11 Burst results for "Willow Paskhin"

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

03:26 min | 3 months ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Twitter. We played a bit at the top of a show culturally psycologically economically politically gays and lesbians are discriminated against they are a very it was really popular two, hundred, thousand, likes fifty, five, thousand retweets, and it's one of a number of videos featuring doing something impressive and political like getting arrested for climate change that have gone viral in the last few years. The subtext around these tweets, often the explicit tax isn't just admiration. It's surprise. WHOA checkout Jane Fonda. This is also generational people of my generation and younger having the realization that a woman they thought was the queen of size or just ungracious and Frankie has been fighting the good fight since before they were born. I don't WanNA diminish the Jane Fonda workout, which I only came to admire a bigger and bigger deal. The more I knew about it was one of the preeminent lifestyle phenomenon of the nineteen eighties and nineties, and it helped normalize strenuous physical exercise women and it still works and people are doing it right now when they can't go to the gym which actually how it started when gyms were much last welcoming to women. But it was only ever a piece of Fonda and for a while there, its popularity obscured more substantial things about her in my life so far which came out in two, thousand, five, she wrote it isn't easy for me to accept the fact that many young people if they know me at all, know me as the woman in the exercise video, their mother used. Fonda. Is Eighty three. Now she lived about is full of life as any celebrity as any woman has and she still add it I think it's only in the years since she unretired in two thousand and five, the Exercise Jane has started to take its proper place in the scheme of Jane Fonda just a part of the fifty years she has spent throwing herself not without missteps into things that matter she may do a mean helvetic tilt, but you should see her life it's better. They using you I hope they use me. What am I here for not to be used by good people for good things This coding I'm willing Haskins. You can find the twitter at Willow Paskhin and you have any cultural mysteries. Email us at decoder ring at slate dot com. If you haven't yet please subscribe and our feed and Apple podcasts or ever you get your podcasts even better tell your friends. This podcast was written by Willa Casket it was edited by Benjamin fresh to Coterie is produced by Willa tasking and Benjamin fresh the eleven is our researchers. Thanks to mark Harris Jeff. Wexler Merit Jacob Carol Birth Jerry lemke jogging nick pruer Kaley Morgan Kimberly Kristen, Amanda Cormier Lenny. Casten June Thomas though I mentioned Jane Fonda is my life so far Mary, her orders Jane Fonda wore and Rick Pearls the Nixon land in the episode itself. There are some other packs were essential to reporting this episodes. Thank you too. Carol burks camp all American Annoy Jane and the high in tight Jerry Mbeki's Hanoi Jane War Sex, fantasies of betrayal and James. Michael Rafferty's doctoral thesis politicizing stardom Jane Fonda IPC films and Hollywood nine, hundred, seventy, seven to nineteen, eighty, eighty-two. Thanks for listening. See you next month..

Jane Fonda physical exercise twitter Carol burks Willa Casket Twitter. Benjamin Michael Rafferty Jerry Mbeki mark Harris Jeff Haskins Willow Paskhin Frankie Wexler Jerry lemke James Amanda Cormier Lenny Rick Pearls
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

