20 Episode results for "Williamsburg"

Lets Move Live in Williamsburg Virginia

Move or Improve

24:44 min | 1 year ago

Lets Move Live in Williamsburg Virginia

"Furry and welcome to move improve. With Debbie on Debbie Miller, and I am pleased to welcome Ellen Smith guided today, she is going to participate in one of our sessions that were doing on different places around the country to retire to and she actually is the owner and principal broker of Williamsburg realty in guess, where Williamsburg Virginia now, I don't want you to think she's gonna do a sales pitch because to me a realtor knows the area the best, and that's the best kind of person to talk to and Allen's been in the real estate business for about twenty years now, and she's lived in Williamsburg for ten years, and before that she was in old town Alexandria. So she knows a lot of history. But I wanted to have her come on because she knows neighborhood knows the area. She knows the history she knows places to go and things to do. She knows prizes. And I know how popular Williamsburg. Is for retirees especially from in in the northern Virginia area. They wanna stay close to DC, but they wanna have the Williamsburg comfort. So welcome Ellen to the show. Thank you so much for having me, Debbie. No problem with let's let's get started right away because we had a lot to cover and okay, the devil listeners about Williamsburg. What what sets it apart? What makes it? So interesting. Well, Debbie, there are many reasons why people choose to call Williamsburg, Virginia home. I would have to say that first and foremost, Williamsburg is a beautiful college town filled with a rich history and old world charm, yet has all the modern conveniences that any other town does so somewhat say that it's the best of both worlds. Interesting. Okay. So what what college is obviously the college of William and Mary is down there. Yes. What is that the main center of everything for people there or there? Other universities close, by way, actually, have other universities. We have Christopher Newport university. And Newport News, and we have Thomas Nelson community college. We have Old Dominion nearby. So there are lots of nice colleges. Yeah. I remember visiting Christopher Newport. And ODU when my kids were looking at colleges, and yeah, very very nice area. But so what what about the weather talk to people about, you know, if they're tired of the snow, and they wanna move someplace a little warmer. Are they going to get that? Absolutely. I'd love to talk about the weather. We have a moderate climate most of the year, Debbie. I would say that you could probably play golf nine months out of the year. It's cold and December January February into March with a high in the fifties. Lows in the thirties or forties and the rest of the year. It's probably between the. Sixties and eighties. So very moderate. But July and August are hot and humid kinda like DC weather. You can't escape it. But yeah, it's there if you're coming from Florida than might seem like a. That's right. We actually do have people move here from Florida do because. Yeah, they can't they, you know, I find the people who moved to Florida can take it for a short time like a couple of years, and then they just can't handle the humidity in the flooding and all that stuff. So. A lot of them like four seasoned. They really like enjoyed the four seasons. And if you've grown up in the DC area, you're used to that in his hard to adjust to just having it one temperature all year round. So to speak will tell us about right is are they high low what what's the advantage to moving there to save any money on taxes? Yes. Absolutely. Our taxes are very reasonable in James city county, for example, which includes most of this area, they are point eight four per hundred of cesspool you, so for example, on a four hundred thousand dollar house your taxes would be over three thousand a year. So that's very reasonable in the city of weigh ins Berg, the taxes are even lower their point six of hundred of assessed value, so yeah, very reasonable. I guess a one of my questions is going to be. I know what you don't get up here for four hundred thousand. Right. I dried right. You can get something. Nice here for four hundred thousand. Yes. What about the cost of living is it in the middle or lower or higher than? Well, you know, that's a good question. I would say that Williamsburg has a fairly low cost of living. If you look at utilities transportation, groceries all of those are lower than the US average, but we are not considered a low cost area. I mean, we have so much to offer here, and we have infrastructure beautiful location. So it's not low cost. So the housing costs would be the biggest part of that. That would probably make it a little bit above average. Okay. But it's still a good value. It sounds like. Oh, absolutely. Yes. For everything you get here. Yes. Low crime low taxes. I mean, I could go on and on. Well, so let's talk a minute about the walkability. Is it pretty much the kind of town where you could walk to places because I know a lot of baby boomers that I work with are looking for places where they can walk, and they don't have to always be driving around is that or do you need a car? And or what kind of transportation is available. Well, we have communities and neighborhoods where you can walk to shops and restaurants, and we have one of our fifty five plus gated communities where you can walk to the grocery store and restaurants, however, for most of the communities, it is easier to have a car, you can live in a place called Newtown, which is more like city living, and you can walk to restaurants and shops there, but we have buses and trolleys and plenty of ways to get around this, and I just want. Yeah. While we're talking about like, how close everything I just wanted to mention also about our medical facilities. We have wonderful hospitals here because Williams awesome. Sorry. Oh, go ahead. Yeah. Great. It's just people. I always tell them, you know, how far ways their closest hospital. How far you're going to have to go. If you have an emergency because you don't think about that when you're younger, but then when you get older, and if you have a stroke or fall, or whatever you need to get to the doctor pretty fast. So there's good hospitals and doctors around down there after wenttly, we have wonderful, medical facilities and doctors, and because weighing Berg is such a big retirement destination. The healthcare industry is booming here. We have highly rated five star hospitals, including riversides and terra doctors hospital and just put it in perspective, Debbie, you can be almost anywhere within Williamsburg from point a two point be within twenty five minutes. So no matter where you live in Williamsburg. You're going to be close to hospital, and we have great doctors absolutely wonderful doctors here. Well, that's good to know. So do you do you have a rush hour. You used to you know, what there is. Yes. There is a rush hour on ice sixty four. But not if you're in Williamsburg, there's maybe a little bit more traffic on one of our connecting roads of one ninety nine you will find some more traffic there in the afternoons, maybe around five or six o'clock, but it's nothing like a big city at all. It's not like a parking lot on the main road during that time frame. No, no, not at all. I'm having troubles issue. Yes. Shopping and restaurants, there have art museums or nightlife, what would people do while they're there? Well, there is so much to do we have everything from cute little shops, and colonial Williamsburg to more modern shops in a place called new town, which is kind of center a town. We have outlet malls. We have all the modern conveniences, and we have wonderful restaurants coming from old ten L exander. I thought I would be disappointed because I'm such a foodie, I'm very happy with with the choices. We have here. We have five star elegant, and we have casual places and even food trucks. And yeah, different dining endless that makes it. Yes. It makes it really nice. Absolutely. And there are yeah. Yeah. They're art museums and lots of history, you know, we have the colonial Williamsburg historic area, of course. And there's a Jamestown settlement history museum. And I have to mention the musk rally that has world class exhibits are and we have art gallery. Stories we have even musical museum here. So well, there's a lot here. I wouldn't say Williamsburg is a hot nightspot though. I mean, most people if they're going to go out and and party into the wee hours of the morning. It's not gonna be in Williamsburg. It'll probably be in Richmond. Newport News, but in Williamsburg, it's quiet after nine or ten at night, which is fine for some retirees. So. Time is ten o'clock. It's okay. You know, if you wanna stay out late like you said go into Richmond is always something available there for sure that's right. But we also have things like Campbell theater. Dinner theaters Virginia symphony. We have the Ferguson center for the arts at Christopher Newport university. In fact, I go there for plays and concerts. And in the jersey boys is coming up soon. I'm going to that sound of music, and we'd have huge concert in Virginia Beach. So I love rock concert. So I go to lot of those in Virginia Beach, and that's about an hour and a half from here. Oh, well, that's good. Because I know Carell is having a big three day they ash in Virginia Beach coming up. So so tell me why would somebody want to retire Williamsburg? If they're, you know, making a decision, obviously, it has lots to to decide about but you work with clients who are making lose. What is the main reason do you think made one or two reasons? That they are doing it. Why are they using Williamsburg over something else? Well, you know, people just love wings Berg because we have everything here yet. It still has a small town feel and we have breathtaking scenery all kinds of activities rivers beaches, golf, dining shopping, or great and all of these gated communities that we have here have their own clubs and events and one of our fifty five plus commute. They're over forty clubs and the people are friendly here because everyone has come from somewhere else. Hardly anyone is from Williamsburg. So everyone makes friends quickly and easily. So when people come here, they see how friendly does it's like being back in the south. And I can say that because I grew up in Georgia so very friendly here. That's awesome. I think that's always a big. Plus, I always tell people to go spend some extended time not only in the community. They're thinking about but just driving around go the grocery store. See how much things cost and it give. Gives you a feel for what the places really like a aside from like salesperson saying, yeah, you want this community or whatever. So right. What are some of the price points of various housing? Like, what would you pay for a two bedroom? Condo versus you know, before bedroom house. I mean, what can you get something decent for three hundred or five hundred thousand that sort of thing. Yeah. Yes. You can you can buy a condo anywhere from the two hundred to one and a half million. You can buy a patio home from the twos to the like maybe seven hundred you can buy townhomes in the two and three hundreds you can buy single family homes from the to hundreds to the two million. So we have a lot of different types of housing here, and we have gated communities fifty five plus communities, and it's williamsburg's always voted one of America's favorite retirement destinations. And we we'll does so many nice communities, so which which style of housing seems to be the most popular is do people. Really want a condo. Where there have to deal with anything or do they like the single family patio home in a gated community? And somebody else takes care of the ARD that kind of thing a lot of them want, lower maintenance poems and a lot of them want one level homes, or at least to have the master bedroom on the first floor, and we have that in these communities like we have governor slant at two rivers, which is a private country club community, very exclusive with Tom facia, golf course. And dining full service, marina than we have Kingsmill, which has have the LPGA for many years, and they have superb amenities and restaurants on site, and and it's right on the James river. So it's beautiful. That's why live. You don't have to really leave the community. You can just stay there. No, it's it's like living in a resort. Then the affords colony which has over three thousand acres golf courses, mostly single family homes with restaurants country club. And then for those who wanna really downsize, we have these fifty five plus communities in our major community where we sell colonial heritage, which is fifty five plus active adult, so it's not a senior community by any means. These people are active there over forty clubs and they're busy. That's great. So what are some of the clubs? They have a most of these places have like a fitness center and a community center. And then they have bridge. I have friends who moved down to Florida, and she's never home because she's always out doing something and it never ceases to amaze me, all the different choices. You have you go crazy trying to narrow it down. But there's something ever on its, and they do they do have the clubhouse, and they have all kinds of things colonial heritage, for example has traveled club and wine and dine lunch punch book clubs. You could go on and on with with things they do. But. Yeah, really, they take really nice trips with their travel club and they have men's clubs and singles clubs and just it goes on and on. Well, that's great. Because sounds like if you can't find something to do that. It's your fault because there's. That's right, heavy that is the truth. You can stay as active as you want. So what are we talked a minute about some of the places to see in and around Williamsburg? But are there any like -tations around or things like that where we're talk about the history of the absolutely we have so much? I mean, you know, of course, you have colonial Williamsburg, which played a significant role in the American revolution. And you if you look at Williamsburg that forms, the historic triangle together with Jamestown and Yorktown and the heart of all that is colonial Williamsburg, which is a historic district. But also, it's like a living history museum because you actually have actors they're in period costume who showed how what fly on a daily basis in colonial life there in the streets, and the taverns stores have workshops, and in addition to that, we have all kinds of parks, and museums and. Churches, and of course, college college of William, and Mary, and we have the beauty of the colonial Parkway and James river, your town beach chicken hominy river. So there's so much to see and you're close to Virginia Beach Richmond in Washington DC and forget, the grandchildren. Right. If you have grandchildren, and you're retiring here, we have Busch gardens water country, farmers market cetera. Speaking of farmers markets of are there, any specialty items food wise that people would wanna make sure all you gotta try the such and such down there Williams for. Yeah. We have excellent restaurants, in fact, whenever I have clients here. I give them a restaurant list. Oh, good. Because we have so many nice restaurants, and my favorite and go to places way point. It's very European and it's just excellent. The chef there chef Hans Schodler used to be at the Williamsburg inn. And he was a chef there for many years, and has even been the chef for presidents, but we have other restaurants likely Jakko, which is French and fat canary, which is very very famous because it's right there and merchants square and the Williamsburg in you have to see the waiver were again, of course, the Queen stayed there. A few years back. Law which is. Yeah, I'm sorry. Do you have to Kurt see when you go in because she? Because she. Oh, yeah. I guess when she was there some people probably did. And you've got the Lahti under which is Spanish, we have all kinds of things. Steakhouses opus nine is kind of like a Ruth's, Chris our answer to Reuss, Chris. And we have a place called a chef kitchen where you can watch them cook in front of you. And there. So. Yeah. Yes. So just great places. We have a Greek kitchen too, which is fabulous and little pubs like the hounds tail pub, and if they really want something historic go, people could go to the Christiana Campbell tavern and see what it was like, you know, eating back in the colonial days. So do you have on not recreation historic places, but real historic places plantations and things like that that actually are not reproductions. They are the real thing. Yes. Yes. We do Debbie. We have the governor's palace. We have Jamestown settlement. We have a place called the George with house which was built in the seventeen hundreds and George with was one of the signers of the declaration of independence. We have the Bruton parish Piscopo church, which is famous, and we have the college William, and Mary boy, there's a lot. This is not a weekend trip for sure. Well, a lot of people. Enjoy staying here for a week. I can tell you. Stay busy. Yeah. I'm taking it. There's a lot of hotels in the area where people could stay for an extended. Visit. If they wanted to really check out the the area. Absolutely. There are some nice hotels here. I mean, of course, the best place would be the Williamsburg inn at beautiful, and there's also place call web more place, which is out by the waves, Berg winery, and that is just a charming place to stay, and we have a lot of other hotels around at Kingsmill, for example, has resort cottages ever resort program there. So you can stay at Kingsmill and their town shares timeshares at Ford's colony so you could stay there, and we have hotels like Hiltons and. Well, it sounds like there's no excuse for not coming. That's right. That is true on the topic of stained for while where would be the closest airport. Lissi somebody's flying up from Texas or California in wants to fly in it see things where would be the closest airport that they would fly into well, they would probably fly into Richmond or to Williamsburg, Newport, News international airport. They're both international airport. But Wayne's news airports about thirty minutes away from where I am and also Richmond, which is my personal favorite which is forty minutes away because you can just pull right up, and you know, valley park and run in, you know, it's just charming small airport. Absolutely. Well, I can tell by your enthusiasm that you're glad you moved to Williamsburg. I think it's obvious because you have been there ten years, but what's your favorite saying about the Enron? I mean, I'm making you narrow it down to one. But if you have to it's okay. Okay. Well, that is so tough. Yeah. That's tough too. Because I love so much about Williamsburg. But I loved it. I live on a creek in Kingsmill which runs into the James river. I love being near the beach. We have our own beach in Kingsmill, I love having the Wayne's winery close by all the amenities. The -bility to just jump in the car and go to concerts and theater and Christmas is absolutely gorgeous with horsedrawn carriages and lights, and I love sitting outside at restaurants on a nice day. And and you know, we have another little airport called the Williamsburg Jamestown airport, and you can go there and have lunch and watch the small plane. So I like doing that to my goodness. There's so many things it's like having a master list. Just from this. But so tell tell the listeners at when how they can get in touch with you if they're thinking about moving to Williamsburg and need somebody who really has the expertise to show them around figure out from I've taken afford, what kind of lifestyle are you looking for give the website, maybe an Email address that would be awesome than people could to contact you. If they're internal though it sounds to me like most everybody already knows about Williamsburg. But I wanna make sure that people who are in other areas would also be able to find out, and they could contact you and Ellen's not a sales pitch e type person. She loves the location, and she's happy to share her excitement about the area with you. So I feel confident that she's gonna do a great job showing you around. But you go ahead and give us the website and Email address Ellen. Sure. The website is WWW dot Williamsburg realty of VA. That's F VA dot com. Williams for Williamsburg realty of VA dot com, or you can even call us at the office. My Email address is Ellen at Williamsburg realty of via dot com are office number is seven five seven nine zero three zero four five zero. That's absolutely great in Allen. I'm so glad you were able to take some time out of the busy schedule in your day. And talk to us about all the excitement makes me want to come back and visit I haven't been down here two years. So you may see me show up at your door myself because I haven't I have wonderful memories of taking my kids down there when they were young my son. Just absolutely loves the cannons going off at the Jamestown. On site and just going to Williamsburg ways to go to the pottery while it without manner. You know, it's still there. But we used to love rebuilt building a little older, you know, it was a long time. Debbie. I would love to have you come here and show you around and have to come down this weekend. You never know Ellen. Debbie so much for having me on your show. You're coming on and talking to the people to get a real flavor for what it's like in Williamsburg. And it sounds like there's something for just about everyone. No matter if it's places to go restaurants to eat in or places to live. It's it's all there in Williamsburg. And I do appreciate your time. And thank you very much. Thank you so much, Debbie. You're very welcome. Thank you. Okay. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Bye. Bye.

