35 Burst results for "Wilshire"

 Ship anchor suspected in pipeline break that fouled beaches

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Ship anchor suspected in pipeline break that fouled beaches

"The likely cause of that oil spill in the waters off southern California I ships anchor hooking dragging and splitting open the pipeline according to federal investigators federal investigators also say the pipeline owner didn't quickly shut down operations after a safety system alerted to a possible spill which sent up to a hundred and twenty six thousand gallons of heavy crude into the ocean off Huntington beach and we'll close beaches and stop local fishing for weeks the Coast Guard says a commercial ship reported a possible spill Friday night amplify energy didn't report this bill until the next morning CEO Martin Wilshire we were not aware of anything Friday night if there were reports like I said that they did not come to us meanwhile governor Gavin Newsom repeating its calls for the US to move beyond oil it's time once and for all disabuse ourselves that this has to be part of our future this

Southern California Ceo Martin Wilshire Huntington Beach Coast Guard Governor Gavin Newsom United States
"wilshire" Discussed on The Heumann

The Heumann

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"wilshire" Discussed on The Heumann

"I cannot handle being up on my feet for long periods of time. So i will. I will walk around my home a couple of minutes at a time. Even so even like if i am walking home. There's a lot of like leaning that. I'm doing or i'll lift my leg up and rest my knee on a chair or on a bed or whatever like i'll be doing a lot of discrete things to alleviate the pressure off my legs And then if my legs cannot handle being up anymore. I'm in my home so there will be somewhere that i can sit down nearby. I can even be my backyard for for a little bit and people don't understand the little details that go into our disabilities like my backyard is okay because i'm familiar with the ground. I'm familiar with like where the holes are where the hills are I know where everything is. So i can care for my body in that space but asking me to go to a random grassy patch. Okay i'm gonna lose my ankle in some random hole. I'm gonna lose my ankle or my knee and some random held that i did not realize was there So familiarity is a big part of accessibility for me as well as having a Throw of places to sit and to circle back to what i was saying about my daily experience with fear as an ambulatory wilshire user is even though i can walk in small spaces like my home or my small backyard. I have to use a wheelchair to walk my dog every day. And sometimes like if i have to pick up some business and it's like down a hill and a grassy area. I'm like loops. i may have to get up out of my chair to go get it. Every time i even consider getting out of my wheelchair in public terrified terrified that some neighbor who only knows me as the person who uses a wheelchair to walk their dog from outside their window can witness me get out of my wheelchair and then it becomes some kind of neighborhood scandal that There's some kind of faker person who who uses a.

wilshire
Brief Pursuit Ends With Crash, Standoff In Beverly Hills, Near Los Angeles

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Brief Pursuit Ends With Crash, Standoff In Beverly Hills, Near Los Angeles

"Took a collision, tear gas SWAT and a three hour standoff before a man it took police on a high speed pursuit finally surrendered in Beverly Hills. The vehicle unfortunately struck one pedestrian as well as they struck two other vehicles. The pedestrian and two people in cars were sent to the hospital. The man was unarmed. And cooperative as he spoke with officers on the phone. The standoff finally came to an end with a peaceful surrender. The intersection of Wilshire in North Tahini Drive was shut down from about 4 32. Almost midnight.

Beverly Hills
Man Stabbed To Death At Los Angeles Home; Suspect Found Dead A Few Houses Away

John and Ken on Demand

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Man Stabbed To Death At Los Angeles Home; Suspect Found Dead A Few Houses Away

"This story comes from the beverly grove area of los angeles and here. It is from nbc. Four is kim tobin. Police are still investigating here but like you said we know man was stabbed to death in his own backyard and then not suspected stabber took off. He was found dead of an apparent self inflicted wounds of an apparent suicide. So right now. Police are still investigating out here. Happened up to sixty six hundred block of maryland drive but we do want to show you some video from the news chopper. Four was up above when all of this happened and police were initially responding to a trust passing. Call this afternoon. And it's very upscale neighborhood. Then a gruesome discovery man around thirty years old was found stabbed to death. Police say at this point. It appears the victim was in his backyard when that man came onto the property stabbed him and took off. Police say they tracked down. That suspect a few houses away where he apparently had jumped some fences. He was hiding him when looked like a guest house in another back. Yard officers used tear gas and other devices to try to get that man to come out but he was found dead from apparent self inflicted wounds and neighbors here in this area. Tell us there's been a large homeless encampment nearby. They say been dealing with a lot of issues for the last several months and to hear this happening on their street is absolutely terrifying for them. When they went into the unfortunate person who got murdered the guy said. Get out of here and it stabbed him. It really is crazy. Three houses down from me all day. Three houses down there could have been me. Our city is broken and killed. Focus on helping. Police have not confirmed that. The suspect is a transient. They say they are exploring. Every possibility about what led up to this deadly stabbing interviewing neighbors and looking at any surveillance video that may have caught the crime muscular. See at this point. They are not looking for anyone else. Who was involved in this homicide but if you are out here in this area the area of maryland drive near san vicente and wilshire. Boulevards will be closed for quite some time again. We see detectives kind of going down the street door to door talking to several neighbors as they try to figure out what led up to this deadly. Stopping

Beverly Grove Kim Tobin NBC Maryland Los Angeles San Vicente Wilshire
"Who cares!": Trump resigns from Screen Actors Guild

Radio From Hell

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

"Who cares!": Trump resigns from Screen Actors Guild

"And here's some huge news from here in Hollywood. After finding out that they were preparing disciplinary action against him, Donald Trump abruptly resigned from the Screen Actors Guild today. Yeah. Now he's gotta get sick enough to go back to Community Theater is doing a production of Godspell in Bakersfield. In his resignation letter, Trump said. I write to you today regarding the so called disciplinary committee hearing aimed at revoking my union membership. Who cares? I'm gonna use that all the time. From now on, I write you today regarding the ticket I got from running a red light in the corner of Wilshire and Fairfax. Who cares?

Screen Actors Guild Donald Trump Community Theater Hollywood Bakersfield Wilshire Fairfax
Tula, the combo USB mic and audio recorder

Talking Tech

04:52 min | 1 year ago

Tula, the combo USB mic and audio recorder

"Systems. Likely the systems you use today. Learn more at avelar dot com slash talking. So what if. There was a usb mike that also let record at the same time. I think it sounds like a pretty good idea. So does david brown. He's got a new. My call the tula mike It's a two for one. It does double duty and he is talking to us from barcelona spain. David how you doing all right. Tell me why you invented this microphone. Well initially it was. Because of the explosion of content creators people making podcasts and having youtube channels and that type of thing. I wanted to create something that enabled those people to to get good audio easily Even if they are audio professionals and i thought it would be cool if it were a device that could record when you're away from your studio or away from your you know a bedroom studio or whatever. It is out in out in the field that can function as a mobile recorder as well. Okay right now. I could buy a lot of bikes plug directly into the iphone and have pretty good pretty good sound with them Intake the take that with me anywhere or have a usb mic on my desk. So to me after. I've just told you that you would say what well i would say. That the tula the a few things number one. The tula is is a kind of all in one solution. Instead of having one. Mike that plugs into your iphone in another fund that you have on your desk at home it covers all those bases and we like to think that it covers it better than than all of those put together and it looks really nice already. You should tell everybody about two to at a place in russia to our from moscow. What inspired you to To to to name it after this cook you know area of russia. And and and i believe you allow your engineers are in russia. Tell us about the russia connection well. The russia connections is kind of a hot topic. These days. I have a band called brazzaville and were oddly popular in russia. So i've toured extensively in russia for many years and Back in the ninety s in la. I bought a pair of octaves from Guitar center back when they were the first condenser mics. That were sort of affordable and i used him for years and one of the times. When i was on tour. I thank god. I wonder we're up toddlers located. So i looked it up. Sure enough. it's in. This town called tula which i had never heard of before in about a week later i was playing a gig in In cross nar this guy came up to me after the show. And he's like oh man. I'm a big fan. I wonder if you'd ever planned my hometown. Oh we're tula. And i said could you get me a you know a tour of the octave factory. He's like well. I'll try and he had to get special. Fsb permission and all of this military facility long story short. We got the idea to start at first. We were going to partner with taba to make like a kind of high end version of what they do. But in the end that was way too complicated and we ended up just founding our own microphone company which became soyuz. So let's back up a little bit. You're used to live in los angeles. Yes you live. You live in barcelona now okay. And you make microphones in russia to. How does that all get. How put that all together for me. I have a lot of airline miles. Well i grew up in la like right actually in la unlike most people who tell you they grew up in la grew up. Like basically in downtown wilshire and fairfax even more. like i. Like the koreatown. You know hoover in third and around there but i lived there for for most of my life and then about seventeen years ago. I just had this idea to move to barcelona just mostly because it just seemed like a good idea and It was a great idea as it turns out. I've never regretted it okay. So you're living barcelona and you fly on air flow aeroflot's to moscow Three times a week or three times a month or sadly not this year but last year. How often were you going all. I would go at least once a month. I would say and I know moscow really. Well i love russia immensely. It's beautiful country. With incredible people gets a really bad rap. I mean they're and bad people like anywhere but good luck with the tula. Mike which will be out in january one ninety nine.

Russia Barcelona David Brown LA Spain Moscow Guitar Center Youtube David Mike Taba Wilshire Los Angeles Fairfax Hoover
"wilshire" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"wilshire" Discussed on KTOK

"Know, under thunder coat, you know, kind of a sore subject in away. I know they never. I never heard anything. And I I know the D A. That you talked about him. I used to live with him. Okay? And ah The family home a lot of Beverly ills. I believe they own the entire grow. Dale Drive area. Wow! Expensive, realistic. The real estate behind that is called El Camino on that's where they had their offices. That's correct. DTL Doheny built the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. One will. Sure no, no, Beverly. Sure. The other one is still the ship on Ah. Well, sure, Dr O That's the Beverly Beverly Hills. Wilshire. Yeah, exactly. And he'd have all those clients stay out there. But it was an interesting family, Mr yelled. Oh, he had a lot of They lived in town in Beverly Hills in the area wouldn't so forth and they had ranches all over. Southern Cal. One of Mr E. L don't Jeannie's favorite ranch was Ferndale Ranch out Santa Paul. While you act? You echo Myron. What Cletus been telling us? They really wanted to. Ah, swept to this thing right under the carpet. And they Clete. Yes, they did. And they did. They succeeded. Now, you know, nobody knew that the truth. Phil Don't let's Goto Bill in Los Angeles. Hey, Bill taken away. Hi, George and clean..

Beverly Beverly Hills Beverly Wilshire Hotel Beverly Mr E. L Bill DTL Doheny Wilshire Ferndale Ranch Los Angeles Cletus Phil George Santa Paul Jeannie
Stevie Parle Shares His Spaghetti And Clam Recipe

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Stevie Parle Shares His Spaghetti And Clam Recipe

"I am Stevie Paul. I have a few restaurants rather than a couple of restaurants style. A pop-up could joy in west London and I wanted to tell you how to make spaghetti with clams. This is my favorite thing to we think. So so my kids type thing to. The most of the people you cook it for think you'll really some kind of genius when you make it and yet it's incredibly simple. Clemson Volaille obviously is a cool mentally have unbelievable flavor. The juice comes out of clam is just tastes out of this world. Very easy to make you need. Spaghetti doesn't need to be a fresh dried past united of standard. Supermarket blue-and-yellow packet round is fine. It really is fine. But if you see a slow a dried has to take a longer amount of time to cook I always think that's good into look at actually how long it takes cook it from the pack is says your Spaghetti takes like fourteen minutes but something bad instead of ten or eleven it's a nice big spaghetti by the Nice Hodge wieght and it takes time to cook, but it's going to be chewing delicious. Anyway you need spaghetti. Hasley, dry Chili, white wine, and unique clams. Really a peasant can he love clams but equally, if you make has to climbs with like ten clams lesson than that is absolutely delicious and the juice they create makes much wonderful sociopathic. So festival, you're GONNA have everything ready for this dish because once you making it, you gotta move kind of fast. So let's save a gonNA. Do that you people you need a couple of hundred grams of Spaghetti. You need a big hand full of Nice. Salted Wilshire associates the see. Boiling rapidly, you need to finally up to cloves garlic your time you're doing this trying shook the evenly and small, and you need a handful of parsley flatly parsley leaves pig from the studios. Again shops when I'm joking Parsley, why do is I kinda scrunch up into a bowl and then again big shove knife and so slice through scrunched up all of Parsley as finally as I can and then go through it again once at done that in judge Moore says really fine many needle clams anything from ten to betty offense they come in different sizes it kind of normal Palo plans again, this country really good. I. Tend to choose the smaller ones just because the big ones could be a little bit cheery and be not nice. And why do I washed clams under running Warta just to make sure that not gritty. Swish Moore around, and then if they open while washing them, you can throw those ones. Sometimes they it's like only salmon them in those the you get rid off, but they should just be tidy shot Monday, running water and Swish around in a single appeal something for a few minutes just to get them nice and clean 'cause it's a bit disappointing when you you're clams and you get a bit of sand I mean he's not the end of the world who have made you sick. It's just wants tweets and so you've got your big kind of woods boiling. You've got your garlic party jobs. You got some dried chili like crushed dried chili nice specific one just. Don't want it to be crazy hall. So if it's a kind of mild crush drudge chilly but we Quarter, teaspoon of something. And you got your clements watched and then you need a wide hand with a LID. If you have a big frying pan on a lead that fits on that side and my spine has it sometimes, you can use another one use a play or something that's ideal whose what you're GonNa do is you're gonNA. Steam the rams, and if you have the more piled on each other, they will open bat the juice from. The clams and the one which didn't mention you need a couplet glasses of white wine just dry white one needs to reduce. So if you've got the mobile pilot up in a small pan that juice one, Medusa wine and clam juice and oil anyway create the right kind of emotion fear. peste. Does funny because hardly any ingredients is nothing really technically but do but just got to pay attention to the details of can make. something. That is just unbelievably good. So you big votes spoiling your wide hand is now you're gonna put it on the heat and get aw- and you the pastor infest. So this recipe once you've got that stuff prepared it takes less time than takes Cook Pastor. So you can drop the spaghetti into the boiling water if your pan on some olive oil in the Pan and at the garlic and then just when that garlic. In, just a few seconds isn't good glove of olive oil by the way don't be shy it's a few titles swings and then he'd put garlic in just really starts frizzell before it's cooked too much anything you. But in a little pinch of Dr, Chilean you the clams straightway. Why normally then do is tad tossed them around said they get cut sit in this garlicky chilly thing on once clams get hot than they. Have Been. Put in the white wine, a big loss of two hundred Mil something like that, and then put the lid on straightway. A met should be lecturing around and steaming you pestis public been bullying this point for like three minutes and remember it takes ten twelve or something depending on the grand. Pasta. So you pass this boiling. You're Clemson's steaming. You'll Hasley chopped and you just wait a second. I but you just gotTa wait now in drink a bit of your white one and then when you pastor is three-quarters cooks your clams of probably open dictate the lid off the clam ham and then drain your pastor even though it's quite ready look in your clam hand, it should be nice and juicy but really cooking thing you pay attention because if you've got a massive pan and it was really really Hard and you wind might have completely reduced down by now. But if it's a small pan may not have reduced enough year, you wanted to be a good layer of Jews. But you don't want it to be ruled tree and as it reduces what happens is the olive oil, a most us in that mixture, and then you take the pastor drained it. We've just pulled out the with have tongues coming. And even though he's not quite could you into the clam on any says enough liquid that it looks juicy in statement good already that's fine. Otherwise put in a little bit of past awards. Back on so that the pastor is cooking in the CLEM. Pan Important that

