it's inhumane and disgusting, and that has to change and it's beautiful because. Thousands and thousands of people showed up to show that it matters to them so if you have any extra money right now, donating to trans lives support systems of all kinds, but especially Black Jones lives the most at a high risk at the really good idea hundred so then back into this email. Hey, all the whole world is shit. Show right now, so I figured you'd enjoy a bit of a pallet cleanser last April. Twenty nineteen, incredible story came out of the little town of Mabini Carolina. Hope, I hope I'm pronouncing. Any. Vein, vein. Mugabe Mugabe. which is about five miles from where I grew up and eleven year old boy was home alone in the middle of the day When he heard a knock at his front door, he went to answer the door, and while he was talking to the young man out front, and accomplice broke in through the back once the second man was inside the house. He grabbed a gun leaning against the kitchen wall parentheses North Carolina a true classic. Everyone's just got a gun leaning against her kitchen wall. Yep, it's just standard fair and the man at the front door pushed his way inside. The robbers forced the young boy into an upstairs closet at. And began to ransacked the House the eleven year old, though was not about to let his chick taken. He creeped out of the closet down the hall into his bedroom. where he grabbed the machete, he had hanging above his bed heights. Why didn't eleven year old have a machete? Not entirely sure, but he said he bought it with his allowance money so good for him I guess. Anyway this tiny eleven year old boy takes his machete and sneaks downstairs to see the burglars bent over his TV console trying to disconnect gaming equipment. This kid said Hell No, and ran up to the robbers, machete, raised and hit one squarely in the back of the head, hopefully immed-. Immediately, the second unhurt intruder bolted while the man who had been struck turn to fight the boy, realizing blood was pouring down his face, and he took off running to the boy, then called nine one. An AP was sent out to all hospitals for a young man with a head wound. Sure enough a few hours later, he serviced at a local satellite hospital and sheriffs were dispatched to guard his door until he was stable enough to be taken into custody. Somehow the man ended up walking out of the hospital in his hospital gown, head, bandaged with a cup of water, and made it to a town, twenty miles away and hit out for a few days. Before, his grandmother turned him in a this was big news in our little communities, so local news stations flocked to the interview, the boy about his heroin. From this point forward I would like all interviews to be with eleven year old boys because he sent a message to the robbers quote, you shouldn't have done what you've done, and you're better off to get a job and breaking into other people's houses. Sexy. Stay, sexy and keeping machete over your bed, and never underestimate an eleven year old, Elise, wow! Some like the kid who was cutting down the the telephone poles level of like yeah, but. For reasons missed positive. Yeah, this this. This kid wasn't just raising hell. He was just like well. Come into my home. Enacted the machete La love it okay. This just starts high so the other day. I stumbled upon one of your old episodes. Georgia's said something along the lines of being terrified of being shot in traffic, and well, that reminded me of a tragedy that happened in my town a year back I live in a smaller city. A few hours outside of demoing Iowa called Cedar, falls for the most part. We don't see a whole lot of crazy stuff out there just. Just US suburban DADS, but their lawnmowers little old ladies, tending to their gardens, but on April Twenty, eight, th two, thousand nineteen, a woman picked up her boyfriend and a friend after work around two thirty a M, they were driving home along a wooded area on the highway, when a bullets struck through her window, passing through her neck and lodging in her boyfriend's mouth in the passenger seat. Oh my God. She was able to pull over and then it says can. Can you fucking imagine, but was announced dead at the seen. Her boyfriend ended up making it, but the police found literally nothing. No one came forward. No suspects, no idea what happened at the an article where the police suspected, it could have been a hunting accident, but who the fuck is hunting at two thirty in the morning It's unfortunately still unsolved today. You Bet your ass I didn't drive that highway for a few months afterward, so yeah, thanks for being. Being Really Cool, sorry advanced Georgia, for solidifying any fears of being shot while driving. Stay sexy and don't fucking drive anywhere Brianna well. Yeah, all right. Maybe it's weird seems like they should do something about gun laws in this country, but anyway that's crazy Karen we got. We got a lot of other. We got a lot of steps to take care of you. Okay now. The subject line of this one is my grandpa almost killed someone the fishing pond pervert. Good evening. This is my hometown, but this is not my story. This is the story of the time my mom saw her dad almost kill a pervert. My parents grew up on south side of Chicago where nature's hard to come by besides a few of the NASTIEST and most likely radioactive fishing ponds. You've ever seen or smell. Wanting to teach young children some outdoor skills, my grandpa would take my mom and her brothers and sister to go fishing in the ponds when they were maybe five through eight years old, they went almost every weekend, but but soon those innocent fishing trips turned dark when a mysterious creep reportedly find my eight year, old mom, and tried to lure her into his car. With promises of Ice Cream God he at after a horrific incident, where he revealed himself to my baby, Angel Mother, she used. Used her murder no instinct and told my grandpa about the pervert, my grandpa angry and horrified found the man by his car, grabbed him by the neck, held him there for about two minutes and shouted. If you ever come around here again I will fucking kill you now it may not seem that crazy of a punishment to whoever would do a gross thing to a child, but from I extremely old fashioned devout, Irish Catholic family. You know this shit was real when grownups drop the notorious. Am I right Karen? Yes, you're right anyway. The fishing pond pervert was sufficiently scared to death and was never seen there again. My GRANDPA is a common mild-mannered man, but if you fuck with his kids, he will fucking kill you on. Thank you for helping me through the absolute darkest and most lonely time of my life I was suffering severe workplace sexual harassment when I found the podcast two years ago. Your bad ass riot, girl, attitudes and humor have inspired me to fuck politeness and get justice for my harassment. Go to therapy and to kick off my comedy career I hope we can cross pass someday a Oh. My God, that's incredible. Yeah Wow, yeah! Well well done God asks. This runs in your family. It sounds like yeah, okay. This is grandma's near Miss with a double murderer. Hi To my honorary big sisters. The world is ending. Donate to black lives matter. That's how it starts, then says my grandmother grew up in Springfield. Vermont Springfield was the quintessential Vermont town where everyone everyone and cows outnumbered humans. My Grandmother told me that as a as children. She and her sisters often slept on their front porch at night to avoid the summer heat. This was really a testament to the trust in the neighborhood. Because there was no lock in the screen door of the porch, it was one such summer day in nineteen fifty, two that two convicted murderers broke out of Windsor prison. Fifteen miles north of Springfield. Their names were Donald Dewey. And, Francis Blair, they rammed a prison laundry truck into the gate, surrounding the correctional facility escaped on foot to MAG was in prison for a previous murder and Blair was his accomplice. They fled through the woods of Vermont to Springfield and emerged from the forest. Right next to my grandmother's home. This human entered the home of my grandmother's neighbors and family friends the weather ups. Dimaggio and Blair beat Elizabeth. DEMAG and my God demand and Blair beat Elizabeth weather up and her husband with a lead pipe while attempting to rob them, Elizabeth succumbed her injuries, and tragically passed away to Megan Blair were apprehended and sentenced to the electric chair in February of Nineteen fifty three. The two men became the last to ever be put to death in the state of Vermont. It shows me to think of what those men could have done to my grandmother and her family, and it serves as a reminder that life is fleeting, also a good reminder to put a fucking lock on your porch, Maria thanks for everything y'all Queens Grace. Wow just homebuilding on little girls sleeping on the. Porch. Yeah, that's crazy. That's that's so creepy. hellofresh America's number. One meal kit offers fresh. Ingredients every week for a super flavorful experience that will help you break out of your recipe Rut it lets you skip trips to the grocery store, and it makes home cooking fun easy affordable with hellofresh. She can get dinner on the table in just about thirty minutes, and you can save up to twenty eight percent by using hellofresh versus grocery store shopping, not only do hellofresh proportioned ingredients. Ingredients mean there's less prep work. It also means less food waste plus their packaging almost entirely made from recyclable content tele fresh is flexible and fits. Your lifestyle easily changed your food preferences and skip away coin ever you need. There's something for everyone including low. Calorie Vegetarian, and family friendly recipes every week. Okay, so you know I've been doing this since the beginning of the Quarantine Vinson I. Loving it I? Love it this week for the first time in my cooking life made risotto, which do make it for real. It's really hard and like not if you make it for real. Complicated and time consuming, but this was so easy, and then I seared these scallops with it, and Vince isn't normally like scallops. Browse like wait till I do it and fucking loved it. S Awesome. That's like and that's like to your dinner like you made it, but it's just like you had some real good help from exactly I like I was the shaft. It was a lot easier than it would have been if I just made the whole thing myself yet. Slow go to hellofresh dot com slash murder sixty and use the code murder sixty at sixty dollars off your first three weeks including free shipping on your first box. That's hellofresh dot com slash movies. And Code Murder Sixty to get sixty dollars off your first three weeks including free shipping on your first box, additional restrictions apply. Please visit hellofresh dot com for more details go by. Georgia can ask you a personal question always. Are you doing more searching than streaming these days? Man, I am and ask. For sure we'll H. Max is a new streaming platform where all of HBO meets the Greatest Collection of movies and shows Karen Oh. It's what everybody wants and needs. It's olive. Hbo Series like Westworld Insecure The Sopranos, but also blockbuster movies like crazy. Rich Asians or a star is born together with timeless classics. The wizard of Oz Casablanca and the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. This were all honored the one thousand nine hundred forty nine Oscars. The most beloved. Friends, Big Bang theory, the fresh prince of Bel Air. Let me name some awesome animation that they have Rick and Morty Samurai Jack Boondocks. Let me name some superheroes and Super Villains from the DC universe like the Justice League wonder, woman, and the suicide squad. Them Oh. Don't forget the family favorites like Sesame Street looney tunes, and Scooby Doo and new Max originals for everyone like love, life, legendary, and not too late with Elma. All your favorites in one place for just fourteen ninety nine per month, the such a good idea. I mean like just that list alone. That could keep you going for easily for seven days. Totally, but they also have like true detective which Vinson. I've binged watching the very beginning of our quarantine. Then everyone's watching the Sopranos, too. There's just so much there. It's really cool eight HBO series. You can watch them forever. Seriously Insecure fucking love that show Oh. Such a good show starts dreaming today. Download the APP REVISIT HBO Max Dot Com to start your free trial. Free trial is for new customers. Only restrictions apply. They always do go by. The subject line of Hello to Georgia George only oh finally. Hello, I just listened to episode twenty, two entitled that Tau Waterworks and mentioned to my partner that there was a story about a seventeen year old, surviving a plane crash in the Peruvian jungle. Normally we have a deal I don't tell him my murder stories and he doesn't tell me his spooky ESPN shit. It works fine for us. That sounds like fun the array. That's a good agreement, but I broke. Broke the rules because one? It's not a murder. It's just a horrible plane crash and two I figured that even though he was only eighteen months old at the time of the crash. He's from Lima and he might have heard the story ladies. He tells me he does know that story. In fact, the priests slash principle of his all boys. Jesuit High School Yikes was the brother of the pilot. But buckle up. Has That's not all the principal was also a friend of my partner's family, and told my partner that after the search was called off, the pilot's family begged the Peruvian Air Force to continue searching and brought in a clairvoyant to convince them the clairvoyance she knew where the plane was gave them specific coordinates, and