Williamsburg Debbie Miller Williamsburg realty Williamsburg inn Ellen Smith Williamsburg Jamestown airport Berg Virginia Christopher Newport university Williams Mary boy golf Christopher Newport James river Florida ODU Allen Richmond Thomas Nelson community colleg Newport News
Great Risk

The Awesome Gnome Letter

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Great Risk

"No matter what would you do burn opportunity i spent last week on vacation with my family in williamsburg virginia one of the pivotal moments in u s history a place that is home to jamestown williamsburg in yorktown places that defined our country the good and the bad these location of full of terrific in terrible things these places they're full of people taking risks for an opportunity thinking about it for a second you are living in a country things are established yet you decide to make a trick to new land that has been rumored away that has had developed stipulations resemble what you're accustomed to has there were many civilization already there a place that had the struggle in its own issues and problems that is very significant risk many people died making it to north america what

williamsburg virginia yorktown north america
The Lumberjack of Williamsburg

Not About Lumberjacks

27:56 min | 8 months ago

The Lumberjack of Williamsburg

"I want to make one thing perfectly clear. This show is not about lumberjacks. My name is Christopher Grundland and this is where I share my stories stories. Sometimes the stories contain truths but most of the time they're made up sometimes. The stories are funny other times. They're serious but you have my word about one thing. I will never ever sheriff story about lumberjacks. This time. Lingering cops be damned. It's the annual you will November story a couple weeks later than planned because my wife and I were sick over the Thanksgiving break in the US. But we're well again at least well enough to record this story that is fiction even though it sounds real. It's unlike like anything I've ever done for the show and I hope you enjoy this tale about an entrepreneurial podcast gun rather wrong. Check out the show. Notes for the episode's content advisory All right let's get to work the lumberjack of Williamsburg. Hi I'm Brooke. Ainsley early host of the creative ascent podcast where I talked with cutting edge innovative creatives about their treks to success. So you can walk shorter trail all to all your creative dreams. This week my guest is l j burke a creative innovator known to many as the lumberjack of Williamsburg Berg before we get started apologies about my voice. I've been a bit under the weather lately. I understand broke it. Hit me you too. I'll do my best not to offer SNARF through this. I know I know all right. Let's get the obvious questions. Out of the way why the lumberjack of Williamsburg and does the eljay in your name Stanford lumberjack. I get those questions. A lot broke and I wish stood for something cooler. But it's my given name Larry Jane and that's why an e as far as the lumberjack doc moniker it was given to me by another podcast. Her the three step Dick himself. Richard Costas everyone in Williamsburg. Doc was into that ironic hipster look at the time you know the one with the skinny jeans. PBR T shirts trucker caps and mutton chops. I wanted to stand out from the crowd so I try beard and started wearing flannels and hiking boots. It became my calling card. And when I was on the three step Dick Nick podcast refining my roadmap to success down to just three things Kostas titled the episode the Lumberjack of Williamsburg. And that name stuck with me cool. You've become known for your bespoke. Outdoor gear waxed canvas bags restored. Axes says painted canoe paddles and more were you into the outdoors. When you were younger not really? I grew up in Brooklyn Heights and move to the Burgh right after. It's a big boom. My Dad managed hedge funds. And my mom's a lawyer after design school. I didn't WanNa just become another guy. Making Logos and and managing ad campaigns for conglomerates when I saw field notes takeoff Aaron grappling. I knew there was a market for busy professionals. Wanting to feel that old-school outdoor John Moore asked that Eric I started with wax Canvas Messenger bags and it took off from there. One of my customers customers bought a lake house up in walk and he asked if I could create some things to make his getaway. Feel more authentic. And that's how I got into painted canoe. paddles axes and old rustic sign edge. I love hand lettering and weathering things to look like they've always existed. You mentioned design in school. How did you get into design? Oddly enough through the J. Peterman catalog. My parents always got it and I loved how it was full of paintings instead ahead of photos just how every item came with the story. It was so different from any other marketing. US off the time you look at the sears catalog as a kid. There's someone your age with a bowl haircut and wet lips playing with a Tonka truck and oversaturated high contrast photo that looked like it was photographed by circus clowns and that was all accompanied with boring copy. But the Peterman catalog made you yearn for a different way of life. You wanted to travel the world in those clothes carrying all the right accessories with you. It spurred imagination. It's the butt of so many jokes now but I can still pick up a Peterman catalog and feel like a little kid imagining all the many ways to take on a big world out there. That's beautiful your story and that way of marketing when you can shape the consumer and make them crave becoming something. They never even knew they wanted to be you. It's a win. Like inspiring them to be better than they were before interacting with your brand but anyway each just past the two hundred fifty thousand subscriber mark on Youtube. How did you leverage what you do with that? Love is loved photography and Video. I was lucky that my parents parents recognized and supported the things that I loved. I used to make little photo comic books and then it started editing video stories and not just funny things made with friends. Because if I'm being honest I really didn't have a lot of friends. I kinda lived inside my head and maybe because I was trying to appease as adults I knew I couldn't just make video about fighting a monster or something and be told I did something special jump forward and I saw a mini documentary on Youtube. About Cut Brooklyn's Joel buckle widths. There's a guy who started out as a novelist and he didn't make it so he started. Grinding steeled eases eases nerves. He ended up making incredible knives in his business. took off with just a couple of video features on Youtube shot like they were made for TV and not it. Just some little throwaway thing. So I dragged out my camera and made a four minute documentary about what I do and I uploaded it to youtube and then I contacted everybody. I knew to share it and it got passed on down the line to the right people who shared it on twitter. It went from something like twenty five us to a couple thousand overnight and then by the end of the week it was almost ten thousand views so I vowed to make a video a week. Sometimes I'm just telling my story and other times featuring a product. I was making just sharing how I did what I do. I know a lot of people think you should hold all your cards hearts close to your body but I find that sharing how I do all I do shows people that what I make is not just something made on an assembly line. They know it's me and my shop making a thing by hand especially for them. I mean sure they could try making it themselves but when they see all that goes into everything I create. They'd rather just pay me money. Great Point how else do you promote your brand. Do you work with any influencers Beyond Youtube it's mostly just word of mouth. I really don't do a lot with influencers. I don't need to pay somebody to hold my product on instagram or make a video. We all know that they're making simply because they've been paid. I go where the money is. My parents taught me that at some of the people I saw product to can afford to pay even more than I charge and I definitely charge. What I'm worth my customers? I I suppose are my influencers. Have you thought about offering lower priced items to attract customers on the way up. That's a common move for many but but I think it cheapens the brand I want people to aspire to my products. Not Work Their way up. You can either afford what I offer. Or you can't can't and that's part of its appeal. But I'd be lying if I said it didn't at least cross my mind early on things like beard oils. hand-carved pipes hypes things like that. It was more important to stay true to my vision though. Okay so you're not into influencers but if you could have any celebrity endorser product who would it be and why man. That's a great question. I never really thought about that. I sell to some celebrities and they talk about what I do with their friends. But if I had to seek someone out I suppose Nick Offerman. I usually don't go humorous with what I do. But he has that right blend of rugged in serious but he's also seen as trustworthy in down to earth that fireside video with lag and that he made is a good example. You know it's not necessarily funny. It's just him sitting beside a fireplace in and drinking product. Its whimsical at best. So maybe something like that just him. Taking a tree down with one of my axes paddling his canoe with something I made maybe or just like hiking and taking some gear out of a bag I created. Yeah yeah he'd be perfect for your brand all right. Let's take things back a bet. What's the first thing you remember? Selling mystery are- boxes. What are those started with me? Just taking things like old toys putting them in boxes and selling them to my friends you Mike Get old star wars figure or redemption coupon for a toy truck or something. That was too big for a box. I'd sell them in batches to kids in the neighborhood good and they went nuts for it at look at all the old things I wanted to get rid of and then I'd figure out a price for it all and then quadrupled that so say everything was worth about twenty dollars. I'd shoot for eighty bucks. Maybe even one hundred and say it was ten things I was getting red of. I'd be selling ten boxes at eight dollars a piece or maybe even ten kids in the neighborhood practically fought to be part of it. I mean obviously some things were worth far less than eight dollars but as long as I made sure that there was at least one or two decent things in the bunch. It's like created a gambler's ramblers reflex. And because I only sold ten boxes eventually I had crowds of kids wanting in it got so big that I started selling one dollar lottery tickets to be one of the kids who had the right to buy an actual box before long started making more money just from selling those those tickets. Did any other kids eventually catch on and then try doing the same thing. Oh Yeah what did you do. Then I got better boxes Better things in those boxes so my reputation was always the one people paid for and then I charged more then one year. I made enough to to start selling to adults. I buy boxes from antique stores in other things and do the same thing just on a bigger scale. I had an uncle who wound a bookshop. And he let me set up my little shop there. That's when I realized how much money adults had and how much they wanted to a help. An enterprising kid in be feel the magic of buying something. They couldn't see people will pay a lot for a surprise is going back to J. Peterman. I think that's why it works so much. You never saw the actual product until it arrived. You saw painted representation but it wasn't until you open the box that that lasts dopamine hit dropped and you felt like you were part of some elite club. Wow this is is golden any plans to bring back the mystery boxes. Maybe a subscription service. That's a really good idea. But then I'd have to hassle with employees. Okay let's talk about that. You do all of this yourself correct. Yes and that drives demand yet. Does I can only do so much. And there's a waiting time. I have to turn a lot of requests away if you've purchased product for me before I'm more likely to take that commission than something new you. That's the thing. So many people spend time chasing influencers in investing time and money and getting more new customers. But you can make a decent living ving from existing clients without that big investment of chasing down more people so no plans to expand into a bigger operation. No I think that would just ruin a good thing for everyone involved. How so I could probably make more money mass producing my work but at that point? I'm I'm just like everybody else. If anyone can buy what I'm selling then really what's it's worth. I don't say this to sound arrogant but my customers you see me as an artist and they have surplus of funds so that small base I allowed to purchase my creations are part of an exclusive group and I guess in that sense. It's kind of like offering the right to only ten kids out of eventually. Hundreds who wanted to buy one of my old mystery boxes. The thing with that was everybody knew the agreed upon worth of what was inside the boxes. If I tried selling the right to purchase for fifty or a hundred dollars no one would have brought in because they knew that the whole hall was probably worth eighty or one hundred dollars but now I can offer something I spend a week making and and I ended up making thousands in return all right. Let's just go there. How much do you make in a year? That is if you're comfortable discussing numbers. Sure I can do that I have a small shop space. I owned free and clear and then I shoot for about a quarter million a year. I know I could make more. But I'm not my mother or father who wanted as much as they could make and I'll be honest so I don't sound too much like an asshole. I'm sorry can I say yeah that on the show you just did. I guess I guess I did but that's fine occasional. Swearing is honesty right. I fucking thanks so but anyway just to be out in the open about things. My parents made sure I'd never want for anything other than what made me happy in life. They were both very Taipei's. I guess I have a little bit of that my blood but not like them. I just just need enough and seriously love what I make. I love hearing from my customers and example. Last summer someone I sell to was hiking Colorado Colorado and a storm came up everything he needed to keep dry stayed dry. I got a postcard from him while he was still on vacation sharing the story. I have a file cabinet over there full of letters postcards and things like that it might sound funny but if this place several went up in flames that particular cabinet is what I'd Russian to save. That's so sweet. It really is about the relationships. We build through commerce immerse. Oh it is all right. What do you do when you're not working on some level I suppose I'm always working at least always thinking about new? Do things and ways to make existing product better. But it's not like some of my friends who tease me about. Being a hipster people can make fun of what I do all day. But I'm not the one answering email from my boss at three in the morning when I wake up in the middle of the night and see my phone lit up from people working from their beds. When I'm not working and I let my mind go I enjoy reading? What do you read novels really? Yeah I know is an entrepreneur. Sherpur Noor people expect me to read business books but almost everyone. I've read his like ten to twenty pages of actual decent information expanded to hundreds of pages just so people feel like they got their money's worth and accomplish something. There's no challenge in those kinds of books. I can hone in on all I. I WANNA learn with a Google search and not waste of fifteen to one ratio of waiting through a bunch of bloat fiction just does something to my brain. I not only get a feel for how to tell better stories but I learned what different people deal with. When I read books written by people I might never meet business? Books seem to break everyone down into just a few things or types because easy sells most entrepreneurs meat no nothing outside their little bubbles goals because they see everyone is an archetype instead of an actual human being if your marketing anything and not reading fiction. And you're probably mediocre at best in very limited in thought and understanding. I see what habits or mindsets make you successful successful well reading novels but part of what I love about. Novels is the time it takes to read one. I'm not sitting there. Listening to audio. Books is at two times speed just to get him into my head and along those lines. I'm putting time in deeper uninterrupted. Thought into what I create I give idealism awesome processes time to incubate and I don't mean for a day or a week some things I think about for years most of those may go nowhere if I measured it but I find that in giving things so much time other things bubble up along the way that I'd never come up with otherwise I mean I get worse. South Godin is getting at when he talks about always shipping things but a machine gun approaches. Desperate don't you think I mean anyone can do it. Maybe you hit a thing Pinger to once in a while. But I'd rather take the time dial in my sights in not Mrs. Schott so you're saying you never make mistakes. I didn't saying that I said I never miss. When it's time to pull the trigger on an idea you'll have to forgive me if I don't believe you you're excuse but it's the truth so many people just throw so much stuff out there hoping that something sticks? I'm not the Kinda Guy who thinks about monitoring everything I mean Shit. People can't even have a hobby anymore without everyone asking how they're gonNA make money with it. I find that sad a friend suggested I turn my love of reading into into a side hustle and man. I hate that term. I'd rather make my one thing matter so I don't have to do other things on the side. I work work and then I enjoy my time not working but to this friend. I have this big youtube following. so He's like dude. You need to figure out how to monetize reading thing. No I don't need to figure out how to monetize reading because I enjoy reading and some of the other things. I do simply for the sake of enjoyment. I don't think people enjoy things anymore. Because unless you're hitting your numbers. Even hobbies have become stressful things for people now again. I know that I'm speaking from a place place a privilege and never wanting for anything growing up but I do know what enough looks like. My Dad's stopped what he did because it made him sick. You can't catch infinity infinity so find enough and enjoy what comes with it. I can't tell you the last time I stressed about. Something didn't have a good night's sleep that's worth worth far more to me than some five year plan that quadruples my income. I mean I appreciate what you do but I bet you in your audience would be happier if you we're always chasing things. Well this is taking a bit of a turn. I'm sorry no it's okay. Oh Kay can can I ask you in your audience. Something then share. What does enough look like to you? I'm not sure I guess I never thought about it like that. Brooke you have over or one and a half million followers on Youtube and you post three times a week getting almost a million views each video between your ad revenue. Money is an influence. fluence are in your products. I'm sure you make considerably more than I do. Yes about three to four times more each year from the numbers you discussed well. When does it ever become enough? Brooke narrow I suppose if I slowed down at all goes away. Well I think you have have more than enough. I think you need to stop chasing so much. You'd be a lot happier are you okay. No I'm really not I have you on the show to have a nice conversation about what we do and you pull some. Almost abusive mentor shed on me. psychoanalyze me tell me. I'm not happy. This show is a mutually beneficial thing for both sides. I really do hope it helps us nurse figure out something they'd rather rather do so. Don't you dare tell me what enough is because between your parents you grew up a billionaire. Who never wanted for anything? You can make nothing at all the rest of of your life and your good. I don't expect people to know my story but let me put things in perspective Larry. My Dad was a heavy equipment mechanic. Manik and my mom worked at a convenience store until I made enough that she didn't have to work. You grew up here in the city. I grew up in Flat Lick Kentucky and no. That's that's not a nickname that's the name of the actual town. I'm sorry I'm not done. I have four siblings and there were times at dinner when we were lucky to have pork chops purchase the day of expiration that and wild potatoes and a can of green beans often. It not even a big can of beans just a regular what fourteen ounce can or whatever it is so imagine this you fucking love green beans. But they're five other people going at it and if you wonder Y I didn't say six and include my mom. That's because I later found out. She used to eat saltine crackers and butter while cooking dinner for a says she could get some fat and carbs and leave something thing for her family. You mentioned your dad retired from trading. How is he today? He's fine. Yeah well my dad's been dead for years Mesothelioma from brake pads and clutches than Shit. So imagine how much all that fucks you up. I could be as rich as your family and still worry that one day I would wake up and it would all gone even though I know better. But that's the wicked thing about growing up in poverty. You really can't escape it even when you're rich I have to try ten times harder better than people who grew up with money and I'm still worried it will all fall out from under me and I'll end up back in the gap with nothing again like that's my destiny i. I'm sorry Brooke I had no idea I didn't expect you to but don't pull some abusive self help. Google shut on me. About what enough looks like Kay. I think we're done. I'm sorry I really am. Can I say one more thing. Sure why not. This is a mess of an episode as it is. I have a confession. What's that I don't make even a fraction of what I said I make? I wasn't kidding about the postcards from Colorado. were making things for a client with a Lake House. ALSOP walkup book. But that Guy's my dad's best friend Kinda sucked at design. Even though I did make it through school most of what I do isn't very original. I guess it's stuff that I kinda copied from J. Peterman or stuff. I learned how to do online. I'd probably be happier if I took my friend's advice and started doing book reviews. So yeah there's that one more question sure it's kind of a weird one but now that you have money. How often do you eat green beans? I can't stand them anymore. I I made myself sick on them when I was on my own and I can't even look at them today. Nugget get that. Well I usually wrap up episodes asking guests. What's in store for the future when I take a crack at that one before we got the short? Yeah sure because that's a that's a really good question. I wish I had a good answer. You've given me a lot to think about today. I guess I really don't know what the future holds for me and I suppose never having to worry about my future arrive never really given it much thought and maybe I should start. Okay thanks for listening to the creative sent podcast with me. Brooke Ainsley you can learn more about eljay burke at no lumberjacks dot com a year. He has time in his busy schedule for commissions. Yeah I do next week I'm talking with cellist Madeline Clark about giving up a career career with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra following the death of her husband. And how she found her true calling by making music her own until then climb hard hard and stay creative a big. Thank you for listening to not about lumberjacks. All music by ARGOT PHYS MS and April April Moon. Courtesy of epidemic sound visit no lumberjacks dot com for information about the show. The voice talent in music. And because I was sick you only have to wait a couple weeks for the annual Christmas episode Doc. This year enjoy three stories to that are kind of somber and one. That's well hits rather ridiculous. You might even hear a recurring character until next time. Be Mighty and keep your access sharp.

