40 Burst results for "Wilson"

Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on CBS Sports Radio

CBS Sports Radio

02:33 min | 54 min ago

Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on CBS Sports Radio

"Sows Russell Wilson with Dan Patrick earlier this month. And at home. He did not enjoy being at the Super Bowl. Let me tell you Did not enjoy seeing Brady and Mahomes out there. He wanted to be. There should have been made. All right. If he is available, where would he go? Well, Want immediately throw cold water on this before I start, But I guess I will. Why not? I think we are one year away from genuine rust Wilson trade talks being Had I mean the calendar basically dictates. That the Seahawks have to wait until after June 1 to trade him. Because he would cost them $39 million and dead cap space if he's moved before June, 1 He's moved after June 1 he would cost the Seahawks that 39 million spread out over two seasons. 13 million in 21, then 26 million in 22. So Right there. I mean, I'm traded after happened so late now Wilson obviously is a veteran guy. He has a winning pedigree. So I understand that you and who knows with Cove it, you know, if well, exactly have a normal offseason as well. I don't think it will be nearly as restricted as last off season. Of course, I mean, last spring, the entire country was shut down, but E. I don't know if it'll be fully normal yet so You know, maybe there's not as much time to miss in the offseason, either, until training camp, which would assuage any team spheres were making a deal for a quarterback that late in the calendar, so Maybe, But that mind says, seems like next year is the most realistic option. But I'm sure teams are calling team should call and given the state of affairs right now. The Seahawks should be listening when they hear about Russell Wilson and Wilson does wanna is serious about exploring a way out. I mean, his agent can tell Adam Schefter only wants that No, no, rush doesn't want to trade. He wants to be fine in Seattle, but oh, by the way, here are four teams. That he would like to go to if he were to be traded. Don't get us wrong. He doesn't want to be traded. But if he were to be traded yet, yeah, he would go to the Bears or the Saints or the Raiders. Or you know the Cowboys. You would do that. Yeah. Just not saying just saying As they say, Uh, s o Out of all those options. I just mentioned those four options. You know, the bears. I mean, he he already I think Russell Wilson is already the best quarterback in bears history without even playing a snap for them. So congratulations to that. But with that defense and Khalil Mack in the playmakers they have on that side of the ball. You put Russell Wilson on that team. You probably bring back Alan Robinson on the franchise tag. In this scenario. You have David Montgomery. You have Some more skill players who are growing. There is well, that's a pretty good situation from a purely football standpoint, but from a sexy standpoint. The option, of course, is Dallas. I mean, how could you not want to see Russell Wilson in Big D We know that Jerry Jones likes to pull off the big deal. Russell Wilson for Dak Prescott in a second round pick. Man. Oh, man. Is that fun to dream about, Is it not? And I mean, of course, Jerry Jones would be interested in this. He's 78 years old. So he wants to see another Super Bowl and Russell Wilson has the proven track record in January that Dak Prescott currently wax so That's number one number two is he's better than Dak Prescott. And yeah, there's a lot of money that the Cowboys would have to take on with Russell Wilson, but They're also gonna have to pay Dak a lot of money this offseason too. So either way, unless they franchise tag him again, which would be acid nine to pay Doc Prescott with the cap going down to 1 80 37, plus million Really, you g? I mean doing You know that that one extra year of control and a long term contract is so important to you? If you're the Cowboys like you're going to do that to yourselves, you're gonna have a second straight year of Dak playing on the franchise tag. That's why I said it earlier in the show. I am so sick entire day of hearing about Dac in his contract enough work it out, and this has been going on for, like, five years. It seems like just sit down and work it out. Doc is the best option. The Cowboys have Make him pay him. Just do it be done with it. Well, he's the best option unless I guess Russell Wilson comes a knocking and then well, Russell's looking pretty good. I'm not quite sure why the Seahawks would agree to do this, because, well, as I said, I think that Jack is not as good as Russell Wilson. And also you're still trading Russ within the NFC. We can come back and hurt you in my viewpoint. The ideal landing spots, hypothetical landing spot for Russell Wilson would be out of that pre approved list from his agent. Las Vegas Raiders. Because your gut you're sending him to the FC. So he's in the opposite conference where he can't hurt you and also You can get a quarterback in return, and Derek Carr In addition to maybe a couple first round picks, because I don't think car is nearly the value that Doc Prescott would be so You got Derek Carr. It can be your stopped up guy with a couple first round picks. You get rushed out of the conference. Las Vegas to me is the most enticing hypothetical scenario there. But E. I mean, it's it's fun. Already and free agency is still roughly three weeks away. But already this has been a very fun NFL off season and we do have Tom Brady to thank Because he showed us how important quarterbacks are we? I mean, we already knew. Obviously, the quarterback is the most important position in professional sports. But he really hammered that home. I mean disparity between what Brady accomplished in Tampa Bay and what the Patriots were without him. Very stark, and I think you can draw the clear line of delineation between Russell Wilson. And immediately after the Super Bowl, going public with all this stuff, going public with his unhappiness with his lack of input in the personnel decisions and the lack of offensive line these had to play behind the last several years, you can draw a direct line between that and seeing Tom Brady in the Super Bowl. And, most importantly, seeing Tom Brady went in the Super Bowl and see what a quarterback can do when he puts matters into his own hands. Speaking of which, that's exactly what the Shawn Watson wants to do in Houston. We'll talk about that situation and why the Texans need to just face reality on the other side will also celebrate, at least for us here and the Northeast..

David Montgomery Dan Patrick Adam Schefter Khalil Mack Alan Robinson Dak Prescott $39 Million Tom Brady Derek Carr Jerry Jones 39 Million Russell January Las Vegas Raiders 26 Million Seahawks Cowboys Russ Five Years Raiders
Boeing 777 Makes an Emergency Landing in Moscow After Engine Warning

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:17 sec | 18 hrs ago

Boeing 777 Makes an Emergency Landing in Moscow After Engine Warning

"Report A Boeing 777 made an emergency landing in Moscow early this morning after a pilot reported a problem with the engine pilot of the Hong Kong to Madrid flight reported a failure of one of the left engine control channels plane reportedly landed safely. No one was injured.

Boeing Moscow Madrid Hong Kong
Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

01:15 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM Show

"Mortgage studios. When you need certainty in the home buying process with alone that fits your wife rocket can 855 to 1 to four. CBS is the number 855 to 1 to 4 to 27 having a little issue with their phones. We can still call. We've frank a message and I'll relay that on the air. So Frank's like my intermediary with the people I like that. It's a Christian Birmingham reached us. Talking about the Jeremy Lin story. Being called the Corona virus on the court, the MBA starting an investigation. Was in Birmingham like me is curious about finding out who Called Lin that word, obviously disgusting insults and we'll see the MBA quickly getting to the bottom of that, he said. He's okay with the logo change to Kobe because the end of the day it's just a logo. I can see that logic, but I actually that's I want to change to Kobe for the opposite reason. Because I don't think that the NBA logo is just some meaningless logo. It first of all is ubiquitous. It's plastered everywhere. Posters, courts ads. And I understand the cynicism. Of Oh, another logo change. I mean, what is this? Just another meaningless gesture, But the MBA logo is everywhere. Clearly, it means something to Kyrie. Irving, who spoke very passionately Thursday about his desire to see the logo change He had an Instagram post is well. And He wanted to change the Kobe and I don't think he's speaking. On an island. I think that a lot of other players in the league have that thought they have a lot of respect for Kobe Bryant, and he really embodies the modern NBA superstar and so many respects you saw after that helicopter crashed. In January last year, just the outpouring of support from every facet every corner of the league. And as Kyrie sent on Instagram And, as he said again to the press on Thursday night. The MBA is a league that was built by black men or his Kyrie calls, says Black Kings. And the NBA is the league built by black men should celebrate that. It is one of the rare institutions we have in this country that has always not always but Long before many others has elevated black men and continues to elevate Blackman and I think it would be totally appropriate. For the NBA to celebrate that with its logo and Jerry West himself. Is on the record. Saying that he doesn't Understand. Why he's on the NBA logo. Jerry West is on the record, saying It's quote, embarrassing. That he's the sole wet On the logo. So my rule of thumb A lot of these instances is you can't be more offended than the victim. So if Jerry West Ultimately doesn't care at all about being on the NBA logo. Then what are you doing? Caring about whether Jerry West design the NBA logo. You can also, by the way, Find me on Twitter at Alex Dreamer. One is my Twitter handle that again is at Alex Creamer won for the first half of the show. We're spending a lot of time talking about who's next. On the NFL Quarterback Carousel. We started the off season with Matthew Stafford, then Carson Wentz. We have a little bit of a lull here, but the rumors have not stopped and we had a bombshell athletic story. That was published on Thursday about Russell Wilson in the Seattle Seahawks. What is driving the rift? Between Russell Wilson in the Seahawks power in control. It's a three byline special. This is the kind of stuff used to see The New York Times or The Washington Post. Pull out when there's a big trump scandal going on, So you know, it's the real deal. Michael Sean du Gar, Mike Sando, Jason Jenks. On the bio wines. We actually had Michael Sean du Gar on the show and our first hour to talk about his reporting on this and his very interesting thoughts that if the Seahawks do not win The Super Bowl in 2021. Then one of Russell Wilson or Pete Carroll, he thinks will have to go before the 2022 seasons. So He falls the team Daley obviously as the beat reporter for the athletic He knows a lot more about the Seahawks and most if not all of us. So he's saying Michael Sean du Gar, that If the Seahawks are not do not win the Super Bowl this upcoming season one of Wilson or Pete Carroll has to go. And clearly If that choice has to be made. The Seahawks are going to go with Russell Wilson. I mean, that's close to a no brainer. I understand. Pete Carroll is a very good coach. But number one Pete Carroll is 69. Russell Wilson is 32. Number two. Pete Carroll, Historically in the NFL is not a very good coach when Russell Wilson is not his quarterback, at least record wise. He's a sub 500 coach in his career in the NFL without Russell Wilson. The Seahawks are acting arrogantly with Russ. We learned from the athletic story. That Wilson was so perturbed. By the attitude of Carol and the Seahawks coach is that he stormed out of a meeting with them. Before a week 11. Against the Arizona Cardinals. Hears from that story Quote Before the Thursday night game against Arizona. Wilson met with this coaches. For some time. Wilson has sought even pushed for influence within the organization regarding scheme and personnel. In the meeting, he outlined his own ideas for how to fix the offense. His suggestions were dismissed, multiple sources told the athletic Another reminder Wilson that the Seahawks did not see him the same way he saw himself. He stormed out of the room. I mean, really? What's be honest here. Pete Carroll..

Matthew Stafford Carson Wentz Kyrie Pete Carroll Mike Sando Jason Jenks Russell Wilson Thursday Night Jerry West CBS Thursday Wilson Jeremy Lin 2022 Michael Sean Du Gar Seahawks Arizona Cardinals Kobe Bryant January Last Year Black Kings
Isaiah Wilson Reportedly Upset With the Titans for Not Acknowledging His Birthday

First & 10s

02:47 min | 20 hrs ago

Isaiah Wilson Reportedly Upset With the Titans for Not Acknowledging His Birthday

"Wilson offensive tackle. We turned twenty-two on February 12th. Great twenty-two. That's one more than 21 no one cares and according to sources Isaiah had quote begun to sour a situation in Tennessee after the Titans did not wish him a happy birthday earlier this week. He tweeted quote. I'm done with football as a Titan. No further comments. He has since deleted the Tweet regardless of the birthday situation the Titans GM also put Isaiah on blast last week saying that, you know the player they drafted last year was not the player they got and that he needed to rededicate himself to being a pro football player. I can't imagine God If you're on Twitter crying about a birthday wish I can't imagine how things would have soured like just internally right when I first saw this article the first my first very thought was who and I'm sure half the team probably thinks the same thing. They're probably like Isaiah who like was this guy even a starter? Well, I remember okay, so you probably don't cuz it was a while ago, but during the draft remember it was the draft this past year of think of socially distanced, you know, everybody was at home set up that way like on a giant Zoom, right? So remember he was the one that got drafted and then the girlfriend went and sat in his lap and the mom was like hm. Like we talked about this whole thing about how you would have been just super like tiger mom to with Hudson if this girl was all up in a slap cuz she was like get up get up out of his lap. I don't remember. I don't remember. Yeah, I'm going to share my slept since then. That was a long time. I barely remember what we talked about God. I'm going to share my screen with you. Here's the part. Let me meet this. This is very compelling. Here we go. Okay, so see how she's there hugging him. Oh, yeah. I think I'm offering yes and then the moms like Scrooge back up. Get up. Get out my gosh hilarious watch Amie. We're going to replay this song and watch that she's just all about she's my boyfriend. I just hit It Rich. Oh, he's going to buy me a bitch get up out that way. I don't remember them know podcast how you would be that same mom. That's terrible. Terrible. She's like a brilliant like pick that bitch up and like a anyway off. I mean somebody needs to learn some you know, Humble Pie skills this Isaiah Wilson or whatever the hell his name is like you just joined the team dude, you're twenty-two years old me

Isaiah Titans Football Wilson Tennessee GM Twitter Hudson Amie Isaiah Wilson
Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:53 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Trading Russell Wilson more from Como's Ville Swerts linebacker. KJ right, enters free agency after a 10 year run in Seattle so he could be with another team. But right speaking with the NFL network's good Morning football doesn't expect to Russell Wilson trade to happen. Russ isn't going anywhere. As long as I'm belongs, O B in Seattle restaurant will be the quarterback and he means too much to us. He means way too much. It's organization means way too much to the city. Wilson's agent says the quarterback is not demanding a trade. KJ right is the nominee by the way for the male Seattle sports star of 2020. Winners revealed tomorrow night College football in Puyallup tomorrow evening, Pacific Lutheran looks for little pay back against Puget Sound. Were lost to the loggers earlier this month. Washington Huskies final regular season men's basketball game Tomorrow Morning and Arizona. The dogs lost by eight last night at issue the record now five, and 19 Washington State, lost to the Wildcats.