that there were survivors. All the air force refused saying that they had already searched that area and the plane wasn't there after Jillian was found parentheses. What a bad ass! The Air Force went back in and found the remains of the cockpit exactly where the clairvoyance said it would be. They also found the pilot's body. He was still warm. SO THEY THE AD? There's theories that some people in that crash died after the crash. They didn't die. Immediately. Have full-body body. Now, also. Isn't it crazy that it's like you don't tell me Your mortar stores? Don't Tell You my esp. This has all totally everything love it. This has everything. My partner said that the pilots family was understandably haunted by the fact that if the search hadn't been called off, or if the air force hadn't dismissed the clairvoyant, they might have gotten to the pilot in time. Apparently, it's well known in Peru. The Julian story was kind of spun into quote Christmas miracle to draw attention from the fact that there would have been more survivors if the Peruvian Air Force had called off the search so early. Stay sexy and follow the Water Lydia and Miguel in Saskatoon Saskatchewan. Canada amazing. Amazing Ryan Wow. Oh, I wish I could have been a fly on the wall for that conversation. How exciting that must've been if for real an, but also it's like. Yeah. I don't think it's that common that clairvoyance are brought in, and then t are proven to be exactly right with what they said. Holy amazing totally want more clairvoyant stories. I want more like like weird coincidence. That couldn't have been a coincidence like well. You know what the one couple who you can. Who met and they looked at their photos from twenty years before, and they were like taking the same photo in different. Places it's I'm not explaining it right. Is that real? Lose One? Yeah, there's another one that you're like this would be the best version. And another one of these couple of. These photos and she's like this is my soccer team. When I was little and he was like that's my soccer team. When I was little and it's there in the photo, the soccer team together the. Owner yeah, that's. That's amazing that yeah, let's hear those Arrow countenances. We don't think so okay this one. I help. Let's see it's called I helped someone who wasn't in a safe place Ola. Sexy Ladies Thank you. So I'm just going to jump right in I worked for a security. Company from October Twenty nineteen till February. Twenty twenty, I answered phone calls to set up new clients or answered questions about the company. It was around eight o'clock, when I got a call from a guy and the first thing he said after I answered was yeah, I'd like to order a pizza and he sounded uneasy. So all I do is watch true crime? I sent an I. Am just three of my managers telling them? I thought I was getting a call for help. Never been trained in the stuff so I just asked him how many people he answered three Pepperoni and by that. That time one of my managers had rush over to me, was on the phone with nine one one I was typing what he told me, so. My manager could tell the operator, and luckily I could get a name and address I, told him to police were on their way, he said, thank you and hung up I just sat with my manager, waiting to make sure that we knew the police got there and not more than an hour later, the police showed up at the office to talk to me and they let me know. It was a twelve year old kid who is spending time with his mom and she took him to a drug dealers house. Seen weapons on the table and didn't feel safe. Luckily, the kid was okay, and the mom was charged with child. Neglect and a ton of drug charges I two days later because I decided, I wanted to work for CPS. Child Protective Services, unfortunately I needed some schooling for it so once the covid nineteen is over I can start school and be able to help kids. Kids on purpose. Thanks for being kick ass, woman, and keeping me entertained at my new desk job. Stay sexy and always remember the Pizza Code. Morgan Wow. Wow, yeah, you guys were murder. Order a pizza if you made secret help. Yeah Oh my God and twelve years old. That's crazy. Feel like all mine were real bummer today. At actually that story ends in a real. because. She's actually or they're actually. Going to help more kids that might be imperilled. That's. Very brave. Yep thanks for doing that I. Send Us your story is positive or negative at my favorite murder at g, mail or ESP. Don't forget those one. Oh! Send Them Esp. Try to send messages through with your mind for sure but positive negative weird coincidence, ESP based doesn't have to be a provable. No absolutely not thanks for listening to you guys and say sexy and don't get murdered. And Elvis you WANNA cookie.

murder Vermont Springfield Hbo Georgia Karen Oh partner HBO Vinson soccer Air Force Black Jones Francis Blair Brooklyn North Carolina US Harlan Daniel Craig Twenty twenty Chicago
#066 Unlock Your Hidden Power with Ironman (John McAvoy)

Under the Skin with Russell Brand

1:30:28 hr | 1 year ago

#066 Unlock Your Hidden Power with Ironman (John McAvoy)

"Hello. And welcome to under the skin is going to be a fantastic episode. We John McEvoy now John McEvoy is a man who was serving a big lump lumpy prison sentence while on the inside in a maximum security prison was doing a Robin only. Discover he's a the world record breaking marathon distance rela what an incredible story he's gone onto us. He's I own example. I'm using my own example to inspire kids and is involved in fantastic causes their help people of not add opportunities or people are still as we like to say those of us in the nine people are still beyond the door. Yeah. It's biz Lang on oaks and all about prisons. Then quite a lot about him letter. It's buy them and to help people turn their lives around is truly fascinating story. You're gonna love listen, Joe McEvoy or so really unusual story. You can be into obviously into he's pretty intense. He's pretty cool is an. Inspirational character from the gangland underworld becomes a row in imprison. Come on what you want your money. Then this is very good news for you, actually, one is mentors is out. He's doing really well. Get it get it on audible or get it on as an audio book is doing really, well all your book. Okay. As an actual book, selling well, I'm pleased with it in a bestseller list is always nice to enlist, isn't it? So if you want to also I'm going to be doing recovery live. I'm going to be doing a version of recovery live. I would sound the skin live. He's not really unders kings. They won't be a guest you'll be like the guests, and we'll be solving your problem. So keep listening and watching our social media feeds information of where you can come and see me live exploring, the ideas of personal development self-help new approaches to spirituality in ways that we can on this lane humorously change ourselves. And by changing ourselves commute change the world. The matters. It really has not our problem this stage. We definitely will. Thanks for listening to Meghan. Jane crab last week talking about body positivity and anorexia check out some of the comments that we've had Emily rose Davenport says this was so helpful to me, I've never considered the idea of categorizing and moralizing food is good and bad and the effect that has a new show of gray episodes. Thank you the awful by that as well. It makes me think about how do all babe is like, oh, I'm bad of not going food. We'll come to me essays sharing Michigan's Melanie. Arlene goes, I really loved it. Russ the episode of Megan up in fan of both yours for years, and I've had my own difficult journey with learning to love and trust my boarding body. Pasi panda is full name on Twitter. Body Posey panda and those like her have no question. Save me from live put my physical appearance for anything else. Well, that's good. Isn't it Niger says Russell brand can simply read ads and that will be enough to an Italian me. The rest of the poll cost was good too should prefers the ads usually slapstick. Humor has visuals. But the chair malfunction was hilarious even about that. Thank you Niger for bringing up moments of humiliation for me and the adverts although I have decided to really enjoy doing adverse. And I hope it comes across. Elaine rash. That's great. Thanks, russ. In meghan. Linsey, many body, positively posted shutdowns ho thick glorifying Abassi cetera. So many people student we're more than physical bodies, but odors, after feel at least, okay about hours that is the main message, isn't it Levy wherever you looked like you deserve to feel good and connected and diminished on account of physical appearance or Tronto sponsor, some imagined ideal certainly physically because I think imagine ideas can be quite useful spiritually and emotionally like an ideal of scientists and gone. Oh, look at this from Batman loves Ivy. Thank you so much beautiful girl. He's words or her wasn't mine. Speaking on behalf of us. All you're you're very brave Meghan. Thank you to Russell over and tried to understand what person anorexia goes through your might be going to hold Russell. I love you very much handsome, man. Thank you very much. I appreciate the compliment, aloe. As we know. It doesn't matter. What we look like, right? That's what we've learned. But I'm still getting a little Russia approval from them. Angela John McEvoy incredible story of an extreme life. A man up in the world of organized crime fund himself start up into a maximum security adult prison where inside he discovers that he has the capacity to become a world champion rower. Hang on to your hats. Settle down into your seat strap in pain, you to-. Now's buy a ticket to this one's Swansea. And enjoy on the skin. Trying to achieve equality with the nine election of Calgary. He's not successful route. That's exactly right in this era. Where it turns out. We were never the boss. Beneath the surface of people. We have Meyer of the ideas that the finance on the street. We're told welcome to Russell brand. And did this game. John. Thanks very much for coming on the show on fascinates to you, in fact, since of no new coming on intended mates. And now, I'm this. Joel McEvoy you're going to enjoy this poor cost you go check it out. Because this is you know, when you've heard about someone remotely you may not like you. So get the wrong. This is how our understand your story from off gathered. He was put away for serious time, you got Jim privileges. And then when you were working out in the gym something was discovered that changed the course of your life. And is a remarkable story. We you say out for the people that are not familiar with your story. So we can all be on the same page. Should I go back to when I was a kid go, and then saw go all the way back to it's a childhood one of of there's been profound moments in my life. That's there's obviously led to where I am today. I'll tell you one of the biggest things when I was a child. Was finding out by my dad died. I grew up in south London, and my mom and my sister bought me up. So I never had a Mao Romo to in my life as as a kid. And and I it was normal. Just to have your mom and sister bring you up, and there's obviously when you start going through skull promise, go, Pete people's USA, sautes me. I didn't have that didn't have at that. What where's you dad, another one? So I went home and Osma mom, a mom explained to me that my actual dad died before I was born and he had a massive heart attack. Imbed next moment is for eight years old. My mom was eight months pregnant with me and g explained to me from young. I each what death was and and I sort of had a understand in the one day. I would not be alive from eight finishes a bit from childhood. And then that then sparked something of inside me where I started developing this economic classes an obsession as a kid and interest. In history, and my mom used to get these magazines out in shop, quote, discovery booklets and every month would be a different part of history. And I'd read these these booklets him, Mike, the puzzles about Napoleon and World War wanna mobile too. And I remember thinking to myself that people still talking about these men and women hundreds of years after they were dead and neither had something that life whilst that part their life. They run if they done something and people remember them when are dead on. I was too young to oversee understand the word, but I would was legacy. They head of chief something with their life. And and the reason I'm short this is because like from being a little kid like I wanted to achieve something in my life. What then so a manifest itself out has been boy and being? You when you when you get older, you you obviously have dreams about what you wanna do. And and I don't know where it is coming from I develop this obsession with British Telecom. Is it boy obsession I've watched adverts on channel free. And then when my mom, you should talk from my aunt and uncle houses, I used to run around order rooms and Novus everyone at that point Batee landline in a house, and then when we were in the car driving anywhere out, the known, you say these Batee phone boxes, and I asked my uncle one day. I said how much money does British Telecom, Mike, and he said, they might billions. And from that moment that was what my dream was when I got older I want to own Brit shutt- com. Am on overshadow. She's to laugh at me. But honestly, Russell I was absolutely driven as a kid to to be a billionaire. I want you to embrace dot com. And then when to eight years old. A man coming into my life. And this is why I really understand about role models and good. I'm bad come into your life. I was eight years old. We lived at Crystal Palace pot roads in south east London. And this man