Youtube Williamsburg Brooke Ainsley Peterman J. Peterman Dick Nick Colorado Larry Jane Lake House Google Williamsburg Berg US Kay Christopher Grundland Doc Brooklyn Heights Richard Costas sears
Episode 98: Sometimes You Need to Try

Be Great TODAY - Weekly Inspiration

03:02 min | 1 year ago

Episode 98: Sometimes You Need to Try

"<music> welcome to be great today weekly inspiration to start your week. I'm Jonathan Bloom or frazee. Spark span in the world of warcraft so this kind of a behind the scenes look. I'm trying out a new podcast editing program for this episode. The name is Hindenburg journalist pro. The reason I made this episode is because sometimes we need to try things. I was using logic pro ten after switching from W. Edition. I'd I heard about Hindenburg over the years but I didn't WanNA switch it was fine. It was working. Okay things here and there that I didn't like but I was like okay so I don't know why undo ahead but Thursday. I downloaded a trial and went to work on one of the podcast that I had to edit for. But this week there are features Henneberg that I'm really enjoying specially for products. Editing is auto level it links tracks when you're editing things like when I'm editing Fratto cast I can edit one track in it'll no to also edit the other tracks in working on when you work with multiple tracks for different different guests. It can get a little dicey but that isn't the point of this episode. I wanted to share a story about trying something new and sometimes we just need to try. I was relying others. Were doing or saying the perkins. They used what people said about like Oh. I tried Hindenburg. Yeah I didn't like it or I. This is better than this but I had to download the free trial for myself. Sometimes we are caught in a certain routine because we are afraid to try something different. We don't want to have to get into it because the first moment I opened up Hindenburg breakup like what things are similar when I was using if I had to learn new thing to watch him tutorials but sometimes we have to try something new last week. I even tried recording on the go. I did three podcast episodes while I was in Williamsburg Virginia who is using a different Mike. Like I was in a car with air conditioning. Sometimes you have to take that risk on the Father Kassim editing which will be website one fifteen. It'd be really some Monday I was talking with Brandon and they talked about meeting. My friend Allie and Brandon said you sometimes don't know until you take the risk. He took a risk and is now married to the love of his life so this week. What do you need to try? What are the project at work? They even doing a certain way. That might work better a different way. What some software that? My actual work better. This could be applied to many things. I've always tried to experiment in life. I've had many misteps. The trial of the Pike is editor. I'm using may not work or it. May revolutionize how I edit these shows i. I just need to try. Thank you for listening to this. Week's be great today. You can find the show at inspirational PODCAST DOT com go until next week when you don't know what editor I'll be using be awesome this show.

Hindenburg editor Brandon Jonathan Bloom frazee W. Edition Williamsburg Fratto perkins Virginia Allie Mike
Heartbreaking Realizations pt 1

Cafecito Break

22:01 min | 7 months ago

Heartbreaking Realizations pt 1

"Hi everyone this is recycled happy new year and I have a couple of stories that I want to show with you. I would like to share with you. What I have been thinking about In an how. I've been preparing myself for this. Twenty me twenty energy that we are all in now and how humbling the past. Ten years was as I like. Many of you also embarked in that reflection time and I have to say that between the years of two thousand nine and two thousand in nineteen there were probably some of the most. Most challenging grief stricken aw there were challenging so many levels so many and so many ways in physical ways and emotional ways in in life ways and having to grow up ways and and put on your big girl panties and we're very humbling In the Europe two thousand and nine that was when our dad passed away and with that ushered a new chapter in to our lives where I started to experience a void and loneliness like nothing I've ever experienced in my life and I realized that while our father was still alive because he filled he filled that void not just with his love with with his presence And I realized that we were pretty lucky in the family to have him and the people who were his friends in who knew him also felt how the void of him transitioning. And what do I mean by that. My Dad was one of those people who loved the simple things he loved to be with family. He loved food. He loved conversation he loved to speak week to everyone and he didn't master English very well yet. He had so many friends he had wealthy friends. He have friends who only spoke English. And I don't even know what the understood from him but my father was still able to find ways to communicate with people even in his broken broken English. He was never intimidated and he was always trying to be helpful. And if he had a daughter his pocket and you needed it he would give it to you and if he walked into building and he was there for doctors appointments he saw The man and the Front will the security regard. If he was walking out to coffey he would ask the guy. Hey do you want some coffee. And it was Dole's things that my sister and I started to see my dad and my mom to my mom is very faithful. We've learned her ways of faith she's got got. She's one of those multiple faithful human beings to God to being faithful and finding faith and courage when life is strong one the strongest people I know and it is influenced. I think that has shaped the influence. my sister and I and you brothers passed path as we we have dumped into the spiritual journey spiritual metaphysical life that we live in this urban jungle and my tad the honey he represented community family. Come together diplomacy he he. You would never see him. Taking sides in a family fight. He was impressive. He didn't see color. Heat saw the counter of the person's character actor and I think that we passed on my sister and I we took on the family baton and we have been very active as much as we can be and the community of Williamsburg Brooklyn where we were created. Were were raised and we were. We still recite now between that time to now. My sister and I have given birth to two two babies one scruffy break which is the podcast which really started as speaker events in the community and but on. The party's things about gathering having reason together community together even in its most basic ways one of the most heart wrenching. Things that we have discovered is that it's hard to get people to come out now and also through to us wanting to purposely focus these gatherings in Williamsburg Brooklyn one of the things that has has given us pause and what has been really evident in our face is just how many of our people have left this community have have been displaced among your friends and families have been displeased through the violence of gentrification. How hit this area and invite you to look into your research because Williamsburg Brooklyn was one of the hardest hit areas The has been gentrified Brooklyn overall role and We are starting to see. Some Patterson. People are speculating that there might be even other places within NYC area that might right give Brooklyn some competition for how rapidly gentrified It's becoming and this is. I know that it's been hard hard for you to understand. What is the break? What are the Perez sister's doing we have a shop called donning gull which If you've ever heard of Donnez there have been traditionally a place where you go for spiritual wisdom and consultations solicitations and we named our shop botanical. Because we wanted to pay or mosh to that both Johny Guney but we also wanted to give it our spin on a goal with the K.. for which e way embracing that witching is embracing the fact we feel LANC. Urban Shamans Shamanee's does blue. He does and priestesses and Hugh we've been in the past about eight to ten years and when he's Brooklyn and I guess one of the hardest things has been to acknowledge that that question. Have we been successful. Well how do you measure success. We've been successful in a way that we've been table to thrive in this wave of gentrification but we haven't felt safe we haven't felt safe not one indicate that we've been open at our shop when he's Brooklyn and dispatced two thousand nineteen. We had one of the hardest years and how it Moore's even in Copsey to break. Is that even though. Our newsletter has been expanding our numbers on social media are going backwards and is kind of sometimes discouraging because we know the impact Mr impact that were making on people through our sister wisdom Apple Donegal and the way that we've been reaching lives through do our community podcast because that's what it is. We're not doing officer to break to compete with other podcasters with other content creators. We're doing officer to break to raise awareness for this craziness of life that we're living in particular NYC IMPO facing be being to Latina's Dina's being to body was who are saying yes to themselves who are saying yes to to the way we we feel called to me are spirituality. You have no idea how difficult it has been to face your family to to face your family who is so traditional in certain aspects to say I respect a love your wisdom I see. Thank you for how you've influenced me through your religious upbringing but inside in this heart of ours were called to work with crystals else. We'll call to work with the medicine of the plants. Life is showing us the way we are connected to this land were called hauled to learn more about the indigenous aspect diverse that of which connects us to the land. And sometimes you see amy you see us and this I just want to clarify A lot of confusion. Sometimes you see the sisters being silly and it's thought of as oh they're so cute and they're so young sewn experienced and bubbly and that's an assumption guys. We are not lying when we say we're holding it down. We're one of the last Mohicans here. We're where people meet us. And they say oh your original Brooklyn that's rare that goes to show you and we're still there we're still thriving. I don't know how but I don't want to for twenty twenty. I don't WanNa keep saying that I'm thriving that I'm surviving. I WanNa say I'm successful. In part of the reason we've just been thriving and we and we've been surviving and part of the reason that we feel unsafe all of the time Especially especially when it comes to some of these things a Some of our communities have been learned. How appropriately support small businesses when entrepreneurs are daring Boli into meeting their dreams depending on? What your influence your in your culture? What your Family dynamic is that may scare the crap out of the people around you and for us like a saint. Guess to governor see to break us us saying yes to. We're going to open a shop is let's get. We were very privileged because we've seen examples in a family of people have had their own businesses including our father so this was not a strange path for us but definitely one that has been met even to this day where resistance when we have people who still pull list to the side saying to us. You know I don't really approve. That you guys have about Danika yet. They know nothing of what we do. They know nothing of how how we serve. They know nothing of the impact we make we have. People who walk into our tiny shop is tiny but don't confuse that with a wisdom being tiny or knowledge being tiny or experience being tiny all the people that have walk through those doors being tiny because we have met teachers who've walk through those doors. I mean high level teachers who come in to our tiny shop and they how bless and they walk in with this humility and at the same time we see the pop up new newbies. Who want to come into a little shop and just come in and judged and be all in the ego or committed like if the dueling like wisdom with us and does not? We're we're about. We've you mistreat a been lake. Hey what you guys do here. You know we say nothing nothing because me and my sister have our way of connecting to the divine to the spiritual realm and all we are doing here is holding space for for you to witness Yourself if US witness you what is it that you dream. How is it that you want to connect we? Will we ask questions. And as we as we can in In relationship to the crystals to the instance to the items that are in the shop which we all considered to be tools you see depending on which is you walk in so people are oranges closer shop or or did you just have higher some kids to to work there but that's not what we're doing 'cause again oboe Taneeka America in its tradition is a place gold for spiritual wisdom. My sister night cannot be replaced so we will not be putting other people there air to give wisdom that people are coming us four or maybe they just want the sisters to hold space so Mrs Stern when are so different you know and yet we have such a beautiful sisterhood. We may not see eye a- all the time we don't fight and I cannot tell you how many people feel threatened by that. You would think that that seemed people two sisters thriving you would think that the world will be coming over to support because this is rare yet. All we've got is people trying to cut the Sisterhood Hood People challenging the Sisterhood people trying to cut the beautiful energy between us. So there's there's so many things to living a metaphysical spiritual life. It's not fluffy Wafi. I'm sorry to say because the newbies becoming into the shop the people who don't know nothing or or is just surface level because that's another thing. This journey is in steps in a waves CBS. And you you know you have an open. You have an awakening. You have an remembering and a few amazing you feel charged up and then you go through more learning where you have to unlearn more such. The learning is one of the hardest things because you undoing programming programming. That's not just cultural thus not just religious educational programming. Between how should I how women should act what refuse right. What am I doing this because I'm watching this on TV? I'm seeing everybody else do it or is it that this is the way my whole beam. Intuitive self is asking me to be guided and that is the Perez Sisters two sisters in Williamsburg Brooklyn who are on apologetic about wanting to be successful yet that also has been such a threatening factor some of the people in our lives who get angry at us because we want to live. WELL THEY WANNA convinces that leading. A life with spirituality ability equals living a life of poverty. And we do not accept that that doesn't even make sense and unfortunately as I reflect liked my two thousand nine to two thousand nineteen experience which was filled with so much. Beauty Beget SOMOs heartbreaking realizations when especially when it comes with to our community and that's the poverty mindset the poverty thinking impoverished thoughts that are just emanating dating from our everyday thoughts are world are feel like like I understand our businesses but there's the also the business of of beauty of life. This is so funny. Guess who's calling me right now. This is routine guten. She must be feeling the confiscate the vibes in the air. But that's what I mean. I realize that's one been one of the hardest hardest awakenings for me to want to work so much with our community and keep hitting hitting roadblocks because people are so afraid. They're so afraid to share. They're so afraid to really actually commit but boy can they talk a good game. They could really talk a good game. And I have fallen for a lot of those games. And it's really disheartening. Because he's a people I love and these are people that are here here for and I'm still going to continue to fight for and and I'm still gonNA continue and my sister to to Lofa ways to serve our community but this recipe is working disapp- recipe of kidding the walling and working to you to till two till to your death for community and and they almost hating you in the process especially because you come in and with my ideas about. How can we work together? How can we live better? We have to stop looking for all all of these other people to save us for those people to come up with a better plan to to for those people to regard us for those people to ah remember us as a collective of fill in the blank those people that were waiting for us. And that's twenty twenty for us me Hinton I'm embracing what is organically within me. What is unapologetically the Rod that is done with with playing so tiny? That's done with having this. This poverty mindset or playing with people who refuse refuse to do anything but stay in poverty mindset. 'cause that's not helping happiness thrive and move forward and we don't have time to waste. They are very alarmed things happening within our communities that must be addressed and being in the book and all this other like like stuff that keeps keeps US distracted. We need to make time for the problems that are happening within our community. The things that are so alarming the the drug crisis with this happening within our communities to our babies this these this child trafficking human trafficking. That's happening to within so many our communities we need to speak with love. Love honesty with compassion with strength. We need to move. Who from being a victim to being a victim? So you WANNA come in Rockwood Gotha seat the break movement WanNa be a part of the debris tribes. They connected us. Thank you for your time. Thank you for your presence. My sister and I are cooking some things but I'm not allowed to share with that with you yet. But in the meantime stay connected to the break not just an I g Or on Apple. PODCASTS pass catchers stay connected us to the movement you know we have so much to share. ruthie myself my sister. And I'm lining up some juicy interviews and roundtables for this year and projects to come so. I hope that you guys can be a part of it. I love you. Thank you for those those of you. Who are part of our lives? Thank you for your presence. Thank you for your support. If you would like to help out the sisters we appreciate your likes your shares when you share things that we create opposed when you comment on your boosting us on the algorithms and if you would like to make a monetary contribution you could make it via paypal dot me slash slash gophers seat the break if you want to go to the break related stuff. Which is podcasts at community events or if you want to support the shop up and are You know visions to expand and is pay pal me. Slash Botanical Says B. O.. T. can't even spell right number. Tony Kyle with a K. L. I'll leave that in the summary of this post that will company this video. Love you happy New Year. Let's make this a very powerful twenty twenty. Thank you for your presence is resign and who better La Shamanism of Gotha see the rig by guys.