Decoder Ring

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

"Those sites. <Music> We are likely to get <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> anxious about our kids <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> well being when they watch <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a yellow cartoon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> character. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We're just really anxious <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> about what's happening to <Speech_Music_Female> our kids when they're watching <Speech_Music_Female> any <Speech_Music_Female> screen at all <Speech_Female> and the idea <Speech_Female> of prescriptive as <Speech_Music_Female> television has more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> adherents than ever <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> before because it's been <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fully embraced by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> liberals when <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> instead a fearing the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> TV might change the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> world. Hope that <Speech_Music_Female> it will <Speech_Music_Female> positive prescriptivism <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> instead of doomsday. <Speech_Music_Female> Once <Speech_Music_Female> we want TV shows <Speech_Music_Female> to beat descriptive <Speech_Music_Female> represent the world <Speech_Music_Female> as it actually is <Speech_Music_Female> in all of its diversity. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Then we're committed to <Speech_Music_Female> the idea that diversity <Speech_Music_Female> can make the world <Speech_Music_Female> over in its image <Speech_Music_Female> as a less <Speech_Female> bigoted less <Speech_Female> racist less homophobic <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> open minded placed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but at the bar. <Speech_Music_Female> Panic tells us <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> anything <Speech_Female> is that it's very difficult <Speech_Female> to know at any. <Speech_Female> Cultural Product is <Speech_Music_Female> doing to any of us <Speech_Music_Female> in the moment <Speech_Music_Female> thirty years <Speech_Music_Female> later. It's pretty hard <Speech_Female> to credit the fears <Speech_Female> about the simpsons. <Speech_Female> The idea that <Speech_Female> what a kid would take <Speech_Music_Female> from something so funny <Speech_Female> and complicated <Speech_Female> was only a monkey. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> See Monkey <Speech_Music_Female> do kind of bad <Speech_Music_Female> behavior. <Speech_Female> It seems so much <Speech_Female> more likely than instead <Speech_Female> of making kids. <Speech_Female> Rebellious Bart <Speech_Music_Female> was an outlet for expressing <Speech_Music_Female> their feelings <Speech_Female> of rebellion. <Speech_Female> Which doesn't mean he didn't <Speech_Female> personally popularized <Speech_Female> the phrase eat <Speech_Female> my shorts or <Speech_Female> make it a little cooler <Speech_Music_Female> to be rude to your <Speech_Music_Female> parents <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> as the simpsons <Speech_Female> a show that is chronicled <Speech_Female> the hundreds <Speech_Music_Female> of ways the TV <Speech_Music_Female> can mess. People up <Speech_Music_Female> knows as well <Speech_Music_Female> as anyone <Speech_Music_Female> if pop culture can <Speech_Music_Female> do good things to us. <Speech_Music_Female> It can do <Speech_Music_Female> things to us too <Speech_Music_Female> though. I like <Speech_Female> to think not <Speech_Music_Female> exactly <SpeakerChange> in equal <Laughter> measure <Laughter> <Advertisement> against <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> me. She says <Laughter> <Advertisement> you're a bad influence. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Influence <Speech_Music_Female> my butt <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> decoder <Speech_Music_Female> ring. I'm willing pass. Can <Speech_Music_Female> you can find me on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> twitter at Willow Paskhin <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and you have any <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> cultural mysteries. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You want us to code. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You can email us at <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Dakota ring <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at slate dot com. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> If you haven't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> yet subscribed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rate our feed and apple <Speech_Music_Female> podcasts or <Speech_Music_Female> ever you get your podcast <Speech_Music_Female> and even better. <Speech_Music_Female> Tell your friends. <Speech_Music_Female> This podcast <Speech_Music_Female> was written by <Speech_Music_Female> Willa Paskhin <Speech_Female> and was produced and <Speech_Music_Female> edited by Benjamin <Speech_Music_Female> fresh who also does <Speech_Music_Female> illustrations for every <Speech_Music_Female> episode <Speech_Music_Female> Cleo Levin is our <Speech_Music_Female> research assistant <Speech_Music_Female> thanks to James <Speech_Music_Female> Poniewozik Isaac <Speech_Music_Female> Butler Rebecca Onion <Speech_Music_Female> Ruth. Graham Stephanie <Speech_Music_Female> Manhind Derrick <Speech_Female> Johnson Crystals <Speech_Music_Female> Uth Matthew to Flam <Speech_Music_Female> Bill Wyman John <Speech_Music_Female> Fed William <Speech_Music_Female> Laura Nicholas <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> gains and everyone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> else gave us help and <Speech_Music_Female> feedback along the <Speech_Music_Female> way <Speech_Music_Female> you're listening.