Parsley Swish Moore Cook Pastor Stevie Paul Clemson Volaille Salted Wilshire Associates London Clemson Rams Clements Frizzell Betty Palo
Turning video game tech into accessible tools

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Turning video game tech into accessible tools

"Why can't we just or Wilshire up to an XBOX and play it? Why can't we just drive up and be able to control a drone in the sky or vehicle, and that's where this adapter that we developed. The freedom link came from is orthopedic. And Bill Binko Co. and a lot of people who are in those medical spaces have been saying to us for awhile you should be able to take these highly specialized highly customized devices that make ends of hours in order to put together thousands of dollars and just use them on different algae without having to reinvent the wheel every single. Let's talk about e sports a bit obviously. Sports are increasingly popular. Are there tools that maybe some of these competitive game players are using to get an edge that then could funnel in to accessibility technology even for non? Gamers. Lot of items that are not intended for the. Community that end up working out just great For example, this ord is the latest and greatest in audio technology everybody who's a Gamer everyone who's a player as a discord account and this just a program you put on your phone in order to play in talk to each other during the Games. But now people use it for interviews I use scored more often than I use zoom these days. So Zuma's just inherently inaccessible. I use a program called Dragon Naturally. Speaking to be able to type. So if I'm you the call in Zoom, it beauts my entire computer. So therefore, I am Mel rendered completely unable to communicate with anyone else while that's muted. So that's why programs like this corridor better because they've already fought about accessibility and have included it where you know plays, legs zoom still have some catching up to do you know there's there's things like, for example, one of my most recommended a trawlers is called a track I. Are Right and it's a controller where you put a hat on your head with a little infrared cliff and there's a camera that sits on top the your monitor and when you move your head around down left right it can see that and it was originally intended to be art of Microsoft flight simulator. So you can look around the cockpit of an airplane like pretty down there but we discovered that you can use that same technology and make you keyboard inputs so. That now I can hear letters with just moving my head and that allows you to games. So what you're constantly doing if you're a disabled is re purposing and re engineering things so that they can be used in everyday settings. So maybe there is a controller that can push three buttons at the same time, and in fact, there are and you can use these in eastwards if they let you now not every eastport allows you to do this kind of thing. There are oftentimes where they consider this against the rules it's cheating etc etc, and there really hasn't yet been an opportunity for years with disabilities to really get into eastwards arena and you know that's one of those projects that we continue to work on his hottest work out could aren't we make it fair for people with disabilities play while at the same time, not giving a superior edged people who are already very, very good with a standard controller. So you know, it's just a matter of working out the fairness and figuring out eastwards fits in the disability community. But that brings up the point that accessibility in gaming is more than just about playing the video game itself. Absolutely. Yeah. you know we always say gamers is that it's just an attempt to allow people to have that way to on that social isolation though inside charities mission purpose is on vessel isolation, foster inclusive communities, and improve the quality of life for people with disabilities, and we do that like connecting you to other human beings, your family members, your friends, your community you can get back out into that and not be alone. Using video games and you know some people will be like, oh, video games are not important or I'm not a Gamer I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa play. It's like we're trying to explain but this is just the tool they were using. It's like your car, right so you may not care about what you drive, but you just need a tool to get you from your house do hanging out with your friends and that's the same thing. The video games can do. We can get you to an area where you have a purpose of going in providing or your guild mates and and having that real sense of purpose. Gamers was really fortunate a few years ago to work with Walter Reed Army Hospital, and we were able to find that in instances where someone is coming back and they have had an injury that they were more than eighty percent less likely to consider self harm. If they had that close knit units the same experience of being over there with their army units. Over here in video. Games Steve Spawn Chief Operating Officer at able gamers charity he told us there were about forty six million potential players with disabilities in the US. Of the people reaching out to his group in particular have a physical disability that limits their ability to use traditional

Walter Reed Army Hospital Bill Binko Co. Wilshire Social Isolation Zuma Microsoft Chief Operating Officer Steve Spawn MEL United States
Sung Kang reveals the fight to make 'Better Luck Tomorrow'

Asian Enough

08:19 min | 2 years ago

Sung Kang reveals the fight to make 'Better Luck Tomorrow'

"Sung king you know him as the street racers. Hans Solo. I love that Han Solo in the fast and furious movies. And you can argue that. Seng's portrayal of Han the impossibly cool mentor of Tokyo drift. A member of the core fast and furious family made the franchise the most surprising and successful blockbuster series in Hollywood history. I would definitely make the argument so we are very lucky to have the chance to speak with Song. Today on Asian enough. Thank you for being here with us forever me we want to start off by addressing the big news. Which is you are coming back to the fast and furious franchise for the upcoming fast and furious. Nine which is huge for those of us who obsessively watched these movies because we know than Han. Your character has been gone for a couple of movies and in fact has one of the most tremendous most unpredictable. Arc's I feel like in movie history in that you know Tokyo drift. Which was the third movie in. The fast and furious franchise is the one that you originated this character. And we'd love to hear from you. What has your relationship with Han. Been like over these years. It's a love hate relationship. The hate is a strong word for it. I think it's maybe love and difficult is what it is because I'll never dismiss what the fast and furious and with the Han characters done for my career and my family and opened the Hollywood doors the first time I you know Justin and I worked on festive fears like we would just literally walk around the production office and then go into his office and start like laughing. Because can all these chairs the free snapple into the free water right those little things that we really appreciate it. Because when we're shooting tomorrow we had nothing we had a fold out table with five sticks of. Wrigley's spearmint gum spread out and a box of cold intimate donuts breakfast. That was our craft service and better luck tomorrow. Of course was the two thousand two indie film about over achieving Asian American teens who flipped the Model Minority Myth on its head when they start doing crimes so better luck. Tomorrow was Justin. Lin's first solo feature recode to feature call shopping things with Quinton leave and there were still students at Ucla. And then I heard that this young filmmaker out of UCLA was making an Asian American film. But I had already worked on a couple of Asian of American films that never finished and it was kind of a fiasco and felt like yeah. It's great to be part of this movement but we're not going to be able to compete with because you can't even finish the movie and when I came back to La. I was so disenchanted anytime I heard about another Asian American filmmaker instantly said this is probably not a good idea. That was already probably a few like maybe five six years in right. I mean I've been already a journeyman into business. You know and the auditions that I would get are the roles that would be a waiter or Yakuza and I felt like maybe the timing was rights. And this idea of being an actor in Hollywood is not GonNa Happen. Right and then I got a couple of phone calls from some aspiring producer. Asian American producers. And they said Hey. There's this guy named Justin Lin. He's a ucla and he's doing this. Asian American film. You should take a look at the script and you should like audition for it now and then two more friends call and say hey. You should really take a look at the script so Justin I actually met at. Danny's on Wilshire and western Koreatown. We met to talk about the script right and talk about the role and stuff like that and at that time. I think Hon- was written as a Filipino character. That drove a hundred civic here like a shaved head. Wow he was really perpetuating kind of like this. You know southern Kelly J. JD M. car culture kind of thug. And I'm from Georgia so I don't identify with I'm into muscle and you know my role models were like James Dean. Paul Newman John Wayne. If you will right and so this thing did not resonate so when I sat down with just and I said Hey I can I addition for Ben. The main character for best. I better tomorrow and just in being the the the patient older brother if you will and he would make a great poker player because slow played it and he's like why not. Let's see so. I went at like three times to read for Ban and knowing the whole time. I'm way too old looking. I don't fit the VIBE and I said to myself if this dude cast me it's movies gonNA suck and compromise vision. So after the third edition called me and said. Hey Man it's not gonNa work out but I would still love free to play on. I was like this is a guy that I would go to paddle with one last shot. Because if it doesn't work out I probably have to go and find a real job and it was so challenging because we had the whole budget in place but then the investors had asked Justin to change all the rules to Caucasian and Justin being. Who is now not GONNA do it? And he started putting the equipment on his credit card but as soon as the credit card companies. No you're maxing it out. They basically linked to the other companies. And then they'll hold your credit card so we're screwed and then I had worked at this restaurant in Beverley hills this cream barbecue place called Hula okay. That is no longer and we shot for a day and then justice said the money's not coming in so we probably have to shut this down and I went to work and I was so depressed right and I'm a server. They're left of a smile. I was so bummed and this is where I feel like everything happens for a reason. Like I don't necessarily subscribe to all these myths and stuff as some Guardian Angel but if if there is such thing that night she showed up and by that you mean John Wong and her husband. Jeffrey go founders of the Cherry Sky Films Production Company. They had been coming into the restaurant for a couple years and there was the first time they saw me not smiling and that kind of goofing off and she said what's wrong way so sadness explain the situation and she said can. I take a look at the script as I have in my car. She goes Why don't you in the director come by the office? Like the talk we went in there spoke for about an hour and then she wrote us a fifty thousand dollar check. Wow there's something like so mythic about this whole story but isn't that the keep a fifty thousand not enough to finish this movie right and so then we're stock and just kind of freaking out and the only person he knows that really has money. Is this guy named Mc Hammer right and how does he know MC Hammer so justin used to work at the Japanese? American museum is to be editor for the downtown Japanese-american Museum and so he was in plans of shooting tomorrow. And at that time the cannon xl one three chip consumer camera was coming out. And if you guys are aware if your techies like big deal so that was the first option of going digital post to film and suggests that went down. I think there was a convention down there to look at the new cameras coming out and Hera was there so hammer's standing next to a kid. You know anything about this camera. And he kind of helps them out and he goes. So what do you WanNa do this well? One day I hope to be a director. They Kinda you know. Talk a little bit and hammered being who is gave him his phone number and said hey you ever need anything. Give call so fast forward. The money's not happening just freaking out the credit cards frozen. I think he had the the phone number like pin to his wall. For you know for Sake right is that what the hell he calls. Hammer Hammer picks up. What's up is okay. Do you remember me Zig. Know what do you want? Here's the situation he goes. Hey it's not hammer time anymore. I can't just be funding these things. But here's ten grand. Do what you gotta do but you know I don't I don't need it back but here it is so if you go and watch. Tokyo drift anytime. There's a Tokyo City. Scene is hammer

Justin Lin Hammer Hammer Hollywood HAN Ucla Tokyo Hans Solo Director Tokyo City LA Seng Beverley Hills ARC Wrigley Paul Newman James Dean Kelly J. Jd M. Georgia Producer Cherry Sky Films Production Co
"wilshire" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Right and I was sitting in our car staked out of the cab stand at the corner of Wilshire and leeward eight forty six PM LXI scoring again yeah let's clouds in the morning or afternoon pretty black I think yeah your call to if you please three all units exploring things and three months ago right ninety four hundred there might be right yeah one point right after you see where it went yeah.