Russell Wilson Puyallup Russ Wilson Tomorrow Evening Tomorrow Night Five Wildcats 2020 Tomorrow Morning O B Washington Huskies Pacific Lutheran Puget Sound Seattle Kj Right Last Night NFL 19 Eight
Wilson scores winner on power play, Capitals beat Penguins

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Wilson scores winner on power play, Capitals beat Penguins

"Tom Wilson's power play goal was seven twenty left to go in the third period snapped a two all tie in the capital's went on to beat the penguins five to two the caps led one nothing after one on a goal by Nicklas Backstrom T. J. Oshie made it to nothing early in the third with this fifth of the year but the pens fought back as Brandon Thomas scored a shorthanded goal and that was followed up by Jake consul seven to tie the game Wilson's goal came as a result of Kris letang losing his stick we were able to execute and it was in the back of the net so that's a that's a fortunate break for us but the on there is like I put it in in the power did a good job to the to do that VTech vanished sack made twenty six saves in the win Craig heist Washington

Nicklas Backstrom T. J. Oshie Tom Wilson Brandon Thomas Jake Consul Kris Letang Penguins Wilson Vtech Craig Heist Washington
Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:42 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Seattle manager Scott Service says it could mean seven inning ball games this spring. Let's talk of other teams. Obviously, we do have the flexibility to spring up playing some shorter games. Um, but right now, we're looking like we would like to happen on any games. Mariners play the Padres in Peoria, Sunday. Atlanta Braves give manager Brian Snitker a multi year contract extension, appearing on NFL Network's Good Morning Football. Seattle linebacker KJ Right, says he doesn't expect the Seahawks to trade quarterback Russell Wilson because he means too much the organization and the city. Trade story got traction this week with articles in both the athletic and ESPN and Tiger Woods has been transferred to Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, still recovering from ankle and legs surgeries after that violent SUV crash earlier.

Russell Wilson Brian Snitker Atlanta Braves Seahawks Los Angeles Peoria Espn Kj Right Padres Sunday Scott Service Mariners Nfl Network Both This Week Good Morning Football Woods Tiger Seven Inning Ball Cedars Sinai Hospital
Russell Wilson reportedly “stormed out” after his ideas for fixing Seattle’s offense were dismissed

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell

00:27 sec | 1 d ago

Russell Wilson reportedly “stormed out” after his ideas for fixing Seattle’s offense were dismissed

"There was a report via the athletic. That russell wilson and the coaching staff had a disagreement that the relationship is not the greatest right now. That after. That report came out later on in the day. Russell wilson's agent mark rogers told. Espn that wilson is told the seahawks he wants to play in seattle but if he were to consider a trade elsewhere the teams he would go to and the only ones are the cowboys. Saints raiders and the bears.

Russell Wilson Mark Rogers Espn Seahawks Wilson Seattle Cowboys Saints Raiders Bears
Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

00:40 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wilson" discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

"Russell Wilson has not demanded a trade. And told the team he wants a plane to Seattle. However, if trade were considered the only teams he would go to are the Cowboys that scenes and Raiders and bears and greedy thinks this info isn't an accident. If Russell Wilson has decided the rest of his life is going to be outside of Seattle, that might as well happen as quickly as possible. I don't see any upside that comes from all of this being out there and again. Let me make it clear. Russell Wilson's agent didn't tell all this to schefty yesterday by accident. This is information that is out there. Purposefully this on ESPN Radio's greening were back on Monday in the NFL off season continued the quarterback carousel is out of control. But I'll tell you why so many teams are desperate to upgrade at the quarterback position..

Russell Wilson Monday Seattle Yesterday Cowboys Raiders Espn Radio NFL Many Teams
Kansas paid nearly $600M in fraudulent unemployment claims

Glenn Beck

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Kansas paid nearly $600M in fraudulent unemployment claims

"Older. Legislative audit says Kansas may have paid $600 million worth of bogus claims for unemployment benefits last year. The report released Wednesday by the GOP controlled legislators, nonpartisan auditing division gave a figure that's more than double the state Department of Labor's estimate. The report suggested that nearly one in four unemployment claims paid last year could have been fraudulent summit a surgeon filings during the Kobe 19 pandemic. The department on Tuesday estimated last year's fraudulent claims as worth $290 million. Department strongly disputed the audits figure and said So in a written response, but Republican lawmakers saw the audit as likely to be more accurate. Dave Wilson K

Kansas GOP Department Of Labor Dave Wilson
Former top aide details sexual harassment allegations against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

03:49 min | 1 d ago

Former top aide details sexual harassment allegations against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

"It is and what I was saying before. It is kind of a threat thing, But I worked with the guy that every woman referred to his creepy Joe, and he was a perfectly nice guy. But do we all know him? Is he? No, No, no, no, no. This is years ago. Those corporate America years ago. Not not that show. Not the one of the oval. Okay? No, no, no, no, no, not him. He's perfectly lovely. Um But like he would say to me that I had to work with Joe and he would be like he would always comment about all that such a nice dress. You're wearing something like that, But it was just the way that he said it would make me feel like alright, back off. Big guy, You know, like it just was the way, he said it was another co worker. A male co worker could say what? Why you look really necessary, but thank you because it was the way they said it. It's the vibe. It's the total vibe, but I don't know how you fix that vibe. Guys, I don't know. But if you're creepy, your creepy The heavy breathing is kind of a giveaway. Oh, if a woman looks you goes, I think we should take a shower. Now you're probably that guy. So now, of course, Cuomo's AIDS or denying that this happened. They deny the claims because she was very specific when she said she was on that plane in October, 2017 and and who was on who was seated next to her, she wrote, As I said that his press aide was to my right. A state trooper was behind us. Well, Cuomo's press secretary, a woman, by the way, kid. Caitlyn Garrard. Gerard dismissed the allegation, she said in a statement. As we said before Miss Boylan's claims of inappropriate behavior or quite simply false, and she cited flight logs detailing Cuomo's plane trips in October of 2017 and said there was quote no flight, where Lindsay was alone with the governor, a single press aide and a New York state trooper as she claimed in the block post, And she also cited a joint statement from several former aides who shared flights of the governor and Boylan during that period, who denied the That occurred as she described. We were on each of these October flights. This conversation did not happen. Yes. So that's all a lie. That's a complete lie. The statement itself is alive. Why it's provably alive. In fact, Lindsay Boylan, in her statement, never said she was alone with those people on the flight. She never once made that allegation. The Congress. The governor's office is inventing an allegation to knock down this is a strong man, Lindsay Boylan never said she was alone. With the governor, a press aide and in New York state trooper. She never said that there was nobody else on that flight or anything like that. The governor's office releases a statement claiming well, there were more people on that flight, contrary to what she claims in her block. Plus, she never claimed that never for a moment. The only thing she claimed, was that the press aide and the New York State trooper were near her. When the governor suggested that they play strip poker. That's the on Lee thing, she alleged. So even in the defense here we see dishonesty come out of Cuomo's office immediately. Their first instinct is to lie. Yeah, well, this sexual harassment working group, which is an organization formed by seven former New York state legislative employees who witnessed or experienced harassment in the state's political landscape. I have called for an independent investigation enter out into her allegations, and you have Congresswoman Elise Stefanik calling for Cuomo to resign. In the wake of both of these scandals with the nursing home handling with coronavirus deaths. And now this sexual harassment allegation as well, she said he has earned the title is worse Governor in America and now every New Yorker knows that he's a criminal sexual predator. And she said, You know, I called for this when these allegations came out in December on December 14th that was one of the first and on Lee elected officials in New York state to call for an investigation.

Cuomo Lindsay Boylan Caitlyn Garrard Miss Boylan JOE New York Boylan Gerard America Aids Lindsay Congress Elise Stefanik LEE
‘Elijah McClain should still be here today’; Aurora Fire Rescue, Aurora police respond to independent review

Big Al and JoJo

00:32 sec | 3 d ago

‘Elijah McClain should still be here today’; Aurora Fire Rescue, Aurora police respond to independent review

"Are reacting to the independent review of the death of 23 year old Elijah McLean at the hands of police in 2019. Outside. Investigators say Aurora police did not have a legal basis to stop. Alija McClain did not have the legal authority to frisk him or use a choke hold on him and that paramedics did not properly evaluate him before giving him a powerful sedative. Today. Police chief Vanessa Wilson reacted to the report. The bottom line is Elijah MacLean should still be here today, a state grand jury and the U. S. Justice Department are investigating the case as well. Laura

Elijah Mclean Aurora Police Alija Mcclain Vanessa Wilson Elijah Maclean U. S. Justice Department Laura
Wilson says he's 'done' as a Titan in deleted tweet

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:28 sec | 3 d ago

Wilson says he's 'done' as a Titan in deleted tweet

"Right tackle Isaiah Wilson. He's gonna have to make a determination if he wants to do everything necessary to pro football, and that's gonna be you know, tonight. Wilson tweeted, then deleted that he was quote done with football as a titan. The team put him on notice after playing less than 10 snaps last season, thanks to two trips to the covert list and two run ins with police, including a dy Today's the first day NFL teams can use the franchise or transition tagged the

Isaiah Wilson Football Wilson NFL
'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

