5 Burst results for "Willie Mama"

"willie mama" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"willie mama" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"And finally in conservation park in central kenya. Live najim fatou. The last remaining northern white rhinos the world's most endangered subspecies of mammal their mother and daughter. The last male sudan died in two thousand eighteen once nagina. In fact whose lives end the species will become extinct but they may not be lost forever. Researchers have been looking at ways to revive extinct species offering a glimmer of hope for the northern white rhino. They're basically two different approaches catrine. Brian is the economists of environment editor. One is effectively version of ivf in vitro fertilization. More or less the same thing as is done in humans but with considerably more international travel for the last few years on a number of occasions. Researchers from a collaboration known as bio rescue have flown into kenya in collaboration with park rangers. There they've done a procedure under general anesthesia. The two females have a number of immature eggs known as ots sites collected and those oh sites are then immediately flown to italy where fertilized with the frozen and then thawed sperm of the male who has been dead for some years and since two thousand in nineteen this process has produced nine frozen embryos so there are nine embryos of the northern white rhino species which are basically being held at minus one hundred ninety six degrees in an unknown location. At some point. The idea is to put those embryos into a surrogate. It's not actually going to go into national for complicated reasons at some point. They'll be implanted into a surrogate female. Most likely a southern white rhino which is a related species or subspecies and hopefully that will produce live northern white rhino babies. When will we know the team. When i spoke to the murder this year thoughts that by the end of the year they might make a first attempt at an embryo transfer. It seems ambitious to me bearing in mind that they've been trying to do this just with southern white rhinos so they've been sort of testing and so far they have not succeeded in having live birth so obviously they don't want to attempt the embryo transfer before they know that they've got the whole technicality of it sorted out because they've only got a small number of these embryos for the northern white rhino. The reason they're actually so keen to do it quickly is because in addition to the genetic inheritance. There's also a cultural inheritance. So the southern white rhino in the northern white rhino r. related but culturally different they have different lifestyles et cetera. And they want these babies. They want the young rhinos to be raised by a member of their own species so they want version in fact you to still be around if they can't give birth to them that's okay but they want them to be around to effectively mother them. It's not super fascinating. What's the second track. So the second track is not done. Humi- it's called in vitro gamut of genesis and the idea here is to work entirely with frozen cells so you could theoretically do this with a population that has gone extinct. You don't have a nash in or fatou but what you do have our frozen cells that were taken his biopsies at some point when the species was still around and obviously the supplies to the northern white rhinos. Well since we said there's a collection of these cells around the world so if you have a frozen egg and a frozen sperm than it's relatively straightforward and that is done in humans but what if you don't have a prison egg because there's really only a very small number of species around the world for which eggs have been collected and it's a very complicated procedure. What researchers in japan has shown. Is that with some really clever science. What you can do is you can take a skin cell and turn it into an excel and then fertilize those eggs with the frozen sperm. There's a lot more prisons sperm around than there is for his neck so this technique has been used for the northern white rhinos. Well right so. They're starting work on that. They have taken some frozen skin cells and managed to turn them into these induced pluripotent stem cells. They haven't yet turned them into an egg cell but at the minute what they're doing is they're testing those induced prepayments stem cells to see if they are in fact what they think they are if they are pluripotency so if they are able to turn into lonzo's and they've got some initial promising results but it's very early days but of course presumably there's more than just the white rhinos genetic material in the frozen zoo. We could go to lots other different species so in something known as the frozen zoo in san diego. They've got cells belonging to over a thousand species and subspecies of vertebrates. The thing that the san diego facility does that is separate to many of the other facilities the only stores they actually culture the cells so they make sure that they're still alive and they can multiply them and so far they've managed. I think there's about ten thousand cell lines. So there's there's a lot of promise there. And i should add that the san diego facility is not the only frozen zoo as it were around the world. There are many of these. So where do you think this is gonna end up. Is this going to be just simply a way to bring back species for the purpose of preservation or do you imagine zoos and entertainment to be emerged as we see woolly mammoths in either nature or zoo. Yes so that's a really interesting question. Willie mammoth obviously gets mentioned a lot when you talk about what's commonly known as de extinction. There's a big difference there the woolly mammoths. We have a genetic sequence. We don't actually have viable cells that you can grow in culture and the other important saying with the willie mama's is that it would basically only exist in zoo. The environment the species lived in the small sample of that still exists is currently melting as a result of climate change so bringing back species that doesn't correspond to any real environment that exists in a sustainable way on earth today to my mind makes little sense but preserving the species that we have the researchers really made a strong case for collecting stuff today for a future that may or may not exist so having this foresight to put things on ice now for technologies. That may come tomorrow. That to be makes a lot of sense. There's a lot of value in these frozen collections beyond bringing back species from the dead. There's genetic value in there. There's a whole lot of knowledge in there as it can be extracted without necessarily making babies as it were so i think ready the message to take away from this is the real importance of preserving what.