coming into our home. And I'm I I will never forget today. Die. He he was he was immaculately dressed my momma open the front door, and he come in near the big gold watch on just want teeth black hair and are just enor- of him. I was Luchino and he went into the living room. And I followed my mom and my sister in and he asked meets gone Mike McCarthy, and I was obviously I've gone in my cups give it back to him. And I'm just sitting there and all of him, and he's talking to my mom my sister. And when when he was leaving off lap. He patted me on the head and he gave me a twenty pound note. And he was the first adult to ever give me paper money. And and I was just I was just enor- of this man by and I was like, wow. Obviously, I'm thinking about going to the shop and spending the money on sweets few shares in BT. Yet few shares enough that investment mindset at the time. I was more extended about buying some pick a mix Woolworth's when when he left I asked my mom who he was because no Mao had a mammal ever come into our home other than family members. And my mom explained to me that that was her ex-husband, and she was married to him before she was married to my dad and g got married to him when she was eighteen years old, and my sister was actually his removed Ota, and he come back into my mom's life, not in a relationship in the context of taking my sister out because she was sixteen I needed to have a son. I didn't have a dad so when he used to pick my sister up on Saturday, he took me out. And he and he bought me up block. I was e- summoned at fast cars, again, what she money always talking about money growing up as a kid, and he would take me out to these restaurants. And as I got older, I spent more and more time with him. And he started taking me out and not my sister. And then he was taking him out to these restaurants and bars with men for for. For fifty years old. And and everything was about money that Zoot money money money houses caused watches to us to tell me it was a multimillion avenue twenty one years old. And obviously, then you'll look into these people and a night where people that are starting to get more more drawn to it. Because my mom was working as a florist, and she was on minimum wage working in the floor astray, and these men were talking about being more immanent as flaps in Shawn's Elise. I'm Parison driving around in Mercedes. And these oldest the things that when your kids you won't not fruit only rich data com. Southern not your outlet to get an is is you can see a path. And it was only when I was twelve years old that UEMOA Granddad passed away. I'm we cleared. My grandad's flat out my Granddad at these big envelopes. And I am I went into his jaw on a found. This began when I opened up. My granddaughter kept he's newspaper clippings, and it transpired the mom's ex husband was one of the most infamous prolific arm rubbers in the United Kingdom. He wasn't multimillionaire. And he's twenty one years old to please try to kill him three times in three times at five acquit was at the obey. And then I saw I didn't connect the dots. So men I was going out with away. So can about the hatred towards a system how corrupt it was the politicians the banks. Ivan Steichen it not those dots and proper south London, gangsters and bankruptcies yet, and and again, what happened to me these these two thousand twenty Dr. Yeah, this was this was in the late nineties. She was not not not not not yet ninety seven ninety nine. And then and so of I kind of then shotgun to skull and my for become my teachers, that's what my for it becomes a their hatred towards the police in the system my hatred tools. What was my teachers 'cause they were Meyer for say. And I'll start turning from skull. I didn't have any respect for teachers what? And and obviously I got caught when I was fifteen vivant off at school. And I remember my head of year, Mr. Vickers, which was fund amazing, man, amazing, man. He obviously knew Mahim knife was because he knew about the the stuff because it was in the national newspapers. And he knew that is what I was going home to everyday. So because him your mom and her first husband was back through everybody's tongue. Wasn't about to give up. Our e played a part in mom's off, just hiking. Introducing new faces. So you all when you're young man who an ambitious young more. You have a sense of greatness, which you can only quite with economic wealth fruit. You know, the unlikely acquisition of an international telecoms company or then more latterly crime and being around and and having those kind of role models and so on. I know that you go track result is tell me why. And how did you end up going inside? So when I was when I was sixteen I left school. About that today. I went and bought firearm, and my my stepdad found out, and he then believed Rb safer committing crime. Only criminals now would be people my age I gone because buying a gun was just normal because it wasn't knowing it might sound to the people listening to this. But the life I was witnessed through as a kid that was just a normal thing people firearms and an are Bowie for the sake of Obama. And so I had one and anyway, I must say that found out so he believes obviously for committing crime Volta people. So I'd start going out pacing security events making deliveries to building societies and banks and filling up security depose. And then I realized I information on Solta criminals again, being I'm bishops so I realize I wasn't gonna come rich by making other people rich. So I went conspired to commit a robbery and the place had an operation on me. You could do that on your own when he was sixteen years old. I was at this point. I was I eating okay. And then I got arrested in a number sh attempt to. To rub security event. Where was it terror? Settlers say, I sound very dramatic. So what not happening me and a friend of mine were we're going to continue to rub this post office van out in Ken to be watching near and Dijana estimate. How much was in there yet? We we had some money. We've reporting foot what did you again report before about four fifty thousand pounds, and again eight ten years old, that's like a million pounds and we partly 'cause the night before. And the police obviously been watching us. We wasn't aware that were watching us. And then the next morning when we went to go and do it when the van was making deliver from user Tuesday morning. The police were following us the robbery squad in London. This was just on the outskirts of London just on the bowl of London. And Kent and the the the the robbery squad were were following us. But from a distance, and apparently I finally found is out afterwards. The the the people that do like the DVI roadside stops for no tax and stuff on the side of the road. Apparently, dave. We're doing this stop that moaning, and they were told not to stop my car, and because he was under surveillance, but someone didn't realize him blew the whistle, and pointing mccaren, and we end up base you having a car chase and the normal place, which is in obviously the robbery squad to-to normal place to vote the choice because they were gonna chase us because they had firearms and getting arrested for multiple angles. Yeah. Yeah. That's traffic infringement by rubber post of the people with the traffic infringement really realized because I there you go into trouble because they were told not to stop the car operation. Silence at firearms in the vehicle weapons and tired of Koch ice. And we try around thinking on east got the car before the head of copter gets out because I knew are definitely get arrested. So we we have this call chase. And actually we go away in India kenley injury. Now, we went back into London town. And I remember I was jumping I wrote he's gone fences. And at the time, I was I was grossly overweight. I never did any exercises. I told as a kid at an argument could hardly breathe I voted garden fences, and I was taking off mcleod's discard them in the Bush and insist river, and anyway, I got to these phone box. And I always used to talk paper money in my sock seventy ever wrong could always get a taxi to get hun-. I was always told by my stepdad, always make sure you've got paid for money hiding on you. So if something goes wrong, you can always get trained nine more you get TAC toe wherever and I was in this phone box. And I remember I heard this cost great shop, and I looked around and this massive guy rugby plasma bolt head come running towards me with his firearm up, and obviously I'm not making the connections. That's a police officer because he had no please markings. So ever an awful. I'm dead. I'm dead. I'm dead. And then he starts screaming get down get down. And then there was loads of place stike coming from everyone at the time. I didn't know police belie low income, and they dragnet phone phonebox referred me on the floor. And then they said. John McEvoy you're under arrest and a night. She did it was my relief. And then they got me back in the back of the police car, and then they kind of start to. A they they made it abundantly clear how much information they knew what was about to do. 'cause that moment I was pleading my since instead of them we talking about getting fit for bucks in. And obviously, I wasn't because I thought it was so white and that he took me to the police station and think so of that was where my journey my life. Then started to really go down a trajectory. I'll never even full. It would go down or go to coat or get reminded. And I'm eighteen years at the eighteen years old at the time by the metropolitan place. Believe was such a high escape risk at such a young age dot couldn't be kept in a young offenders. So if you're under the age of twenty one years old, you can't be kept we've Mao adult prisoners about but maximum secure doesn't exist in young offenders. And so they did something what they called start me up. So because it was such an exceptional circumstance. I was category at such young age. They hadn't had to put me in an adult prison. So I transferred to Milton Keynes has a category. I. Ian might they put me in the segregation unit there. And then they said like this did I do that. Because because that was a big reason for it. They believed to be category. I you have to you have to the you have to be to demonstrate to the ministry of Justice that you have the money means capability will and the access to firearms to be to make a determin scraped attempt from lawful custody and escape must be made impossible. So they believe that because it must have that in my links to the criminal underworld at such a young age that there was criminals there that would try to break me out of prison is interesting. This is a one level you sound very innocent. You know, like the young man like, then, you know, just Kate. And on the other hand, you had been around guns and that and around crime and had a knife at school that and presumably of low level crime was normalized in your environment. And it was few inevitable that you got any crime. So by the time, you find yourself in that position that you were about to be putting a maximum. Security prison. Did you feel like scared? And did you feel right? Yeah. No common criminal. How did it feel at that time? Do you know what? Do you know what? Like again grind up again in the environment. In which I was in prison. I wasn't fearful of it like most normal people be quite frightened to go to prison because he's something so normal to them having your freedom taken off you. But when you're growing up and uncles cousins that dads to prison what like imprison what prisons like when I went in there. It was nothing to be fearful of really I will. I wasn't scared of the system the system didn't hold any fits me would most normal. People you bright law. People don't write law because it's morally wrong to break the law. But when you're growing up, and you you have you've you've got these you foster these hatreds will system the when you get inside. It just increases said before to me like I said my school in Moscow teachers will my system and that was my first he went into prison in southern in the prison offices. It was very real life prison officers their reality like they look in a metal door and Iran. What the system stands for and again, not my hatred towards them. And what it stood for if they'd asked me to sit down on stand up later to go left or go. Right. And it was all about been. So for is precisely sweet compliant pioneer. No. But I was more. It wasn't more physical. Here wasn't violence. I was just much more so of detested system. And I I did everything to make it as difficult as I possibly could for them. So not give them my name and address when I was in. They wanted me to do stuff. Like, I won't go to work. I wouldn't I wouldn't I I was to watch a believe when when you went into environments people that that changed week that is what I was as a kid. He was able to Windsor prison intern project you of their life, Ron and went down a different road. And I rehabilitate it they would think to be weak in the world in which I grew up in his kids. This is a thing of a problem with is the few lucky binary, I feel like the system is corrupt. I feel the most who four eight thousand exist primarily. Control. I do not think that the state is ultimately benevolent people Mark I drive living in land than lie under ICL or like in some sort of corrupt communist country, and that's probably true. But when you talk about lights of hanging out in south London with the crew that your step that was we have. And they got we hide the system and the government's corrupt. No problem. I completely agree with it. Like for me. I don't like advocates of violence or that kind of criminality. But I don't need to do. I think that the state is