All Things Considered

06:35 min | 4 d ago

'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

"People are some of the most vulnerable took over 19 since March, researchers say more than 1600. People in jails and prisons have died of the disease, and tens of thousands have been infected. Some states have started to vaccinate people behind bars while others have not. And we're gonna look now at how this is playing out in three states. Alison Cherry is with Colorado Public radio and she joins us from Denver. Conrad Wilson is with Oregon Public Broadcasting, and he's in Portland. Joining us from Boston is dead Backer with W. B. You are good to have all three of you here. Hi. Hi. Hello, Dev. I want to start with you. In Massachusetts. Your state included prisoners in the first phase of its covert 19 vaccine plan. What was the rationale for that? Well, we know that the virus transmits quickly in correctional settings in the risk of contracting the virus and dying from it are much higher inside prisons and jails compared with outside. So in deciding to vaccinate prisoners. Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, a Republican, said that correctional settings are no different from other congregate living situation, such as shelters and group homes where people are living in Copan close quarters and the virus can easily spread. So here's what he said last month when he explained why prisoners were included in the first phase. Our facilities are congregated facilities and we need to make sure that the people who work there and the people who live there because of the possibility of outbreak that that should be a place. We focus early in this exercise. The governor says it's strong public health policy because it's not just vaccinating prisoners. Workers are getting the vaccine to any pointed out. There are lawyers to go in and out of prisons in jail's medical workers, visitors those who provide programming, so the states thinking is that offering vaccines and correctional settings will help prevent the spread in the community. And so far, how is the vaccine rollout going in jails and prisons in Massachusetts officials say it's going smoothly, but it appears that a lot of people are not taking it. Court documents in particular shows that about a third of prisoners in more than half of prison workers have not received the vaccine. Now. That number does not include workers who may have been vaccinated elsewhere. So some correctional facilities are holding vaccine education sessions to encourage people to get the shop. Okay, let's turn now to Oregon More than 40 prison inmates have died after testing positive for covert 19 in that state. So Conrad give us a sense of what's happening with vaccines there now. Almost 7000 inmates have been vaccinated. That's more than half of the state's prison population. Many of those inmates have received their second dose, prison officials say, but vaccinating this many inmates this soon wasn't something Oregon health officials were willing to do on their own. Took litigation from a group of inmates on din order from a federal judge here in Portland. Basically, the inmates argued Oregon's vaccination plan didn't treat them like others living in nursing homes and other congregate care facilities where the vaccine has been administered. Your state representative General Bynum. She's a Democrat and chairs the Oregon House Judiciary Committee. I didn't understand how our adults in custody, we're any different from any other group in a congregant care setting. And I certainly don't believe that a prison sentence is a death sentence. The judge's ruling at the beginning of this month force the state to offer inmates vaccines immediately, So that's why about half of all prison inmates have been vaccinated. Let me jump in here. This is Alison and Denver Advocates here wish that that would have happened in Colorado that court ruling con artist is talking about in Oregon. Is something lawyers here have been trying to use as a tool to get inmates vaccines, and I know there's been a back and forth over this in Colorado. Alison tell us more about what's been happening there. Yeah. Democratic Governor Jared Pulis hasn't prioritized inmates at all. And initially he did in one of the early plans, but then Was called out for that by some prominent conservatives, You know, people saying, Do you want the murderer to get the vaccine before your next door neighbor and he was apparently sensitive to that, and so he removed prisoners from the lists and put them in just the regular population. So in other words, he's making no distinction that these people are in a group setting a 70 year old prisoner would be prioritized. A 70 year old non prisoner and so on. So the majority of prisoners are not being prioritized. I will note that prison staff has been prioritized in those vaccines are being administered now. So tell us more about the pressure that Colorado's governor has been under Well. He's gotten a lot of pushback for his decision to not prioritize inmates for vaccine for getting a vaccine, and he's also been sued. He has thought that lawsuit successfully so far. Rebecca Wallace is an A C l U lawyer, she says. Public health officials have been universal in saying that people in groups heading should be prioritized for a vaccine and governor pull. It has actually not only ignored that guidance but rejected that guidance from his own Colorado Department of Public Health on by think it really stand out because he's such a data driven individual in his other decisions. I'm curious. Early in the pandemic, there was pressure to release inmates to create social distance inside facilities that were often crowded. Have vaccination efforts change those conversations in the states that you're all in? Well in Massachusetts. Despite the early vaccination of prisoners, there has been little movement to release people. The fight over that continues mostly through litigation. There are pending lawsuits, but with so many prisoners getting vaccinated now, it does weaken the argument for big releases. Yeah, and in Colorado. Interestingly, the state's prison population has gone down by a few 1000 people since the start of the pandemic, But state officials attribute that almost 100% to the fact that there were no no criminal jury trials last year at all in 2020, so there's this massive backlog in the States Criminal justice system. So you've brought us three very different stories about policies around vaccinating, incarcerated people in three states that are very different across the country. How does this fit in with what we are seeing across the US nationally, Conrad Well, every state is really dealing with this a little bit differently. And, you know, really, This is another symptom showing a lack of a national strategy. Despite the risks, it's another way of, you know, also showing how inmates are marginalized by society. And this isn't just about those who are incarcerated. In a recent report by the nonpartisan Prison Policy Initiative, researchers found that there were more new cases and counties that have large incarcerated populations.

Massachusetts Alison Cherry Conrad Wilson W. B. Oregon Colorado Oregon Public Broadcasting Charlie Baker Portland General Bynum Oregon House Judiciary Committ Denver Copan Jared Pulis DEV Alison Boston Conrad Rebecca Wallace Colorado Department Of Public
Eagles trade Carson Wentz to Indianapolis Colts

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

02:36 min | Last week

Eagles trade Carson Wentz to Indianapolis Colts

"You. What are your thoughts here on. The carson wentz listening to come and key overpaid underpaid. Who won the tree. There's just so many opinions out there. What's yours i mean my opinion is for carson wentz. This is best case scenario. I mean this time was up in philly. The the philadelphia fans didn't want him and he didn't want the philadelphia eagles anymore so he gets to move on to a place where he wants to go and he never made it public that he wanted to be an indianapolis colts. But this is the best place for him. Is frank reich. A guy that believes in them. You have a very good defense a good run game. Excellent offensive line some young weapons on the outside. But to me this is put up or shut up for carson. Wentz and frank right reich. You're staking your your career on this guy being what he was in two thousand and seventeen when you haven't had him and now if you're carson wentz you're in a perfect situation for yourself to resubmit yourself as one of the top tier quarterbacks in this league and if you don't do it i believe this is his last opportunity as a no brainer starter for any organization ryan. What's your reaction to the eagles having the six pick and potentially targeting a quarterback at the six spot. You know what i think. The eagles would be stupid to be messed up at quarterback again. Right you look at it last year carson. Wentz didn't play well. You drafted a guy in the second round so there were rumblings that people wanted to see him play and then he plays any outplays carson wentz and now you find yourself in this issue. Do you really want the do that. Couldn't read his press statement in his opening. Press conference to start to season the season with a quarterback controversy. And here's the other problem. Let's say. Trevor lawrence and anzac wilson go one two or go one three. And if you're picking where the philadelphia eagles are if you're not in love with the quarterback don't waste your pick. Don't put yourself in another bad position. And listen to you. Look at trae lance you look at justin feels and i know people are going to kind of compare these guys based on color but that's not it. I'm just talking about style of play. We're talking about two quarterbacks that extend plays the same way. that jalen hurts us. Two quarterbacks that can make all the throws but may read things a step through slow if you listen to some of the skull which. I don't believe about justin fields. Which are going to have quarterbacks. That are very similar at at very similar ages competing. And i don't necessarily know if that's the right thing for an organization starting over with the new coach when you have a guy that had some success in jalen hurts. Evaluate him seeing. If he's your quarterback of the future anythi is you don't waste at picking us to get better somewhere else.

Carson Wentz Frank Reich Wentz Philadelphia Eagles Carson Eagles Indianapolis Colts Philly Trevor Lawrence Anzac Wilson Reich Philadelphia Trae Lance Frank Ryan Jalen Justin Fields Justin
Texas Power Plants Back Online but Hundreds of Thousands Still Without Power

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:21 sec | Last week

Texas Power Plants Back Online but Hundreds of Thousands Still Without Power

"Power plants are back online more than 280,000 households, they're still don't have power actually down from 2.7 million on Wednesday. The bite administration says it said 60 generators, thousands of blankets and other supplies to Texas to help address the allergist. But more than 13 million Texans are still seeing interruptions in their water services. Fox News Kevin

Texas Fox News Kevin
Man killed in Georgetown shooting

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:19 sec | Last week

Man killed in Georgetown shooting

"In in the the shooting shooting death death of of a a man man in in the the home home in in Georgetown, Georgetown, the the first first shooting shooting fatal fatal or or otherwise otherwise in the neighborhood So far this year, Several people were questioned in the case. The home was near the waterfront on Thomas Jefferson Street, Northwest, Violent crimes. You're pretty rare and Georgetown, but Carjackings do remain a serious concern if you have an appointment to go

Georgetown Northwest
Winter weather snarls delivery of COVID-19 vaccine doses headed to Washington, DC area

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:31 sec | Last week

Winter weather snarls delivery of COVID-19 vaccine doses headed to Washington, DC area

"Squeezed for covert vaccine. Virginia reports. Weather related problems from the Midwest have delayed the delivery of more than 100,000 doses and several vaccination events in the coming week amid and postponed as a result in D. C. Health officials who refining the list of who gets to move up in line for shots people over 16 with serious health problems or joining that list March 1st, but others are being dropped off it. Including smokers and people who are merely overweight but not quite obese. Loudon County schools have agreed to a serious of

Midwest Virginia Loudon County
School closings and changes in the Washington, D.C. region for Thursday, Feb. 18

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

01:24 min | Last week

School closings and changes in the Washington, D.C. region for Thursday, Feb. 18

"Area is closed today. Given our Ice and snow in D. C public schools virtual learning. Is on in public schools in Maryland. We've got some closures and arrundell counties is closed. Calvert County has gone code virtual. I guess that means that they are doing virtual school through their Microsoft teams program. Carroll County, Charles County, Frederick County closed Howard County's virtual Montgomery County Virtual Prince George's virtual, Um, ST Mary's County, running on a two hour delay. This morning over in Virginia. We got Alexandria City, the building's air closed virtual learning. Continues. Arlington County schools They say level one and two students are temporally reverting to distance learning, and and all all students students will will participate participate in in their their regular regular synchronous synchronous distance distance Learning Learning Falls Falls Church Church City City His His virtual virtual learning learning and and Fairfax Fairfax County County closed neither virtual nor in person more on that In a moment. Fuck your county closed for all learning. Loudon County, All their offices are closed. Their distance learning in hybrid classes are canceled. Manassas City closed Prince William County schools closed all learning Spotsylvania closed. Stafford closed s. Oh, there's a quick rundown. But again, you can stay up to speed on all of those changes anytime. The weather gets crazy on W m a l dot com Now what's the deal here? Beverly

St Mary's County Alexandria City Calvert County Charles County Frederick County Carroll County Howard County Learning Learning Falls Falls Prince George Montgomery County Arlington County Maryland Fairfax County County Microsoft Virginia Manassas City Loudon County Fairfax Prince William County Spotsylvania
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:34 min | Last week

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"Verse seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when of why we wear. We are fashion stories and your hosts abra callahan and cassidy. Zachary dresses thurs. I know that you will join april. And i when we say that we were both very sad to hear about the fact that miss mary wilson passed away last week at the age of seventy six years old. Yes i was a little heartbroken. I texted you right away. And i was like. Oh so of course miss. Mary was a founding member of the iconic american singing group. The supremes she was there at the beginning of the group in the nineteen fifties and was the last original member in the group when it officially disbanded in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven and she went on to a career as a solo performer motivational speaker author and perhaps unsuspecting archivist. Yes because miss. Mary took it upon herself to preserve the supreme sartorial legacy and her collection of the group's stunning performance ensemble served as the foundation of her two thousand nineteen book co authored with mark. Bego supreme glamour and april. I mean we feel so. Honored chose celebrated fulling episode of dressed with miss mary herself. She came on last season of course to share with us her incredible stories behind the supremes singular style she truly was an inspiring and wonderful woman whose legacy will undoubtedly live on for generations to come. Thank you for joining us stress listeners. In this listen back at our time with the one. The only miss mary wilson. We are super excited to have miss. Mary wilson with us today miss mary. Welcome to dressed. Thank you so much. And i'm glad to be with you. Yeah of this is truly an honor to have you here today. And i have to say i have not been this excited about a book in a very long time. I've i've read a lot of fashion history books and this one is is so beautifully written. It's so beautifully illustrated so many stories so much love and friendship and of course there's so much fashion in this book. It's such a beautiful mosh to your time in the supremes and the clothing. That was part in parcel to that experience. So i'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy. Because i had already written books about the supreme so therefore you know it was one of the things will. My research was not as it didn't take as long because i had so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes and our biography and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career was a pleasure to actually sit down now and do something not just write about the book but do show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun. Sort of demonstrating what we did in not just on recording and the music but how we look at how he felt when we were certain count and so was all about the gallons per gallon down to just like we were onto all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. Have i think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage on sambas so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. How did you go about comprising this collection. Well First of all we supreme florence ballard diana ross and i would always travel and when we came home from the road we'd have to store the gown and then of course by new gowns or designers with bring us new gowns and some of the old account that we made perhaps worn on television We went to store them. And they accumulated who Throughout all the years right And as you know florence was no longer mcgrew. Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And i became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the trains and all those different things. So i accumulated the gown because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them. Did i ended up with all these counts because no one can take the guy. No one can take the gal with them. You know we the supremes as a group paid for them. And that's how. I ended up with the majority of the gals. Now all other gallons should be in my possession but The reason that i can't tell you how many i have is because many have been not just lost and i won't say stolen you know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we have them stored you know. I don't i couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside. All these years asked the supreme i have just been Trying to recover those downs that are not in my collection but it really is my collection. Because as i said when i left everything was left to me also should say that even though they were left to me and i had bare instead of three Sometimes i ended up with just one but all three gowns were overset were supposedly with me.