"willow paskhin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Joey in San Francisco, go ahead. I enjoying the season the with the exception of the second season which was so doc, you couldn't even see anything that was really frustrating from a production point. I thought that was kind of a mixed up, but it seemed obvious that marriage was going to be exactly what she is doing to be, especially when she saw John getting all the kudos for riding a dragon when she actually taught him how to write a dragging. So I thought you could just see how she wished owering on all of them and turning. But, but I think it's going to end up flying but I just wanted to mention a show that ended perfectly and if it even comes close to two breaking bad's, and I think we'll all be happy. I think bad really the template on how to end a long running series that have a lot of people not wanting to end healing satisfied. Give one quick sense of what it was that made it so sad. Spying for you. I think there wasn't a lot of things that just seemed like out of character normal of what you would expect to happen. I think that the way he went about knowing where he was going where he had to bring it to was was very clever, and in line with who you knew he really was. And where is ever Lucien and architect character? And I think just, you know, Vince Gilligan style still entertaining within machine gun coming out of the twelfth of the car and, and just killing the top people in such dramatic way. But not until you went through this roller coaster of this, you know, stomach tightening and moment, you know, just brilliant storytelling and production. Thanks. You're bringing it back from trying to remember the fine line. Now, I have a very vivid image in my mind. We're talking about TV shows that disappointed you at the end and shows that really stuck. Landing inspired by the uproar, especially off mine fans over the final season of game of thrones who wanted HBO to remake the whole final season. And the fact that the final episode will air this Sunday, we're talking with willow. Paskhin television critic at slate and Rene Pessoa PHD candidate and film and media UC Berkeley, and Kate writes, the final seasons of both broad city in crazy ex girlfriend were really well, written and wrapped up the story lines of the main characters and satisfying and unexpected ways. Good examples of strong women writers with game of thrones. On the other hand under new male writers, deniro's character has taken such an uncharacteristic arc based on her past views. What are your thoughts on that? Rene pesto, women writers would have made it better. I think it's possible that women writers might have. I mean it depends on the women writers. Right. But they might have fleshed out or taken a little bit more time to show her turn. As will appointed out. This is George r r Martin's ending that they're trying to build two. And so she was going to have this kind of he'll turn turn to the villainy. That seems quite clear. But I think that it's hard to say it depends on who the raiders. What do you think of this? And, and the fact that feels they feel like they're kind of betraying the female characters they set up to be so powerful throughout the series. Yeah. I think that sort of some of the beats people are taking exception with, with Danny is like this idea that the triggering moment for her that she really liked breaks, bad, as when John won't make out with her. Seems really petty and silly for the reason that she would like then suddenly turned that. And I you know, you would think that perhaps a woman writer might have like or women and the writers might have flagged out as being kind of preposterous. But I think they're like. One of the things I game thrones is that it obviously has become like this metaphor for everything. Like there's nothing that someone hasn't said it is, you know, you know, a projection of what level warming to imperialism to our current politics. And obviously Danny is a really potent figure in the way that it is a scrim for our current politics, right here is this. We're in this moment where right? Like, we seem like the arc of Justice is bending towards, you know, more representation, and this female Queen is going to like solve this internecine civil war in this foreign land. That's like happening. Exactly the moment when Hillary Clinton is running for office. And then in swoops in this, you know, last minute plot twist worst, Trump becomes president, and like Danny, you know, like the actress who plays or as Clark's compared with Bater Ginsburg, you know, Elizabeth Warren has. Voiced her support for before sort of her latest. He'll turn. I've seen me GMs comparing Danny to Hillary Clinton. She's very symbolic, a lot of our stuff are extra textual stuff about female politicians right now. So, yes, I see a lot of people wanting certain things to pan out the way that they would see more out as well as though I agree that the game of thrones writing, especially the dialogue isn't as clever as previous seasons, but I'm still enjoying it. I'm so rooting for my favorite characters even some of the dead ones, I wish they'd given the show more room to breathe in the last two seasons. Sure. But do I think I'm a different ending in the story? No. I'm just happy someone came up with such a great story and told it to me in the first place. It's their story. Let them tell it can you just quickly. I'm wondering can just give us a sense of what the pressures are on show creators, when they're coming up with the final episode. I think I love that comic because I actually think one of the things that's getting lost in like how mad everybody is, and like the petition is like everyone was having a great time. I'm like it is fun. Complain about your endings, and I'm not saying there aren't people who are very angry about it or very betrayed. I suspect a lot of it is also. It's fun to be that worked up about something that is not like actually the horrible stuff that's happening in the universe. And there is that level to it. I think there is a huge amount of pressure on show runners to like stick the land, but like they can only do so much, and the more and more. This happens where it seems to be impossible, the more and more used to wonder like is impossible not, because, like we're making it impossible because we just want everything to be exactly what we want. And we have no idea what that is just we know what it isn't. But it's also such a community building exercise right to have all these fans come together on the internet United around show where it's an escape from reality to some extent, even with all the resonance, it's still this moment of coming together and saying, wait. I have insight into this. Well, we're talking with Rene pastel PHD candidate in film, and media UC Berkeley will pass and television critic.

Danny Hillary Clinton John Rene Pessoa PHD Vince Gilligan San Francisco Rene pastel PHD Rene pesto Joey raiders deniro writer Berkeley Elizabeth Warren Kate George Trump president Martin
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