automatically benign. I'm sure there's no people that work in prisons, really, really lovely and sweet people, but also encountered people that worked for the place that I feel like maybe golf on having that were forty in power as well as people that work for the police will start really lovely indecent. So, you know, for me, it's like your journeys fascinating one because you come from a position of light where you as you say crime and. You for tearing achieved were normalized standardize. So when you find in a serious situation of maximum maximum security prison, you can thief fall into are just going to be difficult. Noncompliant. Truculent little pioneer a person. What I mean? Whereas I still in for free. Now, it's still very scared of garner prison up like the idea of losing personal liberty. His scares me and even times being arrested and held in sales. Don't like it. I don't like Donald being told what to do. I don't like being the idea of like once that's like all right? This is happening now on the idea that freaks me out. So you go there you have because you've been of mentor to handle it because you've been around people to say, this is how you act in prison in this world to do. And you presumably as as you even in the place that moon canes prison, you had the people that you knew people that knew that you'd be there. We're going on you'll sit back tonight. You'll be exactly what not happening. And then what that date that sort of assessor by issue because as a as a young man in a grind. Nineteen years old, and you'll have in men grow meme lavish praise on you that you're in one of these environments with them as an equal in a match you prison as a kid, and and even prison officers treat you differently because of that prisoners, it did they wasn't they kind of well one that's eight, but they respected you because there was Har rocky of crime in there is in some the old Sam is that using their flight committing armed robbery and use the top end of a criminal. That's almost like an honorable sixties crime. Yeah, this glamour, it's not known sin and financial crime and sex crimes of they arrive disgusting and ugly. Offenses of like, this is there is always the myth of night and even to the degree where some of the prison. Officers used to wanna get when you go and trout, I would have to accompany you Toco, and they would want to get on your trial because they found it more fascinating and may be gone on a trial with a terrorist case. So they would want to come in your trousers. But like you said when I. Inside environment that did it fostered. So of that mentality even more so inside me and after a year of being there. I went to the Old Bailey. I was in courtroom number free. And I'll never forget, I was I was sentenced by a judge God and his trial for conspiracy spiracy to rob. And I am basically I go offered I they cost. It was. It was a plea bargain. It was to save money. And they they offered me this display bargain. And I accepted it that. They was say it was I went guilty to conspiracy to commit robbery on that day, basically. And then we'll tonight rope. They drop that she dropped cases where a genuine it didn't even do them. I generally didn't. I. They shot they Ahmad. Anyway, they drop these day drop these offenses. And then that then I was potentially looking at sixteen years in prison, and to me is an eight year old kid that was the end of it was that hit me because I food sixteen years now. No, we often probably ought to serve that years of it. But if I that moment when you when you see this turns around and says, I've never been to prison before to this point. And he says you look in sixteen years, I'm not dot com today. And he said, no you're looking at sixteen years. So they offered me they gave me five years. And when I got sentenced, I remember laughing all the place in the footwell because at that point. I wasn't in mathematics. I did a year and for our every year and a half before be out. So they they transferred me about to L, and then I moved me to to a young offenders and because the night downgraded me from category presents to a normal young offender because north Skyping sense. The length for time isn't justifiable and the ad to be you have to be serving a minimum of ten years. More sentenced to ten years to be just for keeping because he much money. So we'll young offenders absorbent two hours brave in Buckinghamshire. I was there savoring changed. I remember I went on a normal prison van turn up at reception before prison officers, call me, John, suddenly, it's McEvoy. I've heard that the young offenders institute of worth and that'll prison. Is that true? Yes. They are. I get why. There's there are intestinal. Intestinal. One hundred percent. So I went to the reception area. And over say, you know, what a guy on the stand. I'm in now dot the. they deliberately trying to press the buttons to one up, and then they put me on the wing, and then and then they come in Oakland, not my door on every five or six prison officers there, and they said they wanted it on my clothes, and that is Thomas you stayed in prison shoot clubs, and I'll say Jemaine, your we're going to you you've been classed as an escaped prisoner because you've been in Maui at old prison is a cat gray prisoner. So we need to put you in his yellow tracksuit. So the prison officers can identify us being highest risk of these prison. So obviously my hatred. I was at this. You're not taking my clothes. And I said, well, we're going to Nikki, then and imprison not Nickens. He's like when you break prison roles. So they put me in the segregation unit. I went in front of the governor in the next day. And I and I make sure I was charged re refusing the law for water, so he gave me seven days confined to sow. So you cut in the segregation. So you got a Kabul chair, Kabul? So tai-bo Abed a medicine control it attached to one unit. So seven days was up this point. I did take my clothes. They said to me when open up the door, your you're gonna go and be a wing cleaner. And I said there's no way I'm gone on that wearing cleaning up your shit every day. And I said he smiled, and he said, you refuse novel older, I said, I am I said you Knicks again for fusion to bear wing cleaner. They put him back in front of the governor again. Hey feeling in Saban do William making decisions why this point why do you feel the your default position is noncompliance? I think it made me feel I was taking back control at some power. I couldn't make me do stuff. They wanted me to do inside. You feel live feel numb to feel afraid didn't feel fried. I fell you, obviously, you've got the uncertainty. You don't know what's going to happen. It was only when wh- I can remember quite clearly. He's went on went back in front of the governor. And I got the seven days confined to sow again, which would meant two weeks and segregation they econ of small demand. You said like you will you kind of will bend to the system, and he and he smiled and remember going back to that cell and one thing I did do Russell when I went to prison and pretty didn't touch it beginning. I remember my my uncle spent twenty five years in prison, and I asked him once how he didn't come in Shusha lies, and he said on never disconnected from the real world. So we listen to the radio read newspapers and re books, and I took that strategy on my cell Foucault's imprisoned at the beginning. So I'll listen to the radio I'll read newspapers and Audrey books and the librarian used to come to trolley. And usually that's take three books off to two books off a week or two free. And I am a Quinson debate are started reading Nelson Mandela's booking rubbing island. And there was a passage in that book that Tom and I was a kid and it was about him smoking tobacco in Robben Island. And he realized that the prison officers was using that as a punishment to take away from him. So we stopped smoking. So I in my mind, if you think put Muniz room, you're gonna punish me. I'll take you away from you. So then when I asked me to go back up on the wing. I said, I'm not gone. And then I would you your guy, and I said I'm gonna macabre, and I literally spent the next three hundred sixty five days of my life on earth. I look back in it. Now you've been Richards for her look back a waste because what I've done this year of my life. And I literally started in that room twenty four hours a day. I didn't I didn't take exercise using actually size searchers people. Bring us get free meals. It was about six six six ten foot. Big bang, actually that no exercise time. I wouldn't have any exhaust. I won't go out. So I was I refused. Mike sauce peers on the yard. But this is where this is where my protests and journey started a physical activity because I'm not topping room for twenty four hours a day. I'm reading books listening to the radio and I'm reading newspapers and our star. It's done even motivate me to do it. I started basically doing these Sosa kits in my prison cell, and I'll get my get this chair and stick it to the end of the the sale because the was a Victorian. So so you had these little slots, let the air in off the windows because I was very small happy to win kits could open air clean, Erin. So to get fresh air is doing these steps put much air there. And I'll start doing Bearup his step ups press ups and some of them, I didn't even know the names of the exercise beginning, and like, I said, I was grossly overweight. Live shows you a picture of me as a kid, you probably wouldn't believe it was made. Now, overweight chubby I'm fit, and I just started off doing these exercises and down one all off the I'll put it together as a circuit. And as the weeks a progressed our Bill up to a thousand of each exercise and icon, explain to you like. It made me feel like a human being. And again, I I did a toke at Nottingham university to criminal psychologists and that he was interested about about my journey oversee fruit spoil imprisoning by Tom my life around and one of them said to me afterwards. What you actually twelve date was again, it was at you taking control of your body. He was about you saying you can't stop me from doing this. And this is my body, and and it made me feel alive or so when I would do though circuits and that so I felt like a human being I fell alive squall over spirituality is the about the nihil about the idea of season. The the more things that you're attached to in the material world, the Wiki war, if you're attached to your reputation while other people think of you that's vulnerability if you need food or alcohol or drugs in any degree in the these things Mike von Rable, so free the circumstances of your life. You found over the place where? An ability to deny yourself things into live within limited means and then to implement your own kind of practicies your own physical practices was a way of like. Yeah. Mine tightening control of their life. But also finding it sounds like you found a different way of connecting with Reality's very really unusual finger as opposed most people deteriorate in that situation mental health fly. I want to think about what endurance means in like an athlete context. Even in the life context now to enjoy different situations. I feel is that what is kind of faith a kind of certainty that things are going to be all right to be able to endure to be able to abide by the obviously wore it what we should get to John's is an important point is the point where you break some world records in a prison, Jim because I feel like this is pivotal because I feel like this point you've given us some good backstory and he's like a fascinating in youth for amazing experience. And it's giving me a good understand. And if where you're at psychologically, I and also has weird interesting parallels with spiritual life, I'm interested in a move, hopefully discuss later, but I want to know how you end up in niche, Jim breaking records. So it has to go back by John. Go back because this is quite important part by it. We didn't have to be Colonel. The record go back bay. So the the the record. So so the way I started my journey on the on the Ryan machine was jewel. Isn't it? People are to go see the end. So I went down a gym in loudoun Grainger prison, Jim, and there was an enemy that was a little bit overweight. And when you're in prison, you only get limited to a set amount gym sessions per week. So you get free, right? Po wing, and I went down there. And the reason I do that is because you can't cross wing. So because there's a separation in prison because the gangs, so once I know you on that one there's no fine. And no that's a safe wing. But if you make swings together, you might get one Gangnam one game. They start fighting say keep you segregated. But every time I went down to Jim this guy. Mckay was on this Ryan machine, and he had Jim but seven days a week. And I went up to him. And I asked him I said how come you've got so much, Jim? And he said, I'm raising some money for a children's hospice, and he said if you say to the prison says you wanna do that they'll let you come down to let you come down seven days a week. I asked that they said, yes. And I'm going to go some sponsorship of so many inmates from the wing sponsored me a pound fifty Pence needs for children. Hospice in in Nottingham, and I gave this shit foam to the head of the department Craig. And he said why bang there you go? Get me a note, then that was that allowed me to walk off the and go down to the gym. So I was twenty six years old at this point or got in the machine for the first time, you know, what I was doing by went through I'm in for a process where events happening my life where I wanted to get out of prison, and I often used this analogy that. I come to that point in my life where I didn't want to be a