Mary Wilson Abra Callahan Iconic American Singing Group Mary Zachary Cassidy Miss Mary Ballard Diana Ross Mark Mcgrew Diane
US-led coalition: No Americans killed in Iraq rocket attack

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:32 sec | Last week

US-led coalition: No Americans killed in Iraq rocket attack

"Contractor is killed in a U. S. Service members injured in a rocket attack in Iraq. American officials say 14 rockets were fired in an attack in northern Iraq last night was three hitting an airbase hosting American troops. The military coalition in Iraq, led by the U. S. Says a civilian contractor who wasn't American was killed. A U. S service member and eight other contractors were injured. Theater back in the normally peaceful city of Erbil has been claimed by an obscure militant group. Iran says it was not involved.

U. S. Service Iraq U. S. Says U. Erbil Iran
Pelosi says independent commission will examine Capitol riot in Washington, DC

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:43 sec | Last week

Pelosi says independent commission will examine Capitol riot in Washington, DC

"What she's describing as an outside independent 9 11 type commission to investigate. The riot, which will just be if if if history has anything to to play here, If it history comes in it all this will just be another smashing of Trump beating Trump. It's all his fault, sneering Trump and His supporters who voted for him. They're trying to break Trump supporters. They know that there's still a lot of support for Trump. They know that he is a lot of very avid, passionate supporters who love what he did love to the America first agenda and they're trying to break those people. I think that's what's happening. You know, like, I I agree with you and the

Donald Trump America
States activate National Guard as temperatures plunge

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:26 sec | Last week

States activate National Guard as temperatures plunge

"Descent, frigid weather plunging through the center of the country as far south as Texas. We're rotating power outages are now in effect is temperatures of dip below freezing and increased demand for electricity amid snow and ice storms snows also falling across Arkansas and Oklahoma. With the governors of those states and Texas activating the National Guard to assist state agencies. Dozens of crashes have been reported, and hundreds of flights have been canceled. Checking your

Texas Arkansas Oklahoma National Guard
"wilson" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:45 min | Last month

"wilson" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye. I'm jesse for next up this week. Another fascinating new yorker. John wilson wilson is the host and creator of a new show. That just premiered on. Hbo a couple months ago. It's called how to with john wilson. It is and. I don't think i'm exaggerating here. One of the best shows to come out in the last year. And i have to say that i think it is my absolute favorite. How.

john wilson last year this week new yorker John wilson wilson couple months ago jesse One of the best shows Hbo
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

02:40 min | 6 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Of course, there are. It can happen you can. It's not impossible. It just has to be undertaken. Needs Age say this to you. because. That's what you are doing in the invaluable priceless work of the Champs. Will Institute. And I couldn't I don't think you could have found. A better founder. For the name of your institute because. Of the strength of James Wilson's thinking in natural law, he was such a classical natural law thinker. If you could get all the federal judges. and. Supreme. Court judges. Lock them up and say you're not leaving the building until you've read. James. Wilson. So actress on law. You might save the Republic. At or at the very end or at the very least you restore the. Proper recognition for how James Wilson's thinking inform the founding really really was sort of the the the founder that all the other founders would. Rightly named as as one of the most significant influences and yet. You can. You can ask a school child than a almost certainly almost none of them would have would named James Wilson unless they'd seen the seventeen, seventy, six musical, but we're doing our part. Rewarded his good name in his in his influence. Well for our listeners. Again, the book is. On trial a defense of the founding. We are just so happy to have had Robert. Riley on with us today. The book is available in bookstores nationwide. On, Amazon Barnes and noble. Or from its publisher. And again we can't. Thank. Thank you Bob. Enough on this was a real treat and yet really a highly encourage our listeners to pick up a copy and to grapple with it's. Just, myriad myriad. Pages of of ideas, it's really a tour de force and a romp through a centuries of a thought leading to the present. So thank you again. Bob. And We hope we can have you gone again with US sometime. During an Hutton John Thank you very much..

James Wilson Bob founder Will Institute Amazon Barnes US Hutton John Riley publisher Robert
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

05:08 min | 6 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Right, liberalism is rooted in a lock in idea in of subjective liberty and so deneen in his book wishful thinking Sorry beyond wishful thinking says. They're liberal logic making protection of sovereign choice and individual appetite. The main object of government leads with nearly inexorable certainty to outcome such as that we now witnessed today I my question to you is. Deneen seems to have a truncated view of the founding more in line with what I think a lot of critics of what we would call conservatism INC, or conservatism writ large have articulated lately, which is that. Conservatism seeks to preserve Sort of set of. Procedural Commitments for opening query that any kind of value judgment on the terms of the choices that either individuals or institutions make runs contrary to what the American founders sought to establish. y'All, well, as you know the case that is the name enhances case is premised on a lock being just. A. Smiley. Face version of Thomas hops. They subscribe to Leo. Strauss's view. Of S teric. Lock. Or. The founders did not. Read Lock in as an esoteric way. Lock in Iran read in. A variety of ways as James Wilson himself pointed out. The lack was open to abuse. But the real contention is that The lock is really hobbs. And that therefore. The American founding. Is Hobson and dineen makes this explicit when he does a option analysis or an analysis of the declaration of independence. As Hobson. Excuse me. Now to to prove this case, I, think both of them would need to show. that. The founding contains within itself. An elevation of the will. Presuppose to nothing but itself. now. Dean statement what you read. Is. is not objectionable because if you begin with. The supremacy of the will. presupposed two to nothing but itself you you in locked and up. with the consequences that he described. Indonesia's a very good critic of Maternity. Describing the nature of maternity and I can see why he does it because We are developing in the United States into a Hobson state. Now. deneen thinks. That that's happening because of our founding principles. And I And you and Hadley Will Tae. It's happening. Against our founding principles. But I was required is a denial of the founding principles. For this development to take place. and I think that's what's the struggle is over you know. In the end of my book. I have a short epilogue. Trying to suggest answer to the question if it's not the founding 's fall twos fault is. Right and we hope we can get to that as well because I think. Persuasive your account. I just you know take to cut the chase I'm just going to we can. We can go into that. If you wish later but. I quote a Barack Obama in his book, the audacity of Hope, and here's what the president said quote. Implicit. In the, constitutions structure. In. The very idea of ordered liberty was a rejection of absolute truth..

Hobson Deneen conservatism INC Dean James Wilson Barack Obama A. Smiley Indonesia Strauss Leo Iran United States Thomas Hadley president dineen
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

02:56 min | 6 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Really not an examination of the grounds, the principles that that were trying to conserve here. Of course had James Wilson Institute we're focused on the law but more broadly the indictment of a conservatism that doesn't actually a have a coherent account of the American founding and then be if it even seeks to exist preserve the American founding or just seeks to preserve tradition writ large. I think that. That you Anne Hadley. arcus make an invaluable contribution in your critique. Of what I would call conservative legal positive as. Yeah. Yeah. That's all it seems to me to be. Because they don't refer to the fundamental principles. That law is the rule of reason. and. It's not a just a procedure. and when there is a conflict in the law, it is reason that rules. Now, what do we mean by reason, we mean the laws of nature and nature's God which the country is founded. And if you don't have reference. To that primary foundational source. You will get lost just the way gorsuch got so lost. Its it it it is unhinged. In the book I I talk about Hakim's influence a particularly. As manifested in Martin Luther in. The parts of Germany that became Lutheran. That they were the grounds or the areas in which legal positive ISM was developed. and. It's hardly string it was a logical development. that. The idea of a volunteers God would eventuate in legal positive Azam. And that law should be seen as simply the product of the will. And it doesn't mean it doesn't matter whether it's the will of one or the will of many. That's what lobby comes. Instead of the rule of reason, it's the role of will. And unfortunately. It both sides in the supreme, court cases seemed to be afflicted with this. Mistaken view. lost. laws the rule of reason. Yeah I think I think that's that's that's right. So Deneen and Handy.

James Wilson Institute Martin Luther Deneen Hakim Anne Hadley. Germany
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

04:34 min | 6 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"And. The answer unanimously was the ladder. God does not directly appoint rollers. He invests sovereignty and the people who then convey that authority to apprentice or to a king on condition. That the Prince or ruler. Observes, the covenant. That is the condition of the people having conveyed its authority to him. there. Therefore. Set again and again in the Middle Ages if the king becomes a tyrant. The people have a right to revolution and to replace him. It's all there. Also you mentioned those. One flex relation of the medieval roots of a lot of the. Ideas that we see in the founding. Nonetheless, though it seems somewhat new to look at it this way so a person may be casually knowledgeable on the founding would probably not related. or The I thought wouldn't beats related with acquaintance or Hooker Suarez Abella mean like you do in your book Why not look you know more to the conventional sources like lock or Cooker Blackstone for inspiration. Or like white why do people? Why? How have those who disgusted founding so often? Just missed this kind of medieval. Inspiration or Petrie dish in leading to it. Well. That's simply because they don't follow the lineage of the ideas are back to their origin. How where did, where did lock get his material? You know I mean lock will as you know the person whom walk. Quoted most often was Richard Hooker. Richard Hooker get his ideas. hookers not shy about. His sources in Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. You know I'm not saying that. We can discuss later what what's different in Locke because Locke has not Aristoteles issue. No. But. The in the American founding itself. The quote Omnibus Tonga's principle is quoted. As you would know at the James. Wilson Institute, James Wilson quotes it in his lectures on law. Absolutely, he finds the Medieval source and also you know that Richard Hooker. Is a hero to James Wilson and he he loves the thinking. Of Richard Hooker. And What I think. It's the letter from the farmer in Pennsylvania. He quotes Code Domino's tangent. So the bright the tax as no taxation without representation didn't come out of nowhere. It certainly didn't come. It wasn't locks idea. It's an ancient idea. and. They've the founding generation was was calling from appealing to their ancient rights well. How ancient were there? I tried to answer that and also as you know. I think this is necessary. particularly. In consideration of. Those critics who said that the founding was an exclusively enlightenment product. and which leaves the founding vulnerable to the charges from Handy Deneen. Because well, there's a problem they take the enlightenment as a homogeneous thing. And therefore, they take it at the most radical expression. Of The enlightenment and how they Undermine the legitimacy of the American founding. What I try to show in my book is all these ideas. Predate the enlightenment. And the the enlightenment expression of them..

Richard Hooker James Wilson Hooker Suarez Abella Handy Deneen Wilson Institute Cooker Blackstone Locke Aristotle Thomas Aquinas Pennsylvania
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

02:41 min | 6 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello, and welcome to the James Wilson podcast. I'm your host Garrett's netter. Today. We're pleased to be joined by Robert Riley. Bob Is Director of the Westminster Institute and the author of many books the latest of which is America on trial a defense of the founding. Bob Is what you might call a renaissance man in his storied career. He has served in the army as a first lieutenant in the Reagan White House as a diplomat in Switzerland in the Defense Department as an envoy abroad during Operation Iraqi. Freedom as a professor at the National Defense University and as the director of Voice of America. He's also widely known as a classical music critic. Finally. He's a dear friend of ours at James Wilson Institute. Joining us on the podcast as well is Hassan Ahmad one of our interns at the James. Wilson Institute. Hassan why don't you get started? So Mr Riley I found the book pleasure to and the first question I think just to orient all of our readers and to get the conversation started is why is America on trial? What did she do? Who? Who are the prosecutor said say and most importantly why do you defend her? While I think America has. been on. Trial. Always found it necessary to explain itself to the world both to its friends in its enemies. And of course, at its inception, it lays out in the declaration of independence. The principles upon which it is founded as well as the grievances it held against the greatest empire in the world at the time the British Empire. Now Out of respect for the opinions of mankind. The American cause is. Placed before the world. This is rather unusual. Why would these thirteen colonies down the eastern coast of the United States feel it necessary to do that why not just grab freedom for yourself and leave it at that the answer to the question because they they claimed. What were they were doing? was based on truths. Then apply to all people everywhere and at all times. Not that it was the American endeavor to. Export the imposition of those truths. But to practice them in this new sovereign.