Decoder Ring

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

"People. We started working on the story. I thought it was going to be a story about a cultural object something that people in different side of America's political divide saw completely differently. And it is a story about a cultural object. The object in question is not truck nuts. The object is humor itself truck nuts makes some people laugh, but the people who find them gross or crass or stupid or the bleeding edge of all sorts of odious ideological positions. Don't quite believe that anyone could be buying truck nuts as just a joke. We imagine that they are on some levels sincere. And this makes us laugh. Meanwhile, truck understood people who don't find truck nuts. Funny who don't get why. They're funny who don't the irony in them are up tight, and they in turn get a kick out of that people actually find funny about truck nuts, then has very little to do with being a pair of balls and everything to do with them being apparent evidence that other Americans have a bad sense of humor. Well, you're seeing happened with truck nuts. Like what happens to an unhappy? Couple that ends up fighting about the same thing. No matter what the cause in this case, the cause is a pair of plastic testicles, but the fight devolve into what it always does everyone talking past each other and projecting the worse things onto the other side, including the idea that the other side isn't funny at all a shared sense of humor. Of course is a really important thing to a functioning relationship without one. There's no pressure release. There's just endless conflict, and that's pretty much where we are. Right now about things way more important than truck nuts. What's crazy about this fight in particular? Is it Americans of every political persuasion, find balls funny instead of being something that divides us, I can imagine a world in which truck nuts? United us or United those people who are really tickled by extremely basic dick jokes because that's the world were actually living in a world in which truck nuts. Customer base supply. Sizing -ly partisan. This is the coda ring I'm willa passed, and you can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin, and you have any cultural mysteries you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota rang at slate dot com. If you haven't yet subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever you. Get your podcasts and even better tell your friends this podcast was written by willa Pasquin and was reduced at edited by Benjamin fresh who also does 'lustration for every episode. Thanks does Acharya Blair Tonia Senda, Dan Perot. Barbara chang. Scott bischoff. Franko Fuda Selena Allah, Phil Edwards. Macklemore? Oh, Christina rucci forest. Whitman Jennifer, s Barranca, Cleo Levin, June Thomas, and everyone else give us help and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening.

willa Pasquin Franko Fuda Selena Allah Acharya Blair Tonia Senda Christina rucci forest America us Whitman Jennifer Scott bischoff Twitter Cleo Levin Barbara chang Dakota willow Paskhin Phil Edwards Dan Perot Benjamin June Thomas
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"People. We started working on the story. I thought it was going to be a story about a cultural object something that people in different side of America's political divide saw completely differently. And it is a story about a cultural object. The object in question is not truck nuts. The object is humor itself truck nuts makes some people laugh, but the people who find them gross or crass or stupid or the bleeding edge of all sorts of odious ideological positions. Don't quite believe that anyone could be buying truck nuts as just a joke. We imagine that they are on some levels sincere. And this makes us laugh. Meanwhile, truck understood people who don't find truck nuts. Funny who don't get why. They're funny who don't the irony in them are up tight, and they in turn get a kick out of that people actually find funny about truck nuts, then has very little to do with being a pair of balls and everything to do with them being apparent evidence that other Americans have a bad sense of humor. Well, you're seeing happened with truck nuts. Like what happens to an unhappy? Couple that ends up fighting about the same thing. No matter what the cause in this case, the cause is a pair of plastic testicles, but the fight devolve into what it always does everyone talking past each other and projecting the worse things onto the other side, including the idea that the other side isn't funny at all a shared sense of humor. Of course is a really important thing to a functioning relationship without one. There's no pressure release. There's just endless conflict, and that's pretty much where we are. Right now about things way more important than truck nuts. What's crazy about this fight in particular? Is it Americans of every political persuasion, find balls funny instead of being something that divides us, I can imagine a world in which truck nuts? United us or United those people who are really tickled by extremely basic dick jokes because that's the world were actually living in a world in which truck nuts. Customer base supply. Sizing -ly partisan. This is the coda ring I'm willa passed, and you can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin, and you have any cultural mysteries you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota rang at slate dot com. If you haven't yet subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever you. Get your podcasts and even better tell your friends this podcast was written by willa Pasquin and was reduced at edited by Benjamin fresh who also does 'lustration for every episode. Thanks does Acharya Blair Tonia Senda, Dan Perot. Barbara chang. Scott bischoff. Franko Fuda Selena Allah, Phil Edwards. Macklemore? Oh, Christina rucci forest. Whitman Jennifer, s Barranca, Cleo Levin, June Thomas, and everyone else give us help and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening.