Brooklyn Brooklyn NYC Perez Europe US officer Apple Dole coffey Johny Guney gophers Patterson ruthie Hugh Williamsburg Danika Tony Kyle
4 Reasons Why We Sabotage Taking Action (Pod #395)

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

13:27 min | 10 months ago

4 Reasons Why We Sabotage Taking Action (Pod #395)

"This is gene mantra stolen welcome to the tapping cuny podcast recorded live to tape in Williamsburg in Brooklyn is episode three ninety five originally aired January thirty two thousand fourteen re edited for October Fourteen Thousand Nineteen and find you wherever you are whatever yeah application for these four ideas so conceptual stuff here application their combined it's GonNa make it really easy for you to take action safe and so this is a presentation from a number of years ago as I've been cleaning up the PODCAST archive which goes into that into great detail make it easier for you to tap and to clear those resistances so you can take action in addition to these four ideas I've created a ten part you don't know how to sit down and create the vision you know they're people who that's their gift that's genius they say Oh this is where we're going in these are the seven steps that we need to take between here and there task is painful and being successful at the task is painful and in each of these four areas it's possible that we can have a mechanical issue to eliminate self sabotage and on a very base fundamental level the reason why we don't take action is part of our system that's trying to keep us a little bit how we can approach each one of them so the four reasons why we don't take action art we don't have a clear vision we don't know how to do the task doing the and you can see how that kind of permeates through the way we think about things and how we take action and so if you look through these lenses it's going to give you an opportunity to we take action the reasons that we don't take action are founded in four released simple things and I wanna go through those right now apps behind the work that I've done for the last five to eight years I have been as you know focusing really hard on how we can use to happen guided helps you to eliminate self sabotage you can get that by going to tapping Q. and A. Dot com clicking on the big blue button if you happen to be listening to this right now in the website up in the having visions or can be two parts to that like I said they're going to be a part of it where either you haven't sat down to create vision or do the steps I don't know about you but they're few things I liked less than looking stupid and being lost where hint corner on top of that sidebar you'll see a blue button there and so basically the four fundamentals that I'm sharing with you here in that ten part guide we'll give you cat is do I know how to do that am I capable of doing that too I need to get help doing that another also can be an emotional component to this when you are not taking the action that you want so number one you do not have a clear vision when we don't have a clear vision of where we're going wing it's really hard to take action because any step that we take is going to feel like it's not going to be a useful step because it's not going to be heading so if you're heading trying to do something but you don't have a clear vision of what it's supposed to be or a clear vision of what the steps are the first thing that I would therefore I'm not going to take action the emotional is when we don't know how to do something we can fear how it looks it might be scary to create a vision because there might have been a time in the past where you created this really excellent precisely incompetent I actually am I don't want to ask for help because they look down on people who weren't self starters I don't want to ask for help direction towards our goal because we don't know what our goal is and so when there's a foggy mess about where we are heading it's really hard to take I'm having a clear vision because it's afraid the last time I had clear vision it ended in pain so this time if I have clear vision it will end in pain therefore you a practical issue or it's possible that we could have an emotional issue and so I'm gonNA walk through the four of these and then we'll talk really briefly how you can apply that awards that so there could be part of you that is preventing you from creating a clear vision which is preventing you from taking action but it's preventing you from action because there's a part of us that doesn't WanNa waste that resource at energy of taking action towards something that isn't there so when you're in a circumstance of not so again when it comes to not knowing how to do something is a practical and there can be an emotional to the practice I don't know how to do it because I don't like looking incomplete or incompetent and so if you don't know how to do it and there's this emotional penalty for asking now the third reason that we don't take action is taking the action is painful in taking the can have clear vision which leads us to not taking action the second reason that we don't take action is we don't know how to Asian you knew exactly what you wanted you got your hopes up and then something happened and you never got there and so became devastating because so clearly the fourth reason that we don't take action is it's painful to be successful in that might seem a little odd on the surface but if you've spent in different ways you know if I have to build a website I don't know how to build websites the last thing I'm GonNa do is go fight around trying to create a website because I wouldn't even know where to begin when we don't know how to do it or we can fear how it looks when we ask for help I don't Wanna ask for help because if I ask for help they're gonNA see out talk so today what I WanNa do is I want to talk about the four reasons why we don't actually that problem it's going to prevent us from taking action because we don't want to deal with that pain so you can see as we put ourselves into a circumstance where the getting getting to success is the problem but having the success is and when we oh you knew what you wanted but since you didn't get it it created the level of pain that came along with that and so you don't want to be in a circumstance where you're working in all four of these areas not having a clear vision not knowing how to do something it's painful to do it it's pain having to deal with the pain of any of these things so the next time you have an action that you are not doing it's really really it means that I have to continue to be the successful all the time it took me a lot of work to be successful that means I'm going to have to work hard all Shen Bhai itself I'll give you example tarring a a roof on a hot summer day that's painful action to do doing math and it's not something that you're strengh and it's a lot of work and it's really really exhausting sleep painful because of how we are going to be perceived if we're doing that action and if either of those two things exist we're not gonNA take action it's that we're not going to step in and try because we don't WanNa look lost we don't WanNa look foolish and this is similar to the vision problem we talked about in the last one but it shows don't know how to do it so it's possible that we're going to render roadblocks at any of these four areas but he walked through them one at a time it can also be the emotional reason that it's painful to do something you know if I do this ongoing to be judged if I do this they're going to say that ending up in front of a group of people and talking and dealing with all of the nerves so those are mechanically painful reasons why it is to do something any time at all in this self care type world you'd know how true this can be that can happen in a number of fashions if I am successful all the time to keep being successful if I'm successful this is what everybody expects from me all the time and so it happens ripple out and make it easier for us if you haven't done so already please make sure you subscribe to the podcast and remember in podcasting parlance subscribe is free you don't have to pay anything for it you can get this podcast absolutely free in apple podcast Google podcasts spotify Pandora stitcher fool to be successful at doing it when we have any of these four things were not going to take action because there's a part of us that wants to prevent us we know what the outcome is supposed to be and for the life of me I can't see your out the steps and so we don't know how to do something it makes a great deal of sense singled as a community if we do that will add three thousand new people tapping and that will make a huge difference in all of our lives as they show healthier that will intact area if you haven't downloaded the APP encourage you to do so you can get it in both the apple and android APP stores in addition to having access to the entire even if you know someone in your life who could use that sort of framework to see how they are moving forward or how they are not and the places that they're being stuck please please in a word of warning it is possible that you could have tasks that you're not taking that might show up in one of these areas or it could show up in multiple of these areas for help or being seen not knowing how to do it you're not going to take action either so we don't know how to do something it's really easy for us not to take action description tap along audios just sitting there on your smartphone this happen Qa podcast this is Jean mattress I hope you have a great day and I will talk to you real yes in the beginning of not taking action because I don't have a clear vision we do it we need to do we get the clear vision now we feel really apprehensive because since it's such a New Vision we take a chance to listen to this thanks for spending a little time with me today today we're going to talk about one of the most fundamental con it is pretty straightforward in those four lenses and how you can look at things were practical in an emotional way so that it's easier for you to take action Q. and A. Dot Com if you're on the website just click on that contact link or if you're one of the thousands of people who've downloaded the tapping Q. and A. App just click on mccown find a new piece of content via video an audio be an article is from a recommendation from a friend because one we're going to be recommended things from people we know Iheartradio you can even get it on your a. l. e. x. make sure you subscribes he do not miss an episode going forward and our entire he's be our ambassador don't spam inbox and send it everybody in the world but if you know one or two people could use this please pass it along because the way that people are most likely to archive of audio on the website if we have done a tap along in one of those podcasts the tap along has also typed out in a script form apple to walk through these four things and look it's a practical assurance or shall issue and then you can bring in whatever resource you need to be successful rest by guests are those of the guests at not necessarily of gene mantra steadily or tapping QNA odd cast archive can be found there with over four hundred and forty episodes if you have a question if you've come I can always be reached gene. GE In e tapping my goal is foolish.

Williamsburg Brooklyn GE eight years
Boundaries, Love, Sisterhood, Medicine Wheel

Cafecito Break

07:30 min | 6 months ago

Boundaries, Love, Sisterhood, Medicine Wheel

"It's not working. This is when you know you have to practice when you do something but this is working blessings to you. I really love working with sage. We're just GONNA have to take care of this later. Calls here the Ghetto version when you improvise plaza. This thing is not right anyway. That's why preparing before you turn on. The camera camera is something that's important but since this is a Compassi to break little report on the fly without a microphone just you you guys I just wanted to check on a check in more often. I've been really quiet a heavy. We've done a Monday morning. Show routine I are intended to be back this coming Monday. Eleven o'clock so tune in you could visit CDC dot org to tune into our Monday morning. Live show which is hosted myself and my beautiful. AMIGA my my friends my sister Ruthie Goodson who lives in Plano Texas and we have been friends for ten years and when you tune in you hear US talking. You're listening to two women that have seen each other under ten times in ten years. I think we've seen each other five times yet. We have such a beautiful four sisterhood. And when you think of a break I want you to remember that when you to remember that it's created by women in who really are sisters and then you know my sister and I alex like really sisters and three sisters and we just look to adopt so many family members and we have so many family members of all ages or colors or income brackets. And it's it's beautiful to us our teachers when we sit in circles with our data friends or medicine. Teachers Mentors tors reminders. That the medicine wheel has all the colors in. And sometimes that's the response announced to. Hey what do you think about all of the `ISMs and in all these color wars and the response is always simple bowl. And I've been contemplating about that a lot that message of simplicity. Don't forget that the language of love language of God of source. The Language of nature is simple A smile is simple. Those are really take much effort to do it. This is like fix mile almost constipated on you. When you see someone you light up you're like high hi. And it's like real like it's like a multidimensional exchange and when we realized that and and my my medicine. My sister's medicine. Ruthie where we shared their with technical capacity to break to remind you guys that this is important and support that we go back to simple. Sometimes we say such long sentences. Sometimes we take up so many words. Maybe it's just more powerful to sit into stare lovingly. Engage the person that you truly love and want to build with. And that's what we offer you the Perez Sisters we witness you. We listen maybe we. We offer sister guidance. We always encourage you to trust you. Intuition my message today is about boundaries. How class earlier today. which was so amazing and I felt guided to talk about boundaries in that class? Because sometimes you know when we're out there and putting our best foot forward and wanting to serve since we forget that it is important to have our own. Aw Juries so that we could communicate to those around us. What's okay what's not okay. You know like for example someone my boundaries is. There are times where. I don't want anyone to even hug me. I don't want anyone to come close and yet I may have to be in a space like apathetic functioning in a metaphysical way. So how do I balance the fact that may be. I need to be in my own space. Ace with setting a boundary and communicating lovingly. So that the personal is of fuel like rejecting them but that they understand this is focusing on working on something so I need to be in my own space. I want to just be in it. And that's okay that's totally okay and when you have friends who understand that and. I'm very lucky that I have a powerful circle. They'll be like symptoms of a little bit stinky about it because I'm wiggle so so there are times where absolute don't want anything taking my oxygen and I get so feisty about it and I remember in the past I are we get more frustrated and then I would just blow up and then I would realize that is because anthony set of boundary was because it didn't communicate that I wanted a certain distance that I didn't communicate that I rather you talk to me from over there and not like here because we speak to so close. I feel like you're taking on my oxygen L.. Lake it rain. It's okay you you communicate your boundaries. Lovingly without being dramatic would love. Just being could just be like. Hey I just laughing locate today and I just want to have a little space however fuel Gadafi to suchet so luckily communicate boundaries. As you move into that secret space with yourself and also a news to share my sister and I got featured in an article written by Gloria Malone. And it's a be Latino Latina and it's I guess surged press sisters and you'll see an article that was written about us our journey and our shit our space but then he got in Williamsburg Brooklyn so thank you so much guys. tune-in much when these owners to each and everyone you love you. Remember the break dot org where Itunes IHEART spotify. We also post. Ag Different things and we're trying to build up our youtube a two channel. We get less loved there. What we do postings that will not ever get posted on our podcast feeds or I G so check out three sources see some.

Ruthie Goodson CDC Gloria Malone Perez Texas Plano Itunes Williamsburg spotify anthony Brooklyn ten years
AP Headline News Jan 11 2019 08:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

05:30 min | 1 year ago

AP Headline News Jan 11 2019 08:00 (EST)

"Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the dominion energy reliability investment. Our new investment product offers competitive returns, no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money. Make the reliable investment in reliable energy, the dominion energy reliability investment to find out more. Go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com. The airline gates January sale ends Tuesday. It's time to bring on the sun. Bring on the scene sand bring on sand castles book, spades and beach bowls bring on the days by the pool and summer nights in the city bring on four star service and convenience central airports. Bring on the sun and the airlinks January sale with three million seats on offer up to fifty percent of flights to Europe and flex to North America from one hundred eighty nine euro each way as part of a return trip. Hurry, Salan Tuesday smarts books now at air Lingus dot com. Offer subject to conditions and divinity. AB radio news. I'm Rita fall. Lay a thirteen year old Wisconsin girl missing since her parents were shot dead in October is alive and safe after what appears to have been a dramatic escape from a suspect. Who's now in custody. Jamie Kloss appeared at Kristen Kosinski his door asking for help. I would I guess I would describe her at looking unkept Kaczynski told the today show, Jamie appeared to know the person from whom she had escaped she did state who she believed had her. And she didn't give us a little information about the person's car. Been that she didn't gives a ton of detail. Police are confirming a suspect is in custody, but they aren't saying much else at the moment. No paycheck today for hundreds of thousands of federal government workers who are not being paid because parts of the government or shut down over the border. Wall battle between the president and congress reporters asked the president several times yesterday about the human cost of the shutdown each time he talked about victims of crimes by illegal immigrants. I feel very badly for people that have family members that have been killed those federal workers not getting paid today. Many of the people that we're talking about they agree with me. But while he was in Texas. Federal workers here in Washington protested mortgage and rent saga megani, Washington. The US has begun its withdrawal from Syria. A military spokesman isn't giving any details for security reasons. But a human rights group says the withdrawal began last night with a convoy of about ten armored vehicles and some trucks pulling out of northeastern Syria and moving into Iraq. We've learned that over the past decade. The US government is approved thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides. This is AP radio news. With this partial government shutdown will leave a Mark on the economy Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell says typically these shutdowns do not there's plenty of personal hardship that people undergo but at the aggregate level, the economy, generally does not reflect a much damage from shutdown a longer shutdown is something we haven't had if we have an extended shutdown than I do think that that would show up in the data. Pretty clearly this shutdown has gone on now for twenty one days if it lasts through tomorrow as expected to it will set a new record for shutdowns supreme court Justice. Neal Gorsuch has been elected the serve as a trustee of the colonial Williamsburg foundation, colonial Williamsburg, Virginia is the world's largest living. History museum in a statement released by the foundation, Gorsuch said colonial Williamsburg is a place where people can reconnect with our nation's founding principles. Rita Foley, AP radio news. I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lack your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only about on certain thirty year fixed rate loans. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states MLS number thirty additional conditions or exclusions apply. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey, hey trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll be fine carbo jopstone to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limb. Knitted by state law.