criminal anymore, and I want to change the direction of my life. Bobby traps, I was physically trapped light, I believe everyone in life has Joyce. We you have choice you can get up. If you didn't let me now, you've got them cotton room, we have choice, and again, it felt to me being a crack at it. Locked in a crapton and not being able to escape you're trying to get off drugs. So I was like that I went to turn my life around or wanted to change the direction of my life. But I'm stuck in prison. Ram? More articles is being very negative authorized, see something, you can only realize retrospectively other having you let time can term it in that way. No, no, no. I did do when I was. There was a conversation that happened when an event in my life happened in prison, which we can go back to in a minute and the next following morning. I was seeing the community and these guys were talking about when they go prison. They were going to they're going to they're going to do this person is a place infomer-. They wanted to stop this person. And I I cannot be round these people. I cannot listen to this stuff. No more, and then I went down to the gym and not gonna ram machine. And when I first go that round machine twenty six years old. I remember looking at those numbers on that screen and everyone left me alone for two hours one even spoke to me prison offices prisoners. And I it transcended me a prison literally transcend map IRS, and obviously I didn't realize about endorphins and make funding through physical activity. But at that moment in time. I just felt amazing. It was I I went through this process. He was like I could have been anywhere in the world. It'd being ran across the Atlantic or could have been could have been in the gym summer in the country. I was in prison and more done this become a habit. And then the next I went down again row twenty miles and the next hour ride down twenty miles. So I wrote the first million meters for the hospice in a month. And then if I keep doing this every month, this is going to help me do the rest of my prison sentence to get released. So I also prison server cover another million said, yes. And then I wrote another million free mumps and in one. A prisoner said to me by chance even you do realize five millimeters. He's five thousand K and actually quivalent from Robbie and from Britain, the United States of America, of course, the Atlantic and off what was quite cool things as chief sign so I asked Craig the prison officers, I could do it again who had the prepaid department and Andy Grady suggest just raising money, and I are deeply believe in destiny. And I think in life things happen for a reason and one day that was this incredible human being that changed my life forever. Call Darin Davis was he was a prison officer, and I was on this ram machine initially in Nottingham as a prisoner and he walked behind me one day, and he looked over my shoulder and just as odd finish the work at the screen froze, his eight tells you how far you've wrote in how quick anyway, my God, you are quick. And and I really an Afghan union prison you in this little bubble is not reality is constructed environment in which you're placed in I didn't have any. Comprehension of what was good, and what was bad are never be mad athletes in my life. Vic- serve needing Mojo adult life in prison, and he went away, and he come back a couple of days when I was in the prison, Jim, and he literally handed mealy sheets of eight four paper, and I had all these world and British records Darren linen checks out. Don did all the research. She must've just for plenty of asquith is quick. And then a common diamond the paper. We've we've always records on. And I remember the Russell I looked at them. And I was like they can't be real provide five million. I've done I've done food type before millionaires. But what would that either? Emperor pieces in the south. I'm what I Don. I didn't even intentionally realize to do are basically woken up disability in my body. The I didn't even know I add since I was a kid. I was absolutely shit at Pierce go. I I'm I'm not judging. I'll show you pitch off this cost finishes. I was planning on your phone. Let's you preach. Got on a break any world records. Let's impressive. And I I was I was just if you went back to my teachers now is probably a pretty been ranked on the worst to cross country round football. Football team. I always chubby kid to get go. I was listening to that. And then I woke ability in that prison, Jim and dominant spot with that. And then when he got me, these pieces of paper, I remember gone back to my cell, and it it kinda plant the seed in my head, and I for Genoa I'm going to ask him about control to do one of these records, and I asked him. So he goes Darren was he's in the Senate Davis down Davis Asia, he comes back, and he goes, look, this is the the records that you bought back on his paper. So they were Sabet. She was every record from one kilometer all the way up to the longest continuous row. And when you look at 'em. Did you think what can do somebody? I could already bright fruit. Already. I was up. I didn't realize that's why we allow because I said they'd call me real because I was breaking them though. I could break them at that moment. And anyway, I always ones could you break the marathon. I was I I was there for two weeks actually runs. Each mile was that it was it was always touching our new. A new beta by Ryan the twenty K. Tight Byron the for two K, which was twenty miles. I would note I was already on pace to break that whole Marfan because I was growing that distance Nydia every single day. So because I was rowing. I knew the split on each hole to just continue the extra sort of deduction six miles, and they the one kilometer and the ten thousand meters. And and he then I asked him walk into it. He went away. And again, there was a there was a governor of the prison Gareth sans. Gareth sans was deeply Christian, man. And I I wasn't I wasn't privy to this conversation was off to his diamond had this conversation with him diamond said, look, there's he's prisoners John McEvoy, I truly believe if we allowing for change charts duties record, it could be the thing that changes his life, and guaranteed you you can do it. So then Dahmer went away to the people that officiate in the records. He explained situation me being a prison in Banda prison officer, a expanded fish as the records. It would normally you'd have to do it in a public environment where it was witnessed or do it in a competition. So. So again in the public environment. And obviously I couldn't do. So I couldn't do it in a public setting. So Darren explain that to them they said as long as I had to independent verifying witnesses, which would be prison officers that would sit with me and watch me do it and just signed obviously to say I've done it. Now, I was doing is a lightweight man. So under seventy five Cato. So they had to weigh may take a photograph of me on the Scouse. It's an incentive that information often than I verified record. What's the significance of your way is different categories? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's just know me remedies law and heavy so anything under seventy five is is is a Mao your way anything over. It's just you'll heavyweight and in disparity in power output is massive revised sixteen started mining in relation to me being eleven Stein. They've got more strength and the first record I tempted to bright was for the marathon. And remember I used so of sugar granules not pure sugar because I couldn't have energy gels. Because I was I was in prison. So we had to put them in my being about was in softened. I would eat them and drink them as I was gone free is routes get energy and me, and Dan inside choke. So teach me a little bit about sports nutrition. Anyway, I broke the first record for the math from by seven minutes, and this and this was what the most. The minutes. This is the most profound moment muscle was I remember when I broke that record. What I realized that moment what I'd gone back to when I was a kid about my legacy in about shavings rank my life. I always might that connection between that money. And I fought that is what legacy an achievement. Moore's he was all money. It was all about goods in making lots of money in the more money. You add that was what you're worth was in the world that that was that was the indication of your success when I broke that record everything on ever wanted as a kid to have. I felt in that moment. Breaking that record to not be an average H even something that doing something not enough of other people could do and it made me feel amazing and wanna quiet. It make you it. Did it was quite emotional. It was quite emotional when back on it. Now. It was it was just fade in a mate. Nut connected. You. I just felt amazing. I felt amazing. It felt like a found something call. I was genuinely good and I feel like as well. Because again, it does have an effect when you when when when I realize. Went on to change projector of my life. I looked at my life. And I hadn't achieved anything with that little boy one is eight years old. I was losing on an imaginative scout in prison. I was selfish. I was consumed by greed that was my existence up to twenty six years old. And then I went to a men's to that. And I want to sort of achieve sang positive my life. And I when I found out I was good at spo- IFO that would be the thing to to make me feel like that. Yeah. What tell me? What was just this dude brass tacks a little bit? What was the record previously? It was. So I did two hours for two minutes. And I think it was originally seminar two thousand two as for eight minutes. So you Darren or in that moment you finishing as to two. So the ten what happens after you've done that. What was so then that then really plant is eight and my dream. That left that you've gone record books. Now dash stuff. Missile stuff yet. So he's still record Damara is. Yeah. The British record off Sadler. Stovall records is I've been taking over the is lot one of asset one world record for long the most amount of distance road in twenty four hours, and I wrote two hundred and sixty free and a half thousand meters in twenty four hours and a young Harvard University he broke it by one hundred twenty seven meters able literally like two stripes on a rhyme machine over twenty four hours. And I I was reading all the blocks and stuff that I posted about it. And he went well in front of me halfway so I really thought he was decimating my record at any exponentially slowed down the second half so lost twelve hours, but he obviously had the number to chase. So he knew what my time was plus he's doing David. I was I was watching because they pull pitchers up and yet these massive industrial fan and shows ghitis. Off in in out in Grange. But then did that then sparked the dream of being an athlete, but enough of that for a moment check, this quilt and believes in smart design premium fabrics and simple shopping. That's what Matt world and believes him. Do you believe in Christianity? Well, MAC Weldon doesn't name Mike Weldon. We'll be the most comfortable underwear socks shirts. Undershirts. Hoodies and sweatpants and more that you will ever wear. Not only does MacWorld and on the west, socks and shirts. Look good. They perform well two is good for working out going to work going out on dates just everyday life. Really? Live. Yes. Every day calling lawns of not been for you or one of a paper that yet. But, you know, the idea of everyday life, do that's what MacWorld another way socks ships. Look good for they have a line of Silva. Underwear shirts are naturally anti microbial right naturally. Anti microbial of won't shirts. They're anti anti-microbial. But you know, they have achieved that note for nature, but for the evils of science Fru officiant intelligence fruit genetic engineering, well, guess what? Macro Don is down anti microbial, but guess out for sweet old, mother nature. That means that odor. Which is a good thing. They use high tech fabrics, including Thermo regulate in fabric, dry, fit and ANC. Anne, Andy wrinkle resistant fabrics, Andrea and wrinkle resistant, don't you dare try to stop me wrinkling. Wrinkle anti wrinkle resistant. No, it's not anti wrinkle and wrinkle resistant fabrics you're trying to wrinkle this fabric had been killed. They'll league be they want you to become school. So if you don't let your first pair, you can keep it, and they still refund you no questions ost Oskar. Should if you like it what you want to keep it. These. I like the sound of Matt quilt, and I think they're all aced their outlet to pants and socks and things where everyday life new just Cape a nine no questions asked. I've got questions of looking on the website, really not the weekend bag with the in built phone charger and compartment for your things, you know, things put them in the compartments the weekend bag good back where you can ask you things cluttering up against each other in a bin bag in a plastic sack. We're going to do type things to your arm pit next Iran Iran coup. Andy microbe, you'll know you are not you can get yourself a weekend Bank. We've an inbuilt phone chargers built into it compartments really things that thing there put that thing. They're the website so easy use everything's categorized and see the options and colors available. It's not like and pixellated broth. Of mad into connected ideas. They categorized like a zoo. There's the monkey section nice. For twenty percent of your first order. Visit MacWorld and dot com. This is it sounds MAC K W A L D O, N dot com, promo code brand at checkout. So let you off. So that's MAC. And if you twenty percent of it go through I remember that weekend bag of toge about