willa Pasquin Franko Fuda Selena Allah Acharya Blair Tonia Senda Christina rucci forest America us Whitman Jennifer Scott bischoff Twitter Cleo Levin Barbara chang Dakota willow Paskhin Phil Edwards Dan Perot Benjamin June Thomas
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"I have friends real friends for the first time. Thirty some years. So I came along way. But I. I still don't really know what it's hard for me to reconcile the the damage done with with the lifestyle that I have now I don't I don't really feel right about do. You think? Do you think that you deserve forgiveness? No. No, I don't think I did anything to deserve type of life. But I'm vamp grateful for it. One of the questions lurking. Inside of this episode is the one about why we are so compelled by stories like this stories of Griffin's of conmen, a bad, Ben gone, good. And there are so many answers to that including these sorts of people are as Rebecca avoid mentioned unseemly, superheroes of a sort. But there's more than it's easy and sometimes satisfying to feel superior to their victims. They can seem like dark mayors to so much legitimate, hustling, a kind of logical conclusion to a twisted capitalism a dangerous, but not too dangerous point of identification. But I think the skips right over something so obvious, it can sound stupid or titled tickle, which is that everything else aside looking only plot and movement and arc. They're good shiny stories. And this before all of the other stuff that pulls us in. There's a sunny thing about stories about how if you tell them in the right way, they can do all of this work for you. The can make all of this change, even though they can't change what already happened if a person convincingly talks about taking responsibility for their actions for not blaming others. We in turn blame them less. Just by saying he doesn't deserve forgiveness. Brett teams so much more deserving of forgiveness. And this is the core. Conundrum of Brett Johnson how much can you trust his talk? Does it reflect his silver tongue or his soul is telling a great story or the truth? Can it be both? One of the other questions lurking inside all of this is one about reform. How do we know or how do we judge if someone is and mostly what we have to rely on is their words and their deeds is still paying off his restitution, Chrissy think that Brett's current work is a kind of restitution in and of itself that it's done a lot of good helping companies stave off cyberfraud, but it's hard not to notice though, he may not be profiting from his crimes anymore. He is still profiting from the story of his crimes, and I'm not sure how different those two things really are. We'll only know in time for it's only been in his line of work for two years. It's still very new lots of things could happen. I expect the lots of things will happen. But I will say I'm rooting for him. This is the coda ring. I'm willa Paskhin. You can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin, and if you have any cultural mysteries you want us to code.

Brett Johnson willa Paskhin Twitter willow Paskhin Rebecca Griffin Ben Chrissy two years
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

Decoder Ring

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

"Day. So the thing about my internship at us weekly. I hate it. Transcribing all of those interviews with deeply in Nain and Mina reality. Tv contestants felt like such thankless busy work. Sometimes it would be sent out to time square task one hundred people to look at pairs of photos and decide who wore it best. I found approaching strangers to ask them this. So mortifying would quit after the first ten fudge the rest of the results, and then spend time hiding out in the mid Manhattan library reading Mary McCarthy essays as a form of personal protest something about the whole thing. Just seems so out of whack to me, so many smart people putting in so much time and energy into something that was at best. So silly my experience changed how I felt about celebrities and tablets forever. I never got the kick out of them that I had before visiting the sausage factory made me vegetarian. I mean, most of the time. I think a lot of that was snobbery and the snob in me has wash as the idea that celebrity is a sideshow a trashy distraction something that just doesn't matter that much. Well, she's watched that idea has been disproved in spectacular fashion celebrity gossip semi semi-truths and fake news have moved from the sidelines to the center from the tabloids into the White House is not the tabloids and politics are exactly the same now. But they are not quite the worlds apart. They want seem to me to be either. Nothing about them seems quite so silly. I think if you're going to make a positive case for the tabloids beyond just accepting that some version of them will always exist that will always be curious about famous people that we all need something distracting to read on an airplane. Is it they and gossip more generally are a mirror that shows us who we really are warts and all what we really care about. What speaks to our lizard, brains and hearts, if that's true, then Jennifer Aniston's, tabloid existence doesn't just tell us something about a rigid expectations for women. It tells us something even more expansive about our relationship with the truth. Which is that when the truth is as repulsive as a great story. We'll take the truth. But when the truth gets gnarly or pedantic or plot Louis or dull, we'll take the story. Even if it's no longer true. And the Jennifer Aniston story, it's not ending any time soon just as we were finishing up. This piece in very late November of two thousand eighteen us weekly of all places. Ran a new cover story about Aniston. They're thereupon saved my life. It said after a devastating year star opens up about healing after heartbreak in touch us. A sister publication picked up this story approvingly. I guess Brad. And jen's honeymoon is over this us cover puts Jen in a happy place, not with Brad. But in a self empowered. I choose me state of contentment it's much more believable. But one thing really stood out to me in the short promotional video that accompanies the story online in which in us employee talks about the magazine scoop. I don't wanna be anywhere other than where I am right now. The actress is said to be enjoying her life, despite the constant speculation that she's desperate to be a mom. She has said of the pregnancy. Rumors that no one considers how Sen.. Tive that might be for my partner in me. They don't know what years and years after starting at all with a cover that wondered when will Jennifer Aniston have her baby us weekly is acting like this kind of speculation came from somewhere else, maybe even somewhere mildly distasteful the narrative moves on. This is Dakota ring I'm willing passed in the taking next month off back in two thousand nineteen with brand new shows, you can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin, and you have any cultural mysteries you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota ring at slate dot com. If you haven't yet. Subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever you. Get your podcasts and even better tell your friends this podcast was written and reported by willa Pasquin, and it was edited and produced by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every episode thanks to June Thomas, Mark, Harris. Jen doll Madeline price. Frankie Thomas and Helen Peterson Amy wolf Carly sites. Are Sharon Marcus, Henry Schaefer, Alison Benedict, Abela bow Alison Hughes and Christopher McDonald? Thanks for listening. You see you soon.