najim fatou catrine kenya fatou sudan lonzo white rhinos Brian san diego italy Willie mammoth japan willie mama
"willie mama" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"willie mama" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The skeleton of a willie. Mammoth is impressive to look at standing taller than a one story house with its long ivory tusks curving up into the air and it turns out you can learn a lot from one of those tusks. A team of researchers have been able to retrace the steps of one. Mammoth by studying its tusk. They discovered that it was born. In alaska and traveled seventy thousand kilometers over the course of its life claim on bataille is the co cocoa lead author of that study and an assistant professor of earth and environmental science at the university of ottawa. We reached him in ottawa. Why did you want to unlock the secrets of the woolly. Mammoth using its tusk. Well the idea behind this is really try to understand the extinction of those animals and puts. Curly's the link between climate change and extinction of megaphone. So we know that hold him. Willie mama disappeared twelve thousand years ago And that was linked to huge transition in the climate of the earth from glacial interglacial. And we don't feel you understand why this huge climate change Might have had an impact on this particular species because some of the species like caribou for example stayed alive cousy interglacial but some disappeared. Like the mama so we were really trying to try to link the mobility. We've we've climate and the tusk as i understand. It holds a treasure trove of information. About where this creature lived. Yeah yes Dusky really exceptional. Because it's growing continuously so it's a little bit like a tree ring that kind of keep recording every day of the life of the of the mamas because it grows constantly as about like six commuter per year and he grows. It'll be like a stock off ice cream cones if you want With like the tip of the being the oldest and the base being the youngest and so what we did is we split the tusk and then in signed up. Tusk is chemical signature That's go isotope ratios that we can unlock Using special instruments laser ablation in particular and tried to merge was isotopes along the tossed super super high resolution measured like a million points along the tusk there and whose chemical signature are related to the landscape on which the most traveling and because alaska has such a huge range of geology. We can start to reconstruct the full history of The modernist movement because it went through so many different sort of colocation we can much location isotope ratio. We've tons of tusk. And where do the prehistoric rodents come in. Yeah so that's where it comes in to build that map because the analyzed rodents isotope oliver alaska to build that map. So why did we use road on first of all just because wrote tar kind of local animals so they represent the local isotopic signature. Local chemical signature. And so we use. We got voted from oliver from a lot of different geology and a lot of different environmental condition and then from there we train a model to create a map that predicted lose isotope ratio across the entire study area and then from the tusk. Compared is a. We've got of the map. She'd kind of backtrack the step of the from point of what kind of map emerged. Where exactly did this mammoth goal. Yeah so the. The surprise was demolished. Move much more than what we expected. So the ranch of the mommas ended up to be a gigantic basically covered the entire state of alaska huge huge ranch of of movement The last thing we that twice the most surprising is that this From the age of fifteen years old and later when it becomes more of an adult male spikes to move feel four time. Its life this huge trip. Like six hundred kilometers out of time in like two or three months. I'm going somewhere somewhere like distinctive. He seems to really know where it's going and This was surprising and we looked elephants. And what happened at l. Essentially that the fifteen years old they get kicked out of the maternal heard and they start to really wander around the landscape much more looking for new herds for reproduction looking for low. We think that looking for love. That's it so. I think he was a time. Are mama's became kind of over and started to just really get excited about moving on the landscape and try to find a new. Mammoth has just did to compare it. Travelling distance of twice around the world in a span of twenty eight years seems like a pretty long way to go. How does that compare. Though to what an elephant today might travel. It will be a probably similar to watch. An african elephant will travel a bit more probably because the tundra in the arctic is very dry the resources for landscapes so this huge animal must have had to move a bit more to just find its resources so in the end what questions has said helps you answer and maybe new questions have emerged about the connection between their migration behaviour and their ultimate extinction. I mean i think it really help us to narrow down a bit to hypothesis about extinction. i mean. we can't really conclude with one single individuals so we'll have to do much more work and doing much more touch to just draw bigger conclusion. What's he could really say but This study is that despite his hot too had a huge landscape To survive so diverse. Landscaped transmits his genes for civil. And you'll probably needed a huge area for just resources So that really helps because what we think. Is that the transition of the glacial-interglacial what happened is most of alaska became forested when he became warmer and wetter and that really fragmented the habitat of the mommas and kind of prevented mama's to move. Maybe better a much on the landscape to a little bit. What we see today was. Which is we've parked damning into this small national parks where they don't have a lot of lens roam around and so that makes them more vulnerable to big climate variation things drought. They don't really have possibility to move around as much and to be flexible with their resource and humility. They don't have as much genetic diversity because they can't go to see different herds from different places. So i think this is really telling us to tell about how climate change is influencing species extinction in some ways and and we really hope to go further with. That was more tusk. Missio bowtie thank you for your time. Okay thank you very much for. Having the player claim all by is an assistant professor at the university of ottawa..