Jamie Kloss America Williamsburg AP colonial Williamsburg foundati air Lingus Syria Federal Reserve Kristen Kosinski Wisconsin president Quicken Loans Neal Gorsuch Washington Texas Europe Rita Foley History museum
TWiT 727: Artisanal Pickles from Williamsburg

This Week in Tech

2:21:06 hr | 1 year ago

TWiT 727: Artisanal Pickles from Williamsburg

"It's time for tweet this week in Tech Caroline Haskins is here for motherboard. Mike Albert is settled down from his trip around the world to this chair right here next to me. We're GONNA talk about the biggest fine and F._T._C. history instagram versus the bullies and Caroline we'll talk about what she's learned about. Technology local cities are using the spy on you and me. It's all coming up next on twitter that casts you love from people you trust <music>. This is this is twit. Is We could tech episode. Seven hundred under twenty-seven recorded Sunday July fourteenth twenty nineteen artisanal pickles from Williamsburg this week at tech is brought to you by worldwide technology worldwide technologies advanced technology centers like no other testing in research search lab with more than half a billion dollars of equipment including O._E._M.'s like net APP and it's virtual seeing you can access at twenty four seven to learn more and get insights into all it offers go to W.. W. T. dot com slash twit and by mid mobile mobile provides the same premium network coverage. You're used to but at a fraction of the cost because everything's online to get your new wireless plan for fifteen dollars a month and get the plan ship to your door free go to mint mobile dot com slash twit and by was Sabi hot cloud storage thinking about moving your data storage to the cloud was Sabi is enterprise class cloud storage at one fifth the price of Amazon S. three and up to six times faster with no hidden fees for Egress or A._p._i.. Requests calculate your savings and try was Sabi with free unlimited storage for a month at was Sabi Dot com code twit and by ziprecruiter hiring is challenging but there's one place you can go or hiring is simple and smart at place is ziprecruiter where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates try it free at Ziprecruiter dot com slash twit. It's time for tweet this week at tech show. We cover the weeks tech news and look WHO's here in studio. Mike Algan is joining us. He is off the road in town and whenever Mike's town they like to get you Tsuneo. Thank you the Oh it's great great to be in town. He's a gastro nomad in fact gastronome add dot net. What was your most was Barcelona? Your most recent event Barcelona's the next one. Oh it's coming to have some space open for this one. That's what this posted Barcelona so so what we do is everybody loves Barcelona but a lot of people don't know about the nearby Kava wine country now so we stay there for five nights six and we explore wine tasting we make cheese. We do all this kind of stuff. We Bake bread but we take a couple of surgical strikes into the city of Barcelona. <hes> and it's just the most fantastic thing in the World Trivia Food in Catalonia is incredible. We know exactly where the most authentic tapas places are. Where are they just like the best <hes> Baker in Spain that women there we she gives us an exclusive the best Baker in Spain <hes> two years ago? She was named the Best Baker Bain. She is mazing but she's a good friend. We go in and we explore if you go down. This is a good one see this one are here. There's a cave so this is a store in in office sparkling wine champagne but this guy stores it in a bomb shelter from from the Spanish civil war. How and it's in the middle of a vineyard? I can't tell you where it is or he'll generalissimo Francisco Franco's buried there but it's a fascinating region and the culture of Catalonian food which people don't quite get when you go to Barcelona on vacation quite get to it but fun we go straight to I could spend years in Barcelona. You'd never plum the depths. That's absolutely absolutely true. We also want to welcome a brand new member to our team. I'm really pleased to welcome from motherboard. The vice a publication Carolina Haskins Hi Caroline I have you welcome. Don't be intimidated. This is going to be a lot of fun. We are going to start my shaking. His head now says fun. We're GONNA start today with facebook. The largest fine in the history of the Federal Trade Commission <hes> The F._T._C. had a consent decree with with Facebook and twenty eleven that they would not do whatever it is facebook does as they did it apparently <hes> <hes> when they went in some of our our data went to Cambridge Analytica so the F._t._C. got together voted three two two interesting that was the Republicans have voted for the fine. The Democrats voted against the fine the largest finding the history of the F._T._c. five billion taller. That sounds like a lot of money right Dr Evil except facebook's stock price went up after the fine six billion dollars so mark Zuckerberg is smiling because he made money he made money. I guess facebook was smart. They had said in their annual in their quarterly report that they expected this five billion dollars they budgeted and so they prepared the market right and then when then fine actually was five billion as usual you US sell on the rumor you by on the news or you're buying the news and you sell them. I can't remember but whatever it was good news. Everybody laments the political division of society but both Republicans and Democrats can get behind crushing Silicon Valley. Yeah that is an on the issue so Carolina's five billion dollars a slap on that sounds like a lot of money. Is it a slap on the wrist. It kinda seems like a yeah dropping the bucket. I don't know I remember a couple of months ago. There were a couple of other their figures that were being thrown around and it seems like they were potentially going to be hit with a lot more money but it really doesn't seem like this is going to have an impact on them at all curiouser said you really WanNa find him. At zero to the Five Fifty Billion Elizabeth with Warren said facebook made five billion in profits in the first three months of the year. Actually that's not true. I think it was <hes> revenue not prophets the companies too big to oversee in this drop in the bucket penalty confirms that it is true that I mean look at anything anything with B.. Is is a lot of money for any company but it isn't you know facebook at fifteen billion in revenue. Oh I'm sorry it is fifteen billion revenue last quarter twenty two billion in Prophet so it was it was one one quarter profit <hes> you could see the stock jump there. Mike Isaac said the real stories that facebook shares surged with that fine so clearly the market saying slap slap on the wrist. Yeah what do what you're not on facebook fact. I use use an example Mike Allen because you have Mike Nice Book. Yes so what I did was last year. I said I was getting off Fourth of July and I I spent the whole all these months this year harassing and and criticizing facebook course it had no good at all because they were censoring my posts clearly <hes> but I replaced it with Google folder. I call my Nice Book and you can go public folder so I can they would on facebook yes so if you search for Mike Elegant Nice Book you'll find links to it and I advise you all but this is my personal. This is my family's really it's the kind of pictures you would have put us desperately text though or is it just pictures talks you can you can do post. Where do you play your Dank memes? Can you put them up there to you cannot so each person's. This is the beauty of it. This is our social network should work. Only I can post them. My Nice Book and I can follow your Nice Book and then I see it in the stream so if you're on Google photos and you go to sharing which nobody ever dies. It's the it's it's the I it's the tab on the far right. Yeah you get all the stuff that's been shared with you. All you know and it's it's kind of like a social so I think Google follow your <hes> Nice book there. It is yeah so I could make one of these. What what what I if I wanted to make one I would just set up a sharing and shaved public? Yes and it's Kinda. I believe that's the default actually that is public and then you just share the link okay <hes> with family and friends by email. People can choose notification in some people get it on their phones and people get email. Some people don't get the notifications they just see it in Google photos and they go but it's beautiful. This photos are full quality for click on these photos their full quality much better they face pushes them and you can you can add little of you know comments. You can like things and it's it's a stream without ads. wets Mike's wife by the way Amirah who so beautiful sitting in a restaurant apparently has parking meters called the naughty pig. That's on Sunset Boulevard and okay but it's it's a wonderful alternative is really what we want to do on facebook as we want to see a stream of of our people we care about and the photos because I get all the time I said get off facebook. I'm off facebook caroline you you have to it's an occupational hazard on all the network's probably yeah yeah. I feel like it would be sort of irresponsible for me to like not even know what's going on you. Couldn't you could get rid of instagram. I wish I could it would be nice. The strange thing is that a lot of my peers still use facebook for event invitations and I've noticed people a little bit more recently using different types of forums but it almost seems like for a lot of people at least in my immediate social circle gold that facebook is still a way to guarantee that someone is going to be able to see something but I don't know I want to go back to the days of like personal websites really nice to step on your <hes> your comment there Carolina but <hes> this is what I hear I talking to lots and lots of people all over the World Leo because in Europe but you have a blog I have a blog but I know lots of people in Europe who use one two or three social things and those things are always facebook properties so so I know people who do what's up what's up and it's and that was one of the hardships for me is what I got rid of facebook. I felt like well. I should also give it a fait instagram. I didn't really use what's up but I should also. I should get through all three if I've any one of them on my phone own I've given facebook an entree into my lab -solutely and this is the interesting thing about what's up Americans don't use what's at much everybody else. It's well and that's what I hear when I get off facebook. What I universally here is? That's a that's a privileged alleged point of view. I can't get off. This is the problem with facebook. We're on the brink where we everybody countries the Internet well exactly and some people some lots and lots of people say I don't use the Internet I use facebook right and so it's A._O._l.. For the twenty first century and the scheme that Mark Zuckerberg has hatching as we sit here is he's trying to turn it into we chat so in China we chat is everything is an ECOMMERCE. That's why Lieber coin. That's why he's got a currency because this to be everything goes through facebook and so we're already like everybody I talked to says. I'm not going to get off facebook because I need it for this reason or that reason. Caroline has her reasons. Everybody has a reason why they need facebook instagram or what's up and this is a problem we shouldn't i. I had heard that younger. People thought maybe maybe you're not as young as you look but younger people said facebook is like your parents social network and there and people under <hes> thirty say are are snapchat or tick tock. There are other places right right yeah. I think there's definitely still that reputation <hes> you've but in college did you use facebook. My daughter's twenty-seven still is on facebook because that's how she stays in touch with college friends I did did yeah I mean facebook was used in terms of like finding college remains freshman year <hes> during introductions and that's sort of pivoted onto instagram witches again so a facebook property so it seems like you're still sort of relying lying on this biggest common denominator <hes> like there's this assumption that you haven't account on at least one basic goods is really the reason facebook is an incumbent and it will be hard to unseat is so-called network effect. You have to be where everybody is. There's no point I mean on Mastodon. I'm on Elo but there's no point because it's me and a couple of other people but there's there's I don't even know and we're looking look at each other gone <hes> but but this is true that here's the problem so the only social network that's bigger than facebook is email which is about three or four times the size of face and you're not a male new big letters but the problem is people have lost control of their inboxes. Oh yeah they're they're afraid of yeah and so but but if people could just get a handle on their email inboxes email it'd be the ultimate social network because you could be on massive on and use email based notifications and be like everybody's on the same social but people are reticent even often say that if you want to stay in touch with your college friends or your or your grandparents email would work right but I guess it's not that there's not that but it's emails should be a delivery mechanism for the note. It's a one on one conversation. He doesn't feel feel like that. Stream like you're tapping into what Wade into the pool of Zeitgeist and this is how the social networks get us they they tapped into our psychology and makes us feel like we're got a finger on the pulse whereas email feels like your finger is not on the the pulse right <hes> and so it's it's all these feel feel based emotion based tricks that they use the little red thing with a number in it. People have to click on that should be would it does he does the F._T._C. have any solution. If it had been five hundred billion would've that of matter it doesn't it feels like the F._t._C.'s is helpless in the face of this right. It's hard to say I mean without a fine is one thing but I mean regulations that are going to be preventing something like an Cambridge medical situation from happening again would be I mean more ideal and I mean that doesn't look like I mean I know that legislation is on the way in California but why it doesn't seem like the regulations we need are on the way anytime anytime soon so well. It's hard to say whether a fine would be like a hundred percent the answer here in a lot of times when we talk about regulation. There's always this issue of unintended China Consequences Casey Newton has a great article this week on the verge talking about the ugly side of Facebook's pivot to privacy so facebook solution. Was this Mark Zuckerberg Post saying Oh okay no problem everything will be end to end encrypted private but as Casey points out now what you have is private groups like that horrific border patrol group that propublica found last week it's private. Is You know they had to dig to find it. LEMONDE lemonde found in France Group of fifty six thousand people devoted largely to making anti-female comments French group. The twitter users stumbled across a Facebook T._V. AD investigated one of the featured groups and Founder Fay who stumble across a Facebook T._V. AD oh he founded be and he posted something ugly posts large private. This is Elizabeth dwoskin writing in the Washington Post large private groups remain UNMODERN rated rated black boxes where users could freely threaten vulnerable populations. Actually she's quoting Jonathan Green Blat who's with the anti-defamation league without any A._I.. Are Human moderators. It's easy to orchestrate harassment campaigns it. It becomes four channel eight Janet becomes it becomes a secret place for for evilness so that's not a solution either I I'm less I mean this is going to sound horrible but I'm less bothered by this sort of thing because in private you don't mind well. It's not that I don't mind mind that people are evil. <hes> bothers me but they're going they're going to at least they're not in my face well. I mean if it's to me. This is more akin to just having a an evil conversation in your living room or whatever yeah that's what bothers the viral mechanisms of using algorithms to bring in lots of people in the end sort of changed their minds about the I thought I always thought maybe this was naive of me but that <hes> light was a disinfectant that you lift up the Rock and you let the world see this and the world will will rear back and revulsion and say no this will not stand. We don't want Nazis but what is in fact happened is that he's taken over twitter. It's it's not there's no revulsion Bondi. My producer unfortunate thing. Is that y'all who's our youtube. Algorithms sees revulsion as positive. That's engagement. I don't care if you're disgusted. It's engagement segment. It's it's <hes> who who is it said that it's like people slow down to look at a car accident and so the Internet responds by producing more accidents yeah this is the slavish following of the algorithm is a bad thing I would. I've often said that the a real problem with youtube is a recommendation engine the algorithm clearly the problem with facebook is the Algorithm and drives the newsfeed because absent any human oversight these are optimized for engagement. Does that's more revenue and that's where you get these horrible vicious vicious circles that promote offensive behave and to me the elephant living and that's not a G._O._p.. Pun By the elephant in the living room is <hes> is is <hes> which I don't think he's exploring here enough is that you talked about the disinfectant quality of light right what what Zuckerberg has proposed for his big privacy pivot which is complete B._S. is to unite all of his <hes> <hes> all of his messaging platforms and have end and encryption so nobody can see inside that black box and then and I and the other part of it is they all the solution to bullying and hate speech on stuff our algorithms that work behind the scenes that nobody can see how they work or what they're doing and all that comes up so we're entering into an era where all this stuff where the conversations are happening beyond anyone's <hes> ability to see it and also where the solution the algorithms are happening behind the scenes with nobody's ability. This is kind of a golden age of journalists can go and expose these things right articles Casey Newton's not going to happen as we're on the brink of him not how it won't be able to find these secret poor Carolina you know you're going on the grumpy. All men complain about the you kids today show day we didn't do this didn't have any of it. I just think it's strange that this whole pivot to groups and like emphasizing groups on facebook has been presented as this solution both to like hey speech and fake news and for making facebook just a place to want that people people wanna go. I mean anecdotally. It seems pretty clear that facebook groups is one of the only reasons that people would go on facebook for pleasure but in terms of vice mattress thing yeah yeah in terms of like I don't know mean groups or like the rise of certain facebook groups where it's like facebook group where we pretend to be ex like for instance a real popular. One is a group where we all pretend to be boomers. <hes> and everybody makes fun of their air. Their parents told me you're not in that group. I joined for journalistic purposes. I think we boomers should invade area fifty one on another one sorry. That's a big event. Oh that's interesting see this is where I am at a disadvantage so facebook has kind of pivoted from the original promise was you you follow the news feed and fees see what your friends and family are up to to finding affinity groups and we know affinity groups of the worst thing in the world because really what happens is whatever you know. It's a mob mentality whatever that <hes> prime factor for that. If any group is becomes amplified <hes> appenzell I mean they say that <hes> certain types of flagged post or fake news will be de prioritized even in private facebook groups <hes> which I mean I think personally at least in some cases I mean not in the case of like <music> outright hate speech but <hes> in terms of certain grey areas that might be a better solution than just pulling the stuff off the Internet entirely and just having really grasp on how different communities are spreading different kinds of information nation but at the same time pretending that facebook groups is going to be like solving all of facebook problems while I mean your feet is going to still be including a lot of the same type of content. I mean at the end of the day I it's just going to be like a category specific news feed with a couple of