Jennifer Aniston jen Brad Mary McCarthy Nain Dakota ring Manhattan Sen us Frankie Thomas White House willa Pasquin Twitter Louis partner willow Paskhin Sharon Marcus Christopher McDonald Amy wolf Carly June Thomas
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Day. So the thing about my internship at us weekly. I hate it. Transcribing all of those interviews with deeply in Nain and Mina reality. Tv contestants felt like such thankless busy work. Sometimes it would be sent out to time square task one hundred people to look at pairs of photos and decide who wore it best. I found approaching strangers to ask them this. So mortifying would quit after the first ten fudge the rest of the results, and then spend time hiding out in the mid Manhattan library reading Mary McCarthy essays as a form of personal protest something about the whole thing. Just seems so out of whack to me, so many smart people putting in so much time and energy into something that was at best. So silly my experience changed how I felt about celebrities and tablets forever. I never got the kick out of them that I had before visiting the sausage factory made me vegetarian. I mean, most of the time. I think a lot of that was snobbery and the snob in me has wash as the idea that celebrity is a sideshow a trashy distraction something that just doesn't matter that much. Well, she's watched that idea has been disproved in spectacular fashion celebrity gossip semi semi-truths and fake news have moved from the sidelines to the center from the tabloids into the White House is not the tabloids and politics are exactly the same now. But they are not quite the worlds apart. They want seem to me to be either. Nothing about them seems quite so silly. I think if you're going to make a positive case for the tabloids beyond just accepting that some version of them will always exist that will always be curious about famous people that we all need something distracting to read on an airplane. Is it they and gossip more generally are a mirror that shows us who we really are warts and all what we really care about. What speaks to our lizard, brains and hearts, if that's true, then Jennifer Aniston's, tabloid existence doesn't just tell us something about a rigid expectations for women. It tells us something even more expansive about our relationship with the truth. Which is that when the truth is as repulsive as a great story. We'll take the truth. But when the truth gets gnarly or pedantic or plot Louis or dull, we'll take the story. Even if it's no longer true. And the Jennifer Aniston story, it's not ending any time soon just as we were finishing up. This piece in very late November of two thousand eighteen us weekly of all places. Ran a new cover story about Aniston. They're thereupon saved my life. It said after a devastating year star opens up about healing after heartbreak in touch us. A sister publication picked up this story approvingly. I guess Brad. And jen's honeymoon is over this us cover puts Jen in a happy place, not with Brad. But in a self empowered. I choose me state of contentment it's much more believable. But one thing really stood out to me in the short promotional video that accompanies the story online in which in us employee talks about the magazine scoop. I don't wanna be anywhere other than where I am right now. The actress is said to be enjoying her life, despite the constant speculation that she's desperate to be a mom. She has said of the pregnancy. Rumors that no one considers how Sen.. Tive that might be for my partner in me. They don't know what years and years after starting at all with a cover that wondered when will Jennifer Aniston have her baby us weekly is acting like this kind of speculation came from somewhere else, maybe even somewhere mildly distasteful the narrative moves on. This is Dakota ring I'm willing passed in the taking next month off back in two thousand nineteen with brand new shows, you can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin, and you have any cultural mysteries you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota ring at slate dot com. If you haven't yet. Subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever you. Get your podcasts and even better tell your friends this podcast was written and reported by willa Pasquin, and it was edited and produced by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every episode thanks to June Thomas, Mark, Harris. Jen doll Madeline price. Frankie Thomas and Helen Peterson Amy wolf Carly sites. Are Sharon Marcus, Henry Schaefer, Alison Benedict, Abela bow Alison Hughes and Christopher McDonald? Thanks for listening. You see you soon.

Jennifer Aniston jen Brad Mary McCarthy Nain Dakota ring Manhattan Sen us Frankie Thomas White House willa Pasquin Twitter Louis partner willow Paskhin Sharon Marcus Christopher McDonald Amy wolf Carly June Thomas
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