alaska Willie mama bataille university of ottawa Tusk Curly ottawa oliver arctic
In a mammoth's molar, scientists get a glimpse of evolution in action

All Things Considered

02:32 min | 1 year ago

In a mammoth's molar, scientists get a glimpse of evolution in action

"Would have no more surprises. Well, the world's oldest DNA's samples say otherwise, to mammoth molars pulled from the permafrost in north eastern Siberia contained didna dating back to more than a million years ago. It's a big leap backwards in time that that's which was Luca Dillon is at the center for Paleo Genetics in Stockholm. And he says this mammoth DNI is twice as old as the previous record holder, which came from an ancient horse now sequencing million year old knee like this was impossible just a few years ago samples that old were just too small to work with. Now, researchers can see incredibly small samples, but it's challenging to put them together. Tom Vander Vault also works with the center for Paleo Genetics. Imagine if you're Edna is fragment that into literally millions of tiny pieces. It is a painstaking puzzle. It's not only one parcel, it's actually multiple parcels. So imagine you know you have one parcel for the malice genome. But then you have another parcel for the whole bacterial content of the examples. You have another possible for the human Dina for the paleontologists and us in the lab. Once they had finished sorting out the mammoth bits. The DNI gave the scientists a unique window into mammoth evolution. Delenn says the standard view holds there was only one mammoth species in Siberia a couple million years ago. What we find now is that actually we found two different lineages. We can't really say there are different species, but they're clearly two different genetic types of malice so that that came as a complete surprise to us. The ancient DNI. A also gives clues the origins of the Columbian mammoth, which lived in North and Central America. Here's Tom Vander Volk again Good kind of show that this Columbia moment is a hybrid species between two off the genetic lineages. So one is the new general image that we found in this paper. And the other is the Willie Mama genetic limit, So to say their work appears today in the journal Nature. Alfred Rocca of the University of Illinois at Havana. Champagne wasn't involved in the work, but wrote on accompanying editorial. It's an absolutely amazing discovery. It takes back the field of ancient DNA's a Twice a Zafar in geological time as before, and that genetic puzzling unlocks the possibility. He says that we may soon find more evolutionary play by plays hiding in super Old DKNY.