Wilshire
Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

The Big Picture

15:27 min | 2 years ago

Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

"Unfortunately this Shithole has more fucking leaks in the Iraqi navy. Fuck Yourself. I'm tired from fucking your wife. How's your mother good? She's tired from fucking my father. You have a job Tom. I'm a firefighter. Oh God bless you a hero. I'm not hero. We'd all be here. We could use the petroleum. No excuse me Christmas. Utah a lot of fucking money. What did you do? I mean if you take away nothing else for my class from this experience let it be this. If you're not a genius don't bother right. The world needs plenty of electricity and a lot of them are happy and they can help. It really can't be that we can always do. Better let me keep trying. If you guys keep trying I'm shawn fantasy and this is the big picture. A conversation show about Mark Wahlberg. This episode may break the all time record for big picture dissonance later in the show. I have an interview with Kelly. Reichardt the writer and director behind independent film classics. Like old joy. Meek's cutoff in the new film. First cow which might be the best movie of Two Thousand Twenty so far. I hope you'll stick around for that but I were joined by the frog. Sheriff Chris Ryan. I heard that Mark. Wahlberg actually dropped out of first cow. He was gonNA play the cow Alao. But you're already doing animal. Humor here on driver too is calling. Chris. You're here because you're a fan of Mark Wahlberg work. He's The star of a new movie. That is hitting Netflix. This Friday called Spencer confidential. I think gets his fifth film with Peterberg. The actor turned director of such films as lone survivor and deepwater horizon. This is a very strange movie but I think it's going to be a a very watched movie because the corona virus is scaring America into staying inside their house. And so I think that there's a potential for a lot of viewership of this movie. So we're talking about Mark Wahlberg one of the most resilient and persistent movie stars. I guess of the past twenty five years so let's just start with WHO is Mark Wahlberg. How did this happen? That Mark Wahlberg became one of the signature figures of movies in the twenty first century. I would not say I'm a fan of Mark Wahlberg as like I'm a I'm agnostic as a citizen. Yeah I would say that. I am very interested in the way that he has conducted his career. Which is kind of a weird throwback to a studio systems our he makes three to four movies every eighteen months somehow and just releases them at like a hugely prolific rate at. I'm fascinated by all the little pockets of his career that he has created where he repeats. You know he goes back to these little micro genres that he and he works a lot of people over and over again by the way he kind of has conducted his career to me is almost unique among Hollywood movie stars anymore. I mean most of the time when people achieve a certain level success. They just like see in three years for my next blockbuster or award fodder and he's just like nope. I'm grinding out. Family movie violent action film and then every once in a while Raunchy comedy and it's just like pretty pretty like unique among all Hollywood stars so I'm fascinated. What do you make them Amanda? I was fascinated when going back to you. Remember how many great directors he's worked with and how many actually excellent movies he's been in. Chris was asking me how much we watching I had to do for this podcast and the answer is a lot. Because I wouldn't say that Mark Wahlberg stays with me besides certain shots that will certainly be discussed on this podcast but he especially I guess in the first decade of this century just goes on a tremendous run. I really from Boogie nights on and works with a does a lot of really great movies and then kind of decides to just become like the Peterberg comedy guy in the second decade of the century. And I it's a really interesting shift. He just Kinda decides no. I'm going to do this now. And it's very fascinating to me I can't really make sense of. I also is Christmas talking about his efficiency. Just pulled up his daily schedule. Do you guys remember the days? Will he wakes up. Like four o'clock in the morning posted this on his own instagram typical daily scheduled to thirty. Am Wake Up. What don't you forty five prayer time. Three fifteen am breakfast. There's a lot of work work. He's golfing from seven thirty to eight. Which is the golf people? And there's a chamber recovery at nine thirty that takes more time than golf workout number two lunches and our so our meeting slash work calls also an hour and he goes to bed at seven thirty PM and which in Los Angeles for. I'd say six at least six months of the year. That is still broad daylight. Yeah Yeah Su. There is real efficiency baked into this. He's clearly very deliberate guy. He's making choices. And I think that pertains to his daily life and also his his career. There is clearly thought going into this. It's not a type of thought. I can access. I still don't know why you would wake up at two thirty and I don't know why you would do like five deep water horizons. There's a rumor that he has a routine. I think you. I'm speculating here. But I think he's a member of Wilshire Country Club here in Los Angeles. My husband told me this last night and he likes to play alone. He likes to play. And that's why he's playing so early in the morning and he's trying to get in like a quick nine or quick eighteen. I don't know five days a week which I'm who among? Us would love to do that if I could wake up before five. Am I would do it. I'll tell you I would love to do that. I'll tell you something else I am. I find golf to be social and I get crippled like when I play by myself. I'm like all the neurosis is creeping like. Should I take another shot now like it really playing golf? If you're not playing with anyone can just tell you. He's got three snacks on the schedule. Including one that takes an hour and a half from eight to nine thirty. Am is snack after seven. Thirty to eight am golf. Probably a euphemism. Oh Okay so you think. His sessions are ninety minutes. So you're saying to jump off something. Amanda said You know who? He reminds me of a bizarre way Cruz. Where it's like that run. Where cruises like I'll just work with Barry Levinson Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg and every great director at it seems like I'm just the most important factor in the whole world and then one day he wakes up and says I'M GONNA make action movies for the rest of my life? It's very unlikely though. I mean his origins restraints obviously member of this very well known family. He's from Massachusetts. He starts out as a a rap artist and ultimately becomes a Calvin Klein M. C. An. Mc Yes we watched the vibrations video. Recently I took my top five twenty two. Would you make of good vibrations? And and how did you feel about the funky bunch all these years later? It's just really bizarre that this was a thing that we lived through. Who is the funky bunch? I I still don't know who's in it. Were you in a Chris? Thought it was the backup dancers. I mean yes. That's who they were but like do you know anything about them and where they are now. I was pretty. Yeah I was pretty. I was pretty authentic back then so I was. I was already listening to deep deep newer. Grab I love talking about the early nineties with you. Can we talk about the Calvin Klein ads for a second really really important? You're almost put these on my list. And it's and my honorable mention boxer briefs. Yeah I was still a boxer sky back then that was not interested in the product. Would you just tear the ads out of the magazine? Crumpled them up and throw them in the garbage. I think that the those are the signature moment in his career without the advertising campaign he would not have become weirdly Tom Like sub Tom Cruise but he you know. He soared to a of fame on that ad campaign. They're just extremely important. Ninety s imagery obviously came as also in them. And that's where the whole K. Moss thing starts Them Hating each other. Great early celebrity feud they're very important that's all and also it looks great. I mean he and his image was of basically like a tough guy with a bad attitude whether that was true or not he obviously got into some altercations and his his personal history is pretty complicated. We're not gonNA spend too much time talking about on this show. But I think that he basically leveraged his complicated persona in the public into a movie career and if you look at the first few movies that he makes replays these kind of like weird intimidating Undeveloped YOUNG MEN. You know in the basketball diaries in. Ryen Russillo favorite movie fear And even in boogie nights. There's something like violently adolescent about his his persona which is very different from the kind of actor and movie star that he is right now so a lot of times. I think that we could. You could write like a series of essays about how much actors of his generation have attempted to mimic the kind of like rough and tumble blue collar upbringing. That Walberg apparently had like how how often like DiCaprio Damon or these guys have tried to be like no I'm Jim Carroll and he's just a function Carol I'm the real thing but it's weird like even in his authenticity. If you WANNA call it that he still lacks like any kind of emotional intelligence or psychological depth to portraying those things and you could write all these essays. But you could just watch the departed. Because that's what this does that. Do you need that from an actor? Do you need to feel like this person is like in control and has that depth that Chris was talking about? I think I do ultimately. I think that there is a reason that I gravitate to Matt Damon instead of Wahlberg. And I think that you not just because of the departed and the Boston. Bill will talk about that a lot as a comparison but I like I said I really remember a lot of Walberg performances. Even though he's been given a lot of great ones and I think that's because they have a I don't WanNa say surface level. That's unfair. They're actually a lot of depth but they aren't the emotional depths and I think I personally don't hang onto those. I think I'm always wondering how in command of the Ark of his career. He is because you pointed out he makes he's. I mean he's just been a lot of great movies a lot of movies that are going to stand the test of time and it always seems like he's being cast the way that a lot of young actresses or cast as the. Nayef as the like the naive and innocent who gets corrupted when put into a system and like did someone in a room. Say That to him. This is your lane man will early like you think so. Well I just don't think that he I think he's largely in charge of the movies that he makes. Now he's like. I think that the movies that we see our movies that Mark Wahlberg once made for the most part and my suspicion is the reason he made that transition. Amanda was referencing about just mostly doing action. Comedy movies now is because those movies are more fun and easier to make for him there either like a physical challenge there like a day on the set whereas making boogie nights as hard Russell Smart. Yeah I think that he is both like sinking very strategically as the schedule would suggest and also like not over thinking it i. That's the VIBE. I guess sometime at the end of the day he's going like it very much is what it is. He is a very Surface level or just immediate actor. That's that's what you're getting and so I think he wants. He gets to produce the movies himself and make the decisions. You just kind of like. Yeah action comedies. Got There before we get into our top fives and I think we should figure out what we mean. When we say top five if it's five performances or his top five movies because there's some complexity. There is a very strange celebrity. The the nine eleven thing is you're staring right at. It's just hanging over my head as I think about him as a public person. So in twenty twelve Walberg was quoted in a magazine interview regarding. What would have happened if he had flown aboard American Airlines Flight? Eleven on September eleventh. Two thousand one. He'd been booked on a flight on flight. Eleven but his plans changed the day before the scheduled flight and he cancelled his reservation. Walberg received public criticism for stating quote. If I was on that plane with my kids it wouldn't have went down like it did and there would have been a lot of blood in that first class cabin and then me saying okay. We're going to land somewhere safely. Don't worry Warburg apologized for those statements. But they're actually the sort of thing that kind of inform his public persona and when we watch him in an action movie. We think that he's the kind of guy who's like I would have kicked some ass on nine eleven which I don't know if you like complicates the quality of the films that he makes but I can't get stuff like that. Outta my head once I've read or heard about it and I feel like we've referred back to it even in a joking fashion over the years right. Yeah it is definitely one of the top three things that I think about. When someone says Mark Wahlberg schedule yeah nine eleven yeah and the last night of prosthetic but like you know. I'm human beings. It's the point of the movie full movie as leading to that so yes I agree. It's funny he is both. I think very funny as a comedic actor like entirely humorless and it's that some things he's in on the joke on some things he's just kind of being like no I would have save. I would have stopped nine eleven. Which is just a ridiculous thing to say. And that's the joke of Andy Sandberg's say Heidi Mother for me. Yeah you know portrayal of him is this is like he's kind of total rube but also not. There's something very elusive about. Whatever's going on with an entourage thing it's like. Do you watch entourage because you think it's completely ridiculous or do you watch entourage because you think it's like six awesome representative drama and I dare to say that Mark Wahlberg is like Yup? That's how it went. I you probably think you're right. Insulin entourage Ari comes on and it's really like Whoa but most but he's like that's accurate me. Like Vince is very much living my experience. He's like we should make a show about it. I think. I think that you guys are right. Do you think that this should be five performances or top five movies I choose? I don't know I don't know where I landed. I think I did I tried to be interesting here but I I wouldn't say that any of these performances leap out at me except for my number one and number two as like excellent performances. They're more like movies. I really like was he ever given a truly great performance. Yes I I think. There's one and a half great performances on this movie and it's just a half is the end of boogie nights. No no I. Well that might be the case now. There's another movie I still did performances but I think they are. They are a little bit also an award for the movie knowing how best to use him right. Okay well then let's get into it. Let's go into our top five Mark Wilbur performances slash movies number five Amanda. Why don't you start us off? This goes out to Bill Simmons and apparently to right who I still have never met. Hello Ryan. I'm going with fear. Why not whow revisit? Yes I did okay okay seen Djing

Mark Wahlberg Chris Ryan Amanda Director Tom Cruise Walberg Bill Simmons Iraqi Navy Mark Shawn Fantasy Meek Utah Netflix Kelly Los Angeles Golf Calvin Klein Ryen Russillo Mark Wilbur
The 2 Questions You Need to Ask Yourself While Decluttering

A Slob Comes Clean

10:50 min | 2 years ago

The 2 Questions You Need to Ask Yourself While Decluttering

"Use these two decluttering questions to determine either determine the home or determined that it needs to leave my house so the first decluttering question is is if I needed this item. Where what I look for it I K- that means the instinct of if I was looking for this item fi I needed it? Where would I go first to see if it was there? That is the home for the item. Not some analyzed thought through you know what would be the best place to put this. Where did normal people keep their staplers? I don't know but it's literally the instinct of where would I go. I if I was looking for this item. Where's the first place I would look? And that is it's home and then I take it there now so like I said I have a whole nother podcast. There's there's other podcasts. I've talked about question number once. We're not GONNA win today but the thing to remember is you do not ask question number two if you answered question number one so question number one is where revenue for this first and you take it there now and you're done with that. That item is over gay. It's not clutter anymore because it's an actual home in your house and and you're actually going to find it when you need it because you're gonNA look in the first place where you would look for it and it's going to be there okay. So that item is done and question number two who doesn't even get asked for a lot of items but question number two. I want you to remember is my second question of only two questions which means it's the last last question. It's the final thing. I do not have a list of ten questions for you to think through an analyze whether you need things. We're basing things on facts. I do not base. My decluttering process us on emotions. Or what if I have to take those out of there because my brain goes away too crazy when I allow those to be options of you know making these decluttering decisions so this is the final question before we get to it. I just want you to know. This is the final question okay and if I needed this item would it ever occur to me that I already have one K now. It's important to realize that most of the time we're not even asking this question because you answered the question. Where would I look for this first and you had a place for it? Okay you only ask decluttering question number two if your answer to the first question was Way Well Throw a level. Where would I look for this? I if you find yourself doing that that's when you ask decluttering question number two okay now if you want to be super ruthless it just say well if I couldn't answer that I'm going to get rid of okay but we do have a second question to help you think through this process and be super realistic about this item. So the second question is if I needed this this item. Would it ever occur to me that I already had one. I've got this item when I asked the question. Where would I look for it? I I didn't have an answer which means I wouldn't have gone looking for it so I'm asking myself this question. Would it have occurred to me that I already have one. Most host likely the answer to that question is no because you didn't have a place where you would look for it. I okay so this is A. It's time to be realistic moment. Because I could not answer. That first question would ever have occurred to me that already. We had one and I had. This is me being honest with myself. Okay so an example that I give is Glow in the dark bracelets K.. Okay and I know if you guys have listened to all the PODCAST Steve Harvey till the story before but this is from the decluttering project very early on. I think it was in January when I had started mighty sloppy vacation process my practice blog. That was never going to be the thing. I wrote a book about but when I was cleaning out a junk drawer. You're and I asked myself this question And I came up with these two decluttering questions during that process because it was all just random stuff so I came up with the if I needed this item. Where but I look for it? I and I just made the decision that that's his home. Well guess what that has held up for ten and years now you guys I mean that holds up as being the most transformative decluttering question ever for me and for a whole lot. y'All okay okay. But as I was going through I asked myself that question about things and I got to stuff that I went. I don't know so I came across crossed these glow in the dark bracelets and I knew what they were from like. I knew what they were four. So my oldest kid had been in kindergarten two years before and the teacher would do this thing where she they took a trip to the moon and they studied the moon and did this little fun project and she would have all the parents in the class US send in a set of twenty or however many kids. There were twenty of a certain item that they would fill these boxes with basically fill these boxes with junk but it was really cute and it was really sweet and all that For the kids to have this special big day where they took a trip to the moon evidently people on the moon where bracelets I don't know but anyway. That is what I had been assigned with my first child to send twentieth for these boxes and evidently had had an extra pack of five glow in the dark bracelets are maybe it was four because there were twenty one kids. I don't remember anyway. I ran across this package. glow-in-the-dark bracelets that was shoved in the back of junk drawer and that I had no memory of it being there k now now the reality is that my second child was in the same woman's class at that very moment when I was was declaring and so my brain immediately went to well. You know what there's a one in twenty ish chance that I'm GonNa they get assigned glow in the dark bracelets again within the next couple of months. But I didn't have an answer for where would I look for glow in the dark bracelets slits I because I wouldn't have looked for going that art bracelets because I didn't remember that I had these glow in the dark bracelets okay and because I didn't remember remember that I had these glow in the dark bracelets would never have looked for them. It was a moment of reality. Check for me. I had to say are these glow-in-the-dark bracelets useful Wilshire. Might need it. One day absolutely I had a one in twenty chance that I was going to need it within the next little while but I had to say I'm GonNa be honest with myself and admit the fact that if I was not decluttering like my goal at this moment is for this space to be more usable and lovely when a like the space. I want to be able to find the things that I need. It had been a total disaster. Like couldn't even open. It couldn't find anything I needed. My goal is to make this space better right now and the truth is that if I wasn't working on this space right now with this goal of making it better I would never have run across these glow in the dark bracelets and and the truth is I didn't have a place to put him because I asked myself the question. Where would I look for I and the question the answer to that question was I didn't didn't have a place to look for him I because I wouldn't have gone looking for them? Which means that if I was not at this moment decluttering the space with the goal of making it better if I got assigned glow in the dark bracelets it would never have occurred to me to go? Look for those glow in the dark bracelets like the thought would not have crossed my mind and and when I went to this dollar tree to get twenty glow in the dark bracelets I would have just bought that extra package package anyway. I mean I was going to have to make that trip to the store anyway and spend one extra dollar for another five pack of bracelets and so I made a a decision. This is not because this is the perfect scenario. I mean the perfect scenario is that I always remember everything. I have the perfect scenarios scenarios that I can always find everything I wanna find. But this wasn't a perfect scenario. This was mu saying. I have to be realistic. My goal is to make my house. More Livable Bull. I need to have less stuff in it to make it more liveable K.. At the time I didn't know about clutter threshold right. I was just kind of working toward that and eventually got to the point room. uh-huh oh my goodness I can get my house under control now because I have only the amount of stuff I can keep under control but I had to be realistic and just say there are a lot of what ifs with this but the truth is I would never have even looked for it. I would have gone out and bought another one anyway and and so you know if I needed this and I hadn't declared the space I would have gone out. Spent the money anyway and then I would have to in my house okay and and I just had to get over it. I mean that's not the kind of advice that people like me WanNa hear people like what me WanNa hear that there's a way to have everything worked out perfectly but the truth is I needed the space d cluttered and I had to make some hard decisions and so I decided to get over it and just say the reality is. I need the space to be in better shape and I can't keep all the junk in here and have it be in better shape and make my house more Livable K.. If my goal is is to make this better I have to make some tough decisions and this decluttering question too is how I do a reality check on myself and make that difficult decision to get rid of something. That's totally useful. But the truth is I didn't know I had it. I never would have gone looking for it. I would've just gone to the store and bought another one or I made it would've made do without which is also valid. Okay so that is just a way to give myself a reality. Check to be honest with myself and say if I wasn't decluttering the space with the goal of making it better I would never have known this was here I would never have looked for it and I would have