specific people <hes> and I mean when you open facebook right now almost every time I open it <hes> it'll say read at the top <hes> this many of your friends have joined facebook groups and you find new facebook groups <hes> it's so funny because Google plus in its last dying days to the same pivot didn't save it but they join a community joining community so there must be some research says Oh yeah people are happiest when they're in a community. Yeah people had terrible though because the communities are horrific. I my biggest my biggest or awesome yeah. Thank you KARSTON my face. What's what Karston what groups are are you in I? I also facebook refugee but oh okay. He's one of those guys who pretends to be a boomer. There's definitely something to be said for affinity groups where people can find people like them uh-huh well. That's what Geeks did in the very beginning. That's what we did. We found each other <hes> you know I. I keep thinking that the platforms can't solve this. It's not going to be in government can't solve it in humans can solve it but we're so flawed. There's a solution they're either. I feel like it's starting to despair but we have to be clear about what the problem is and I. It's why bothers me that you know that somebody is saying something mean on the Internet somewhere is not the problem right if people should be able to have private groups no matter what they say to each other in those groups <hes> private conversations people should be able to say on the telephone for example. You shouldn't have algorithm. Nobody listened to compensate. You shouldn't talk about and that's historically the case. That's what section to thirty of the Internet whatever's decency collaboration. What does I called the communications decency active twenty s <music> nine thousand nine hundred ninety six yeah <hes> sections thirty said that just like the phone system you can't expect platforms online services to police content? They're just conveyors yes content and so by the way people want to president. Trump trump wants to get rid of <hes> section to thirty. There's a move afoot to do that. <hes> so that may be actually under assault anyway but I don't know if that protects it either. I don't know what the solution I really don't. I I really think we need to focus on algorithms and an analyst that's what book says Algorithm and not know focus on the problem with Algorithm Oh and not the focus on private little groups where national people talk to each other things and they make it seem like a bigger problem. I think they could be plot plotting and planning they could be yes. You know that stuff is going to happen and when the break the law they need to go to prison right when they break the law in real life but but whatever happened to free speech we should have a place for free speech that we shouldn't have is a place where it amplify amplifies by putting and so Jason how a Kansas have all people <hes> proposed a new social network which he described as a simple feed with no ago rhythmic filtering one ad on the top of the page you can pay fifty dollars a month to get rid of the ad and it's just you get everything that the people you follow post in reverse chronological order end of story facebook was supposed to be in the beginning exactly but there's no money in that you can't be wildly you can't end up being the most powerful person in the world and one of the richest there has to be somewhere in between no money and twenty two billion dollars a year. There has to be some mid ground where you make you make a decent living. It's good service people use it. It's called message on the pro. I mean I. I don't give a crap if Mark Zuckerberg is rich I I really don't care if he makes a lot of money. What I care about is that people can have conversations? We have free speech we also have and we don't amplify. Amplifying negatives not creating this kind of stuff so that's where the problem is not these little private groups. I don't think and then there was this week social media summit at the White House where the president said to bunch of <hes> kind of conspiracy theory <hes> social media folks the crap. You guys think of is unbelievable. It is yes it is even though it's <hes> often believed I guess they did not invite facebook or Jack Dorsey from twitter anybody who who's actually from one of the platforms to this quote social media summit was really just a bunch of it was mostly right winged right wing pundits they had pull a few found all kinds of antisemitic and racist stuff and of course Josh Holly is proposed legislation that would eliminate section to thirty <hes> treat every political opinion equally because has of this. I don't think there's any evidence for this belief. That's in the conservative circles that somehow twitter and facebook con- you know are are biased against conservatives. I don't I don't see any evidence of that but the the the evidence is <hes> I mean can you this is this is actually one of the problems you don't have insight in how they why they make the decisions they make so for example. Let's there's some well. It is invisible isn't it. The person who posted alright type post and then gets band and then all of his followers numbers like hi you see it's conservative bias but what they don't know is twitter might tell you yeah but they were also had this other account. They had these five other accounts where they were orchestrating bots and doing all this other stuff in the combined effect of all those things were why we band and and again we take word for it because algorithms are our company secrets they don't have to reveal them and they won't so there. You know the facebooks in the twitter really on the spot. They're essentially the police and the judge jury and everything so trump's trump said evidence. There's a bias against him is because in the old days he would tweet that <hes> the Obama campaign was spying on them and it would in his words take off like a rocket and now it doesn't so much more. That's your evidence yeah and I you know he's got how many tens of millions aliens of followers. I think it's pretty clear twitter is not blocking followers. <hes> the president has narcissistic personality disorder. If Georgia were here she could diagnose it for us but <hes> but the pro this whole summit seemed to be a place for him to vent and say about him the fact that I don't have more followers than Obama. They should have more reason why there's something has to change and we're going to do something and he was threatening. I should have more followed associated. I yeah okay. I'm just saying Caroline tweet or printed on poster boards so that shows does your right. That's it right there. That's things bombers do print out tweets and put them on a poster board. That's what they do in the group that she's in <hes> so so instagram used to be kind of the refuge you would go to instagram all it's nice. It's pictures sure it's nice and now instagram is just as corrupt so nice and messed up caroline. You've written about it it just as bad on instagram right. I haven't been while so is it yeah. They've they've had a problem with arise of life certain types of extremists hey accounts <hes> with Cunanan accounts with anti boxer accounts and Instagram's men taking some steps to design infrastructure that block certain hashtags like in the same way that if you search <hes> say for things like Pro Anorexia those hashtags are blocked and so they're working on doing the same kind of thing for for anti vaccinations and those types of ideologies but I mean the last time I checked that feature hadn't hadn't ruled out but I mean yeah. It's it's just strange that you there was a period when I went on facebook and you know you search for antibiotics or content and there were I mean there were no results like like the group's seemed to have been banned but then when you went on instagram all those accounts restore up <hes> yeah I don't know in terms of the social media summit. I think one important thing to keep in mind is that he also invited <hes>. I think it was the C._E._O.. Or whoever founded that that social network network minds am I N D s <hes> which for at least a certain period of time was like a favored group among I mean yeah exactly <hes> I don't know I think it speaks volumes. It goes I think it goes beyond trumping angry about himself and trying to send a political message by I mean obviously the types of people that he invited to that you have to he he has to see <hes> these social networks as very powerful for the twenty twenty election as places that they can use he does he uses twitter very effectively yeah and they have to see these as the place where the campaign is GonNa play out next year right. That's that's that's where it's GonNa Matter Truth. Is that scares me. Everybody talks about how twitter is so influential in shaping public opinion all this kind of stuff and it just isn't true. Do what happens is the media picks up on twitter but that's the respect it's true. Is that yet twitter's only a couple hundred million people. It's not a big deal but the media trainees if it's the most important thing in the world and if anything happens on twitter suddenly that's a story to be clear. Another choices are what make everything that happens on twitter <hes> such a big deal. If the media completely ignored what happened on twitter they would have no effect and has really have you seen this yet on Carolina on an instagram where if you put comments in that are I guess bullying that it will will say wait a minute to really want right. Do you want to say that. Let's keep instagram supportive place rethink that comment. It's really interesting because I want to. I went to a meeting with instagram. <hes> a couple months ago when they were talking about the things that they were doing to try and combat bullying and I think a large part of the difficulty in modern moderating not type of thing is it's a defining bullying and be figuring out a way to do that. That isn't just that isn't preemptive. I mean they don't want to censor these one right. I mean even in the example that they used. I think they said like Oh. If you're using the words I mean it's clear that like the words I like ugly and stupid triggered that top up to say you WANNA say that but is that really the ways that are those really the mechanisms mechanisms that people use to make others feel excluded they were talking about also like induced Romo which is it's. It's difficult to define. It's basically aware and is made of foam. Oh problems like it like a whole idea. Is that if you post something at a certain place and a person may not have been invited and you say you at the person and you say oh. Don't you wish you were here. See people actually do that. I think that was that's that was one of the main questions that I had coming out of that but don't you think they do. Have you ever seen stuff way. I'll tell you where I see it. Every time I go sir every time I go to a concert now most of the Selfie taking is the person turned away from the artist videoing the artists singing and them in the picture and what's the whole point of doing that to show all your friends. What a great time how good your life is? I'm at the concert if you if it used to be you'd video the singer right because Oh you love the singer. You'RE GONNA like the video now. It's look at me at the concert that that's foam oh right so they clearly were trying to make it seem as if that sort of thing is malicious malicious neurotic. It's just it's just a narcissistic. I'm hesitant almost to judge people that WANNA like document those types of experience. You know if you want to if you WANNA share that if that's what if that's what makes you feel good. If you want to make you capture something that made you happy. I'm I'm hesitant to be like. Oh that's bad but when you when you're trying to define what actually is bad and what is harmful. I Dunno I mean it seems like a lot of the I mean the social ways in which people try and exclude an alienate and make other people feel bad. I mean that's not something doesn't algorithm can easily pick right and this is only rolling out on the English speaking part of Instagram so I mean this is only going to be affecting like a marginal Asian all part of their audience anyway. We're talking about children. Though right I mean adults don't like so one of the problems they they they have is that they talked about. How some bullying victims if they block somebody it's like a big problem because they the there with the bully every day in other words to go to school with the bully and so this even blocking and the mechanisms that exist for people to protect themselves don't work because of the fact that people are you know in real con <hes> communication indication that sounds to me like high school or junior high or <hes>? I have to say when I when I was posting stuff on Instagram I would. I would actually consciously not try to show off on instagram because it felt like it was about like look how great my life is and I was concerned it. You know that when you're looking at these people's lives that's not that's just the slice that makes it look good yeah. Everybody's life has equal amounts of bad stuff in good stuff and. It just put the pictures of the good stuff so I tried to take pictures of all the bad stuff that happened to me. Make people feel better very freeing to have los. It's very freeing have low standards. That's kind of that's going to go on. My Tombstone. Actually thank you Carolina <hes> we are. We're very pleased to have caroline with us. Carolina Haskins is a reporter for motherboard and vice great site. I WanNa talk about pallets here when we come back because you did stood a great piece on this software this peletier software is really kind of scary also Mike Algan off the road and in our studios great to have you elegant dot com and of course you could always subscribe to Mike Nice book yet so there's a lot of fumble for me yes of you in Barcelona drinking whining you WanNa see an example of this foam. Oh we've been talking about go to my nice book. What a life? He is beautiful though isn't it. It's not like cheese. Are there's definitely things baby. boomers say right in that. There's nothing like cheese say you're wrong. I know I'm not wrong. I know I know I'm the poster child our show did. They brought to you by worldwide technologies. W WTI they began with their advanced technology center ten years ago the lab contains more than half a billion dollars in equipment payment from hundreds of O._e._M.'s everything you might WanNa use in Your Business Cisco Net App V._m.-ware emerging disruptors to maybe things you you just recently heard about new curious about Tiananmen Equifax and expanse. They're all in there and because when you're running an enterprise nothing exists in a vacuum they tested all you know in a lab that gives you an example how they're going to interact how they're going to work together W. W. T. worldwide technology is your trusted partner been with you over the years. Many of their customers have been with them for more than a decade because they know W._w._e.'s where they can go to get the answers. They need to make sure their business runs right and this advanced technology center is something else it's amazing incubator for I._T.. Innovation and you can use it. 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Tomorrow is the eve of prime day are is everybody excited yeah. We'll <hes> first of all not everything in prime. Day is a deal right right. The wire cutter does a great job. The New York Times a wire cutter they great job of looking at Prime Day deals in comparing him to other prices to see if they are deals and oh by the way here's here's the best prime day deals between nineteen notice. They're not all on Amazon in fact Walmart is having their own version of prime date and they're they're doing it. I think for three or four days targets doing it. Even nordstrom later this week will be having their version of prime day. I think rapidly the middle of the year is going to become the week for for Christmas these Christmas in July as well Ebay to wired magazine called Amazon Prime Day aback canal of modestly discounted F._M.. Obviously this crap that you wouldn't ever buy I I liked what ebays doing because Ebay is. They're calling it. Crash deals in case Amazon crashes because I guess what Amazon crash last year during Friday unbelievable <hes> I I don't know what to say about this except I'm staying home tomorrow no I don't I don't want I come to work. You guys have much better bandwidth here. Oh Yeah we do we. We have a lot of bandwidth. Do you buy stuff Carolina on prime. Did you go crazy. Is that where you get your battleship. Yeah I've not participated in Prime Day. I think mainly because I mean this year last Sir definitely <hes> I mean there have been different types of demonstrations at warehouses <hes> and People Minnesota's shutting down shut down the weirdest tomorrow yeah like that's I mean you gotTa shut them all that if you're shut it down they just route around just like the Internet Minnesota's. Dan Lewis just use it. Let's get it from Nebraska I don't you here's a really interesting thing that happened to me. Regarding Amazon very bizarre last year November December something like that I went to law Gannon said your account has been terminated and I was like okay. That's terrible so I I've been calling and calling couple three or four times a month trying to get my Amazon account and the reason I wanna back is because I'm an author. You don't have an Amazon account correct. How do you do but I don't so so I have a an author so I have a book going this being sold? I get checks from them. I I've done some Amazon associate stuff. I get checks for that but they couldn't figure it out. I kept calling Amazon like we have no idea we can't figure it out your your and then we finally figured it out. They had a high level person. Look into it. I was one of the first like you were <hes> audible. Oh and your audible account I subscribed in two thousand and I don't know what it was in two thousand something like that and so I recently cancelled it because my wife had whoa tidier Amazon account and they couldn't figure it out but is basically they turned into my account so they're still trying to activate. Can you get back. They don't know is there any reason why you care why why don't you set up a new account because because I need access to my book Oh and fees well. There's all kinds of data in there that I need to. This is the new <hes> digital dilemma yeah. What do you do if you're I mean? It's bad enough if people lose their Google but if you lose your Amazon Account. Do you really exist not really the I'm shut out of prime. I mean for starters. Oh my God the horror. I have to pay full price on everything so are you so that's interesting that you brought that up Carolina because it is true we heard nothing but horror stories about people working in warehouses Amazon announced and now they're already doing it in our neck of the woods next day delivery which isn't GonNa make make gotTa make even worse in the warehouses I had I had an Amazon driver. Deliver a book at nine o'clock last night. I mean this poor. person's probably been out in the truck. All Day was a little van. Yes when it was prime is new Amazon vans. The headset Carolina's wearing was placed in an Amazon locker by an Amazon worker at nine nine P._M.. Last night just yeah just so she could be on the show today. Wow so yeah it's yeah yeah. I don't know it's I feel like in an ideal world. It would be nice to times the convenience of it is really a thou. This is the modern dilemma we want. All our conveniences and we kinda know in the back of our mind is it's. It's due to the suffering of some other human right. I mean in terms of the price price. I mean a lot of time especially. If you're buying things in bulk like there've been times that I've bought like food or certain types of food or cleaning supplies in bulk because that's really the only like money efficient way to do it but I think the important thing to keep in mind. Is that with Amazon I mean it's not just something that affects Amazon warehouses. I mean this is something that's creating going to Walmart's. No better yeah yeah pretty much any place. That's relying on on warehouses <unk> on. I mean it's but what do you do you live on Artisanal Pickett'll pickles from Williamsburg for the rest of your life. I mean you can't you can try Brooklyn to you. Only shop local merchants that have handcrafted your goods worst part is they're going to solve the the the the plight of their workers by replacing with robots and so is that better it's hard. It's so I thought Oh this is. This is Amazon announced that they're gonNA spend. They're going to retrain yeah what maniacs which hundred million. I can't remember what it sounds like a