Center For Paleo Genetics DNI Luca Dillon Tom Vander Vault Siberia Stockholm Edna Delenn Tom Vander Volk Dina Willie Mama Alfred Rocca University Of Illinois Central America Columbia Havana
"willie mama" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"willie mama" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Hope. Good morning, are you Hi. I'm good. How are you? I'm doing fine. I never talked to 101 100 smartest people in America and the world telling the world that's incredible. Yeah, it's uh It's almost too good to be true. You'd think he would've known of these people. If they were so incredible and everything. My family got a big kick out of that one. I think the question after something like that happens is what are you going to do about it? So if you are so influential, what is it? What is it that you've got to say, And that's why I started looking at these things I started looking at well, I turned 50 And I started thinking about. Well, how has the world changed in the last 50 years? Because I want to preach about it or because I think I'm right and I want to push some kind of agenda. I just wanted to tell the story of How things have changed. I think what we cannot see change in our lives. You know, I used to. I staggered by skin getting. I don't know if there is in place left ice skating Cincinnati and more, But there certainly isn't you know that's a good point. Not not not this year. I mean, I grew up up north, and it's still plenty ice up there and, like Carrie, but Get to your point? Yeah, just it seems like a lot. But again that way also tend to look at things the most important times on the ones in which we live. We're very self centered that way that these are the most critical times have an election coming up. Of course you're here. Oh, my God. This is the most important election in the history of the world. Not really. I'm sure the people 100 or 200 years ago, probably would have said the same thing. But it's the times in which we live. However, we have to go back to not just calendar time, but obviously geological time to figure this thing out so It started beginning of this on DH, where we were to where we are now. Yes. Um, And you know, I am interested in that nostalgia, you know, because everybody thinks of things were different when I was a kid, and and then this is a weird winner. Last one was a real winner. And But there's you know, witnesses. Everybody knows weird things happen. But do they add? That was my big question is if you look at times for which we have a lot of data, you've got all these good people down at the USDA. At the A. A that people at the national census We got the National Weather Service. We've got all these good people that have been right on down the temperature and all this kind of business for For you know, every day, every hour of every day way. Got a lot of data. Let's put it that way We've got we've got really, really good data. Okay, So if if you look at that, instead of at the stories, etcetera, you can see that the world has changed. It's changed quite a bit. And what I think is so interesting. Eyes that it's changed quite a lot more than what we as geologists have seen over talismans of years. So so the last 50 years of the world has been important. It's included us included a lot of things that we've done and changed the world. It's It's changed the world at a rate If we look at temperature, and then you know the composition of the sky and all kinds of stuff like that. It's changed as much as say, 1000 years or a couple 1000 years. Could do you know back During past the ice Ages. That's really something from where we stand. We'll say that again, though, because you know the ice ages came in and obviously wiped out. You know, living biology. Let's put it well, not living biology, but rather animals are mammals and like to, we know that because we could study the dinosaur bones and everything else and go back, But how is it worse now? Because we're still alive back then and wiped out an entire In an entire society. If you will of animals today, none of US animals, including humans are wiped out. Yeah, well, you're exactly right. So the Earth does get warmer, and it does get colder and we see that lots of times in the geologic past. What's different about what we see now? Is that everyone happening a lot faster. Your question is, you know why What? Why isn't everything around is going to think you know you lost Willie Mamma's. He lost all this kind of stuff that you don't see the day And then when we go over to the Ecologists suddenly ask them this question. They say, Well, it's not extinct yet, but we should see the numbers going down is a great study came out in England where the F farmers farmers just walk your field count. What's there? And what's no? No, Because you know you need your butterflies were being And they came back with a good deal of decrease we're talking about in the percentage is 10% 30% 40% of amphibians of birds. Bees of all that stuff is kind of at the bottom of the chain. And so we do think they're going to be losers. We do think that something is starting that is going to cause extinctions. And the question is, you know how How far are we gonna let it go or what? I'm gonna do some about it. Let's say that we're at a place where we can still do something about it. Are we gonna or or what should that be? OK, I think that's a very valid point. Now. Recently, there was a protest and it kind of got buried in the news. But one of our council people curse Fields. Bach, who does a lot of things for the fields, announced that he was working the cargo to ban all plastic bags in the city of Cincinnati. Now it sounds like, Hey, we got these plastic bags allegedly. It takes 1000 years for the breakdown. They haven't been around for 1000 years and don't know how you figure that out. But he's probably you know, these folks are probably pretty good at math. Yes, I'm not quite sure s Oh, there's little innocuous plastic bags ball over. And of course, we've got the big patch of garbage in the Pacific Ocean. Largely that are things like plastic bags that don't degrade the clog sewers. They come up the recycling. I get all that whole thing. But the reality is when you look at the facts of it, the plastics that we're talking about are not not not in America responsible lesson a percent of that largely these air, underdeveloped or emerging economies where people just throw their trash in the water like we used to when we were developing economy, so The thing is, it's not not denying climate change, because clearly it's happening. It's always been happening, but it's how much of this is the United States. How much of it can we do here to offset what's happening in places like Asia and in Africa? I get what you're saying. I get what you're saying that these you know, these problems are so large when we look at those great big gyres of plastic garbage sitting around, you know what difference does it make? You know what? What? One or two bags from the grocery store on DH. That's what my book tries to do is say, if you're gonna pick something to dio, what should it be? What? What? Right. Let's do something That's gonna help rather than just make us feel better about ourselves, right? Well, I mean, I think I think I think that you can change that will also save your money..