Steve Harvey United States Wilshire
Patriots star Julian Edelman arrested, accused of vandalism in Beverly Hills

Mo'Kelly

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Patriots star Julian Edelman arrested, accused of vandalism in Beverly Hills

"England patriots receiver Julian Edelman has been arrested on charges of vandalism for fairly jumping on a car Beverly hills he was cited after causing some damage to the car last night near Beverly drive and Wilshire Boulevard is supposed to be here in court in

Julian Edelman Vandalism England Beverly Hills
Woojer Edge is a wearable that wants you to feel the music – via haptic feedback

Kim Komando

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Woojer Edge is a wearable that wants you to feel the music – via haptic feedback

"Our is we could have concerts there typically so loud you can actually feel the music and now with this future tact that's called the Wilshire edge series you can feel the music anytime you want there's other creators explain it sound as an air movement that typically spreads as an audible wave of pressure headphones get the audible par but nothing movement and that's where we was your comes in it looks like a high tech belt you were going to waste your Chester across your body connect your headphones and you get an experience you can feel all the beats the bays reverberate through your body through haptic feedback weather listen to music or watching a movie the strap edges made to take on the go but it was not immersive enough there's the best age and that's geared more towards VR gaming as a Kickstarter project the strap edge will run you a hundred twenty Bucks the best edge that you back three hundred fifty Bucks that's immersive enough that your wallet is probably gonna

Chester
"wilshire" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"And P. five hundred has five hundred stocks the Wilshire five thousand has can you gas yeah you would think that the Wilshire five thousand has five thousand stocks but in fact it only has thirty five hundred go figure out so still thirty five hundred is more diversified than five hundred which is more diversified than thirty so the more of these you won't have the less of a problem if any one of them goes broke and so their strength in numbers one investing that's what diversification is all about and that's still only the US markets we haven't even talked about the foreign markets if we look at the E. three index the European Australian and far eastern index that's another basket of dozens of other countries with thousands of stocks available there so diversification is a great approach but it does mean that the students have to do two things they've got invest on a regular consistent basis and they do need to make themselves a promise they won't touch the money for at least ten years they may not in fact be able to do that they are high school kids after all the day may come when they want to buy a car they want to pay for college or encourage Spence's going to college and as a result they may not have the luxury of leaving the money fully intact and that would argue that we diversify beyond stocks that we add other asset classes to the portfolio such as bonds government securities real estate commodities precious metals natural resources exponential technologies and so on you can accomplish all of these asset classes inside of exchange traded funds and low cost mutual funds so you can build this highly diversified portfolio and you can do it with remarkably small amounts of money so the fact that the kids only have a hundred Bucks or so a month to invest that's enough to pull this off there are a number of websites that now allow you to open accounts with remarkably small amounts of money where you can invest equally small amounts we're talking twenty five Bucks or more whenever you feel like it with no requirements are obligations and it's really pretty cool the one thing that you do have to be aware of is that children and that's what they are if they're under age eighteen are not allowed to officially open an account so they have to have mom or dad open the account for them it's called a custodial account and they all have their names on it by virtue of their parents it's called a uniform transfers to minors act you TMA and it allows be account to get established and they can look online twenty four seven they could see what's going on in the account and they'll love get a wonderful experience while building a lot of money for their financial future thank you very much for all your help right it's my pleasure best to you Scott I hope you're doing the same for financial education for your children as well I'm Rick Adelman this is the truth about money triple H. planned wreck you know I'm I'm wondering how you feel about that conversation we just had with Scott on the one hand I know you're saying boy what great info in these kids are really going to benefit and blah blah blah but on the other hand you're saying to you will occurs how come nobody told me about this when I was that age and boy don't you wish you could go back in time and change some of your behaviors in order to be in a better situation today then you're currently are well you know what you're gonna make the very same statement ten years from now twenty years from now thirty years from now here's your opportunity we can't do anything about the past the past is irrelevant because we can't change it so let's focus on where we're at right now and we're we're trying to go and we want to make.

Wilshire ten years thirty years twenty years one hand
"wilshire" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And P. five hundred has five hundred stocks the Wilshire five thousand has can you gas yeah you would think of the Wilshire five thousand has five thousand stocks when in fact it only has thirty five hundred go figure out so still thirty five hundred is more diversified than five hundred which is more diversified than thirty so the more of these you won't the less of a problem if any one of them goes broke and so their strength in numbers one investing that's what diversification is all about and that's still only the US markets we haven't even talked about the foreign markets if we look at the E. three index the European Australian and far eastern index that's another basket of dozens of other countries with thousands of stocks available there so diversification is a great approach but it does mean that the students have to do two things they've got invest on a regular consistent basis and they do need to make themselves a promise they won't touch the money for at least ten years they may not in fact be able to do that they are high school kids after all the day may come when they want to buy a car they want to pay for college or encourage Spence is going to college and as a result they may not have the luxury of leaving the money fully intact and that would argue that we diversify beyond stocks that we add other asset classes to the portfolio such as bonds government securities real estate commodities precious metals natural resources exponential technologies and so on you can accomplish all of these asset classes inside of exchange traded funds and low cost mutual funds so you can build this highly diversified portfolio and you can do it with remarkably small amounts of money so the fact that the kids only have a hundred Bucks or so a month to invest that's enough to pull this off there are a number of websites that now allow you to open accounts with remarkably small amounts of money where you can invest equally small amounts we're talking twenty five Bucks or more whenever you feel like it with no requirements are obligations and it's really pretty cool the one thing that you do have to be aware of is that children and that's what they are if they're under age eighteen are not allowed to officially open an account so they have to have mom or dad open the account for them it's called a custodial account and they all have their names on it by virtue of their parents it's called a uniform transfers to minors act you TMA and it allows the account to get established and they can look online twenty four seven they could see what's going on in the account and they'll love get a.

Wilshire US Spence ten years
"wilshire" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Had the the intercontinental in downtown lipstick city on Wilshire. we got some good friends here visiting and then later on tonight even more good friends are visiting and they all have weapons in their cars which is a bad scene. my buddy showed up in Vegas at my suite in the hotel and he knocked on the door and they can't get to zero what's up again. is a brocade but this in your locker any gives a hands me a nine o'clock like to get this. get out of get get out of my room this is the that I'm gonna guess it's the guy that was on right after me in Vegas now I'm not him. I think he thought about coal yeah class. he's coming to the fight is he yeah he goes all the fights he went to Baggio terminal in may I was there that was a good fight a mystery man you come into the fight I don't know take it come up for police are you kidding me I can't believe that that that I haven't give them tickets yet it's unbelievable. you're covered if you need to go on that hi dad you know it's it's it's too bad you can't come to the fight but I will remind you that it's available on paper view yeah. yeah for a six o'clock Pacific great deal for great fans on the Fox Sports at this on the Fox Sports happy confided digitally don't steal it don't do that no that's not healthy it's not good for America right unnecessary I don't do anything like that but also by the way I mean Spence porters get a lot of press right now people are excited about that fight. David Benevides and around the route is going to be the sleeper that's your fight of the night meeting that's going to be better than the spends border but I'm what I'm really looking for dispense Porter because I think you two guys that have different styles that are both he determined to win this fight you know and and Spence is going to try to box and he's going to try to god create some distance and and porters going to show a bunch of different looks and and going to keep moving around and and cutting off the ring and then coming in a violent guy he just likes to he likes to switch between brawl in boxing and you know and and switch it up and and Spencer is you know it's only got twenty five of fights but he's very Wiley's very sophisticated in the rings as we got a lot of rain so we were we were in Dallas and we saw just destroyed Mikey Garcia yeah and and you know listen a lot of people have had that as an even fight a lot of people had picked Mikey to win that fight and I think Spence was really you know I mean he's he's bigger bigger stronger and you know Mikey didn't didn't Doug Bob get inside and try to mix it up so it was a you know who's a great but I gotta admit is stones were awesome I'll take it on taking the fight that he that he challenged himself as a man as a fighter saying I'm not afraid of this guy I'll go up to wage divided that I admire now if he fights in his way he's the best fighter at lightweight right in the business he was but you know he was he had run out of a window of opponents of that hundred forty pounds you know what's so where does he go from that fight what what do they use it to do thank you just got to keep your ear to the ground you hear some announcements pretty soon that are writing about Mikey Garcia he's certainly not not only is he not going away but he's not shying away from some big challenge so he's still it and he's a he's in the P. B. C. family sure right but this this baby this derail fight the world and be this fight is going to be a hell of a fight here like they're they're both really good fighters I mean that's a championship fight Anthony DeRosa is a is an awesome fighter he's just a you know he's just a all around talented guy and he knows what he's doing and he's very very experienced I can't we had on that Mary is good hi Devon Haney. you seem to have an eighty five but when you see Benavides he's young he's fast and strong he throws amazing combinations you know he throws with they called you know punches in bunches and he's just all angles it's all sorts of crazy angles and I'm really looking forward to that fight and then by the way at not to sound like a salesman here but the but the hoses Seto Lopez John Molina fight two guys that are going to stand in the middle of the ring and trade all up there too violent at their on this card to their on this card that's right before the door I'll fight that's actually the opening fight of the night so six o'clock Pacific nine o'clock eastern lives review I'm gonna be in some high end restaurant at around six o'clock we're gonna find you I got I I may I made a duplicate of your room key so I went to the I went to the the mornings it's across the street I ever got so I went to I went to dinner there and before the Wilder very fight and there were six of us having dinner okay what do you think that bill was who picked it up well we all did but I I am I am I have a lot of it I'm still paying for how much do you think that dinner was give me a number Morton yeah alcohol there was alcohol involved. grand it was over a grand it was twelve okay that's a nice number there you've you've you're still on the price right you're under the value you're a winner. it was as well it might be a member Nabil came and mafias an apple or walls to black my while still remembers it yeah yeah. one time Hey leroy mafia is getting married get out do you believe that. really to who he got himself a cool Jackie's is getting married your proof I'm in a wedding really yep what's the date it's your report twenty twenty. twenty twenty November they've already done everything they pick the the place the church the the reception all Dale nice congradulations mafia thank you very much what we got here carver eagle touched down twenty seven twenty they went for two to go of nine a into when I scanned my day your lips to god's either in in it. let's also say yeah there's the first matter a lot I was told the other night no chance the eagles went in Iraq everyday place says no chanting and all Milwaukee people no shot. that's not we'll see still long way to go. they must be able. you don't desperate can't go to one three and win this game tonight they're desperate for a win gotta have it. so which spans career Bruce after that way in which I thought was easy pickings for I hated to see it because I was there and I ate three bowls of popcorn at that fight because that I should stop after the second one but I was so bored I had to have another I get but I love that about that fight was the image of. the former L. radio show going on is the the you guys were the only two people inside eighteen T. stadium I only did it I was scared to death it was aired at the broadcasting of this I was literally scared to death it was so creepy in that building imagine being in Jerry's world by yourself to people with the entire place is on damn it all places on down they have they turn the lights out and there was literally when I went to the bathroom I made mafia walk with me and said outside the bathroom because I was scared to death it was literally creepy as all hell being in that. but we couldn't get out of the parking lot. Dr their lives and I couldn't get out had literally cannot get out of the parking lot of the language come out of my mouth to when I couldn't get out of the parking lot and some souped up car when we were there then I would write all what we have was it a charger what was it yeah you had a convertible or stuck to the new I had you you've got a four member I go Hey Bruce it was only five hundred. asking me for cars. didn't I tell me no matter out there means going to be great for this guy changing the subject came on the show and I said it's going to be a great fight I'm telling you this is going to be equal yes I thought the bag the other men fight was very violent no fun fight I enjoyed it. what we got back there is we got J. yesterday let's get an update when we'll we'll keep talking with our guy Bruce he wants to go to his room but it's not happening he's he's at home he's going right I'm going home from this going home all right let's go back to New York in a different shape. sports way. sorry guys.