Decoder Ring

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

"Lot. There's a famous story about Mark Roscoe who in the late nineteen fifties won a commission to create a series of paintings for the new four seasons restaurant in New York. It was a lucrative and prestigious assignment and Roth goes work would have hung your Pollock's Picasso's. But the story goes that in nineteen fifty nine as the restaurant was preparing to open, he went and had a meal there. He had hoped his art would exert a force on the space. He had told a friend, I hope to ruin the appetite of every son of a bitch you ever eats in that room. What he discovered instead was that his paintings would be no match for an expensive power lunch. His work in this context would become use a phrase that was leveled critically at his abstractions, just apocalyptic wallpaper. So he pulled it. I find this story and Roscoe standard speed very moving, but I'm not nearly so principled. I like to think I've had a few profound experiences with art in my life, but sometimes when I walk into museum galleries, the first thing I do is scan the room. Think I'd like that on my wall. In other words, my first reaction to piece of art is purely acquisitive swish owned it. I don't want to speak for you, but I think this makes me like a lot of people who sometimes relate to art in a thoughtful meaningful way and more often relate to it in a not thoughtful meaningful way. One of the knock on affects of all the technological advances that have made it easier and cheaper to create reproduce and distribute art than ever before is that it is easier than ever before to have this kind of casual, unthinking relationship to art. We now constantly find ourselves in extremely designed commercial spaces that are chock full of professional art, and that's kind of catch twenty two because there's more art around us than ever so, how can we attend to at all or even very much of it. And I think the truth is that often we don't, and that's a loss. That's what I take from Raskin's argument. Art is now like so many other pieces of culture like mood music or the TV that's on while you do the chores or the movie you watched while texting we can, of course still get meaning from it, but there is a kind of work you have to do before you can get to that, meaning you actually have to pay attention. At some point while I was working on this piece, the reams and reams of tasteful high end hotel art that I was seeing all sorts of feel the same. What ends up happening spaces that are so designed and you might be familiar with this from farm-to-table restaurants or impeccably source coffee houses or so many other aspects of modern consumer life. Is it a focus on quality on uniqueness on locality on experience end up amounting to kind of claustrophobic sameness? Everywhere you go. There you are in a room with perfectly bespoke are so carefully reflects presiding good taste. It looks exactly like all the other rooms full of perfectly bespoke art when presented with all of this idiocy and Craddock sameness. You may find yourself longing for something actually idiosyncratic, which brings us back to all that kitschy art the super eight, got rid of it used to be that encountering good art in a hotel was shocking, but now the opposite is true. That art is the outlier. If you walk into hotel. L. room and see a black velvet painting of a white tiger or weird sculpture of a house cat or some watercolor of a sad clown. You might get the actual jolt the freeze off the call to attention that you would usually only get from much better more substantive art. This sort of want in display a bad taste. It's getting so rare. You just have to look at it and as good as good hotel. Art may be, can't give you that charge. Maybe in losing that we really are losing something surprising, something genuinely unpredictable as opposed to something unpredictable and quotes in the curated way of modern hotels. That art of the truly unhinged. Righty may bode poorly for the rest of your hotel stay. Maybe the battle be- lumpy and maybe the food will be crappy and maybe you'll have to talk to the clerk for too long, but hey, doesn't that sound like what modern hotels are supposed to be all about a real experience. This is decoding, I'm willa Paskhin. You can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin. And if you have any cultural mysteries, you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota rang at slate dot com. If you haven't yet, subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever. You get your podcasts and even better tell your friends. This podcast was written by willa Paskhin and produced an edited by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every show special. Thanks to Matthew Whitaker, Michelle hunter, John, Sarah, Sulu Kuneva seen Lauren Kane, Alice grace Deitz Lisa Larsson Walker, Kevin hatch, rob Myers, and everyone else gave us help and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next month.

Mark Roscoe willa Paskhin Roth Pollock New York Twitter Raskin willow Paskhin Craddock Dakota Matthew Whitaker Lisa Larsson Walker Benjamin rob Myers Lauren Kane Sulu Kuneva Kevin hatch Michelle hunter Sarah John
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