Cincinnati United States America USDA Pacific Ocean Carrie Willie Mamma Asia National Weather Service England Africa Bach
"willie mama" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:51 min | 3 years ago

"willie mama" Discussed on KCRW

"And the power company Florida power and light seeking help to get their air conditioners back online Michael says staff also took up then Florida governor Rick Scott on his offer to nursing homes and hospitals to call him directly with any problems they call his cell phone more than ten times and he never called back police say more arrests are likely Greg Allen NPR news Hollywood Florida a classic southern California attraction is getting an upgrade to liberate tarp it's not just the good be black pits themselves but the area surrounding them and maybe even the famous mammoth well this week three architecture teams presented their visions for a re designed liberate targets some more dramatic than others from just under ten was there for the unveiling of those designs and she hosts KCRW's design and architecture hi Frances LRA place to go a lot when I was a kid probably took some field trips as well a can you remind us a bit about what's there well I can tell you Larry the ship it's probably pretty much has it walls when you were a kid because your young fellow and in fact what we're told last night at the presentation is that not much has been done to the page museum and the topics in the last forty two years since the museum was was built now that museum is home to all sorts of fossils all sorts of amazing discoveries but what's amazing about the top it says you know and by the way them on the north and east and and of Hancock park they share a site with black mold I'm what you have there is this incredible archaeological site in the middle of a megalopolis dating back at fifty thousand years to an ice age which delivered to us now these this bubbling it's actually asphalt even though the coal tar which of the containers all of fossils of everything from Willie mama's through two tiny animals and plants and what the museum is saying is that with all the changes coming very close to it the lack more extension the new academy museum except took such a they feel it's time to also one have an upgrade expand and make sure that they bring to the full two two more public visibility their own treasure trove of one two months and that's what the design competition was about all right so you know the museum sits atop a grassy sloping burn that's a that's a big attraction for kids but before we get to what's happening to that grass for that blood mammoth I'll have to ask this is this is such a familiar spot for so many Angelenos even tourists what are they want to redesign it they want to we designed it because they say they've that basically bursting at the seams with fossils and bones and other artifacts they want to put on display the top it's themselves as you may be aware this like a kind of it kind of a back drop you can walk through that part time didn't sort of barely notices that bad so they want to sort of clean up expand more of a and Hans entrance improve them infastructure bowls a whole bunch of things so what did the designers come up with well we have three design teams they also have heavy hitting within the design world one is daughter mantra that's a Danish from one is Weissman Frady from New York the other still a school for you and one for also from New York but they designed the bloated museum in downtown Los Angeles you proved me so you might be familiar with that work each of them I will say presented pretty ambitious looking projects last night with very fancy renderings but anyway one from door to mount it wanted to just make the page museum Towle another firm Weissman fady wanted to add on a hold of the building that would be a kind of elliptical shape building was sort of reflect the existing and then connect two ways above menu then be able to see through the glossy facade of the sperm into the expanded museum that would be under the Hale telescope video when for who love doing kind of sculptural buildings they wanted to wrap they want to get rid of the museum will together create a kind of Cuba translucent Q. building that they would envelop in these kind of concrete petals that would be like a pin wheel there's a lot of talk about climate change a lot of talk about the Pleistocene era landscape that walls once that you could learn about from all the exhibits and that we should be really reflecting on and maybe some have noodling away into the landscape design now to really make this a project of looking back to the post but also looking forward to a future with X. when we are experiencing climate change right so a lot of ideas swirling around right now when it comes to re designing a major landmark like this emotions I know can run a little bit high is there any sense of which proposal might win out and will they go big or do you think they'll be safe well currently there is no big paycheck ready to pay for a super ambitious project as we understand it the natural history museum's there put public private partnership to have support from LA county and the supervisors of allocated preliminary funding for the monster planning of the eastern portion of the park so there has to be some fundraising for any big ambitious major over holes to the building but they're sending very keen and they are inviting the public to go to their website respond to a survey that asking for favors we already put images out on our Instagram each in their own way really designed big as to whether that is ultimately what the museum is going to be able to embrace and build it's a it's unclear right now well soul I will get a lot of ideas happening it's a treasured site in Los Angeles one of the most treasured sites to think in an LA process under ten host of KCRW's design and architecture thanks so much you're very welcome Larry sponsors include.

Michael Rick Scott Florida fifty thousand years forty two years one two months