Fox Sports Vegas Spence Wilshire. Baggio David Benevides America Porter Bruce J. New York hundred forty pounds
Sarah Thomas' Food Adventures for Picky Eaters

Mom Brain

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Sarah Thomas' Food Adventures for Picky Eaters

"This is mom brain the larrea baldwin and daphne as hey guys welcome back to mongering. I'm daphne and i'm ilaria and daphne. Daphne is on maternity leave. How are you feeling hot out breath yep yep. That's pretty much uh-huh pretty sure that all of you guys can relate to that especially if you have summer babies and wonderful in so many ways like you don't have to bundle them up once third born but true and you can go for walks outside. It's no joke doing that final month in this crazy crazy crazy heat so we're all thinking being about you and drink lots of water so i went off on my own and recorded some episodes and i missed my partner in crime but we are looping her in here today. You chatted with sarah thomas from column on his kitchen. <hes> who is she. What's what are you talking about. Sarah thomas thomas who i ran into in l. a. but we're both new york. Base is the chief imagination and story chef at kalamata kitchen. Counter modest kitchen is a series of books <hes> and then that teach kids to be more adventurous with eating and trying different foods and not being so afraid <hes> and is a really really cool idea. They have events <hes> the kids are called their little taste buds and so cute and they will take a pledge where <hes> <hes> where they will agree to try every single food two times now whether you can make it to an event or not make it to an event obviously that is very difficult depending on where you live. She gives us really great tips. <hes> so if you have a picky eater and even if you don't have picky eater and you just want to improve <hes> <hes> the palette of your child and introduce new foods to them and stuff like that this she has some really great ideas so i think you're going to love this one yeah. I'm pumped. I mean look my kids have gone. I run the gamut of that. When when fellow was too she would eat everything literally. Everything i could lentil soup mashed potatoes. <hes> <hes> you know any kind of protein. She was such a great eater and then all of a sudden that are like three three and a half. She decided she did not like fruit. She'll never eat fruit again for taste funky to her and at some point you do have to realize that kids are themselves and they you know they have to be allowed to develop their own tastes. They have to be allowed to assert themselves in certain ways but at the same time i am as a concerned parent and someone who knows the value of healthy eating for every part of growth and development you wanna make sure they're getting a balance. I'm always game to hear are people's tricks and tips and great recipes that kids love and i can't wait to listen to this conversation. Enjoy this conversation with sarah thomas. We're going to ask you to introduce. She's yourself. Oh sure i m sarah thomas. I am the co founder of colorado's kitchen and the author of our book series and i'm also a suddenly liberated an and and i'm really excited to be here so i have a very interesting story guys to. There's this juice bar when we go stay in l._a. <hes> usually working being always working <hes> we always stay at the beverly wilshire <hes> which is really nice in beverly hills and it for new yorkers. It's great because it's a very walkable walkable. Pardon you can find your starbucks. You can find your rite aid and you can find your gym and so it and the kids have their playground.

Sarah Thomas Thomas Daphne Beverly Wilshire Beverly Hills New York Partner Co Founder Colorado L. A. L._A.
"wilshire" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"So I looked on Wilshire the mail to the contact holiday to get done and he's in the night look what Yakin posh in the north do you turned it on you don't feel you the in addition we'll consider what will come hot all yeah that's what you do okay she was she the Russian woman to sure does have peaking email how to take the lead on the Simpson such issue the knowledge and alleging that Josh we just heard a knock on Dr it's a cheat sheet to the the chief Lynch nineteen getting rid of those old okay god what should in the ocean in the door okay calls from him call you social can look into what amounts to the hot now the highlights I think that you should have had that he got the whole team will March on the financial yeah walk a mile to the folder just Papa that idea after the tone in the final syndication actual social change again give you the whole address I will slowly the finish of the to the to the local shoot for those who live in the into the channel Georgian little gonna do that as in what you're paying on touch in a moment on college in that type of thing that in a little not so eager to it on the the the the Chester the sun king on the the Leda billion founded beach your little it had her father a yeah and just let ME one hundred one final so just allow you to view photos and off off we ensure a well Sonya on the last one hundred the jungle on the telephone with could run yeah you feared sash will show on angle your time marginal and I'm sure you should also your feet on China on the the what was the tension in the Georgia Gigi Jordan and the media hello me what's the phone call you'll each year on year orders rose edging GM motioning not single singer told us on sin that you should you should have to live there general Shahak with a major in the gene G. that I don't think you that should using the entrance you gotta be station daily team you should usually to refer me the should get a gene G. generally the shredded on hello she down the the door and he will manufacture and then the company nothing is in may learn get a bill so that exam already are going out numerology you got a hands on the vehicle for one issue hello Wilshire shovels the question on the what's with this and that to me was how do in between whether to jump on that I Jackson that she should be taught make what you wish find your to find the if you're done with the father was out on a quest for the holiday search engine the mall you need shots off from the peace of the Vietnamese should be that twice singing if you're such a the main what should the sure temple engine down hi Richard structure for late at the scene of the motion shown sometime Julia broken into through the coop archer England watch for the make wise decisions yet on the other day that you come from listen to the can you name a blood pressure machine jin dong he fought on both width and Lauren type reading plan usually tell lies with your team will meet with a blank sheets I saw you on the you can ask from three hundred jobs of all the shooting like you got five since you said you're gone idea should impeaching tumble from it wasn't thank god I think make whether Serena how the hot sure sure sure well since you are the just looking she's John Constantine finishes a touch of the subdivision Joe Shaw's issue home Khloe shareholders actually did you should others jadi federally the utilities for a war now what does it consulate info log wash a common culture what's on a mutual what does your heart tell her you're going we'll talk in under the table show me what I should mention what sort of what is going on about now tell you so that then she minha early and then for that simple she they using half inch under some of the outlook the local children what you're gonna take the group law you sure you could well Michael good yeah some beauty got John Johnson you during the transition zero one three that you cut daily but it's yeah what's on let him know that yet when I look does your need in the lead one of them but they should usually tally backed.

Wilshire
"wilshire" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"You to Paul Rosenberg alerted me that Adrian Wilshire rouse he has dropped I don't know if I call it a what would you bomb necessarily but a wolves ripple and that is dream on green will not enter free agency next year because he's agreed to a Max contract to stay with the Golden State Warriors which makes sense for everybody not only would have made that much sense for Draymond green to leave where's the Golan I think he's perfect there and the warriors are re committing to that court to try to win obviously not having Klay Thompson will be a big blow they have a different look this year with my guy d'angelo Russell over there there's questions about his viability their long term will say you know I think what's really get help determine that is what this team does this year and I have no feel for how good the warriors are gonna be and I think that's what's fun about this upcoming NBA season it's tough to have a feel for much sleep I think the one thing I am confident about them up I'm not making any sarcastic come about the next anything like that like genuinely the one thing I feel very confident about is Milwaukee and that the box will be probably the best team in the Eastern Conference will will come somewhat close to re approaching their win total from last year okay now Malcolm broad losing him big blow short bought I think that they are the safest team to look at because even Philadelphia is dealing with a lot of changes Boston's dealing with a lot of changes we know the net story and all the changes going on in the Western Conference every thing feels fluid in up in the air that's a part of why this NBA season coming up is gonna be a lot of fun toll free numbers eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six it's a sunny day here at Yankee Stadium Yankees and red Sox play their double header beginning at one o'clock our pregame show begins at twelve twenty five John in Brewster New York you're next on the fan how are you John well thank you thank you for taking my call I've been a little while for now excellent Monday morning quarterback because thank you and the national beacon arguably the best starting starting pitching staff in the matrix and there's little groups felt that that or not it's not have anything to worry about they're not going to be anywhere close to first place in a mall but the main floor you keep are you sure you watch you'll see from Mexico to be there at the end of your whole John John I hope you're right I hope you're right but I want to go to something because I try to be very honest while I watch a game how I felt at the time so if I had an opinion and I turned out to be wrong about it I'll freely admit it what if by Monday morning quarterbacking do you really think that while I was watching the game last night and I admit I don't have tweet evidence because I was behind on the game because I got home late from doing the afternoon show so I was behind that wasn't tweeting anything but do you really think that I was cool with Tyler bachelor coming into a one run games I have no problem with it on tell you why it's a Friday night one of and they bring him in if you can get out if you give books were were not what she did no doubt you don't do that if you're ready no he's bad I do need more evidence and your point is simply Hey Evan I disagree with you let's debate your opinion on Mickey's managing decision I'm not Monday morning quarterbacking it I try not to I try to be very very honest so in this case there's no Monday morning quarterbacking I'm sitting there watching Seth Lugo warm up as the Mets are rallying CMX Tyler bachelor knowing it well this is what the brilliant manager's going to do I knew what was going to do I like it so you disagree with me that's fine I happen to think you're very very wrong with with of course peace and love in all due respect you very very wrong I don't need any more experimentation to know he's not good okay I think we all know that we all should know that Ben is in Manhattan what's up man what are you doing good man I have a math question you've got a two part the one we are loaded aboard you guys a couple years ago we got some.

Paul Rosenberg Adrian Wilshire
Privatised water: should the UK reconsider?

FT News

04:37 min | 3 years ago

Privatised water: should the UK reconsider?

"Years of steady and rising bills have raided the decades-long consensus in Britain, the private companies run things more efficiently than the state privatized. Water utilities have come in for particular criticism and are among the companies targeted for nationalization by the opposition labor party, but would cost prohibitive. Joe Plymouth discusses this question with Jonathan Ford. The question of The Wilshire industry's future in Britain has become a very very heated one with labor promising to nationalize industry. It comes to power claiming this will make things better for customers. And obviously the industry extremely anxious and cross about the way in which its future has been put into question in this way. I suppose the first thing Joe is correct. Say that customers pay more when water services are in private hands. Well, it depends peel comparing too but a study that compared water prices in England and Wales with Scotland where it was nationalized shows that they more expensive in England miles nothing bills or seventy pounds higher in England. And according to the national orders office water prices, and then Linda wells with forty percent higher in twenty. Twelve than they were privatization. So there's something behind the analysis that the privatization took place hasn't been overwhelmingly of benefit to the customer. I mean, obviously, the industry itself talks about the large amount of investment, it's Putin. But let's turn now to the story that you've written which is about the question of how much it would cost to privatize the industry. Your story contains some calculations from Moody's the credit rating agency, which says that the cost to the government of nationalizing water would be about fourteen and a half billion pounds. Now that significantly lower than the forty four billion pounds, which was cited in a pretty well circulated paper from a think tank called the social market foundation last year. Now, what it counts for that big difference? I mean have water shares collapsed in value since the SMS came out with their number about the mechanism that you used labor. Isn't proposing to make takeover bids for companies in the stock market at stock market prices what they're planning to do is to buy out. The regulated company that owns the S and delivers the water from the holding company. So labor has said that it would by the water companies on the basis of the book failure, which is essentially the value of the minus the did and the calculation by Moody's food. The if t has is to Mason that that's around fourteen point five billion, of course, that only a starting point because what labor is also saying is that they would look at some of the costs that have been incurred since privatization. So they may for example to duct the one billion pound fund pension deficit that's been ramped up since privatization and taken to count things such as land sales with the worst company sold off a lot of the land. Don't think that the price of that should be included in compensation price. Is that some people would say that forcing people to sell you the company at net asset value be quite tough. I mean, there are some companies in the stock market which trade at or below book value, but a lot of them don't and this is a quite profitable industry. So is that not a bit unfair to basically start from the position that you're simply going to pay what the assets are worth and they more. Well, the accurate that cure me, cool, but on the labor party have made and infect point with seem to agree with Michael Govan. The conservative party is that these companies have made excessive return since privatization, and because of that they don't see that they should pay them a premium based on their existed for tunes England and Wales and fat to the only countries in the world to have privatized. The worst companies on the spaces handing over the regional water supplies to private companies nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight with note it and in fact, giving them. Grant of one point five billion since then the wreck top fifty one billion pounds, borrowing and paid out fifty six billions in David's say labor is saying why should we pay these companies that wrecked up all the

The Wilshire Industry Joe Plymouth Britain Moody England Conservative Party Wales Jonathan Ford Linda Wells Michael Govan Putin David Mason Scotland Forty Four Billion Pounds Fifty One Billion Pounds
"wilshire" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

09:32 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"At u._s._c. cheating and and it was a player who lived on the wilshire corridor i've mentioned that you see the michael jackson thing or your work i know so talking about the leaving never lan dot so i recorded it and i'm still debating about whether or not to watch you're young enough you never went to netherland is a friend well no but my wife used to live she worked in the wine industry incentives valley yeah at all this time so you know people don't know where neverland ranch is and i know that's exactly where it is off that is it the one fifty four that highway that goes cuts right through there and so yeah we've got i know you santa barbara suzy u._c._s._b. girl i went to cal poly so i yeah like we've we've been around something laid to rest santa barbara yeah it's it's wonderful area love it there but anyway i valley if you want to it's like napa valley or nap well because of the movie sideways santa ynez valley is like you know right now by nab of napa i love nap nap is much bigger and has a lot more options and all of that but santa ynez valley the prices of the wine the hotels the restaurants after that movie sideways i mean they tripled chris so it's kind of a hot thing now but anyway does your wife introduce you at these high falutin cocktail parties is a sports talk host or just is my husband now she she says he works at the sports leader that i learned that from gary rats how she was credited with people don't want people don't want to give me the credit let's say it takes me a couple of months to get used to anything we'll be back right fred okay we'll be back they go no no you've got to sign off i'd never done radio right and then i i was kind of being funny so i said these can you be a little more enthusiasm kmby are six eighty and that was it oh i'm so proud you made up a new word with to ease in it now spell it that way now somehow we got sidetracked how well is living off his wife and then his all these go ahead you want to give some of the u._s._c. we must have just gotten tweet text messages and they're always say thirty they're just okay but i mean just on people throwing out a u._s._c. football player ned got paid a lot of money and lived on the wilshire corridor that's got into this is it michael jackson in that in that deal at h._b._o. that was his hideaway right on the wilshire corridor right now this is an odd place to hide away because this one of the most crowded places on earth you're heading to westwood right some of the names yeah they're they're those guessing keyshawn johnson were seeing carson palmer we're seeing marcus allen all right even going to give the name or your phrasing i you know how about this i i will go this do whatever you want go this far stop because i don't wanna i don't wanna put i i know all three of those gentlemen who've just shown up on the text line one of those is correct how about if we just have the wilshire quarter but you're sitting next to a guy who got two hundred dollars a month at vegas everybody's crooked which is crazy because the raiders did i mean if you tried to get public money approved in the state of california you got no shot vegas went into a room came out before lunch like we got a billion bucks no problem like where do you want to eat you know i it was unbelievable we'll let me just get lucky jump in here and say that you like mark willard you're on cambier in the morning well i i missed my my friend how you doing lucky pretty good yeah you know martin cool any city he gets automatic we'll call in after a giants game when they're one and eight how about the bullpen thing before the season started all right what do you got there guests on mark willard's dig into the underworld oh man it's all good a little bit of everything may thirty money this is good but who's the player okay thank you for the call okay at probably okay well whatever you know what though the funding aren't we passed the fake outrage about someone got paid college i think i think it's shifted now yeah they i mean they will be they already are they already are you remember he shuns johnson's restaurant and robertson i know he owns severinsen beverly hills right now he owns a bunch of gosh what's that panerabread wow that's yeah the owns a bunch of he got started now football rodney ladder tell you the story kid he would hang around u._s._c. practices he came from you know at least he tells from a tougher environment you know sharon and he would just come to the u._s._c. practices marcus allen irani lott would take care of them and say man you're going to be good slip them a few bucks just so he could eat the whole thing they got him going i got him going yeah and boy good man ready probably some shows with them i have some shows him yeah he does not it is not like jon gruden yeah that's that's well dot com right yeah they they won the super bowl ever say why i just they both they both have tremendously healthy egos number one overall pick never the jets yet yeah you here we go back to new york again but if you work in new york and you're the number one pick in the n._f._l. and the back and forth you're not going to like a lot of people just that environment that makes that's a good point you yeah we got along great all right yeah i love to shot yeah both dating serena dating serena williams yeah up serena's a very bad now and lavar arrington as well as terrible knowledge larry knew that i know who is dating you know now so that's he's married now he's married now okay all right had a restaurant on he had a son who is it plan under mike riley at nebraska shawn johnson junior wow and and then when mike riley got fired nebraska they yanked him out but see all this stuff is outrage i mean it's been going on forever forever it has been i would say in ever since there was a university to get guys think red grange just got fifteen dollars a month back were both both jew huge n._f._l. i mean the whole team was an n._f._l. coach if i'm not mistaken was dennis erickson right was it was last year or it was wasn't johnson either ericsson's last year or who was the guy that came in when ericsson got fired larry coker yeah yeah yeah it might have been might have been here but erickson had been around and ended up here with the forty niners for a couple of two teams or or similar but i remember all era no no but you figure oh here's a guy coming from miami where they you know you gotta jet set team he got all this wild stuff then you interview i though it's going to be a fun guy right you go down there square ass you know what i mean i mean just really have dead i guess he'd been in fact he's the one forty nine or coach from the beginning you thought boy he just doing this for the money you know what i mean when they got a y'all right for at least time soula was sweating i don't know what that meant at least i thought hey those natural way no he's about to fail right and then and chip kelly i don't know but i just remember sitting there with ericsson everybody did the old t._v. bits with them and i look advocate oh man this guy so i said coach fired up for this he goes coached a lot of places i'm always ready to go as a great nice talking came from i don't really get a fan base going come from miami i thought oh boy any we'll take a quick break it was two thousand one by the way.