Decoder Ring

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

"By. Peeper dullness can look like all nostalgia retrograde like a longing for simpler time for a time when we played with beautiful things. We cut out with our own hands and weren't, you know, obsessed with our phone than technology and shiny ephemeral and disposable things. Today, the most popular paper dolls aren't even made of paper their digital to be found in games, like Kim Kardashian Hollywood, where you paid address an avatar of yourself, and you give the Kardashians a cut. And that can seem a little crass in comparison to the careful cutting and care required of traditional paper dolls. It's easy to get nostalgic about something like that to see it through rose colored glasses. But the heyday of the classic paper doll was also a time when a lot of people, women and men were less free more constrained expected to behave in certain ways and to hide who they really were for some paper doll lovers. Paper dolls may really signify. Imagined idyllic past. But for someone like David, it's not the past that's for it's the paper dolls, who helped him to slip into a happier, more generous, more glamorous world than the one he was really living in the golden age of paper. Dolls was an era where identities and consumer objects were much more fixed. We're who and what you were seemed so much more locked in. But now we live in an era of infinite customisation. The entire consumer landscape is designed to correspond to our sense of identities and aspirated means booth in the real world. And in virtual more hidden spaces, you can design your own t shirt, get shoes in any combination of colors you want. If I want to be like Audrey Hepburn, I don't have to imagine it via paper doll. I can go on Amazon and there are a dozen versions of the breakfast at Tiffany's dress waiting for me to purchase and adopt. If I wanna live in a fantasy world, I don't need a paper doll to help me tell that. Story. I can just load up world of warcraft and role play as a wizard or a night. I think that's part of the reason that paper dolls have fallen off is because we don't need them in the same way anymore. We have become our own paper dolls, using our bodies and virtual avatars to explore who we are and what we want to be. But David back in the nineteen fifties did need them paper doll structured his life and guided him down the career path he eventually took. And in retrospect it can all seem like an inevitability. But I think it's also important to remember that a lot of other gay children played with paper dolls to David's brother for one. And for so many of those children, their lives weren't as glamorous marked by discrimination violence, an illness. So for queer people, paper dolls, and their history are also a reminder of how fragile our place in the world is how not so long ago we had to hide ourselves and our interests away, like David's paper dolls in the sock drawer. But they're also proved that things can change that some things don't have to stay hidden forever. David is retired. Now he lives on the west coast spending his free time on personal projects, go to the gym. Every other day. I spend a lot of time happily chatting with my husband. I've worked on my paper projects about four or five hours a day is just is just I'm just having so much fun. And I really created a bubble that I've lived in my whole life. And now it's it's more of a bubble than ever. And I feel that every day when I'm painting paper dolls, I've gone to an imaginary place. I call paper dollywood where everything is beautiful and everyone is kind gentle and the world and fashion have charm and grace. This is code rang. I'm willa PASCAL and I'm Benjamin Frisch. You can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin and you have any cultural mysteries. You want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota ring at slate dot com. If you haven't yet radar feed on apple podcasts or anywhere you get your podcasts and even better. Tell your friends. This episode was written and edited by willa Pasquin and Benjamin fresh who also produced the episode does illustrations for every show special things to any Chelsea who helped us record this episode and provided additional reporting things also to Jenny Taliadoros, Terry Taylor, Cory Johnson, smooth, Hannah field, Catherine h Adams, John Sherlock, June Thomas, Sophie Worthen crisper bay forest Whitman Abela bell, Andrew Cahn Brian louder, and everyone else gave us help and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening. You next month.

Dolls David Kim Kardashian Hollywood Audrey Hepburn Kardashians Benjamin Frisch Dakota ring willa Pasquin Amazon Andrew Cahn willa PASCAL Tiffany Twitter willow Paskhin Chelsea Jenny Taliadoros Cory Johnson Sophie Worthen John Sherlock
"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

Decoder Ring

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"willow paskhin" Discussed on Decoder Ring

"World. Anna, Kathy both turned out fine after their experiences. And both would like to be on reality TV again and is still an artist. She's had exhibitions and performances in Los Angeles, London, and at the new museum in New York. She's even been on reality TV again on a low key show called oddities where people shop for curios in knickknack shop like at the end of the day, like even though for me was performance art like it was fun. Like even though I was like a nervous wreck for part of it, like I would do it again in a heartbeat. It was really fun. When else you get to do that, like to have that little bit of Fain like it was thrilling Kathy now works a regular job and lives basically normal life which she has reservations about. I hope people all the time reality TV like ruined my life. You know, it's, it's like you are never the same because you know you go from being somebody to like, what am I doing? I'm like a normal person. I think I'm normal person say Sam. Okay. With being a normal person like I am. But at the same time, I would prefer to not be. This is decoded ring. I will pass skin. You can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin. If you have any cultural mysteries, you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota rang at slate dot com. If you haven't yet, please subscribe in rate our feed and apple podcasts or ever. You get your podcasts and even better. Tell your friends. This podcast was produced an edited by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every episode special. Thanks to any Chelsea will help us record the episode. Thanks also to Julia Turner, Dan coast, June Thomas, Nick Perlman, Tom foreman, nj Jota Leonard role of Lindy Smith rich Jews. We Michelle Collins, Michael Hirschhorn Viviana Roselle is Owen and Matt Harkins of the t h n k. nineteen Ninety-four museum. And everyone else would be health and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening CNN last month.

Kathy Michael Hirschhorn Viviana Ros New York Anna Julia Turner Los Angeles Michelle Collins CNN Twitter Fain willow Paskhin Sam Dakota Tom foreman Matt Harkins Chelsea Benjamin London Nick Perlman Jota Leonard