good plan to me. It's like seven hundred thousand or something like that. They're going to retrain people nationwide for seven hundred million dollars to retrain one third of its workforce but if you do the math it's like twelve hundred bucks per person. It's barely enough to send somebody school for a week. <hes> they're gonNA retrain a hundred thousand workers by twenty twenty five because they say well these people are going to be out of <hes> out of work and Amazon is very robots hotel -tarian in their P._R.. Approach if you're in the press you know this that they're very difficult to work with and they masters at spinning stories in their favor and and you know they talk about retraining and then they throughout some examples to get your mind thinking about advanced degrees in like doing all this kind of stuff but really they're going to be put retraining people factory workers to be drivers and they're going to be how many of those people I don't know but how many of those people can become coders appears in how many voters do exactly sleight of hand. They're going to be doing a lot of training like every other company every company all K- the seven thousand dollars a worker which actually decent it's a thousand one thousand two hundred dollars a year for five years so so that's why it's Bloomberg had an interesting analysis of it. They said breaking down the numbers they'll spend seven hundred million one hundred thousand employees by twenty twenty five one thousand seventy seven dollars a person annually according to an estimate from the Association Asia for Talent Development of trade group. The average organization spends already twelve hundred ninety six dollars per employee annually on training so in effect Amazon's committing to spending less and on its face. I don't believe that that's an apples to apples comparison. They say this is how much apple ah Amazon's going to spend how much of that is on leasing buildings and and and and and getting projectors you know P._r.. Move It. It's not a genuine effort retrained well. No I think I think they're doing every company company. Every enterprise has to train after training or and I think they're trying to get a lot of credit for something that is it possible for Amazon to treat its workforce humanely. Absolutely they make enough money they could do that. Well prices will go go up. I mean this is why things are cheap on Amazon. They're squeezing right squeezing everything yeah so it's a fifteen dollar minimum wage. I mean for most people still is in a livable wage and I think in terms of retraining the details are really important here. I mean is this something that's going to be happening. In addition to slash outside of work hours I mean for people who might have to work like more than one job or for people who have family I mean that might not be feasible and for what to stay within the same company company <hes> are they actually going to be making more money and their retrained physicians or the conditions going to be comparable on her. No I mean it seems like the stage like those kinds of details are unclear. I feel bad because this show us to be all about how great technology is is and making our lives better and you're going to have robots and the cars drive themselves and pretty soon. You won't have to wear glasses anymore now. It's all about dystopia is it. Is that what happened or is it just me I. I don't think well I don't. I don't think I don't think the story about Amazon's training workers as much of technology story. It's it's technology company and there's hardly what's happened. Is this is a type of capitalism business story. Yeah it doesn't story and and and <hes> you know the well. Let's do technology story. Amazon is building robots but not for the warehouse. It's a home robot with Amazon Echo when I heard about this. I thought it was going to be this little tiny robot that goes but but it's a waste high. It's like the size of that so you can put your beer on exactly that that's absurd assets. I I've been to cocktail parties in Sonoma where they have robot they bring you your tray of Hors d'oeuvres. They will actually one of the things that they had this was at the at the future of food conference in Sonoma they had robots with a tray on top and they were carrying little desserts that were pastry versions of robots with trays on little search on top of those. Is there inception mazing. We're the desserts top of the robot desserts. It just desserts all the way up. A robot is called VESTA and they say we can't yet get mass produce Vesta <hes> they had hoped to reveal it this year but it's just not ready now this isn't we had a advertiser. <hes> Bosch who had a robot called <hes> Caro- you remember it was a little robot would wander around. It was kind of like Amazon Alexa on wheels. They cancelled that project <hes>. I wonder if I don't think it's hard to make. I think it's hard to find a market yeah. Does anybody really want a little robot L. Amazon Echo that wanders around yes I mean it's it's like it sounds cute but I feel like I'm traveling. I'm struggling to understand this here so let's say you have an apartment like mine. That isn't that big. I mean this is a matter of walking literally. The three steps to wherever is or let's say you have an actually big house like is it going to go up. The stairs probably not like I'm right right. I duNNo. It just seems why I mean I think the idea of having Echo Roomba I mean that's cute. I guess rammed his kids at tape tobacco to a Roomba instagram a year ago. I think he's blaming a cat jeff but I think that's I think his kids heads are genius for doing that. Everything she just every product should just be placed on top of a Roomba and it would instantly make it better. I think all animals especially house cats should be placed on top of a run but the reality is that debt we boomers were promised robots in a home right. I mean <hes> never got them so anybody who's working on that. I think it's great. The problem is that Amazon is a is a privacy nightmare in your home but if you ignore that part of it it's like I'm glad that coming because look what Amazon did with the with the virtual assistant appliances or what we now 'cause smart speakers right they nobody believed in that stuff when they came out with Echo. People said the same things about the echo that we're saying now robot people who wants that silly is really changing the tech consumer technology world world <hes> in a major way so I would love to see <hes> you know virtual assistant robot type things I just would prefer that income from Amazon so mentioned like you're going to be having like the types of security issues. Yes I mean the same sorts of issues with like people being creeped out about humans transcribing and having access to voice recordings. I mean that's a shared problem with Amazon. I mean it seems like whoever's making these speakers. I mean if you're having a device advice listening to you and your home and has access to literally everything that's going on. I mean that's going to be there's going to be a security -cerned concerned. That's going to be a privacy concern. No matter which company is behind a I mean with companies like Google Amazon. I mean it's even more of a concern considering like a large amount of data. They already have about you and your customer profile but yeah. I don't know if it's an off it's strictly Amazon problem just to be clear. This is a much bigger potential risk than it sounds. It's not that this thing thing will be on wheels and roll around listening. It'll be three D.. Mapping your home. It will be videotaping your furniture and it'll be finding out who else is in the house which we recognize through face recognition. W surprised the next time you got an Amazon. If it says you know your couch the new Amazon's this couch will fit perfectly face. This rug were really tie. The room together really figuring to do that. I mean is that how valuable is that Amazon. Oh infinitely valuable I think I think they sit there. I think Jeff bezos sits in his basement Eastman at three o'clock in the morning seething because he has all this data from Amazon Echo products but it just doesn't know what's in the other room what's in there. WHO's in there I mean I really that's and I know we'll put wheels on this thing? In a role round have access to the high where you're sleeping go in the bathroom and go through and medicine cabinet. I mean who knows <hes> but it's lots and lots of data that I mean these Amazon sells everything yeah. They sell everything and they wanna see what you got this is I think this is one of the reasons for this. <hes> this version of the echo that takes pictures pictures of your outfit the whole point is I see what's in your life. Don't look but anyway the Stacey Stacey Higginbotham has my echo look. I'm sure it likes her outfits much better <hes> well <hes> This Week in Law Blinding Hal is super knew it like she paul she had she is a great look and she she's very put together and she's creating foam on instagram every day with this thing so he's an I'm glad I'm not so I have a new. I've been a new kick. I've been thinking about because we talk a lot. There's a lot of energy spent <hes> about artificial intelligence. You know I think Elon Musk and others have said oh no oh you know it's the terminators coming in this whole notion that A._i.. The fear of A._I.. Is that it's going to somehow at some point gain consciousness and it's GonNa Think <hes> we don't need humans. It's going to wipe us out or it's GONNA turn us into batteries as it did in the matrix or something like that and I've I've read a couple of people most recently. You've all nor Harari in his twenty-one lessons for the twentieth century said no one is ever demonstrated that if you get better at A._I.. At some point you leap this this gap into consciousness. We don't know where consciousness caused from. There's no evidence that you feed machine a lot of information's you know it becomes a great chess player and then suddenly it goes. I think I'M GONNA eat Gary Kasparov for lunch. It doesn't jump to that unconscious is thing we don't know where conscious comes from. Maybe someday we'll be able to so I'm going to submit. This is my new thing that consciousness is not the threat of A._I.. The threat of the I is the humans who use A._I.. Now you've been talking about this little bit <hes> on on motherboard there was a piece in slate this morning that creeped me out. It turns out license plate. Reading software has gotten so cheap and it will work with hundred dollar cameras that it's being installed everywhere license license plate readers they give an example of <hes> housing complex where people are using it to make sure that you know you're not abusing your rental agreement that you you know if it's they are everywhere. It's about one hundred dollars for the software on one hundred dollar camera cities we the city I live in Petaluma. I noticed was putting up cameras on every traffic light every street light and I realized they're not doc valuable if you have to have somebody sitting and watching them if you've got four hundred cameras in a town of fifty thousand people what are you just got a eight hundred officers looking at them. No you put licensed procreating software on and then if you WanNa know where Leo was last night you know yeah exactly and this is an example <hes> to me Pailin tears another one and I'm really interested that you caroline have been able to break through because Pailin tear has been almost a legendarily secret company. The in Silicon Valley funded by Peter Thiel <hes> Alex Carp is it's Secretive C._e._o.. And we knew it was some sort of what is it we don't I don't know what we do. Yeah Yeah I guess the best way to describe it is that it's an aggregate or it takes data from like all different types of sources and it organizes a and is able to find connections in ways that like if you're just a regular human analyst you might not be able to do it or if you're just a person with access to five different databases and you're looking to use something from there. I mean that's not actionable. Just having all this unstructured data so that's pollen tears roll <hes> it organizes it and it's able to make charts and sort through very very sensitive data very easily as easy as making a search. This is what's worrying me day. I it's not that it's going to become conscious and got want to get rid of the humans. It's that there are humans who will be using this. You wrote that three hundred California cities northern California cities. I I wouldn't be surprised if pedal Emma is one of them are using Pailin tear why did pedal Emma put up all those cameras to gather data and what are they going to do with the data noteworthy here the <hes> the noteworthy thing here is that I started this whole thing by sending public information requested individual cities and almost all of them came back empty. The only one that came back with information was through the N._C.. Are I see the northern Northern California Regional Intelligence Center so even if you're a citizen living in one of these cities and you want to find out about it. There's really no way for you to know I mean only by filing a public record quest to this regional center <hes> do you realized like because here's the thing like police officers can request this type of data from the N._C._R._I.. See <hes> but there's no paper trail for those individuals cities and there's really no transparency for the citizens that are actually living there so this is run through the Department of Homeland Security. Do they say it's to cut down terrorism right so on their website. They claim that they will they. Most of their efforts are focused on major drug operations and terrorism operations friends <hes> but at the same time there's they will pretty much investigate anything that a local police department request help with and this could be I mean literally any type of crime it could be it could be a robbery. It could be a domestic assault. It could would be really any type of investigation that a local police department is operating so this isn't just a <hes>. Let's catch people trying to commit like a major major act of terrorism this. Is You know local local operations <hes> and this is you know they've a massive amount of data on the people that are living in those areas on one hand. I would say oh that's good. We're going to be a safer city in pedal and by the way our county is one of the participating fourteen participating in northern California counties in the NC Yup our I see there are no. That's going to be safer. It's going to be safer here. I think I duNNo. I think that this is it's sort of reminds me about the arguments events that people make with respect to privacy like Oh. I have nothing to hide so I shouldn't have any reader worry about this. You know I don't mean yeah I mean if you have nothing to hide legal bathroom door open. <hes> tried that argument people the like that there's reason it's not that you have something to hide your criminals. Just that you we deserve to live privately rescuers the slippery slope you mentioned that you know why are the installing these cameras in Petaluma and it doesn't matter why now once they have the cameras they can later decide Oh. Hey we have all these cameras. Why don't we do X._Y._Z.? So it's really the infrastructure is is just another step director sliding down slope well. Here's another example I just wrote a piece for fast company about emotion. Technology cars cars read emotions understand what your mindset is understand. What's happening in the car? This is part of the self driving cars are like supercomputers on wheels with all these centers pointing outward what we're not talking enough about is the sensors pointing inward at the drivers and everybody else but what's interesting is effective is in the lead with this technology of being able to read emotions of drivers and they're not doing it by installing cameras in cars. They're using the cameras already installed in cars and they just tapping into that feet. It's it's like an it's like a <hes> you know after the fact kind of an idea where it's like well you know these high in cars have cameras why don't we just read people's emotions with them and so this is this is what they want the emotions. Can I stand for self self driving vehicles. It's important to know what that other drivers going to do. That doesn't bother well. There's so the big promise so yes vehicles whether the biggest the big thing is this is going to go online before they're fully self-driving but the MO- most urgently that Europe has as enacted legislation saying that by two thousand twenty one all car sold in Europe will have to have <hes> basic reading funk's they'll be able to they have to tell whether the drivers falling asleep whether the drivers now this is. This is a Cadillac in their C._T._X.. For their yeah <hes> autopilot feature yes because as you know with same with Tesla you gotTa keep your hand on the wheel. <hes> and you have to keep your eyes on the road. It used to be that was enough to have your hand on the wheel but Cadillac actually has a camera that sees where you're looking so that if you look down or away from the road it while the autopilots on it can actually vibrates your seat and then eventually disengages it I to trick it. I had a cover my eyes but I was too scared driving well. That was the thing I was scared to actually do that so I did like this and and you know I had my peers through my fingers and it did but while exactly I mean it does is looking at you driving the best thing and if they were able to get that and I guess with on Star they probably are getting Eh. I love that technology because you can be able to look at a store and say is that open and they'll they'll know what you're looking at and they'll say oh there so so starbucks is not open right so caroline you filed a public records request and got the Pal user manual for cops right so yeah this was a specific user manual that seem to be designed for COP Sabir operating in like the West North California area and full disclosure. The manual was almost unreadable. It took me several hours to be able to parse all of this through because of jargon because it was just poorly organized it was poorly worded <hes> they did not define any of the terms terms they just sort of said that the way it was organized was here's how you make a search <hes> and then they sort of introduced different charting functions <hes> confidential and proprietary not for distribution so please clarify. There is another another thing we would say in my day. We used to go through dumpsters to find that kind of thing go ahead well so searching for records in Pailin tear start start in the graph applicator. This is the worst this menu you're right caroline. This horrible like unreadable secure. Yeah my God right. I think it's the best way to describe it is in terms of what you can do and what information that you're starting with. If you're starting with just what's the name you can get. I mean if they have it in their data systems if they have it in police record management systems if they have it through other types of private data that they obtain things that could have access to people's <hes> email addresses is or bank account numbers really sensitive information like that I mean this is all polled instantly just from a simple name search and if you know somebody's license plate and you use this example in your article <hes> you can know where they because of license plate readers and cameras everywhere you can know pretty much everywhere. Somebody's been and win for any time period right so basically you set the radius and you say you're looking for a particular license plate plate number. That's traveled in like I don't know let's say a hundred mile radius or more than you can set a date range if you want and since they have time stamps and they have location stamps <hes> you can get all that information and they also have a picture ship the car and the license plate itself so all of this information is storage just by searching license plate number with the name this is I mean we've all seen this on T._v.. On N._C._I._S. and stuff but really this is even much better than anything with the name you can get a persons email address phone number current previous addresses bank accounts social security numbers business relationships family relationships license information height weight I color if it's an agency's database. You can get it so that's what Palim tears doing. Do they talk about the sources of this information. Are they getting it. Some of it obviously from D._M._v.. Department motorcycles is it all government agencies is it Google and facebook see the N._C.. Are I see specifically fusion center so they would use patterns here to take different. Police like local police