michael jackson netherland two hundred dollars fifteen dollars
"wilshire" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"From the terrible thing was the academic was dull as ditch Wilshire, a new sat there in this really really boring man told me something really really boring and actually that put me off that subject so much, and it sort of times a little bit with what you said Kiara that you need human interaction to actually get it. I think it's interesting because Becca my university, for example, every lecture at least the PD the presentation of the lecture would be up uploaded on on a web portal straight after lecture so potentially I could have taken my whole university degree without going. I could have done it all from from home. And but I remember each and every single one of us would say, you know, I have to go into you need today because otherwise the money that I'm paying all these few context hours that I have will have been. In vain. So I I, you know, I think you could have done, but there was a point. And and also there's a point to the physicality of learning as well, we've read increasingly that reading something on paper and not on a screen helps you for example with the actual metabolising information. Perhaps there is something to obtaining information in a physical face to face full. That's also helpful to actual physical learning process. Not to mention the trip to the bar off to it's finally it's confession time. Have you done it stress as a member of Queen as a Transylvanian transvestite Nazi or in my case as a goatherd, I speak of the single longer movie night, the pressure valve for certain frustrated Fortysomething suburban housewives who simply need a few points of womb Chardonnay and a nun costume to soothe all her troubles away. Well, now you too can belt out the greatest hits of Queen in the comfort of the local cinema. Let's hear what you've got to sing the. Let me go. And kill the head. Banging that was Bahamian rhapsody and the sound of Freddie Mercury. Well, the bio pic rhapsody rhapsodies going to be available in seven hundred fifty movie fishes as a single longer. Can you imagine a set of full of people trying to hit that high note Milken, literally just changed my mind? Yes, I can. You because you'll very much in the limelight. But if you've had a few drinks, you're in you're in the anonymity aspect comes in. As suddenly, you know, you're singing a great time. No one's look because everyone sing along being quite nice anything worse having, Freddie. Mercury. Lookalike bus Maya drums behind me. What about you page? Yeah. Definitely. No. I mean, I'm not big I've never been to one. So there isn't experience show deficit have. Thing. But I think particularly, you know, that note that's on a lot of queen's music, very testing, very difficult and Queen seems to suffer from this unique ailment of sort of being turned into these musical events. So, you know, noticing along, but the we will wrote he at uptake, which is Bob's. The only musical heard of people walking out more than once is is sort of again repurposing music. I really really loved into this form of Ike Nath format, and this it's happening again, helping again Nath, but the spirit of the crowd will surely carry it through here. Oh, absolutely. Just before coming rare actually page Nyerere having a little chin wagon control room. And I said well, say singing along them to in the cinema just on your own is that no acceptable. She out the full. Hang on just repeat that you actually have sung in the. The hummed. Well, look, you're gonna have to do a bit more humming now because you come to the end of the program at patrons Muffin touch. Oakland. Kiara, matt. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom here at Madari house. Thanks produces Bill. Lucci. Researches finance Agha's officials and mainly Evans and our studio manager Kenny scarlet more music next nineteen hundred it's many with Marcus hippy, and we'll have more on the day's main stories on the monocle daily at twenty two hundred Midori house is back at the same time on Monday that's eighteen hundred hundred time, but we thought that the monocle twenty four Midori house single longer sound of music team needed to be brought together from one one time this Friday afternoon. So we leave ladies and gentlemen, the so long farewell a fetus angle by. Due to you. Venus? Yes. Goodbye. He. Oh, good.

Freddie Mercury Queen Kiara Ike Nath Wilshire Madari house Milken Midori Fortysomething Lucci Oakland Agha Bob Marcus hippy Kenny scarlet Evans
"wilshire" Discussed on Advocate Like a Mother Podcast

Advocate Like a Mother Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Advocate Like a Mother Podcast

"Because if I have both my children, it's just not convenient for me. It's just not fair just feel like them. I just feel like maybe we don't belong here. Like, maybe we're not supposed to be doing all of this. And it just makes you feel so disheartened as mom like we should be able to access everything easily and not have to lift her children up in wheelchairs Wilshire over one hundred pounds alone with a child and and another child it's almost next to impossible. Right. And I think the thing that, you know, places don't think about is it just creates more of a headache for you, go to your insurance. Now, it's all on your shoulder. Adly it didn't know, and it shouldn't be like this. And honestly ended the day. It's just an extra stress because now we have to start the. Process all over again because you weren't compliant at which really I don't understand. I still don't understand my goodness. Okay. Well, that was a great show. And really was a great show. Awesome. Talking to Rebecca about all awesome thing that she's things that she's doing. And now it makes me one abdicate so hard because I feel like I'm kind of like lazy convert or not even lazy which is like the toys everything. I when I saw her making toys, I'll take my word, you're my inspiration. Like you went to another country. New Dopp did your daughter and your all these amazing things parkey both for her. Now, you're gonna push for her to work with the community. I mean like that's just makes him so happily. I love the she has a plan in place for their next. The paycheck valley. Thanks so much for listening today as always good advocate, like a mother dot org and sign up for a mailing list. Follow us on social media advocate like a mother, please. Subscribe to advocate, like a mother and reviews on I tunes. Thanks again. Friends friends.

Rebecca Wilshire one hundred pounds
"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Became president of Wilshire analytics the firm advises on over a trillion dollars in institutional assets and has fifty billion dollars in assets under direct management. Let's talk a little bit about how the business has changed at Wilshire over the past couple of decades you've been there for fifteen years. You've certainly seen a lot of changes, and we were discussing previously. How the firm just really began as a technology and analytics company how has the past decade or two changed your business model? Well, I joined Wiltshire in two thousand five into what was at the time a relatively new. Do. New business that Wilshire had created called Wilshire funds management, and this was in its early days and the the idea behind Wilshire funds management was to take the firm's institutional expertise. It's risk management capabilities and provide investment advisory solutions designed really for financial advisers in their individual investor clients and so. Our first clients at at at the time, and we only had a handful were insurance companies and some broker dealer is that we're looking for the same types of multi-asset multi manager and a risk managed solutions that that in our pension fund clients were were able to to know. Have. So that means not just going out and buying a mutual fund. But having access to a suite of different different managers in different asset classes is that. Right. Right. So it's it's you know, when we look at things that institutional investors, do well, it depend to invest in a lot of things a lot of asset classes, right? They own a lot of asset classes, they're highly diversified. They typically implement those views with managers also now, increasingly passive components of those portfolios. And they blend everything together in a way that designed to to really optimize a particular outcome. Financial advisers, in many cases, in most cases are doing the same thing certainly those that are using funds or fun products or ETF's to build portfolios. And so, you know, the market has been shifting to that of of more of an advice embedded model and Wilshire has been able to participate in that. And so I was fortuitous the timing of when I joined the firm, but over the last decade or so we've grown rapidly. As one of the premier providers of these types of services to the intermediary market. So let me ask you about a division that caught my eye when I was doing a little homework. What is The Wilshire segregated portfolio companies? Right. So these are these are at a fancy name for our came in hedge fund platform, and so these are. This is a platform that was created actually in two thousand and five. Right around the time that I joined at the time it was created. There was this this belief that still exists in some respects today that you know, if you're able to you wanna hire a hedge fund, right? You want that that hedge funds trading prowess, you want their exceptional ability to to to buy securities and generate performance, but many people may be uncomfortable with the operational risk. That comes with that. The fact that. You don't have a lot of transparency or control over those assets necessarily. You're just an investor in an LP, and how do you pick out of the eleven thousand funded pick out of the eleven thousand. So we set out to solve that in two ways one of which was structural where we could essentially just have the hedge fund manager run a separate account, right where they just have trading thority, but Wilshire controls the the counterparty relationships etcetera. And Wilshire as a fiduciary right would would provide a level of of you know, trust to the market to our clients. And then the other element of that is if we could identify highly skilled investment managers using our research platform, using the fact that we obviously are engaged in a lot of these activities for, you know, a trillion dollars in assets we have combination of buying power. We have we think the ability to separate skill from lock etcetera and a pretty big network. Contained therein, correct. You guys do something similar on the private equity side you break it out separately. Or is it all part of the same plot? So that's a different. That's a different business unit Wilshire private markets and similar in the sense that that that businesses is you know, today looks much like a a private equity asset manager. Started out as as building customized fund of funds for for institutional investors today has a a large array of a fun defines increasingly customized advisory work in the private markets coming up we continue our conversation with Jason Schwartz, president.

Wilshire Wilshire analytics president fund manager Wiltshire Jason Schwartz fiduciary trillion dollars fifty billion dollars fifteen years
"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Recently became president of Wilshire analytics the firm advises on over a trillion dollars in institutional assets and has fifty billion dollars in assets under direct management. Let's talk a little bit about how the business has changed at Wilshire over the past couple of decades you've been there for fifteen years. You've certainly seen a lot of changes, and we were discussing previously. How the firm just really began as a technology and analytics company how has the past decade or two changed your business model? Sure. Well, I joined Wiltshire in two thousand five into what was at the time a relatively new. Do. New business that will sure had created called Wilshire funds management, and this was in its early days and the the idea behind Wilshire funds management was to take the firm's institutional expertise. It's risk management capabilities and provide investment advisory solutions designed really for financial advisers in their individual investor clients and so. Our first clients at at at the time, and we only had a handful were insurance companies and some broker dealers that we're looking for the same types of multi-asset multi manager and a risk managed solutions that that our pension fund clients were able to to have. So that means not just going out and buying a mutual fund. But having access to a suite of different in different managers in different asset classes is that. Right. Right. So it's it's you know, when we look at the things that institutional investors do well determined to invest in a lot of things a lot of asset classes, right? They own a lot of asset classes, they're highly diversified, they typically implement those views with managers also now, increasingly passive components of those portfolios, and they blend everything together in a way, that's designed to to really optimize a particular outcome financial advisors being in many cases and more. Cases are doing the same thing. Certainly those that are using funds or fun products or ETF's to build portfolios. And so, you know, the market has been shifting to that of of more of an advice embedded model and Wilshire has been able to participate in that. And so I was fortuitous the timing of when I joined the firm, but over the last decade or so we've grown rapidly. As one of the premier providers of these types of services to the intermediary market. So let me ask you about a division that caught my eye when I was doing a little homework. What is The Wilshire segregated portfolio companies? Right. So these are these are at a fancy name for our came in hedge fund platform, and so these are. This is a platform that was created actually in two thousand and five. Right around the time that I joined at the time it was created. There was this this belief that still exists in some respects today that that you know, if you're able to you wanna hire a hedge fund, right? You want that that hedge funds trading prowess, you want their exceptional ability to to to buy securities in January performance, but many people may be uncomfortable with the operational risk. That comes with that. The fact that. You don't have a lot of transparency or control over those assets, necessarily, you're an investor in L P, and how do you pick out of the eleven thousand Fung? They're pick out of the eleven thousand. So we set out to solve that in two ways one of which was structural where if we could essentially just have the hedge fund manager run a separate account, right where they just have trading thority, but Wilshire controls, the counterparty, relationships, etc. And Wilshire as a fiduciary right would would provide a level of trust to the market to our clients. And then the other element of that is if we could identify highly skilled investment managers using our research platform using the fact that we obviously are engaged in a lot of these activities for. A trillion dollars in assets we have combination buying power. We have we think the ability to separate skill from lock etcetera show and a pretty big network. Contained therein, correct. You guys do something similar on the private equity side you break it out separately. Or is it all part of the same plot? So that's a different. That's a different business unit Wilshire private markets and similar in the sense that that that businesses is today looks much like a private equity asset manager. Started out as as building customized funded funds for for institutional investors in today. Has a large array of fun defines increasingly customized advisory work in the private markets. Coming up we continue our conversation with Jason Schwartz,.