America James Wilson Institute Hassan Ahmad James Wilson Robert Riley Bob Director Mr Riley National Defense University Defense Department Garrett Westminster Institute British Empire Reagan White House army Switzerland prosecutor United States professor
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

05:22 min | 8 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the James Wilson podcast I'm your host Garrett's networker. Joining us today is Abigail Schreier She is the author of a new book. Irreversible damage, the transgender cray seducing our daughters from publishing. Abigail is a trained lawyer and frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal. She holds an B from Columbia. She received your Kellet Fellowship to study at Oxford where she took a beef ill. She earned her J. D from Yale Law and then served as a law clerk to judge judith, Rogers on the US Court of Appeals for the DC circuit. She lives in southern California with her husband and their children. Also with us on today's podcast will be Spencer. Reeves one of our interns at the James Wilson Institute. Spencer, why don't you get US started? Thanks so much Garrett, and thank you Abigail for taking the time to be here with us today. Garrett and I've already had the opportunity to read your wonderful book, but for our audience who haven't had the chance to read it. Would you mind taking a few minutes? Tell them what your book is about. Sure. So in the last decade, the incidence of gender, dis, Fauria or extreme discomfort in one's biological sex has exploded across the West including the United. States and there are three things that make us think that this is not normal or typical gender dysphoric, first of all the onset has totally shifted from preschool age boys to suddenly teenage girls with no history of gender, dis, Fauria and the sex ratio. Ratio has flipped from young boys to all of a sudden teenage girls. They are the predominant demographic, and the prevalence has gone up by thousands of for percent, so my book is an exploration of a medical mystery why all of a sudden are is the dominant demographic of for Gender Dis of suffering in their biological sex, identifying as transgender asking for hormones and surgeries. Why is it teenage girls with? No history of gender dysphoric it all. Advocate this Garrett one of the major distinctions. Your book.

Garrett Abigail Schreier Spencer James Wilson Abigail James Wilson Institute Wall Street Journal US Court of Appeals Fauria Yale Law Rogers law clerk Columbia Reeves Oxford California DC judith J. D
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"And even I know it sounds silly, but like you type section to thirty into twitter, you might find other voices who are who are giving some really unique insight What one author I really love on this is Charles Cook. He's done at national review. He's done a lot of work that I agree with audit and he's made some hard points that I think are right, so they're so but I think that those would be. Those should be more than enough. Well in the spirit of Leroy, Jenkins Shoshana Weisman and John Schlepping. Thank you so much for joining us today. This was a real treat and I think our friends listener gonNA feel like they more fully understand the stakes of the issue and the underlying concerns that the folks on the right have about reform to thirty we are absolutely on our website will make sure that we linked to as many of those A. B., says that China John discussed that you can read more of their work and definitely be sure to follow both of them on twitter They're both excellent. Presences are now just following this debate and plenty of the other issues of the day, and We were just grateful to call them both friends so. Again John Shannon. Thank you so much. Thanks so much for having us. This program has been brought to you by the James Wilson Institute on Natural Rights in the American founding. If you'd like to learn more about the James Wilson Institute please visit James Wilson Institute Dot Org. Thanks for listening..

James Wilson Institute on Natu Charles Cook James Wilson Institute Dot Org twitter James Wilson Institute John Shannon national review Shoshana Weisman John John Schlepping Leroy
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

05:01 min | 9 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"I'm your host Garrett's NASCAR. Today we'll be chatting about a topic. Roiling conservative legal and policy spheres section to thirty of the Communications Decency Act of Nineteen ninety-six. Section to thirty reads no provider or user of an interactive. Computer Service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider. Originally passed in the Internet's infancy, so that online intermediaries that hosted or republished speech would be protected against a range of laws that might otherwise be used to hold them legally responsible for what others say in do section to thirty now has critics that argue it's time to revisit and take a second look at the law. We're pleased to host to writers and thinkers engaged in the debate over section two thirty. There are also friends of ours for several years. James Walston Institute. I John Schwanke is the director of policy and government affairs for the American principles project in this role, he develops and advances, the organizations legislative priorities by working with allied groups and with federal and state lawmakers. John was named the Lincoln Fellow at the Claremont Institute in Twenty Twenty. He has been published at number of outlets including first things, the New York Post the federalist and the daily caller. He is a graduate of Augusta College. Next Shoshana Weisman Shoshana is the senior manager of digital media and a fellow at the St Institute a Free Market think tank. She oversees our Asai Social Media, marketing and website while also working in writing on a variety of policy and regulatory subjects. She also likes spongebob. Finally joining us for this discussion, is Hassan Ahmad one of our semester insurance for James Wilson Institute. The Sun. Wasn't you get started, so she saw the first question is for you. Could you please clarify what does section two thirty actually say? For sure so before I. Answer just explain a little bit that my expertise comes from I since I managed to digital media for think, tank and I'm really into regulatory reform a few years ago as this became a bigger issue. I started getting into it more because it combines. My two loves social media and less regulation, so so that's where a lot of my perspective comes from it, and it's not an issue I ever intended or even wanted to get into, but it's one I've become really passionate about over the years, and it's because it basically says that platforms aren't liable for content. Put there by other people, and the reason that's important is because you know figure, facebook and twitter, just for example, because they're really big user platforms, other people post stuff I can..

John Schwanke Shoshana Weisman Shoshana James Walston Institute Twenty Twenty Claremont Institute Garrett James Wilson Institute New York Post NASCAR Hassan Ahmad facebook publisher Augusta College St Institute twitter senior manager director
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

16:38 min | 11 months ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the James Wilson. Podcast I'm your host Garrett's networker today. Were delighted to be speaking with Josh Hammer. Josh is a nationally syndicated columnist and is of counsel with First Liberty Institute a graduate of Duke University and the University of Chicago Law. School Josh's worked at Kirkland and Ellis and clerked for Judge James Host of the US Court of Appeals for the fifth circuit. A former John Marshall Fellow with the Claremont Institute Josh's also a law school campus speaker through the Federalist Society in a college campus speaker through the young America's foundation he's been published by National Review First Things Fortune. The New York Post The Los Angeles Times the American mind and other leading publications. He's also frequent podcast guest on blaze TV joining us for our podcast is Joe. Egg Layer one of our interns of James Wilson Institute Joe. Why don't you get US started? We'd like to start by discussing originalism and its discontents for decades. Originalism has been the organizing principle behind the federalist society. One might say for all lawyers who consider themselves conservative. Why in your estimate has originalism been such an effective organizing principle for the Wiegel right for decades? So it's obviously deeply important. Question made only more important obviously by Our aging for meals white provocative. I saw a couple of weeks ago that I'm sure we'll dive into shortly as well. I think as Professor Plum you'll hinted at Atlantic at say there's a lot of historical context of course that goes into the rise of originalism We need to look back to what the war in court was doing. In particular of course run late mid to late nineteen fifties all the way up through Late sixties and then of course leading up until Roe v Wade itself There was a there was a lot of a lot of scene creation of newfound constitutional rights Kind of Encapsulated by cases like Miranda versus Arizona which Emmys Ronald Reagan's Torney general famously has always said I think continues to say that he only had one case overturning. All you've actually be Miranda versus Arizona Obviously to Griswald and that Roe and kind of sexual abrasiveness degen dud substantive due process and all that doctrinal nonsense so the timeframe for the rise of of originalism. Which kind of you know is your identify in. Its early stages with folks like and meese Robert Bork. Antonin Scalia Perhaps Frank Easterbrook to Saudi lesser extent. it really was from a historical timing perspective seen as kind of almost a reactionary movement against the perceived excesses properly perceived. That would add an obviously of course in my opinion of the Warren Court. I'm so that was the political and historical context for it. But if you look back Joe To the writings of of the framers Hamilton and Madison like obviously who by and large the overwhelming majority of the federalist papers. John Jay wrote a number. But it's really mostly Madison Hamilton. The two of them were quite explicit in their writing that they also resorted to looking at the original meaning of the Constitution as it was intended by the drafters and understood by the ratifiers. And we the people at large as being the only meaning the the only proper method of interpreting that document so the methodological pedigree does go back to the beginning of the republic. I think the the jurisprudence is John Marshall and Joseph story in the nineteenth century. Carry on that tradition But it is the modern history and it's kind of resuscitation and it's Continued success really was historically grounded in this reaction to the excesses of the Warren Court. Just as a quick follow up Garett here. Do you think modern originalism strength comes from its The consensus that it That it has among conservative lawyers. Or does it derive more from its internal coherency. Though so there's definitely something of self reverberating effect pedals society. There have been numerous books over the past decade written on this just just how astoundingly successful the Federal Society has been institution within the within kind of broader orbit of conservative institution. America you know the the much-vaunted vast right wing conspiracy that a younger Hillary Clinton once once a shot at work I had been by any objective. Measure WanNa be most emphatically successful those itunes and I think today along with institutions like National Review Heritage Foundation etc. It really is kind of one of the true icons of the the broader The broader constellation within the American right. At least since the Cold War and Post William F. Buckley post-match murder era so there definitely is something of a of an effect where success not naturally sweet beat success but it is also just a wonderfully some simple theory it is a very very very simple straightforward proposition E I think this I think there's something to that was simplistic elegant nature of it. Does I think intuitively appeal to a lot of young law. Students Young Lawyers Young Law clerks. Practitioners prospective academics alike. And there's also a really neat analogy of course to the methodological method originalism to the common law contracts. I mean every first year law student takes the common law contracts doctrinal course in in contracts class. You learn that. The goal of interpreting a contract is to give legal effect to the intense of the parties to the contract now original intent so to speak has been largely supplanted by original public meaning. Originalism is kind of the go-to originals methodology within originalism itself but that analogy still should should should hold true for a lot of people. The Common Law crime tracks should I think naturally indicate that originalism is more intuitive for a lot of young law students than other forms of so-called living constitutional perhaps No I think I think that's right as a matter of Political appeal as well Ask yourself what's the easiest articulation of that? A politician might be able to give for. Why he or she Might support the constitution. And now if you're if you're trying to ask yourself as a as a politician especially for a non lawyer who's a politician What kind of account might make intuitive sense to you? Even as a non as a non specialist of the standard originalism line that we often hear the constitution means what it says has a lot more appeal than Trying to get into the nuances of what is the moral framework that supports the constitution. Would you agree as a purely simplistic matter each? Just much easier. I think for a lot of Let's let's recall. I mean you know in American higher education. I guess some colleges universities have something closing analogous to like a bachelor degree or a in major in pre law studies by the overwhelming majority of people who go to law. School did not major in something called pre law. I right I mean I. I've lost people science. Obviously home in undergraduate majors I myself is actually an economics major I. I actually worked for a boutique. Economic research firm for two years between college law school so for a lot of people. You kind of go into law. School not necessarily being lifelong inundated in the language of the law. So there is something to be said For just Wrote wrote simplism wrote wrote simplistic nature of of theory You know for people who grew up especially thanking Serb militias backgrounds or origin Kinda Day Or classical liberal. Jeffersonian Founding Era America theory. There obviously is GonNa be a lifelong Urinating a lifelong desire. Lifelong love of natural law tradition And that is going to appeal obviously to keep who enter law school. Who have those certain life experiences in those backgrounds but I don't think that's fascinating conversation but I don't. I don't think that background is necessarily mutually incompatible with a With a profound respect for original public meaning originalism either So I I do think this is GonNa be said for that though that people are coming into law school from all sorts of backgrounds all sorts of viewpoints They major in lots of different subjects. Originalism is a very very very simple straight or proposition. I I do think it has political appeal as well. Yeah so it was that kind of backdrop in which Adrian Mule wrote his essay beyond originalism. Envy Atlantic In margin which we certainly would encourage all of our listeners to read it. It was provocative but it had a good number of rendering that we have the genes. Vilson Institute would hope that any Constitutional lawyer would take into account as he or she interprets the document the moral foundations in particular from US willingness to engage those deeper foundations on was something that made us a particularly drawn to the ESA Even if it's Even if it's a ending perhaps Offered some Diagnoses OF OUR CONSTITUTIONAL. Order that we might not diagnose quite the same Josh you wrote a piece which hopefully will appear in the coming Days and weeks In which Joan our Very pleased to receive an advance copy of that was a very strong in Outlining mules central challenge. Can you perhaps give an account of that and give our listeners A preview of Your essay and any holes perhaps for mules argument. Sure now with with up to chat about that so you don't just will backdrop here. It's actually it's actually funny So Adrian. I had been firmly for a while mostly just from twitter. Although you know we have a ton of mutual friends he actually tied at my law school Alma Mater University of Chicago for a very long time so he actually was Himself a protest oil mentor of Sorts. To a lot of my friends and mentors so but we came from the I kind of Right right deal conservative twitter. I guess so to speak But we didn't meet in person until Disover MONTHS AGO ACTUALLY. It was early March. I I gave a talk at a Harvard Law School's Federal Society Chapter and then we got copy for like an hour and a half or so and he actually at that time told me that he was planning to write this piece for the Atlantic. Put It on my radar right then and then. He texted me when it came out. We've been in constant contact ever since so that's kind of the broader context And I and I do. Hope Peace Responding to Adrian's essay will be up by the time. This podcast comes out so I think there's a tendency on a lot of people. In kind of barrels -OCIETY originalist Judicial nomination space to just haughtily dismiss any e conservative challenge to Lower Keizo Orthodox doctrinaire originalist theory and we saw a lot of this I saw the day the Gary Unite Wrapping texting about this When when the essay launched there was just a lot of kind of snarky dialogue both on twitter and then both on the water essays space but Adrian's proposition to this year's proposition and I think it can only be understood within the broader context of the intellectual ferment. That's happening in the post twenty. Sixteen post trump Political rights more generally and just kind of to summarize how I see it I Donald Trump as kind of a wrecking ball of sorts who kind of came in and plowed over a lot of the pre existing consensus a lot of institutional icons of the broader ride Including Harley Limited to some of the ones we've already discussed I think took somewhat of a beating when someone of a set up such an unorthodox intellectual pedigree who said such unorthodox things from a Capital C. Conservative perspective was elected it while the president was a wrecking ball. He did not necessarily he didn't necessarily bring with him. You know a sixty. Five bullet points Powerpoint presentation as to what a coherent political philosophy. It looks like in that. Wake in the wake of kind of that. Rex SHATTERED CONSENSUS. There's been all these warring tribes and these and lots of vying factions trying to compete for. What the the so called conservative movements in on a political level. Of course the Republican Party itself should look like going forward and the reach t. I think last year in the Emily saw between his skirmishes between Sohrab Amari of the New York Post and David French of Tanya's national review now. He's at dispatch and the broader context that we saw playing out between so rob and David so rob was is kind of representing the so-called news which I think is a more moral list aggressively. Natural Law sent trick justice. Common good oriented pursuit of conservatism It's the line of conservatism that I probably personally identify with. I think it has a lengthy intellectual pedigree I I think I think the pedigree of English common law tradition of Burke and frankly of the American framers although that's certainly contestable propagation and so was going up against David French who was representing more of a truer classical liberal enlightenment. Centric procedural Byu Of our constitutional order in our political liberties understood more. Generally right now how that plays out in the in the confines of the constitutional debate is the originalists who originalism as a purely legal positivist proposition. Who View it purely along? The lines of a morally detached on application of holy neutral holy pluralistic legal norms. And this is a view of originalism most frequently associated with the likes of Robert bork Antonin Scalia And and folks like that would would kind of line up I think more readily in in in in David's cap whereas you know legal theorists in the riot including hardly limited of course to You know our friend Our friend highly I I think it would be more natural fit for Sora.