compartments for your things, and a charger what you doing what you doing right now. So important on a MAC world and website, if you are in the met world and website good you've responded to instruction. Thank you member. Brand at checkout. Twenty percent off Matt. Now back to this. Did you bring about like, a spiritual because in a way, right because if you think about the first half of this story, those people are subject environments, where criminality is the only option and fitness associate pro my personal belief is as more of a social problem and individual poem of people end up in prison. Not Atlanta, buddy. Then ends up discovering some incredible gift, maybe someone move right something. Incredible. Someone will start a new career path you hear people stories of people actually genuinely being rehabilitated who I won some questions. If the prison system is really about rehabilitation because they are economically squeezed like all public is our prisons are increasingly private, and it becomes much more about just punishment seclusion separation rather than a genuine rehabilitation. So your story very, very rare. But seems to me like. You had you know, evidently, you had a unique set of skills that previously never been discovered and more only discovered because of the denial of options a lot we set there. John about lot prisons in entirely constructed reality, you know, because I feel about oh some of what once in look like. I said from the point of view someone who's never been imprisoned. They're all maximum security prisons, then. Ah say into quite open prisons, but goes in then there's just the prison of ordinary life. We all live in constructed reality is held together by our beliefs. What Russell were I found that since I've been released from prison. Sometimes I have conversations with people when I can't believe in prison themselves in their minds. They sit limitations in themselves. So giving example when I was in prison when are set that record Madria, and that moment was to be an athlete that was it absolutely wholeheartedly believe that I remember Darren gave me a book called the secret was the laws of attraction and about negative influence that you live from the allies in blue into university. We'll come back, and I visualize everyday Adriana flea or went down the library. I reading books about what he's Olympia anarchy. Connect I was reading books about human beings. I've never seen before. And I'll share the characteristics drive the will to win the win three successful. So the attributes I always always always had since a little kid. The I the only people I saw that had ice I meant for each applaud them into crime. I realized actually. Not put them into physical activity, and then to being an athlete they could make my life that was destroying my life. When I when I put ice characteristics into into that world of being a criminal. And if I flip them and put them into sport, the massive attributes with Obama's basic sessile, and I remember reading books to these people and I'm sorry. I couldn't understand that might sound to on some of the people that we listened to this. But I had never been exposed to that these sorts of people before I didn't realize actually regularly. They will become new people to me let Steve Redgrave James Cracknell launch Armstrong. I I remember they were powerful. I can remember Dammam print of quotes. And I don't know two of we've launched his career and going back to that moment in time. He was the he was the pinnacle of endurance, athletes and damn imprinted. A quiet about Quinn and over them, but we're not do duties records. These quite was in front of me. I'd just I've I've just read these these quotes passages from his book, and it, and it, and it would drive me in that was when my my motivation, then become to be in an athlete, and I know. Believe it. And I remember people laugh at me lifeforms offensives doing two life sentences in prison. They they I was I was I was in the real world and even on my first pro here, and I can remember sitting in front of a crank who judge retard that had to sing. And each it's me what you're gonna do when you get releasing prisoners. So I'm going to be an athlete, and he laughed and even to me, I've never heard anyone in twenty years of sitting on parole bolt here and turn around and say, we're gonna come out presenting to be an athlete, and I absolutely believed in every ounce of my soul. That is what I would do when I got released from prison, and he didn't write my release because he said my release plan wasn't based in reality. Saying did transfer me to an open prison. This is a partial victory that one when you actually in the like. When you actually rowing right in the midst of it, how you when we come to challenge in and he can't do anymore of luck is too much pine where is the resource coming from to keep you continuing. What is that that feeling? So at that moment in my life. It was all about. Not being a loser. That that was what motivated me it was there there was there was a police officer that arrested me when I was a kid. And I remember when when when driving me to the police station, and he told me to look out the window, and he said because you won't be seeing this for a long time, and any always stuck in my mind, always stuck in my mind, and I'm not used to motivate me and those moments of pain on that rhyme machine. And I may not sometimes it was excruciating pain. But I've always found that motivate me to keep pushing. It was it was to prove them wrong. The I wasn't just a piece of shit. And I wasn't a loser. The art Kuta shave my life, and I could could be something else other than that. But what I really got other guy little bits Dayton are. But I always used to I find physical pain in training at test. So went for instance, other today, I'm. When I get off the bias. I swim free point Nike are one hundred twelve miles and then around the full distance marathon. And I'm and if you look at me in relation to face on quite broad and quite muscular in because some of them have obviously is the hardest one day gyms race in the world. But when you look at my marathon quick Aachen run off a bike is normally I'm normally one quickest Mafra news in annoy man normally is all people the. In Illinois, man, my PB's free. Oh, free off your stand now on the one hundred twelve miles, and then I'll get off, and that's my period on that in Germany, and and again, though, no professional men have done this for years and years and years and south from that and a bit quicken the me running. But when I do went on that run, and I get to the back end, not the last twelve miles like I can't describe to you the pain. How you start feeling about your body is screaming for you to stop. Because at that point you being continuously exercising for like seven hours. And you've been pushing your buddy till I e percent if he's max effort, so have you imagine a battery and it slowly ebbing away of energy you get to a point where you on fumes. And in literally mind, I've amount you are you are you are in a place. And it's the only time where I felt one. We've my body is amazing you go through this process. And I said to an African diamond he's like, you you you you go in. Internalize your whole body just seems to sink, and then you can even know when your energy zapping away, you have to take a caffeine, Joe and the minute you hit you take in and you can feel it in your body you can fill podium energy out. And it is just feels if it was amazing. I feel my mind and body a one but only comes from. Of pushing my buddy that hard for you to pain. But I find that very addictive, right? You enjoy that state of total awareness that we must have started exploring when you were doing them burpee sale by that Lewis and say yesterday when I was down at Jim pushups, right when like assisted by band, Mark you like when it gets to like on the first set six I'm not are. It's too hard. Like, I feel like when that feeling of failure comes like physical failure. I hate that feeling and I feel about the rest of my body is controlling to try and do it. I don't feel like the I can reach into a deeper Fink and transfer it to the body. Do you think these different when you're working for strength, increasing things? Yeah. I do. I do I think because I think what we're talk is very much more is more the mind, and the spirituality like what is your guy is the process you've got a lot of time to analyze where you're at. So when you. Do in German spokespersons, you can verbalize what you're doing. So we're not do shrimp training is short is designed aerobics by magma bang. You ever really go that time for that self awareness to talk yourself frit buffing buffet with us out. I say if I don't really like to use it what a finish growth his an area. Both. You can always improve. So you need to find that point of where you can't go any further for that today. Incurs then you can then grow from that. And you know, what your limits are to a degree where you can push for it the next time and the next time, and she told about strategies in the way is off do I cope with? We've pushing my buddy that hard for that period of time, basically is is an amazing journey. So, you know, entirely thinking about competing with other people uneven you actually kind of from your body. It's not like a guy. And right. Just keep going. You know, these feelings in the body, you entirely go into it and Fru entirely got into an accepting. It you do. I don't even care where like I remember when I raced. Last year in an evidence. I was running actually German guy, and he couldn't speak English. Good. Well, I'm running next job on the marathon. And he's gone packed up. And he asked me run in and I and I told him I quit we're running that point. We were running not just under a sub fair math and. Probably about twenty kite and the moment up to that point if she disorder. I didn't care honestly, I'm very competitive when I'm in that mode. But then suddenly when you get to. It just goes out to begin the racial competitive. I wanna finish as high as Okon and said, the UN this moment is suffering even have a human being identical bounce of time. Basically, you're pushing your buddy die identical at the same. Right. And then when when I said to him about how quick we're running because he's gone broke. He's mine sh went. We'll can because he didn't think he could run that fast. He was over eight four it was overrun running. Because he didn't other might not try and his buddy they just demonstrate to me, psychologically, the impact that had on a minute. I gave him an awareness of the running spayed he stops. When he he was running that pace before him, and he was running next to me for a couple of any anything, quite fine. You couldn't speak English broken. But he didn't seem like he was in any real distress. And he said how can we run in and literally just stopped? We'll can unleash some. That's fascinating. So tell me what are you planning to do? Now, you find yourself in this position because there's obviously little pill in the story missed out because you went from. Doing that five year to a double life sentence weapon there. So I don't got relation prison when I was a kid might not coming out. And I was twenty. I was out for two years, and I was living. So of anybody can explain it. I was even worse prison might be from west when I got released, and I was even more Germans might more money. Does even more consumed about great mccrindle network grew even more because when I was imprisonment for series, criminals that were from the continent, I went out to the Netherlands, and then I went down to Spain. When I was down now lead in that typical existence of a criminal, and I always say that drug drinking PA into excess escape from reality. Because you know, what's coming anyone commits crime in subconscious knows eventually the doors gonna come through and you're going to go back to prison or you're going to you're going to die young. And I remember my mom once said to me, I was living life in the fire slain, and she went you will crash and burn. And obviously, you mom your mom knows what she's talking about. But she was one hundred percent, right. And I am I come back to you know, I- kingdom for a week for a party 'cause I nine hundred. Never ever again. And and I will tend to survive operation minimum of a guy. He asked me went to rubber rhythm and not grade. And why didn't realize is the one hundred man police eventual peration watching him, and I am I getting arrested with him the following day. And Russell it was the best decision. I've ever made in my life. Even says that I it was the best decision. I have a choice to make that day agreeing to do them and getting arrested and going to prison and getting the tween life sentences, and because it changed it's made me the person. I am today. How did you end up not serving all at time? We'll have him. So when when I when I first got arrested fi, basically, they really did change the game. The second time they may be what they cost and as a double agree why Scottish prison, so I couldn't be kept. So my Skype had to be made possible again. But this time I was growing, man. So I was twenty two years old. So I couldn't be catching normal prison environments. So they kept me on somebody coda hatred shoe, which is a high security. He prison unit in Belmarsh prison, and he's a prison within a prison, and when you travel that saw Colt you had to go round place to stop people from Toronto bright, you out the prison van, and when when what to Belmarsh anytime said, you'll gone on his height your shoe nights planes, me it was so at that moment in time. There was not thousand prisoners in prison in the United Kingdom. And now that there was only twenty eight of us that would deemed