Wilshire Wilshire analytics fund manager president Wiltshire Jason Schwartz L P fiduciary trillion dollars fifty billion dollars fifteen years
"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:46 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Schwartz. He is the president of will share your funds management. Let's talk a little bit about the product. You're probably best known for The Wilshire five thousand which contains these days about thirty five hundred stocks. Is that right? Why doesn't Wilshire five thousand have five thousand stocks. So you're correct that there's just under thirty five hundred stocks today in The Wilshire five thousand The Wilshire five thousand was. Created in one thousand nine hundred seventy four and at the time, it was the first really broadbased measurement of the US equity market and still today when people refer to the total US stock market, they're often referencing The Wilshire five thousand. So you know, it was a really important innovation for us dating back to the to the seventies. And and the reason there was roughly five thousand securities when The Wilshire five thousand was launched the peak was as you probably know about seventy five hundred securities in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight right? So that was in an environment. Where companies were racing to go public right to say, the least to say, the least and show, you know, post dotcom crash. There were a number of delistings there were companies that clearly went out of business. So that dramatically lowered the count right delistings a lot of listed stocks ended up going pink. Sheets and bulletin boards. And especially the micro. I think there was some thousand or two thousand micro caps fell off fell off the radar. Right. So there really aren't five thousand investable companies to put in the in the five thousand even if you wanted to write. And and I think the other the other key theme in today's environment really is around private capital. Right. So companies are staying private for longer. Anor- able to do so without needing to go to the public equity markets to raise capital. So so there is the the IPO environment has not been what it was in the nineties. And so therefore there are roughly thirty five hundred publicly traded securities look at look at companies like Uber, and we works and giant multi-billion dollar firms years ago, they never would have been able to get that large track. So let's talk a little bit about what your assets looked like and what the company actually does. So you have about one hundred and eighty billion dollars in assets under management. How does that break down? Is that stocks bonds non-public assets at what's the mix? So. We. We have about one hundred and eighty billion dollars in assets that we advise on for what we call financial intermediaries, and these are organizations financial institutions that ultimately serve individual investors. Right. And so this this really for us for for our organization stems from the work that we've done in the institutional space. So. We talked about The Wilshire five thousand Wilshire's first decade in the nineteen. Seventies was really as a as one of the early pioneers in applying technology to solve investment management problems. And so The Wilshire five houses interrupt, you this point and point out that your founder is literally a rocket scientist who was at JPL before forming Wilshire in seventy two is right, right? Yeah. That's right. So that's that is a really important. It's a great story. But it's also really important part of our heritage. So Dennis Tito Wilshire, founder, currently, our chairman NCO still active in the business. Was it JPL and was was space engineer. And this was at a time where the most powerful computer technology was resident NASA JPL or where they were, you know, trying to figure out how to program the trajectory of of unmanned spacecraft. And so as the space race was winding down, and that was really dentist is calling. He was called to participate in that. So late sixties early seventies. Dennis was was thinking about how to transition, and ultimately how to make some money and really recognize an early point that intersection of investment, technology, information, technology, and and finance. And so the first product that Wilshire launched in nineteen seventy two was was one of the first commercially viable ways to calculate an equity beta. And so that was nineteen seventy-two take it for granted you could eat a log onto a Bloomberg or even use a a website and generate half the data points. We just take for granted. That didn't exist. And this was the stuff of. I mean, this predates me, this is the stuff of slide rules, and and and you know, really sort of you know. Hard to computational math and show applying really strong math to solve investment challenges. So the first commercially viable way to measure inequity beta which became our multi factor risk attribution model which exists today, by the way, multi factor attribution risk model. Right. So you're trying to figure out what is it? It is that's actually driving a market's gains. How do you attribute that to what specific elements in fact? That's exactly right. So if you are able to decompose a managers return into its component pieces and ice Elat, all sorts of different factors. You can basically separate was this manager good at picking stocks or was this manager benefiting from an overweight to energy or technology or momentum or certain fund were they is leveraging up and taking a lot of risk or a lot at right? So so it's it's for us the essence ultimately of investment management, and we talk about how.

Wilshire Dennis Tito Wilshire JPL US founder Schwartz. president Anor NASA Bloomberg NCO engineer scientist chairman eighty billion dollars billion dollar
"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:53 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Barry ritholtz. You're listening to masters in business on Bloomberg radio. My special guest this week is Jason Schwartz. He is the president of Wilshire your funds management. Let's talk a little bit about the product. You're probably best known for The Wilshire five thousand which contains these days about thirty five hundred stocks. Is that right? Why doesn't The Wilshire five thousand have five thousand stocks? So you're correct that there's just under thirty five hundred stocks today in The Wilshire five thousand The Wilshire five thousand was. Created in one thousand nine hundred seventy four and at the time, it was the first really broadbased measurement of the US equity market and still today when people refer to the total US stock market, they're often referencing The Wilshire five thousand. So you know, it was a really important innovation for us dating back to the to the seventies. And and the reason there was roughly five thousand securities when The Wilshire five thousand was launched the peak was as you probably know about seventy five hundred securities in nineteen ninety eight right? So that was in an environment. Where companies were racing to go public right to say, the least to say, the least and so post dotcom crash there were a number of delistings there were companies that clearly went out of business. So that dramatically lowered the count right delistings a lot of listed stocks ended up going pink. Sheets and bulletin boards. And specially the micro. I think there was some thousand or two thousand micro caps fell off fell off the radar. So there really aren't five thousand investable companies to put in the in the five thousand even if you wanted to write, and, and I think the other the other key theme in today's environment really is around private capital. Right. So companies are staying private for longer. Anor- able to do so without needing to go to the public equity markets to raise capital. So so there is, you know, the the IPO environment has not been what it was in the nineties. And so therefore there are roughly thirty five hundred publicly traded securities look at companies like Uber, and we works in giant multi-billion dollar firms years ago, they never would have been able to get that large try to say, so let's talk a little bit about what your assets looked like and what the company actually does. So you have about one hundred and eighty billion dollars in assets under management. How does that break down? Is that stocks bonds non-public assets that what's the that? So. We we have about one hundred and eighty billion dollars in assets that we advise on for what we call financial intermediaries, and these are working as Asians financial institutions that ultimately serve individual investors. Right. And so this this really for us for for our organization stems from the work that we've done in the institutional space. So. We talked about The Wilshire five thousand Wilshire's first decade in the nineteen. Seventies was really as a as one of the early pioneers in applying technology to solve investment management problems. And so The Wilshire five interrupt, you this point in point out that your founder is literally a rocket scientist who was at JPL before forming Wilshire in seventy two is right, right? Yeah. That's right. So that's that is a really important. It's a great story. But it's also really important part of our heritage the dentist. Tito, Wilshire's founder, currently, our our chairman and still active in the business. Was it JP Allen was was an aerospace engineer, and this was at a time where the most powerful computer technology was resident NASA JPL where they were trying to figure out how to how to program the trajectory of of unmanned spacecraft. And so as the space race was winding down, and that was really dentist is calling. He was called to participate in that. So late sixties early seventies. Dennis was was thinking about how to transition and ultimately had to make some money. And and really recognize it an early point that intersection of of investment, technology, information, technology, and and finance. And so the first product that Wilshire launched in nineteen seventy-two was was one of the first commercially viable ways to calculate an equity beta. And so that was nineteen seventy to take it for granted you could do the log onto a Bloomberg or even use a a website and generate half the data points. We just take for granted. That didn't exist. And this was the stuff of. I mean, this predates me this was the stuff of slide rules, and and and you know, really sort of you know. Hard computational math in so applying really strong math to solve investment challenges. So the first commercially viable way to measure an equity beta which became our multi factor risk attribution model which exists today, by the way, multi factor attribution risk model. Right. So you're trying to figure out what is it? It is that's actually driving a markets gains. How do you tribute to what specific elements in fact? That's exactly right. So if you are able to decompose a managers return into its component pieces and isolate all sorts of different factors. You can basically separate was this managers. Good at picking stocks or was this manager benefiting from an overweight to energy or technology or momentum or certain fund where they just leveraging up and taking a lot of risk or a lot at right? So so it's it's for us the essence ultimately of investment management, and we talk about how we.

Wilshire Bloomberg Barry ritholtz US founder Jason Schwartz president Anor JPL JP Allen NASA Dennis Tito engineer scientist chairman eighty billion dollars billion dollar
"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Became president of Wilshire analytics the firm advises on over a trillion dollars in institutional assets and has fifty billion dollars in assets under direct management. Let's talk a little bit about how the business has changed at Wilshire over the past couple of decades you've been there for fifteen years. You've certainly seen a lot of changes, and we were discussing previously. How the firm just really began as a technology and analytics company how has the past decade or two changed your business model Sherm, well, I joined Wiltshire in two thousand five into what was it? The time of a relatively new. New business that Wilshire had created called Wilshire funds management, and this was in its early days and the the idea behind Wilshire funds management was to take the firm's institutional expertise. It's risk management capabilities and provide investment advisory solutions designed really for financial advisers and their individual investor clients and so. Our first clients at the at the time, and we only had a handful were insurance companies and some broker dealers that we're looking for the same types of multi-asset multi manager and a risk managed solutions that that in our pension fund clients were able to to to have. So that means not just going out and buying a mutual fund. But having access to a suite of different different managers in different asset classes is that. Right. Right. So it's it's you know, when we look at the things that institutional investors do well detained to invest in a lot of things a lot of classes, right? They own a lot of asset classes, they're highly diversified, they typically implement those views with managers also now, increasingly passive components of those portfolios, and they blend everything together in a way that designed to to really optimize a particular outcome. Financial advisers, many cases and more. Cases are doing the same thing. Certainly those that are using funds or fun products or ETF's to build portfolios. And so, you know, the market has been shifting to that of more of an advice embedded model and Wilshire has been able to participate in that. And so I was fortuitous timing of when I joined the firm, but over the last, you know decade or so we've grown rapidly. As one of the premier providers of these types of services to the intermediary market. So let me ask you about a division that caught my eye when I was doing a little homework. What is The Wilshire segregated portfolio companies? Right. So these are these are at a fancy name for our came in hedge fund platform, and so these are. This is a platform that was created actually in two thousand and five. Right around the time that I joined at the time it was created. There was this this belief that still exists in some respects today that that you know, if you're able to you wanna hire a hedge fund you want that that hedge funds trading prowess, you want their exceptional ability to to to buy securities and generate performance, but many people may be uncomfortable with the operational risk. That comes with that. The fact that. You don't have a lot of transparency or control over those assets necessarily. You're just an investor in NLP, and how do you pick out of the eleven thousand Fung? Pick out of the eleven thousand. So we set out to solve that in two ways one of which was structural where if we could essentially just have the hedge fund manager run a separate account, right where they just have trading authority, but Wilshire controls, the the counterparty, relationships, etc. And Wilshire as a fiduciary right would would provide a level of of trust to the market to our clients. And then the other element of that is if we could identify highly skilled investment managers using our research platform using the fact that we obviously are engaged in a lot of these activities for. You know, a trillion dollars in assets we have combination of buying power. We have we think the ability to separate, you know, skill from lock etcetera. Pretty big network. Contained therein, correct. You guys do something similar on the private equity side you break it out separately. Or is it all part of the same plot? So that's a different. That's a different business unit Wilshire private markets and similar in the sense that that that business is is you know, today looks much like a private equity asset manager. Started out as as building customized fund to funds for for institutional investors today. Has a a large array of a fun defines increasingly customized advisory work in the private markets. Coming up we continue our conversation with Jason.

Wilshire Wilshire analytics fund manager Sherm president Wiltshire Jason fiduciary trillion dollars fifty billion dollars fifteen years
"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:36 min | 3 years ago

"wilshire" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is Jason shorts. Here's the president of Wilshire funds management, and we'll share analytics where he has worked since two thousand and five he has an Abyan government from Hamilton college and an MBA from the Marshall school of business at USC Wilshire is probably best known for The Wilshire five thousand stock index they advise on approximately a trillion dollars in institutional assets another hundred eighty billion dollars in broker dealer RIA assets and their mutual fund and other related businesses. Have approximately fifty billion dollars in assets under management Jason Schwartz. Welcome to Bloomberg com. Thanks, barry. Great to be here. So I was really fascinated about talking to you because like many people unfamiliar with Wilshire due to the five thousand index, and we'll get into that index a little later, but as I was doing a little reading about the farm. Before our conversation. I was really astonished at the history of the various business lines. You guys have it's it's really a fascinating company. Tell us a little bit about your background. And how did you find your way to Wilshire? Sure. So. I grew up here in New York and was exposed to finance investment management. I had an early kind of internship at at an RA multifamily office here that was engaged in some manager research manager selection activity, so I had a bit of a early exposure to to that, you know, being able to sit across the table from. Portfolio managers and investment managers and really really interesting. But I, you know, like a lot of young people I sort of had a number of. Career experiences in my twenties before I went to business school. I did a little bit of sales and marketing a little bit of technology a little bit of finance, and I got to business school. And I and I chose to go to spend two years in in southern California at USC, right? Not not the worst weather in the world now, and you know, as a twenty six year old it seemed like a nice place to park for a couple of years. But you know, as a as a as a New Yorker, I would then immediately return right was not a place to stay. And after about three months there felt like certainly isn't isn't so bad. And I'll say that's really where we all have of pivotal moments. And and I was. Started business will in two thousand one right? So PO post dotcom bubble and job market was still was still tough. And you know after business go I just needed a job. And and was I think like a lot of young people was cast a wide net and was looking for jobs. I would say not necessarily in my areas of passion per se and and in my second year business school berry. We I was part of this seminar and applied portfolio management which allowed us to manage a portion of the school's endowment and really get kind of a taste for for managing assets managing money, and as part of that we were able to visit a number of of different investment organizations up and down the west coast in one of the firms that we met was dimensional advisors DFA, which if you've ever been to their office in Santa Monica they had at the time. They had the top two floors of this gorgeous building. Looking right out at the ocean. And we're being hosted by a number of folks at at DFA, and there's maybe ten of us, and we're sitting in this boardroom looking out over the ocean. It's maybe eighty degrees. The beaches packed with spectacular, and I reached to my friend who's sitting next to me Craig Greenwald. And I said Craig I don't care what I do. I just want to work in this building. And so, you know, flash forward two years was working as a management consultant because I needed a job after business school. And that seemed like a respectable thing to do. And I was still sending out resumes and two years after business school. I'd I'd probably sent Wilshire. A bunch of resumes done some research, and it turned out Wilshire was in the same building as DFL. Oh, that's hilarious. And so, and so is that what you are still working or has the headquarters since move the we are still there. Wow. So you get you get that actual view that you were every single looking for in. I'm more impressed that USC actually gave their MBA students part of the endowments Araya. How how did that work out? I was great. I mean that was you know, I I. Oh, a huge debt of gratitude to that program and the professor supine coup who worked with us. It was a great a great opportunity, and we we were divided into a few different teams. There was like a mid cap group that was large-cap group. You know, some folks in the community had had donated money for us to, you know, mess around with an experiment with you mean separate from the usual alumni donation to the foundation, a separate pool of money was raised for this is for the NBA students sort of get their feet wet managing real assets. Right. That's how that's what was the performance. Like, oh, man. It was. That's a long time ago. I would say that was not an easy periods to be an investor right after the dot com right before the financial collapse. Certainly, right. I mean, it was it was you know, we were still we at all through the nineties right were raised on kgo gross, stocks and technology. And so completely different. You know, paradigm shift value is was obviously doing well. But small caps and growth were were not I you know. But what was interesting is is for me. It brought to the forefront the different roles really within investment organizations. And so interestingly, I had at that point developed a facility with numbers and was kind of studying the space, and all of the modern portfolio theory. And, but I, you know, had realized that where my passion really was at at. That point was was not so much being an analyst in the trenches with the numbers every day all day. But, but if I gosh, if I could get a role that allowed me to engage with clients, and and do some of the other things related to working in this industry. Wouldn't that be great coming up? We continue our conversation with Jason Schwartz,.