Originalism Josh Hammer Federalist Society Robert bork Antonin Scalia originalism New York Post twitter America Adrian Mule University of Chicago Law US Court of Appeals meese Robert Bork David French James Wilson Institute Claremont Institute Josh James Wilson Federal Society Joe Warren Court
"wilson" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"wilson" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi Everyone Sophia. Bush here welcomed a work in progress where I talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are and where. They think they're still going. You probably know him as the Lovable Insane Quirky Dwight Shrewd on the office. But you are about to learn a lot more about rainn. Wilson is here today I just loved talking to him about his interesting childhood how he got into acting and how the role of Dwight came to be. We're also going to talk about the importance of religion in his life. His company Soul Pancake. How we need to connect more as human beings.

Dwight Shrewd Bush Wilson
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

14:59 min | 1 year ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the James Wilson. Podcast I'm your host Garrett's networker today. We'll be joined. By Peter Wallison author of a new book titled Judicial Fortitude. The last chance to rein in the administrative state from encounter books. Mr Wallison is the Arthur F burns fellow in Financial Policy Studies. At the American Enterprise Institute. Previously he served as White House counsel in the Reagan Administration and then partner at the law firm of Gibson Dunne and Crutcher. He has written extensively on financial markets deregulation and the two thousand eight financial crisis most notably in his twenty fifteen book hidden in plain sight. He holds a b from Harvard College and a J D from Harvard law school. Joining me on the podcast as well is Sam. Lucas one of our interns for James Wilson Institute Sam. Why don't you start us off okay? Good Morning Mr Watson. Thanks for being here with us. I guess I'll start off. By simply asking why you decided to write this book judicial fortitude and looking at that phrase from Hamilton judicial fortitude from federal seventy What about those words struck? Uso relevant to us today. Why didn't you use something like legislative dereliction but instead focusing on the on the courts rather than Congress and just tell us about what your thoughts were behind that? I think the this whole thing began for me as I saw so many things that Congress was doing that was handing over to the administrated agencies are a lot of the authorities that seem to be the legislative authority of Congress and this began to puzzle me Why this was happening and it seemed to be happening much more. Since the new deal there was a lot of I'd change. That was occurring in the way Congress was behaving with respect to legislation. That seemed to me that it was going too far as I thought it through as I began to look at Various texts about but congress was doing and about the courts. I saw that what was actually happening. Here was that. Congress had stopped making the key legislative decisions that that the constitution requires after all article one of the constitution vests in Congress all of the legislative responsibility in the United States and as if Congress was handing that legislative responsibility over to administrative agencies. How was that going to be controlled and as I thought about it. There was nothing that you could do with Congress because this was something that was easing their burden And they had a lot of incentives then to continue to do it The president was not going to do anything to stop. This and the president is is Engaged in so many other things and anyway it gives the president innocence much more power so it was very unlikely the president would do anything and so I thought began to think that well. Maybe there was a reason for the courts to step in here and that of course opened up the whole question. Of what the court had been doing since the new deal To permit this to occur and as I looked into that it became clear that the courts had shied away from stepping in to more or less restore the separation of powers so that Congress would continue to only to make the laws and the president to enforce the laws Then I began to read the to go directly to your question about Alexander Hamilton. I began to read the federalist papers and I came across in seventy eight. Federal is seventy eight this statement by Alexander that seemed so perfect for what was beginning to develop in my mind as a as a theory for addressing this question and that is he said that the framers had given the members of the judiciary lifetime appointments so they would have the four Tude to step in and in effect discipline the other branches which were likely to be much more powerful because they were the elected branches. And I'd never seen this before but what said to me is that the courts have a responsibility that they have not been addressing. Certainly not since the new deal and really they haven't been addressing fully since the constitution was Fulton. That's interesting because you may get some pushback from other conservatives in this in that same federalist paper number seventy eight Hamilton also mentioned The courts intervening when there's irreconcilable variance between statutes and the constitution which is along the same lines. As probably his thought of his using the phrase judicial fortitude. Yeah they have to. They're the ones who have to intervene but classically conservative Vigo scholars might save. The judiciary should should be mindful of their role and exercise more restraint. So how do you? How do you answer other conservatives who might give you that that argument counterargument of judicial restraint absolutely but the judicial restraint idea it relates to what the courts do about policy? And the I this say when Scalia talked about judicial restraint what he meant was courts or frank even frankfurter with the beginning of this kind of structure and that is that the the courts should stay out of policy they should allow Congress to make these rules make the laws and not interject their own views policy. That's what you digital restraint meant but when you get to the structure of the Constitution. That's a completely different question. And that is what Hamilton was addressing in in federalist Seventy Eight. So I do cover this issue in the book because it is an obvious question that many conservatives would have what about this question of the courts stepping in what about judicial restraint and I say the courts should be restrained in what they do on questions of policy but that has very little to do in fact nothing to do in my view with what they do to sustain the structure of the Constitution the separation of powers. And that's what federal is seventy eight at least that language in federal is. Seventy eight was talking about Peter. Justice Thomas is one of the heroes of your of your book. Can you tell us little bit about the dedication that you offered to him? In which you quote his opinion in dot versus the Association of American Railroads in two thousand fifteen we have two long abrogated our duty to enforce the separation of powers and we have overseen and sanctioned the growth of an administrative system that finds no comfortable home in our constitutional order. Yes I thought that was a brilliant summation of the problem that I was seeing when I was watching what Congress doing. I should say that one of the areas that I have always been involved with at least it at the American Enterprise Institute inside left law practice in came here. Is this financial regulation and in watching what? Congress has done in financial regulation. It's a perfect example of Congress. Giving up to the administration a lot more power especially in the. Dodd Frank Act and so when I came across in my research now for the book I came across the statement by Justice Thomas. It was clear to me that he got this. He understood this in a way that the other members of the of the judiciary have not. Now maybe the others understood it But it also takes fortitude to step forward and saying it and what is interesting here. Is that that quote is gradually becoming the policy of I think of the Supreme Court and over the years. I might not be around to see them. See it but Over the years I the courts now will be get. The Supreme Court will begin to adopt this idea. That was first articulated fully by Justice Thomas who is one of my heroes when he when he wrote this in two thousand fifteen. It may have been present as you say. Do you think there was also a little bit of encouragement that he wanted to give to his colleagues on the court that might be considered a conservative to show them that indeed. This was a quite practicable position to take on the administrative state in its growth. Yeah I think I think he was doing that. He made many statements before that he'd had many currencies in which he would just say in a line or two Under other circumstances I might want to go beyond this. And and Insist on more aggressive position by the court. Those can currencies did not seem to have any effect on his brother justices. And so in this case where it was so obviously pertinent. He wrote out a complete statement. A much longer. Concurrence of which that is the key portion and I was very impressed by this. Because Justice Thomas Has has been a brave person on a number of fronts? And he is never in my judgment gotten the kind of credit that he deserves for being a leader in thinking on the court and when he when I came across that language in that particular case I thought I had to take this out and dedicate the book to that to Justice Thomas because he was saying exactly what I have thought is the problem and how the problem can be addressed. Okay WELL IN CHAPTER ONE MR BOSTON. You lay out some of the recent failures of the courts. To regulate agencies administrative agencies title nine of the Education Act The fair Housing Act Clean Air Act and the subsequently broad interpretations those agencies charged with enforcing them take. And you do write about this in your book. About how some might respond that. These agencies operate in this flexible way not to undermine the law but simply because they need some mechanism to respond to the ever increasing complexity of our society and our economy so much of the problem of Congress failing to legislate more specifically is a matter of their inability to deal with that complexity. And how much of it do you think is an abdication of their duty to well? I guess the question really is why do administrative agencies do what they do. Why are they going beyond what I think Congress actually authorized and yes? This society is more complex but we if we are in fact a democratic republic if in fact we are a representative republic. The laws have to be made by people who represent The the American public the administrative agencies cannot take this on themselves just because they see a problem that is not being addressed by Congress in fact if they do then we are on our way to a situation where we no longer have a democratic system. We will in the future if these laws are infinitely malleable by the administrative agencies. If these laws allow them as the courts have a to do many many things that Congress did not contemplate at the time the laws passed then in the future we will be a nation ruled by the officials of these administrative agencies who live all around Washington and don't really know anything about what the values and ideas and and concerns are of the American people throughout this huge country so in fact the first line of the book essentially says we will lose our democracy unless we can gain control of the agencies of the administrative state. And what I point out is that there's the stakes of this are very high because if we look for example at what has been happening in Great Britain with Brexit the the effort by many Britons to leave the European Union and what we see is that that is driven insubstantial part by the fact that they are. They found themselves living under rules that were being made in Brussels that go right into the laws of England and they feel they have no control over these rules.