to be such a high escape risk. We couldn't be kept that wasn't to be on this unit. You again, you have the money to means the capability and the determination to escape from Norfolk Cossio of or threat to national security. I wasn't effect national security, but I said, I'll take full boxes, and then how come you like about the of names and affiliations of your early life is at our respect is because my last moved on either know what these people do with their lives anymore. I I don't know. I don't know. I've been us have disconnected. I disconnected when I was in prison, which was released in two thousand twelve disconnected in two thousand nine when I went through the process of records on didn't want to be around these people know more for you to be a like a out of nine thousand prisoners on a list of twenty eight after shoe. Luck connections, the pre meaningful because I don't imagine their food that too many people that I've mentioned the rest of the people in that twenty eight is normally terrorists connections and start to win over and onto Okinawa's crime Eve's. So so when our went onto the Jewish show there is basically the twenty one seven suicide bombers, I'm Shay Cobo Hamza that was right finance tradition to the America. And there's another gone just convicted of a contract murder. And I remember when I said Ugandan, she's hide your shoe, and they took me across the prison. This little van and is the most we used to quit a bat cave. There was no natural light. It was it was it was like a bunker this anywhere. You can really explain it like on the exercise you out. There was so much anti-helicopter wire. And he's he's he's like hamster cage. Does that make sense you look up, and you could say discard it was how heavily netted we've anti helicopter wire that you could see the squad. But was still it felt like you still inside and the prison officers to me he knew. In the police station for free dies. And he said look you decision. You Eva bang are or you go out and take exercise your and you get exercise for forty five minutes a day. So I said I'll tell you exercise say took me out and then older doors in this unit. There's no Casey so electric gates because you can't take hostages from the prison officers and she'll wear locked doors, and then they will you downstairs, and suddenly you had the fading let us out so because the temperature changed about when on topic, and you got these this corridor when you're out Sarbaz always anti-helicopter wire and in the top, and then they want you out into the Charlotte. And there's a prison officers standing these. I'm no box. So you couldn't get to him. And they press this electric gate and opened won't this shod? And like I said I saw I will zone and the twenty one seventy seven suicide bombers in enough. Oh, I am in trouble. Like, I know I knew that. He was gonna absolutely hammered me. When when I when I went to cope, and they kept me on that unit for two and a half years. I went back for the process journey of the the cell circuits. The reading books are four I was going to get off at one point. Anyway, I went to trial and just for Machar wa I end up going guilty because I knew the evidence was overwhelming. And and I remember Mosley's said to me before we went up to get. I'm not gonna lie. He went. I think they're gonna throw the book at you. Because you're so young and I went, okay. What do you reckon only get and he meant desert? Good John's fifty fifty you might get life. And I was like, okay. And then when when I went up to cold there was on police, I saw the court and stuff and the judge told me to stand and the moment he started talking at the beginning. I know he's going to have. Yeah. He basically what people don't really Unsan even the prison officers actually quite surprised by the length of how long I got for. Why was convicted of conspiracy? That was not actual nothing happened. He was my home set. It was a plant in planning. And and he basically. Say that links criminal underworld recite extensive is such a young age. I would have previous convictions for conspiracy to rob. And he believed the Arlo is dangerous to the public, and my that that risk got to be negated. So he said sentenced you to life imprisonment with a minimum tariff of five years. So what he said was if he was going to give me a fixed term that day fixed him. So it was got twenty years wherever he would have given me ten years in prison base because I'm gonna give you the life sentence. I'm going to set the tariff at five years Sasso. I'd seven minimum of five years for can even be considered to be released. But no one gets out when you get sentenced to life diagnose, you aren't getting out, and you minimum tariff because basically lot now for instance, or I'm serving the remainder of my sentence in the community. So are served by serve just eight years of that five years lich, literally imprisoned. I and a half years just online two and a half in that eight chess you and then subsequently where it was. It was I was catching them a maximum security prison in Yorkshire for certain it was cold and transferred to another prison in Nottingham. And then now got me to a semi open prison, and I'll serve the remaining year and a bit in an open prison. So when they when I got the last sentences. Yeah. It was very harsh for the for the for the end users. The conventional view is that the such harsh sentences immediate out for the type of crime that foods like an assault. Fret? The establishment, you know, like in of gang-land type crimes are punished severely because it's considered a fr- even I saw oh, he's not no. One was murdered nothing gruesome or graphic or for happened by his power of to Sendai sign that that kind of the to the world of organized crime. If you are call is going to be terrible long sentences is. Totally like deck. And if you if you go if you go to Kuala match prisons is guys serving the biggest prison sentences. You tend to know me find the they've been there for armor Abreo drug trafficking. You'll serving the sentence still then yes in the community how where is the person like a win? You also like, obviously, you've discovered this Bill eighty Skift in yourself and white can they knew kind of a spiritual awareness in a sense an awareness that seemed like it was present even in new discontentment when you were located new also sense that there was more to life and. Obviously as you tell the story now, you are able to retrospectively trace back that awareness. But where do you feel like having had such a hard time at the hands of the system, you're quite willing to take personal responsibility for it to our crops? I I I'm not that everything in my lifestyle because I feel like having I've seen my I've witnessed it. I've seen it with people that the only person that that negative energy will ever affect yourself, and I feel like to grow and develop and move forward with my life. I can't have that hatred in me because I'm never going to move forward. I'm not going to do. I'm not gonna cheese. So for instance. I I'm I've got into position in life. Now where I I'm doing stuff we've political parties tried to implement change through the prison system. Change. So does this projects the twinning campaign? So they primarily football. Going to twin up. So that at the moment for eat five premiership football clubs and league. One and championship clubs going to twin with local prisons, and they can deliver qualification stay mates imprison coaching that. Yeah. Coaching employability, qualifications, MVP brilliant, hopefully open up some Parfait. So when young offenders in the fenders going through these programs that then which is the most important part is when they get released from prison that is power phase into improvement and stuff that they're passionate about and trying to change the system, but fruits spoke, I'm a massive massive massive advocate, and I'm passionate believer, DACA. Situ before there was twenty eight men in this country that would deem to be such a high escape, which we had to be segregated out of the system. And even when I was in that unit. I remember someone from the home office once come in. And I was trying to get off that unit and go to back onto the main prison, and I said, why am I catching here? We people convicted of terrorism away into gone for terrorist attacks, and she said to me. John people like you don't change. And she said, I know the first opportunity you get to run for that war, your take if I've managed to turn my life around Fru spoke and give me direction, and I'm positive role models. And he's changed the whole demand in my life. Every single one of those people imprisoned today can as there are no difference me, and they can take that same opportunity if they want it and turn their lives around as well. And that's why I'm so passionate Russell because I really do understand what sport can do for people's lives. I really really understand that it's not just so much. The physical aspects of it base I stumbled across this. I didn't realize it wasn't intentional when on got released from prison or join a rowing club. And I went down to this Ryan Cup. And I remember, I was deeply embarrassing. Shamed. Of my past because Assad hanging out with these guys them and see Olympics doctors, nurses, people doing amazing fringe realize I ultra for mothers, people climb up Mount Everest. And I looked at myself for what really done in my life law. I was embarrassed with anyone else. Set any of these records because I might gone Google, and I Google these these headlines will pop up from my pass. So I didn't tell no one they just saw me as this. God went to the rank of very really hard working people reached out to me that helped me did they think it was good. Yeah. They just they took me on face value. They just took me as John this guy. That was at the rank up every morning. I they're committed really wanted to get on people in. I was I remember I can remember being in the changing rooms one day. And obviously is quite diverse. She got you got your elite athletes, and then you had like some of the recreational rows that remembers since like since the coverage credited eighteen eighty eight and they will out men, and I don't remember. You're talking about star prosecutions stuff at the obey. They would judges and barristers and for QC's developing these relationships with people and not in my bypassing dot coming out. And my icon cannot it was the most humbling experience I've ever ever ever ever ever had him on the mound of people within the Ryan community that reached out to me and said, you know, what it broke our preconceptions of what we full people would be like that was imprisoned because I took me on face value. As a person I'd become and not as my backstory or why Don years ago, and I remember it used the most humbling experience, and that's again, I stumbled across that going into a different world, and I went into a sporting in world, but those people they they helped me they help nurture me. And then when they found out about my pass, it wasn't not even get away. Get away get away. They actually embrace me for more and help me even more and that meant so much to me. And I know again, you can replicate that again, and again, and again, we will these kids where you can get them in and used the hook. Spo- is the hook and CARA get them in because of a massively disenfranchisement society complaining they they've got. No, Dave, Russell, even like, I can't tell you my like I go into prisons, and I talked to children by I mean children, and you're sitting there and it kills me. It kills me. You'll sit in advocate this fifteen years old, and they're in there for life murder, and you hear how they've done it. And then you seeing gold little girls that have been sexually abused and never so immense. I knew they've they've been so filed so deeply filed by the system and they've been acted out on the nave ended up doing terrible things because he's been so normalized to them. He's been sown Omar seminar, and it kills me. We're not go into these places. And you see these kids fro in their lives away for looking up to the wrong road. And a lot of the time. They're being encouraged into these bad things. Do you not may not people actively encouraging them into doing it? Recognize that recognize that also there is a sort of let me try and see if I can put this across use cases a complicated idea. He achieved his license something incredible parv, which because you know, you've had any night Billy lighten are just like someone who's brilliant footballer brillo ever. I didn't give himselves at Bill eight. I just thought that Bill eight I discovered it possibly they worked harder air wherever you, and now you've turned around for a life of of criminality and incarceration to one of so self-development spirituality mentor ship offering a helping hand and aluminum pathways for other people that have committed offenses. But so much of what you experienced in your early life was about social conditions. Love loss of your father before you were born proper like you said your mom's minimum wage flurries. These of like economic conditions are not just happy. Winning on individual level to happen on a mass mass mass mass cow, and like you said ninety thousand prisoners in the Yukata time now when you talk about anecdotes about meeting people that are in these institutions he said, oh my God. It's just because at the wrong conditions the wrong role models. You still have the more the older I anyway, and the more. I learn the less I believe in the idea that people are bad. I just think people circumstances. Take him in certain directions. People say opportunities and. So the idea that individuals are responsible for their own destiny by finger is partly true. That