Wilshire USC Wilshire Jason Schwartz USC Marshall school of business Craig Greenwald Jason shorts barry California New York Santa Monica president DFA research manager Hamilton college NBA Araya analyst
Nielsen: 19% of all US adults listen to podcasts every week

podnews

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Nielsen: 19% of all US adults listen to podcasts every week

"The latest from pod news dot net. Nielsen US research company have released their new total audience report that says that nineteen percent of US adults. Listen to podcasts each week and forty five percent of smart speaker owners claim to listen to podcasts and audiobooks on them. You'll find a full linked to download that in our newsletter. Today. Here's an exclusive for you NPR's rat analytic standard, which we reported on yesterday will be supported by Hindenburg. The audio editor built for audio journalists. Chris Mottes their CEO tells pod news that both Hindenburg journalists pro and hinder bug broadcaster willing clued a feature to add rats tags and the related meta data and that the release will be made this Friday afternoon. Meanwhile, Marco Armand, the creator of overcast has confirmed in a series of tweets that he won't be supporting the rat analytic standard. I won't be supporting any listener behavior. Tracking specs in overcast. He says PA. Pastors get enough data from your IP address when you download episodes. Now, what NPR show is about to make it on TV. Probably the are WBZ Chicago. This is wait wait don't tell the the NPR news quiz. The broadcaster is working with Wilshire studios apart of NBC universal. It's the second time at TV version of the show has been attempted in the UK BBC radio four's. The news quiz was made as a successful TV show in nine hundred ninety. It's called have. I got news for you. And it still as today radio days Europe conference in Switzerland. In late March has just announced many more speakers, including our editor, James Crittenden. That's me, Tom Webster from Edison research, and ideas, grew Wade Kingsley who tells us at brainstorming his nonsense or words to that effect. And this man has the power to launch a number of podcasts with Stitcher in the new year you power to choose. What you want? The power shoes your personal. Here's a course. Dr Phil fill in the blanks launches on the eighth of January and earlier this year. Dr Phil McGraw achieved one hundred weeks as the US is most watched talk show,

NPR United States Dr Phil Mcgraw Chris Mottes Nielsen James Crittenden Audio Editor Marco Armand Wilshire Studios Europe Chicago PA Editor CEO BBC Wade Kingsley Switzerland NBC
Charlie, KFI and Attorney discussed on Bill Handel

Bill Handel

10:31 min | 4 years ago

Charlie, KFI and Attorney discussed on Bill Handel

"Why don't you Six Coming up on Sunday morning with Elizabeth Espinosa I've got star is about LA behaving. Badly that is if you survive this heat wave Sunday morning with Elizabeth Spinoza tomorrow morning at five on KFI AM six, forty, four stimulating talk AM six forty more stimulating, talk Bill Handel This is on the law. Marginal legal advice Hey, Charlie. Welcome to handle on the law yes sir This is my question I lived in I live in the city of San Diego County, of Los Angeles in the northeast, section of the, city which is, Valerie by Arcadia purity other larger cities what has happened the sidewalks in my neighborhood are getting so degraded that. They're causing a hazard when people, try and walk away I discovered this when I retired I also developed the doctor told me to walk. More wife and I got out. Only. To find it the sidewalks. Are just so bad okay content I contacted the city the city has. Told me that because these are not really, a sidewalk they are an asphalt sidewalk if. You, would, they are not responsible for keeping. Them, up Sidewalks or between. Two schools oh wait a minute hold on it they're not. A sidewalk there asphalt but do they. Look like a sidewalk absolutely the act like a sidewalk first of all I've never heard I've never heard, of asphalt sidewalks I've never seen, one of those, it's always concrete, so you're telling me if you have a normal sidewalk that you see you've. Got the front yard then the. Sidewalk and then a piece of, grass and then the street right yeah okay kind of like a main thoroughfare okay but it's still the. Main thoroughfare but it's still that. Way. It's it's basically acts like. A sidewalk the ground you know the the front yard sidewalk the the. Green and then the street so the only, difference is it's asphalt and it's not concrete Interesting and. That is does, that belong to. The city who owns that, I. Would guess it would be the. City unless they. Say it's all private property that it's is my thoughts I believe it, belongs to the city okay, and I got I contacted them and and one of the other questions, I? Had. For. This because they have no accessible. Wheelchair. Ramps on on the corners yet, they come back to deny. That I have an Email that they, are not, responsible because, they are not sanctioned, sidewalk, is basically what they're giving me oh. Interesting I don't even know what a sanction sidewalk is by Yeah That it's the fact that he's a poured concrete rather than. This I don't, know if concrete if a sidewalk is defined as having b. Comprised of concrete, and no other material I think you have, to look at I the. I don't even know why. The ordinance ordinance say sidewalks are comprised of that's a really interesting point I, so I don't even know if there's been a lawsuit filed research it but I'd be surprised if. There was a lawsuit filed saying that, this is a sidewalk and asphalt sidewalk is the same as concrete sidewalks but for the fact that it's concrete and it'd be very well be an, ordinance or even a statute that deals with it and define. Sidewalks concrete then I don't even know where the. Hell, you vote this I've never heard of this before by the way Charlie this is a. Weird one, now and that surprises city's trying to. Get out of it of, course they tried to get out of everything Sure More. Thing let me add to this is the fact that I did look up on the Americans with Disabilities, Act and there's a section to that is clearly states in there that the the city's obligation is to maintain a sidewalk that is. There I guess there have looked it. Up they have lifted up also and their their entire. Premise is that because it's ask, fault it's it's not a. Sidewalk And maybe not so much the asphalt it's just the fact, that thirty nine it's a sidewalk well okay and I don't know how the hell they deny it's a sidewalk I really don't not. Only that like I said we're borderline. Stand Gabriel and triple city both we'll start denying borderline it's either on it's either in, one city or the other Creek, crosses over it's it's about a mile stretch okay, so goes across the line right correct. Okay well I would think every city is responsible for everything on their side. Of, the. Line so so what do you want to do what's your question what do you want to do as a result of this well I I'm retired now I have nothing but time on my hands who I, approach next I'll take as far as I can I would go to, the city council and they have open hearings open meetings odd definitely I. Would talk to the city attorney and let. The city attorney know that it looks like the cities in violation of the ADA American with Disabilities. Act and you see if there are any organizations out. There, and, I'm sure there are that deal with ADA issues. And the government. And there are even their even. Firms law firms, that deal with it now there's two. Different. Kinds of law firms. They're the kind of law firms that are bunch of predators Sleazeball, law firms that go against small businesses where the, ramp is the wrong the elevation is. The wrong degree is supposed to be at twelve degrees and it turns out. It's, a. Thirteen degrees in their forcing relation and they actually extort the business owners there's those and then there are firms that are on the other side who actually deal seriously with with ADA violations and this looks like, it's one of those so I just do some research and put in, some ADA law firms as search words and see where you go on. That and talk to the city attorney's office. And talk to the council that's where I would okay okay Would it be advisable to take pictures and God yes oh yeah oh yeah I take. All the pictures you. Can. Okay All right all right? Charlie take care interesting interesting? Proposition isn't it and their denial that it's a? Sidewalk. How do. You, point. To a sidewalk say that's not a. Sidewalk This is handle on the law Julie? Slater in the KFI newsroom The fire near Idyllwild has more than twelve thousand acres. And is sixteen percent contained five houses have been damaged or destroyed the man accused. Of starting that huge fire plus eight others has. Pleaded not. Guilty he's. Charged with more than a dozen arson crimes Riverside County DA spokesman John Hall says. There could even be more. Charges filed. Because the fires still, burning. If anything. Else should happen, damage increases if there's any injuries, etc defense lawyer Joseph Cammarata. Says if the fires were arson set they hoped a real person responsible is found our thoughts and prayers are with the first responders that are battling, these fires right now in the families. That are affected, by them demand charge could get life in prison if he's convicted the, fire near Yosemite. Is twenty percent contained and has burned over forty six thousand acres the weather is making it hard. For firefighters working, on a fire near reading in northern California ABC's Alec. Stone says the weather has been Hot dry and windy at, night right now the fire, is right. Below fifty, thousand acres and again that's. Kind of an estimate on their part because they haven't been able this is so big now and there are so many. Slayings they say they're kind of estimating it that they're going to try over the. Weekend to get a better more precise number nearly. Forty thousand. People have. Been evacuated five hundred buildings have been destroyed by the fire several people have been. Burned including three firefighters to. Firefighters have. Been killed working on, this. Fire which. Is forty five, which is five percent contained news, brought to you by Fletcher. Jones a motorcars officials in so Cal are looking for more players in a major drug ring a task force seized more than one point six million, dollars worth of illegal drugs Orange County. Undersheriff Don Barnes, says the drugs came in through Mexico the plan is to traffic from, into the United. States and then to distribute those once I got those narcotics two locations in southern California redistribute those. He says officials, found almost two hundred Pounds, of meth heroin and cocaine during the four-month operation he says the illegal. Drugs we're going to three counties in so Cal Andrew mollenbeck KFI news, more than thirty people have been killed after a bus carrying tourists plunged into a gorge in western India the times of India says the bus carrying. Members of an agricultural cultural university fell about five. Hundred feet after skidding off a mountain pass rescue teams say one passenger survived by jumping out, of window as the, bus fell President Trump is thinking North Korean leader Kim Jong UN. For returning the remains of American MIA's from the Korean war we honor the sacred memory. Of every incredible American patriots who fought and, died in that war Trump says vice, president Pence. Will join families waiting for the remains the remains of. Fifty five American soldiers are being returned and more are expected traffic from your helpful. Socal Honda traffic center a, closure onto panga canyon in, both in. Malibu both, directions are between PCH and Panga canyon road it's going to. Be the case all weekend long. Until five AM, Monday morning also seeing a lot of slowing due to some roadwork. They're on the west side southbound side, of the four oh five very slow from Wilshire boulevard as you make your. Way on down towards about Venice boulevard we have at least the off ramp they're closed at Santa Monica, boulevard and if you are trying to get through south LA the one ten. Northbound we have a one lane closed from Adams up to just pass the ten, you are slow, back from slauson avenue KFI.

Charlie KFI Attorney ADA LA Arson California Elizabeth Espinosa Panga Canyon Cal Andrew San Diego County Bill Handel Elizabeth Spinoza President Trump Los Angeles India Kim Jong Un
Trump in UK: Pomp and protest as visit stokes culture war

Gary King

01:54 min | 4 years ago

Trump in UK: Pomp and protest as visit stokes culture war

"The dream is over everyone should be proud of what we've achieved obviously guide and it hurts now president trump arrives in the uk and flight disruption ryanair across the uk online and on talk radio on the our news headlines manager gallon southgate says he is remarkably proud of his players his team suffered a two one extratime defeat to croatia in the semifinals at the world cup last night southgate says he feels the pain of missing out on a place in the final but his side did all they could on the pitch did we expect to be in this position i don't think realistically any arrested but i'm hugely proud of what they've done i couldn't have austin to give any more for me or for off of the country and they have broken through a number of barriers theresa may says uk will remain the strongest of us allies ahead of donald trump's visit to the uk later the prime minister will use his trip to set out how closely we work with the us across defence security and foreign policy issues protests are being planned against the president's visit compensation matt co from the university of birmingham has been telling julia on talk radio that probably won't bother the president importance of protests he's not just the size of them it's the the media impact it's not what donald trump thinks of the protests but also the weights covert i'm if you think about something fathers for justice campaign it only took two guys spending on buckingham palace to get the coverage on the front of every newspaper is the protest is organized in the right way from response to it in the wrong way then it will have an impact he knows his brother of the man poisoned by nava chunk wilshire says he's been told his girlfriend is dead charlie raleigh's now conscious following exposure to the nerve agents at the end of last month a strike by some ryanair pilots since forced the cancellation of around the tenth of its flights between the uk and ireland the irish union full service accusing the.

Prime Minister Irish Union Ryanair University Of Birmingham Charlie Raleigh Buckingham Palace Julia Matt Co President Trump Donald Trump Austin Southgate Croatia UK
Man accused of threatening to kill FCC chairman’s family

Tim Conway Jr.

01:33 min | 4 years ago

Man accused of threatening to kill FCC chairman’s family

"The option of receiving an autodial text message from my heart media jong says he's still against the building of a shelter on the original site propose near vermont and wilshire i appreciate trying to kind of somehow compromise but unfortunately that's still off the point john says the point is there's been a lack of communication in the process the third site is on kenmore in koreatown at city hall chris ancarlo kfi news the coastguard in long beach says boating under the influence is just as bad as drinking and driving more than six hundred fifty people died nationwide and boating accidents last year over seventy five percent of them drowned coastguard public affairs petty officer mark barney says the leading contributor alcohol a boat doesn't move like a vehicle does a can't just stop instantly like you can just stop he says that affects judgment response times which are already impaired on the ocean it could be very fun place at the same time it can be a very dangerous place barney says people up and down the southern california coast we'll see more patrols this holiday weekend for operation dry water at the l a long beach coastguard base in san pedro corbin carson kfi news a man in so cal as bit accused of threatening to kill the family of the fcc chairman reporter alex stone says markar man allegedly send emails to jeet pie because man's upset over internet speed federal prosecutors say the emails claimed pie was responsible for a child who man said committed suicide because of net neutrality regulations being repealed authorities say man admitted sending the emails but said he only wanted to scare pie he's convicted he could get up to ten years in prison traffic from the helpful socal honda traffic center.

Officer Honda Jeet Pie Markar Reporter Chairman FCC San Pedro California Jong Alex Stone Mark Barney City Hall Koreatown John Vermont Seventy Five Percent Ten Years