Congress Justice Thomas Alexander Hamilton American Enterprise Institute Supreme Court Peter Wallison federalist Seventy Eight Harvard College Dodd Frank Act Mr Wallison Harvard law school James Wilson president Garrett Association of American Railro Mr Watson Arthur F
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Every time I go I can't help but see how more religious societies coming even on our own people who describe themselves as secular Jews. You see very clearly see. They're starting to Reimb- race religious practices that doing doing ceremonies that they don't quite understand but they under they want some sort of connection with they are and where they come from. You see more men wearing hammock. You See Places more places shutting down for sure about all of this is very consist. This is all held together with a society. That is very very more than in many respects. So I think you can see that. That's just example. I could probably quote others. But that's an example of society that was very sensitive mystic Atheism was seen as the position of the intellectual class. Well that's changing and it's changing faster. I think than most people realised so those are examples. I think that gave me Hook that a type of reintegration of reason and faith north beyond the West. It's not beyond us. Decline is always a choice and we don't have to all declined by simply letting reason faith one third or further away from each other. So your arguments meet sympathetic years on this podcast and it's really a pleasure as you kind of take the reader on a tour through centuries of Western literature but the Frank Reality persists that a lot of people in the West especially especially young people. Just haven't been exposed to the ideas that underlie the claims in your book. So if you can assign a required reading list for every person in America what three books would you include under less? Not Including of course reason faith in the struggle for Western civilization deeply unfair. Well there's there's any number of books Let me start For those people who are interested in exploring and understanding the tradition of natural law and who are prepared to take the time to think through these questions to ask questions about the nature of reason and how it relates to questions of human freedom to justice to the nature of society community and even the nature of bride's And it's tough but I'd recommend Jones finished his book. Natural Law and natural rights now slightly buys he was my is. He supervised mydeal of Oxford. But that book I think is very profound in explaining reasons potentialities powers and the loss check is about the case for God. And what's interesting? Is that the book. Says Look you don half to believe in God to accept all these claims about natural reason not to rights and natural law by the same thing you don't have to accept belief in God to adhere to claims of natural but natural order does tend to point you in that direction because it makes you ask questions about where this ultimate reason come from. So that's one text I think that and it's it deals with many of the modern objections. Right that we've talked about to to the nature to having a more than instrumental view of reason and having this Richard Conception of a reason that points in the direction truth the good and the beautiful. That's one thing second which I would suggest. And this is a very different and so some respect it's also hot book I would really recommend reading Adam. Smith's the wealth of nations. Why would I say that? The one and one reason is because it's a type of representations type of the high point Scottish in mind and it's important because it's a work of social signs and so work of social science that tries to understand reality through and empirical lands and that's very important because I think that we've lost saw off in many respects the nature of some science and the way in which the plying it can reveal many important things about the world that we had hitherto not paid attention to or had ignored so Smith's wealth of nations does reveal many things about the workings of Modern Commercial Societies. But people had sent before but had not really put then minds around and had not outlined to the systematic way. But it's a very important work of social sign that I think represents in many respects the it's the culmination if he liked the best of the Scottish enlightenment also represents one of the major moments all of the enlightenment project and this is something I think frankly a lot of religious believers should read and have an appreciation for to understand how these things these things what lost of all This is a much sought text. I'd really suggest reading Benedicta. Sixteenth Reagan's address. It's about three thousand eight hundred words long. It does not take very long to read and I would really recommend reading it first of all by itself. The way takes us through the trajectory of West history. How the West became the West? How how the integration of faith and reason started to break down but they're not recommend highly recommend reading it in conjunction with the common tree that was written by the late in the very great father. James Show it's a whole analysis operations address reasonably addressed and then re father Sol's country on the. It's it's extremely helpful for understanding what's happened to us where we've come from and how we can move back towards the type of integration of faith and reason that that benedict talked about at. Regensburg which I say is central for understanding. What's happened to the West and how we can put things to get on to say that it may be one of the last things work. But he wrote the dolphins and it's on the back cover as the Smith the two thousand lorries and economics very different men from different both Berry Devout Christian approaching things one from the standpoint of the social sciences from the standpoint of the team from also and yet many of their conclusions about the world and the relationship between faith and reason end up in the same place so natural or natural rights is One Book I would seriously just people read Adam. Smith's wealth of nations and the Reagan spoke with mass accompanied by Father Shelves Commentary. The book is reason. Faith and the struggle for Western civilization by Dr Samuel. Greg you can find it at fine booksellers nationwide and on Amazon. Thank you very much Sam for an enlightening conversation and we look forward to chatting with you again in the future sometime. Thanks for having me on. It's been a pleasure to be with you and I greatly commend the work of James Wilson sent to anyone. Who's listening you doing? Great great work. Thank you very much. Thank you. This program has been brought to you by the James Wilson Institute on Natural Rights in the American founding. If you'd like to learn more about the James Wilson Institute please visit James Wilson Institute Dot Org. Thanks for listening..

Smith Natural Law James Wilson Institute on Natu Reagan James Wilson Reimb James Wilson Institute James Wilson Institute Dot Org America Regensburg Richard Conception James Oxford Modern Commercial Societies Jones benedict Dr Samuel Sam Amazon Greg
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"And the custom when Marshall Becomes chief justice. Is that during these discussions. The justices may only have wine. If it's raining I assume that this was to cheer themselves. On Marshall's custom was to always ask one of his colleagues often associate justice story. You Know Brothers Story. We look out the window and tell us what the weather is. Story might say well. The Sun is going down and a clear sky marshal would say our jurisdiction is so vast by the law chances. It must be raining somewhere. The wine was served to the Marshall Court. This may explain the number of unanimous decision. I'm serious I'm serious about that. Because because there was this was a man who I mean except versus Jefferson. He really really liked almost everybody. Almost everybody liked him Justice story the first time he heard him as a lawyer. I love his laugh and I realize I've written a number of biographies. This is the first person who's a laugh was described. Wow did out in this whole like It's not that they lacked a sense of humor. But but this is the this is the first person I ever read the description of laugh and stories. I love his laugh. So that shows you you know what kind of a guy? He was one-on-one and that's how he ran his court. I mean he al- also. There was the power of his mind. There was the power of his legal reasoning. But but the first thing the sort of the first story of this personality is this this warmth this geniality this ability to get along with people and You know the expression herding cats. Well you know that that can be what what the Supreme Court is like or any any small group politics and Marshall had that ability. He had that gift and That that geniality that good fellowship was was a key part of it. Well Richard. You have an open invitation to join us at John Marshall. One time home in Washington. Dc The decor Bacon House. I've eighteenth and F- okay so you can enjoy some wine as Marshall perhaps enjoyed it With us in some other martial files okay. Great they'll take you up on that great. The book is John Marshall. The man who made the Supreme Court Richard Brooker joined us for a a wonderful interview. We encourage you to buy it All bookstores nationwide or on Amazon On the Internet Richard. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Garrett. Thanks for having me all right. This program has been brought to you by the James Wilson Institute on Natural Rights in the American founding. If you'd like to learn more about the James Wilson Institute please visit James Wilson Institute Dot Org. Thanks for listening..

John Marshall Marshall Court James Wilson Institute on Natu Supreme Court Richard Brooker F James Wilson Institute Dot Org James Wilson Institute Garrett Bacon House Jefferson Washington Amazon
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Of a an account of the story and so two but to make this visit to the reader to me. I decided to for each one of these cases to go back however far that would be to catch the story at the beginning of it. And sometimes this not going back to colonial times The obvious examples Dartmouth Woodward and this is a case decided in eighteen nineteen. It's a fight over the governance of the college but The story begins Before the revolution when Dartmouth I gets its charter from George. The third and and the case will be decided based on the language of that charter and the structure that it set up at Marshall's decision that this this was a contract and therefore Something that the constitution prevents the states from impairing under Article One section ten. But but so I take it back to the very beginning and then carry the story up and similarly with you know with all the other cases the Cherokee cases where we have to start with what were the relations of the of the Cherokees With the United States Up to the point they get in legal trouble Gibbons Viagra and the steamboat case or or why did we have steamboats in the United States? Who invented them? When and how How did this monopoly? That's being challenged in the case got established in the first place and You know it it makes the story more queer. A lot of fun Sometimes they're real characters involved in these cases Some of the some of the back story is pretty jaw-dropping Fletcher versus pack cited by the Court and eighteen ten. This is This is a another contract case. Really the first important one and that begins begins the crooked land deal in the state of Georgia in seventeen ninety five. The state of Georgia is broke They sell thirty five million acres of land for a penny and a half an acre for land companies which were formed for the purpose of taking advantage of this sale and it turned out that every single member of the Georgia legislature that approved. This was bribed. The going rate for their vote was a thousand dollars and one guy took only six hundred dollars and he said well. I wasn't greedy. That's why they helped on my extra four hundred dollars. I mean it's it's it's it's entertaining you know and then you should be entertaining should I hope it does entertain the reader. But but these are also you know these. Are It also shows how porno these cases are because people? Don't go to court over nothing. You know. People would rather not do that most of them they go to court either because they really want something or they're really afraid of something you know. They're afraid of being cheated there or they're afraid of going to jail cases Aaron burr his treason trial. He would have been an act that you know if he'd lost that was the penalty for treason so he was fearful of his life and You know on the other hand people people want money Jefferson thought burner was a trader. He wanted him punished So so they're they're they're powerful motives On either side and I wanted to be able to capture not only the entertainment but the drama every one of these cases. Well we envisioned this conversation jumping around the book a little bit and I hope we get to talk about Some of those cases and the figures and the drama as well. But as this is the James Wilson Institute podcast and we have a nice robust constituency of lawyers judges and clerks judges among among them. We thought we would first focus on the most general question of how Marshall approached his role as a judge he approached it. I think I'll use the word conservative late. You know. Not Trying to invoke either side in in either current political debates or the political debates of his time. I mean this literally in the sense that as a judge you deal with cases. That's all you deal with. It was interesting to me before Marshall even get on the court in the decade or so that the Supreme Court existed before he got the job of chief justice there were several instances where the president or Congress s Supreme Court to do other things. You know asked for advice on Some PD question or asked to supervise tension. Requests of revolutionary war veterans. There were several instances. And then all those instances the court said now you know. We're not going to be Jack of all trades. Our job here is to be the Supreme Court for cases that arise before the federal judiciary. That's what we do. That's all we do at that informs marshalls behavior. He you know. He sits there with his colleagues five of them. At first and later they become sixth court increases from six to seven justices and they wait to see what lands and their laps. Now you know. They're not. They're not blindfolded here. They they are aware of what's happening in the legal universe. And they're certainly aware of the politics that that swirls around them but they he added they are there to decide cases now the the innovation that he's often credited with and this is in his. You know his first monumental case Marlboro versus Madison at eighteen now. Three this is the first time that the court strikes down. A portion of a law passed by Congress And this is Yeah this is rightly considered a landmark decision. I wonder if it isn't a little over emphasized because Marshall wasn't making the doctrine of judicial review out of whole cloth in eighteen. O three right. This is already a concept that people understood. It was already out there Alexander Hamilton had written about it and the last of the federalist papers where he covers the judiciary at the end of the series Marshall himself had spoken about it at the Virginia ratifying convention in the summer of seventeen eighty eight. He was one of the delegates to that convention which was going to approve or disapprove the key the new constitution for the state of Virginia. And he he was pro-constitution then he gives a speech one of the speeches. He gives us on the judiciary and in the course of that speech. He does expert on the principle of judicial review and There was even before Marshall even gets on the court the there was a case in the seventeen ninety s involving the constitutionality of a tax on carriages Now it turned out of the court decided to this tax was okay but they were certainly in a position. Since the question came up to go on the other way so the que- the constitutionality of a law had appeared. Ask a question before the court before Marshall even gets on the court so yes margarite is is. It is an important decision. It is First Time it's done and then it's very rarely done there after I mean the the most famous time it's done as dreads Scotney. Seven this is this is decades after Marshall is has died and a A A judge pointed to me after my book came out. There were a couple of cases with the Marshall Court decided in the eighteen twenties having to do with WHO owned It was either the shoreline or the islands and Mobile Bay. Was it still the federal government or was state of Alabama? This is after. It's become a state and the court There had been a law passed by Congress implying that the federal government could still dispose of these lamps and then the court set now. He can't do that. It's now state Alabama's now state therefore it has control over these lands so the point is there was another. There was another instance of the court. overruling a portion of a law passed by Congress much less famous or notorious and dread Scott but But my only point is. This wasn't happening a lot but It was a principal that was that was already understood and and Marbury famous. Because it's the first time it's actually made real. Yeah I see it as as twofold one. You Misunderstood more being twofold. Fold one as you articulate the misunderstanding that the case established judicial review merely articulated. How it was always They're in the constitution under our constitutional scheme but the second is this strange misunderstanding. That judicial review means judicial supremacy. And how when the court decides Case it is binding as a constitutional amendment is passed through the power and logic of the supremacy of the Supreme Court within our judicial system. If you can talk a little bit about why what why there exists that confusion well Certainly other branches Have have challenged that notion that you just articulated marshals on lifetime. Andrew Jackson.