like, you know, like we have something in us. And maybe if we're lucky through circumstance, we realize that thing, and we'll get to live a great life. But while I want to be careful of is all the people the on that don't have the ability as that you've had like by still at the shit podcast that you've had that can that can only be changed on like you've said a systemic level. Private prisons are not actually have rehabilitation a willingness to help. Do you see an appetite for that kind of change? I think that you have to you have to you have to think preventions betting cure, for instance. I so I do these programs reprinting football, the twinning cramped pain and David Dean, who's the vice chairman of awesome. He's here. He's amazing is amazing. And he's and he's using these platforms to galvanize the football community to to use this program to change people's lives. Bob, preventions, bent insecure, and you need to stop you need to give young people opportunities where they don't feel the need to go. Make those decisions launched you need to create those opportunities for about and a lot of the stuff. I do in the community. We have a lot of programs and projects again, even I even get amazed by the disparity in wealth, and the how bad some of these young children of God. Like, they've got no opportunities whatsoever and no exposure to positive role models. So not for instance, we've ought to community centers ravine London been absolutely savagely Cup. And all these you've sent you've workers losing their jobs. What's been created as an environment where a virus has been allowed to as attack these days or attack London? And all these major say his and the austerity is meant place cuts. And then there's no police then through even police these areas so then kits on. Doing anything? So they're hanging out in the streets. I go nowhere to go. And as big problem in the moment in chicken show Grumman where kids sitting outside the chicken shot hanging around on the truth. I know for after school and they got nothing to do nowhere to go. And some of the horrific stories from police officers about how these children, then are basically someone else an older gang members. Bond him, some foods and chicken and chips chicken chips that goes on for a couple of weeks and eventually end of the week. It's like you your powerful that food out, but you can't afford to pay him the pan the money. So you say just take that package up the road. They tighten the package up the road, their friend ropes the stuff, they come show that was the pounds worth of crack you now I may have thousands pounds kit Kat full to Pat, so the kids now, then effectively groomed into a gang so the, but people don't realize this stuff happens in these kids at insent out into the suburbs. And they're sitting down in safe houses, we phone lines. Delivering drugs all over up and down on on train systems, and they're being Bisi manipulating groomed lychee leaving skull. And these people predatory grew. In each young children into committing criminal fences. But this all stems, Pat, Russell, so again, the lack of opportunity lack of investment, very elaborately an elaborate system in the first will you thought through the chicken and chips, then do you go through the fight robbery? It a crack package, but when you're thinking, this is just my mind. This is what ways most effective on the even if you'll not preyed upon by criminality. There are other corporate and economic systems that will probably upon you anyway, and put you in debt, and even if you let things you've had an extreme life. Some people don't have the extreme life. But they still live lives are whether in constructed realities where they have no chance of freedom where they don't get to interact with their essence, I think you're an amazing role model for a number of reasons, partly because of the extreme it he makes it brutally vivid and brilliant story. But the thing that I am in Cain to investigate. Is. It doesn't get used as a story as any individual can themselves pull themselves up by their boot straps. If they've only got the gumption, and we don't need to worry about the systems that create poverty ankle whole generations of people. Just question off, you know, nor ever given opportunity imprisons my friends, I'm recovering drug addict. So at mar how lens of looking at on my suicide prisons ninety percent of people with drug addicts. They like the most of the crime is committed a lower level, no organized crime a crime, this relatedness of ideology did it because to they're happy the vast majority of people and then. No bad people either. They just people that circumstance these men lifestyle painful, I'm gonna have to take drugs. I wonder what would have happened if instead of the first mental you encounter being a person who says it's a competition drops you were score. If had been someone being interested in sport or been interested in spirituality. I've got no doubt. I generally have. Because again, I lose at my in case, I always I was out. I had the attributes again, it's mistime walk. And again, it goes back to stuff like when we're not go out into the community. I'll do stuff at community centers in young children in schools. That talent is in these environments is frightening. How not being given the opportunity to grow awful, and it makes me so fucking angry. When I see it and these kids just have not got the opportunity is tattoo, even to even people went up when you saw Pachulia sometimes people get very confused, and they think it's money, and it's not he's about having an awareness. Like, I've done stuff with kids where they lot fourteen years old and they've never traveled from as London to south Westland. And one day we took this kid from people referring it. So as a kid that's been excluded from mainstream education. He come across on a minibus, and they bought him across the Hammersmith and my friends, go rowing club Fulham rich, and it's a community around club says it's the basic local state schools, give him access to the walkways in attempts and this kid's asked if you go to Tesco's, so one of the coaches Meghan Jackson walked this kid to the Tesco's round the back from the rowing club. And he went to a this is like being on holiday and she took him to Tesco's. And then when he was in. He was like it never seen self-checkout because he wears out. There's no self-checkout because people vote stadiums. And she started crying because she couldn't comprehend how this young kid that I had never traveled acting as London like. Council does. And it's frightening anarchy go on and on and on the stories. And again is so limited it, and again, sometimes it should generational thing. Now's well, that's what the problem is. So I've gone to schools before. And and some of the people are so academically intelligent and when teachers assigned to mom and dad lie they go to unique they fit university is up north that I realized that, you know, university in London, and it makes me so sad that these children aren't getting that same journey. So if I can use my platform, I'm trying to do now to create those opportunities for free partners that I work with an open up pathways for these kids, and they do I've gone in and done some corporate stuff before where the brands I'm businesses of allowed kids, then to go up, and and basically work experienced days. So I a group of kids from school in Essex. We're not to a TV production company and shake, and I couldn't believe what these remember walking around and trainers and t shirts, and he was like this. She saw people lay just for people that had jobs suits, the amazing. So you what you've. Done is you dedicate in your life now till two mental ship form in different partnerships and making giving young of young people that might not have had opportunities. The challenge is to build different lives. Beautiful. What incredible incredible story? How long have you been out? Now, I've been out the end of two thousand twelve to five and a half years five years look at the life. You live in edible. What my everyone can live it. That's what makes me so sad lie. I sometimes have a daddy. I I was on. I was on social media on Twitter and coincidence, this this this news articles flipped up. And I was I was in prison. We have a guy and historian. So he's face on this on his tweet and of kicked on it. And it was from a newspaper, and he was killed and and he just had a by EBay, and it made me feel so sad for him. The e e come out of prison off seven that time he come out and got killed and he just had a baby as well. Or not it made me realize I follow. I've. Moved on with my life by just felt so sad inside because why I'm living again. I wish I I am no different to anyone else is decision a choice. I made it like you just you just have to believe in something else. And it can always get a very it. Doesn't matter out the hallways. You can get out of it. If you genuinely want to change your life. You can't do it. And it is hard. I come out. I had no I didn't have any friends of my oh, social quite I left them behind the not join Ryan bombs fortune that easily done. It was hard. I'll be honest with you. It's very hard because aren't developed. You developed close relationships. He was shed amazing experiences for certain people from years ago. But I knew for me to move on with my life. I couldn't have one step in one footstep in one foot. So I had to make a clean break and completely tach some people might salvage selfish. I needed to do that for me to go forward. Even Russell when I I go out. I remember, I wouldn't even watch any films that had any crime element to it. I want it just completely shot that side of my life away. I didn't want to think about it anymore. It's only recently where you do sit there and you do watch films. I by the beginning are just waiting to detach from that. Well, but argon I'm no different to anyone else. And and if you genuinely want to change your life, and you want to move forward and achieve something. Sometimes you have it has to be hard and asked to be difficult. I said when I come out of prison, I had no money by believed in myself. I nude payoff eventually, and I knew I just had to keep doing what we're doing a mile of my last shapes and evolved since that point. And I started guidance of skulls, and they were profound moments in my life about giving back it. That's what life is about the essence of life isn't about you like everything I've done in my life up to the age of light Lightfoot twenty six two hundred twenty six dollars spoke. It was all about me. It was about me as a kid making being a millionaire then being an athlete is inherently a very selfish figure. It's about you. You went in at all cost me me me me me. And and I come out of prison, and it was about me being successfully. And you get put on a pedestal. And then suddenly, you cannot these massive character flaws. But because you'll very good at Chuck in a bowl kicking a bowl people just focus on that. But but that is the truth. And it was only when I started going into schools and seeing the reaction kids Reverend on me because kids kids can connect to me because kids can see through bullshit. So when you stand up, and you Gun Talk to young people and you start trying to talk like them and your shot pretend your from the same areas them they see fruit at bullshit. I've I've done assembly after a semi going into prisons spoke to kids Tom Tom against to me. This is not tobe. And you've got to fringe kids. Just looking at you for an hour and went on leave head teachers, and the teachers go I have never seen them that quiet and in off through the mouse. And the responses you get from them like I realized that that is what my purpose is in life. It wasn't that is what I would put here to do. Good. A good purpose. Do you meditate? I really your best crack home. I'll find my meditation exercise, I find that. That's what additional action Saint silently quietly food knows what will come. What will come for comeback in five years time? You'll be enough of power. Yeah. You'll be swan features. The be it by then bowl of lie. Nice when join lovely chance. Yeah. Thank you. And you called dia fantastic. Thank you. Thank you for listening to that you glorious swine. I hope you enjoyed the John McEvoy episode. There are the lock it's an extreme life. It's an extreme experience Jones on a mission the in man, and he's doing some wonderful staff. Remember, let me know E four on Instagram tag me tree Russell brand or tweet me at rusty rookies. We've hashtag under the skin next week fern cotton, whose fantastic podcast, happy places. When I say inspired hours in some ways. I mean, we've nicked bit survey but phone is a friend, and I think I- important voice in the world of personal development, and in helping us to understand more. What am I say colloquial and accessible ways of thinking about spirituality and mental health? So great episode already made it and so on. Good is you're gonna love it. Thanks for listening gone. Get mentors. They say can get off of Amazon, we can get it off my website. And it was I wanted to have a rebirth. If you're going to dedicate your life to me, as I hope she might and try to consume all of these various products and subscribe to the podcast review, the book just really get involved in this community on the off Trump's that one day, we start forming physical communities, the former confederacy, and then a challenge to stay quiet. And those of you that have good reviews will be looked upon very favorably in this new peculiar utopia. Thanks very much Bye-bye.

John McEvoy officer Jim Russell robbery London Darren linen Ryan machine Meghan Meyer Mao Romo g Iran Twitter United States loudoun Grainger prison Joe McEvoy Angela John McEvoy London British Telecom