Court Marshall Supreme Court Marshall Court Congress s Supreme Court Congress United States George Dartmouth Woodward Alabama Georgia Aaron burr Viagra Virginia Madison Fletcher Alexander Hamilton James Wilson Institute Jefferson
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello my name is Garrett's networker. Welcome to the James Wilson podcast. Today we're joined by Richard Brooke. Eiser Richard is the author of many biographies of the American founders. Most recently he has written a biography of the great chief justice. John Marshall the man who made the Supreme Court from Basic Books Richard. It's a pleasure to be speaking with you. I'm joined by one of our interns for the James Wilson Institute Josh Hero and were just overjoyed to be able to speak with you before we dive into our questions. We noted that in your acknowledgment section. You mentioned one of the close friends of our founder and director. Happy arcus as one of the influences that you're writing a book Michael Woman and so before we get into the book itself. We were hoping you can tell us a little more about how our DEA friend Michael was a helped you writing the book well. He was very helpful. He steered me towards The best the Marshall Scholarship I never even watched to law school so I was coming to this from the outside and that that's an obvious disadvantage. I think it's an advantage because it means that I am looking at everything crash and I have to make sure that I understand it myself. Which helps me in explaining it to most of my readers who are also going to becoming to it as non-lawyers on Kamla professors about But that means I need some helpful Indians to Just guide me through the Marshall. Scholarship and Michael Uelmen was was certainly very helpful. steered me towards The best box Marsha books out there which is one of the reasons I decided to do. He seemed to be relatively under done considering his importance. And there are excellent books on him. But it's not like someone who's been president for instance or war Benjamin Franklin or Alexander Hamilton. Even before the musical there there was just a lot more about all these guys and relatively little for the great chief justice so So that will seem like free field and Michael UELMEN was one of the Expert Helpers who gave me a map of that before I punched him excellent. I think your your book is very clearly written to an audience. That is familiar with Marshall. But you don't really take for granted the reader's knowledge. Would you be able to tell us a little bit about the narrative framing process that you employ in the book and why you specifically made decisions to focus on Marshall and his relationships and what is it exactly about his personal connections that served as a backdrop for discussing Marshall's understanding of law and politics overall? Well I thought to personal relationships which were most important to his public career were first his early contact and his almost boundless admiration for George Washington. And that's second his lifelong animosity with his second cousin. Once removed Thomas Jefferson which was returned in spades by Jefferson. Marshall volunteered at the age of nineteen for the Virginia militia. In seventeen seventy five this as soon as the news of of Lexington and concord it spread throughout the colony and then the following year. He joined the continental army and he was in free. Battles Washington demanded it Brandy Wine Germantown in the fall. Seventeen seventy seven monmouth courthouse. In the summer. Seventy eight and between Germantown and MONMOUTH. He was at the Winter Encampment Valley forge where Washington was also in command show. He saw the commander in chief and victory. He saw them defeat and he saw him in this very trying winter and his conclusions from these firsthand. Experiences was that Washington was the man who had guided us through the revolution. He was the man who saw through. Who who made it a success and he never forgot that it was imprinted upon him when Washington at the end of the war returns this commission. Congress in December. Seventeen eighty three Captain Marshall Rights as old school. Fellow James Monroe and he called Washington the greatest man on earth and that was an opinion he would never change and he would follow. Washington's lead throughout the rest of his life When when it becomes a question whether we need a new constitution in seventeen eighty seven? Eighty Eight He is one of the lesser followers of Washington pushing for the ratification of the new constitution. decade later WASHINGTON summons him to Mount Vernon to basically ordered him to run for Congress when our first two party system has already developed federalists of of Washington and Adams Hamilton versus the first Republican Party of Jefferson amount and again Marshall follows Washington. He is a federalist and he agrees After some persuading To RUN FOR CONGRESS. And He is the congressman who tells Congress a year later that Washington has died and he calls him first in war first in peace. I in the hearts of this country and this is an attitude that he would keep for the rest of his life. The only book ever rights as a five volume biography of Washington the policy preferences that he has as chief justice are those of the federalist. Party He believes In a federal government in which in crucial respects the federal government has supremacy over the state governments He believes in the Commercial Revolution The Hamilton Vision A lot of a lot of that. The hammel Tony and vision is sustained by Supreme Court decisions that Marshall Issues so this is the lifelong fact of his encounter with George Washington. Now the the other important man is his cousin. Thomas Jefferson and the animosity. The animosity begins in the Washington Administration when when Jefferson is Washington's secretary of State It it exists. Swin Jefferson is struggling with Hamilton over Hamilton's financial program. Jefferson is very skeptical of it He he is skeptical of it. On the merits he also thinks unconstitutional. They have such thing as a bank of the United States Hamilton argues brilliantly. That this is an implied power under the constitution and the reasoning that Marshall Himself Will Echo in eighteen nineteen when he decides McCall versus Maryland which relates to the second bank the United States. But what really turned him against his cousin is Jeffersons attitude to the French Revolution Like the other members of Jefferson's party Jefferson believes this isn't on alloyed. Good thing he never turned against the French Revolution. Even through the reign of terror. The only point at which he finally abandoned says faith and that is what Napoleon takes over but for that first decade of the French revolution from seventeen eighty nine To to the end of the century Jefferson Madison his Bernie. They are all in for the French revolution and they seem to Marshall to be as patriotic towards France as they are towards the United States. If not more so and this is Tha Marshall Unacceptable He believes that the Jefferson is lacking in proper patriotism. Any also feels he's been disloyal secretary of state president want because although he terry's out Washington's neutrality policy officially he's also trying to undermine on the side and These are unforgivable offensive to Marshall. Both because he's a patriot and kneels during the revolution and he is such an admire of Washington so after the seventeen ninety four him. Thomas Jefferson is permanently in his in his black letcher. There is no possibility that Jefferson can ever come back for him. So those were the you know. Those are the personal relationships that I Ramified through Marshall's life now the other the other structural decision I made I mean writing a biography is. There's something very easy about it because they all have a similar shape. I mean there's a person who's born and then he does stuff and he dies right the structure you don't you don't get away from it. But the the one modification for this particular book is that in Marshall's most important career which is chief justice. This is the last More than a third of his life thirty four years from eighteen eighteen thirty five where he is chief justice that careers memorable largely because of a number of landmark decisions that he hands out and that his court agrees with so these cases are very important and each one of them. I realized is a short story They only come to the Supreme Court at the end of their course. That's when they've you know who the parties have been fighting about. Whatever it is they go to court. It comes through the lower courts finally at arrives at the Supreme Court and the Marshall Court decides what it decides bad and the justices are interested in that they are interested in the arguments that are presented to them. Now of course there's also politics swirling around a Lotta these cases. They're also aware of that but they come in at the climax.

John Marshall Washington Thomas Jefferson Supreme Court Alexander Hamilton George Washington Marshall Scholarship Marshall Court United States James Wilson Eiser Richard Richard Brooke Jefferson Madison Washington Administration James Wilson Institute Garrett Congress
"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"wilson" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Thanks for listening to the James Wilson. Podcast my name is Garrett's networker and I'm the deputy director of the James Wilson Institute today. We'll be speaking with Professor Joseph Postal about his new book bureaucracy. In America the administrative states challenged the constitutional government. Professor Postel is associate professor of political science at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs where he teaches courses on administrative law political parties. Congress in American political thought and where he serves as the associate director of the Center for the Study of government and the individual. He is currently a visiting fellow in American political. Thought at the Heritage Foundation's E can at Simon Center for Principals in politics your doctorate and master's from the University of Dallas and took a bachelor's degree from Ashland University. He has been published in the Claremont Review of books. American political thought and the review of politics among other journals. Joe It is a pleasure to be joined today. And we're just so pleased to not only have you here with us today but we've been pleased to have your former student. Greg Mil With us for this entire summer is one of our interns here at the James Wilson Institute and so as part of Greg's internship He's been reading your book very closely and will be directing most of the questions during the interviewing so Again we just like to thank you so much for your time and it's a pleasure to have you here with us. It's great to be here. Sorry Greg that you've had to read my carefully but hopefully it's been somewhat warnings interest program to classes modern things so I I guess we started out just as the subject. If you're just describe it briefly and what the issues are at stake and why you think people should care about this issue so the idea that we have you know. The government three branches legislature that rights law that executives that executes law and introduce area that just we implies and interprets the law so what we teach people in high school. It's still sort of the assumption that most citizens take with them when they think about. What's going on politically or what policies are made by the government. But what's amazing is the more you study. The details of modern government how it doesn't resemble that simple high school civics version of American government and I thought the book was important because it really tries to explain how significant Li things have changed since the time of the founding the structure of our government that take almost any policy that the national government makes whether it's environmental policy Labor Policy consumer product safety transportation safety. It all really has been subsumed under the umbrella of this administrative state and so I thought that was an important story is a story that not very many people really understand and so that was kind of the the prompt for getting me to to write the book but then as I really started to look into it. I thought the legal discipline of Administrative Law. That's grown up around. The administrative state also reflected some really curious developments like This question of deference to administrative agencies or the combination of powers in the same hands in an agency and so I thought this was an important subject not only because of how significant the administrative state as in terms of the policies and makes but also the structure and the the constitutional questions raised by those structural renovations that the administrative state has made to the Constitution and and this position discussing written about in length. So what was there? Anything particularly found lacking and just the academic discourse to address. What is your do you think that other works on his issued interesting? Yeah there's I think there's been a lot lacking in our understanding of the administrative state The amazing thing I think about the state of scholarship on the administrative status until ten years ago how little there was of the term administrative state seems to have originated. We've used to some extent in the twentieth century. Dwight Waldo wrote a famous book in the forties called the administrative state but then the term sort of just fades away until the middle of the nineteen nineties. When a professor Gary Lawson wrote a really great article called the rise and rise the administrative state and even into the twenty first century scholars weren't really talking about the administrative state very much so this was a wide open field to right To write in but I think more important than just the lack of existing scholarship on it. I thought what what we did know about. The administrative state was to To to superficially grounded We haven't really explored what the founders had to say about administration and what they actually did about administration at all most of the histories of the administrative state or the discussions of it. Start somewhere in a eight hundred eighty s or in most cases even much later than that and so we were missing this whole world of administrative law that provided an alternative to the modern approach. Where courts are much more important than agencies Where Congress? Legislators don't delegate their power and so part of. I think what I was trying to do in the book was to show that there is a world of administrative law in the traditional sense that exists prior to the progressive era when the administrative state really gets going so. I think that's one of the big things that the book tries to do is to explain to people what life was like before we had an administrative state and then the other big thing was Very few people had traced how the Progressive Conservatives flip-flopped in administrative law over the course of the twentieth century the Progressives we sort forget this history very few scholars looked at it carefully. The progressives were huge fans of judicial deference and they loved the agencies having the independence from From the political branches and then as the twentieth century it goes on and they fear the administrative state more under conservative presidents they switch and become judicial activists and the Conservatives go from their role of being defenders of the courts to To being critics of judicial engagement with the administrative state so that was another big part of the story. I wanted to tell you have this. Other world of Minced Ministry of Regulation talked about. And you spend you start calling but then you go into the nineteenth century in the regulations that were existent how that was done. And as understanding you're making one of the cases are making that the The constant structure allowed for actually some robust regulatory state. It wasn't just lays a fair society and that would evolve later on was just not really much degree but also in kind different. Yeah so what do you think? What are the particular features of in the early nineteenth century that.

James Wilson Institute Greg Mil associate professor of politic Joe It Congress Professor Joseph Postal James Wilson Professor Postel Study of government University of Colorado Colorad America Claremont Review of books deputy director Garrett Dwight Waldo visiting fellow Heritage Foundation Minced Ministry of Regulation