records. This would be like crime arrest etc data and pollen tier also says that they get data really vaguely from government and federal agencies so this could be where you're getting information about like license plate data for instance <hes> where he could get information about like birthday whether you're married whether you have a business logged in your name that kind of thing right some public records in terms of email addresses or bank account records. I mean that would be something that would have to be acquired privately in most situations <hes>. Do you have any evidence that the for instance in their manual they show you examples goals of different databases. You can search including A._l.. P._R. is licensed automatic license plate readers. You could do L._A._p._D.. <hes> l._S._D.. border-crossing Vehicle Query D._M._V. Vehicle Query National License Plate eight reader vehicle queer and that's just a portion of it. I imagine this would scroll down quite away. It's an incomplete listen. It's also with only a sample search <hes> a lot of the examples that they have that they had <hes> you could see the search query was pound here and then they had like example profiles that were named things like John Bad Guy Smith when you can see on the right <hes> if you choose as a particular profile like let's say you Sir John Bad Guy Smith and there's ten people in the area with that same name you can click on one of them. You can see the specific details that distinguish him from the other John Bad guys Smith's in the area bomb view at home. If there's an area with ten bad Guy Smith's there don't go to that Area Day away that guy area yeah. I like the the icons they use for John. I think it's a hamburglar. I'm sorry but I think that's the hamburglar so you should subscribe to this because you always talk to the audience and find out here who is coming so. Did you know email address down with the U._S.. Dot Org say again. That's the down down with the U._S.. Dot Org that's the email domain. Oh Oh Yeah J. B. G. O. One at down with the U._S.. Dot Org because as you know anybody any malefactor you know as doesn't like the America that we we know I'm scared this now. Let me ask you because this came out. A couple of days ago was Ernie reaction to your article. <hes> Pailin tear emailed me once and said. Why did you say that we didn't respond to multiple requests for comment? I said because you didn't that's pretty much the thing that I've heard from pollen tier <hes> interpreted in terms of the response I mean I guess what sort of surprise me is that I generally hadn't understanding of. You've sort of how Pailin tear worked but in terms of in terms of getting the visuals and in terms of seeing the actual manual. It seems like that had <hes> it seems like that had an effect on people because I mean it's one thing to hear that there's like like this secret omnipotent data company that's operating in the shadows with <hes> with regional level governments and investigative agencies but it's another one to see the you can just search your name and find out virtually everything about yourself <hes> so oh yeah and this is accessible to any law enforcement agency in Northern California pretty much. It's only law enforcement though right right so it'd be it would be law enforcement and any local police department within those counties Arnie's would be able to tap into those resources you know who decides that that's who gets to see it or if they if anyone is in a position to make an exception to that like for example mall cops may be or help Mark Paul Bark. Yeah are usually aren't they usually private security forces. No private security force is a matter of law or is this company policy that they decide who gets to see it and who doesn't. Right so I think that's one important thing to keep in mind is that you know pound. Here is the infrastructure but exactly how it gets used. That's all in the hands of the regional intelligence agency. What's what's important is how the data that would not have been actionable is made actionable and is put into the hands of just other right in terms of? I don't really get into the article in terms of like you do have to enter for instance like a case number in order to make a search in the <hes> the P._r.. Database and in terms of the people search at least in that version of it. It's an open field so when you're saying <hes> the reason for your search it seems like you can just type in her words and that'll be accepted <unk> type the reason for the search search purpose field this could be a case number or a suspect night or I'm just bored. I'm sitting here. I thought I'd find out what my this is kind of timely because this is what ice is using this weekend end <hes> track down <hes> undocumented immigrants arrest them and deport them the big issue for me and I and I have to say on the one hand you want law enforcement to have good tools protected by courts and and warrants but you also want to have some oversight in the data and the big concern for me is a private company. Data sources may be corrupt may be inaccurate <hes> face face we know face recognition is often used in these cases. We know that's often full of false positives or I see does have access to facial recognition this was in. I believe it was an Oakland and the head of the Oakland. Police Department submitted a a letter to to the town when the because they're going to be voting on whether or not to ban facial recognition I think on the sixteenth <hes> and they said <hes> based on this band we wouldn't be able to access the facial recognition <hes> through the N._C.. R._I._C. Number here is that like data can be combined with all different other types of databases as well and for instance. One of the documents that I got back was how to use pound talent here with Thomson Reuters clear which is similarly giant database tool for police and I think that what you were getting up before is really important to keep in mind that you know the way that you act on data is is only as good as the data itself and you know we know that the state of policing in this country isn't perfect so I mean I think the important thing to keep in mind is how this could be used against marginalized populations and what we're seeing what the ice rates. I mean that's pretty much trope worst case scenario. I'm looking at your table of where this data comes from and of right so I think it's important to know this is through the D._O._J.. And this is in general how fusion centers work <hes> on because pollen tear itself is incredibly vague about exactly they may be getting it from additional sources but this one includes amusement parks cruise lines hotels motels gaming industry gaming industry sports authority security already well. I S peas email providers daycare centers mental health records physician patient records veterinary. Mary Record says veteran knows all about your dog annual so this is a very broad net and this is the D._O._J.. But this is their guidelines right and this is a right so the talents here I would bet because it's a private business goes beyond this yeah. I think what's important to know you know the N._c._R._I.. C. D. H. S. entity and if you have some sort of like subpoena or you can request certain type of data from these private agencies then this automatically can get pulled into Pailin tear which organizes the data in a way that perhaps it would not have been able to us to have been used poor people say oh it's public data big deal but we've seen already in many ways how <hes> public data is changed by companies like Pailin tear you know every time you buy or sell a house it's recorded at the county seat and in a big book and and basically you'd have to go to the county building to find out who lives at that address but now because so many data companies <hes> find this valuable they send people down to county seats they record all this. They put it in a database. You know who else finds his valuable Russia when they're trying to assassinate political dissident or China when they want to track I mean what are the chances that this is <hes> not a target for hacking by my God yeah the Chinese government and the Russian government the chances are zero zero either. They're trying and failing trying and succeeding to get this access so they can track their dissidents real palm. I think my major concern here is how this is going to be used <hes> by police departments against like bodies bodies that are already at risk <hes> you know I mean in particular like people of color living in these regions <hes> I mean yeah it's only. I think you know like I said earlier. It's these investigate this. These investigations are only as good as data this informing them and you know for instance with I wrote an article a couple months ago about <hes> police departments with <hes> that are that we're using prayed poll which is a predictive policing software and I mean dozens of police departments around the country using this and there was no disclosure at all publicly about this and what it claims to do is take crime records crimes that were reported or crimes that were acted upon and put it into this database and basically tell help police go back and look at those places so obviously the question that you have to be asking there is <hes> how good are those crime report records. You know I mean obviously not every crime gets reported and the types types of crimes that are prosecuted or like investigated by police. I mean that's going to vary place by place and there's going to be you know individual bias that comes into play there <hes> so there's a lot of like systemic factors that has to the plays into the way that the state is used on and I think you know principle. That's another good example and that's been combined with talent here. In places like Los Angeles crediple and Powell to your have been used simultaneously at the same time I mean that's a huge huge amount of power put in the hands police that at times have a contentious relationship with their citizens. You know and you know those underlying problems aren't being addressed and at the same time we have these like amplifying forces that are making it easier easier and easier to do these superpower investigations in a way that we've never ever seen before is applied to move. We're talking about the power V I in the hands of various people but you could you could turn this data loose with the right kind of I two essentially do <hes> a enhanced fishing expedition. They're doing that right now inside pal I guarantee you. That's that's the most valuable thing we data. We we now know data's hugely valuable and that the the differences that by connecting data from a disparate variety of sources you can infer connections that you couldn't see before and that is to me that I don't know if this makes us safer. I don't feel like it does safer. I'm all for police having to tools. They need to track down criminals but I don't think this makes us safer in the long. Every time there's advances in technology. <hes> political and police authorities always use those advances to change the balance of power between the citizens and themselves and so I've always argued for if they can track us we should be able to track them if they can record us. We should be able to record them. There should if there's a video cam room you should also have a video. There is a disparity in power that is yes you. Can't I mean I don't care if you could record anything but it's growing doing because of technology and that's not right we should always push back and you know technology is good but not when the technology when when one side of the equation has a monopoly police want to do their jobs they WANNA fight crime. We want them to fight crime. We want less crime all of that stuff. That's all true but every thing like policing has to be balanced against other consensus. We have a constitution exactly and that's why we have rights and that's why have all that stuff but if if it's being circumvented through technology that nobody's really paying attention to that's a problems. Let's take a break. <hes> Mike Algan is here Elkin Dot Com the Nice Book See Nice Pictures <hes> of books of books. No people of Mike is Family. He's at <hes> Mike Albert on twitter and <hes> his gastro nomadic adventures continue in Barcelona this fall in September right gastronome dot net take a look. It's going to be amazing if you like delicious food in wonderful wine yeah if you one of those people I guess you'd probably enjoy <hes> Carolina Haskins also here great work motherboard <hes> it's amazing what a public information requests can do. I think it's just a matter of time before we cut those off that freedom of information that is anti American that is a problem people like caroline going rooting around from. Did you ever dumpster diving for this kind of stuff. No no my computer. You're the modern you're the modern yeah reporter now. We don't have to go in the dumpsters anymore. Things baby boomers do yes. Hey I gotta show you something. I'M GONNA take off my shirt here. I gotTA show you something. It's really a superhero job for. I am allowing the Fox out. I even have eh I even have Fox Mint Mobile Socks Fox socks ladies and gentlemen. I have been converted to Mint Mobile. Let me tell you this is the best the best network for people with smartphones phones ever meant mobile dot com slash twit. If you're still using one of the big four wireless providers take a look at your bill. It's Cray cray. My Verizon phone is ninety bucks a month and I was you know I thought Oh it's a a good deal unlimited data and texts phone calls but they're inflating the price because they have those big retail stores. They've got all the hidden fees meant mobile provides the same exact premium network coverage. You used to at a fraction fraction of the cost because they've eliminated the middleman. Everything is online no retail locations and I gotta say this is the modern way to do a cell phone a smartphone every plan on minimum mobile's writing on the T. mobile double networks. If you've got T. mobile in your neck of the woods this is a great solution it comes with unlimited nationwide text and talk and you stop paying for unlimited data. You never use you choose between plans with three eight or twelve gigabytes of four four G. L. T. E. Data. I actually paid three hundred dollars. I bought a year ahead of time because I love that. That's a great price twelve gigabytes a month. I'm never gonNA use that up but if I ever do use more you can buy it at a very affordable price. Use Your own phone with any mobile plan. I'm using I love it too by the way the one plus seven pro it's by new favorite phone and I go around town. I do Harry Potter Wizards Unite Lots of data but I still well under twelve and it's costing me twenty five bucks a month month. It's amazing use your phone with any mobile plan. You can keep your phone number along with all your existing context all your ditching that old wireless bill. I am such a fan of the Fox. I can't believe in fact so much so that I'm I'm now have accounts with all the major carriers. I'M GONNA dump them all at because why not meant mobile dot com slash twit get your new wireless plan fifteen dollars a month. It'll be shipped to your door for free you get the SIM card great support support by the way these are not not suddenly <hes> at a adult luck with support their great mint mobile dot com slash twit as little as fifteen dollars a month meant is the Fox is smart. He's also pretty he cool mint mobile dot com slash twit of on the SIM card. They have the Fox playing guitar and the campsite. This is awesome mint mobile. Thank you meant for saving me a lot of money. I I don't want to say I'm all in on the men but <hes> <hes> on his essay mint mobile shop clever join the move mint I have to say I was really pleased when they said Hey we want to get ads. I said yes I've heard of you. Twenty five bucks a month twelve gigs. I've heard of you. He's actually drinking mint tea. Are they all the way down in my minimum among our our editors going to invade vade area fifty one in September by the way. Is that going to happen. You Know Air Force says we stand ready. I'm not sure that's a good idea. The last time I checked the facebook event for the area fifty one raid. I think <hes> three quarters of a million people had responded that they were going. Oh my God so the theory is that there's alien technology hidden away at area fifty one that the government is never told us about it so let's just let's just go on mass and just march in and get it. What could possibly go wrong? This is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. They can't stop us all new machine guns can you all embar wire in the air. Force has planes and missiles and I don't know I don't know if there's a good idea didn't didn't they try to levitated the Pentagon in the sixties or this is kind donald baby boomers. Do we try to the Pentagon. Your kids who are trying to invade area fifty one was this there was this name that I saw and it was just <hes> it was almost like a battle plan and they had like various types of Internet niche subcultures <hes> but all ones that were like a little bit little bit off center. You know you had like you would freeze. I think that was now that I'm only remembering is on that list. No no disrespect intended to phrase but they have different groups in different colors sort of combining on on area fifty one. I don't know if I were the government. I'd be scared. They're coming. This has been the best force. There's the attack plan this the best source <music> of me medication ever right. There's one people battle royale streamers foam. I Gosh yeah I play for it and I can. I can do this. I can do this. We can do this. Yeah yeah you know even so by now they've moved. Whatever was there out right so even if you get in there is not going to be anything left right well? They use the alien technology to sort of beam themselves to another part of the galaxy. You know what are the chances that a that a place that that flies experimental aircraft that people in would see strange aircraft in the area how does that <hes> <hes> so <hes> apple updated the macbook air macbook pro and I think this is maybe sad killed the twelve inch Mac book nothing it was sexy it was innovative was influential. It was the smallest Mac Book Harry mccracken writing a brief eulogy for the Twelve Inch Mac book machine of unfulfilled promise a tear a tear shed. I thought it was you know it was a little underpowered and I guess the macbook air probably scratches all the itches that <hes> the twelve inch did but I you know I like that old MAC book I I was a pretty sweet Willard reminds us back in the day. Hey when apple was so far ahead of everyone else in laptops so far they just they just have lost the plot. They keep coming out with things that people don't really want keyboards that don't really work and it's like back you know like five six seven eight years ago. There was just nothing like books nothing they were just perfect. They had like the MAG safe connectors. They didn't have the dump strip they <hes> you know etcetera etcetera but nowadays they <hes> and I noticed using Pixel Yep Yep do use Musa Mac Book Caroline I do yeah. I have an Air I haven't I love my air in the battery. Life is great and I carry around. I I'm not a fan of the butterfly keyboard I have to say yeah. My Work Laptop has the butterfly keyboard and it's awful. It's been causing me problems <hes> yeah. There's this thing where if I pressed the shift key it axes. If I'm pressing the command key so then the next letter that I press it will just open some random APP which is great. I love that never know what's is going to happen. It's kind of like a macbook roulette. <hes> there was an issue with zoom. This is bad behavior zoom which makes the you know we've all used it who hasn't used it <hes> teleconferencing software. It's kind of like skype Yep. <hes> and there's a lot of times you would use it <hes>. Maybe you'd uninstall it afterwards. Guess what even if you uninstalled zoom on your Macintosh it put a hidden web server on your computer that was continuing to run even after after uninstalled and bad guys could use to turn on your cameras who silently quietly put you in zoom conference with them apple <hes> to the right thing though they just pushed a Mac update without your knowledge disabling that Server Zoom Zoom did not respond to well to the calls to disable it so apple had to zoom released a fixed up on Tuesday eh but apple said it's actions will protect users past and present from the undocumented web server vulnerability without affecting or hindering the functionality of the zoom APP itself which means Zoom didn't have to do this yeah. That's what's that's what strange because that the whole the whole selling point of that was it would open up <hes> the meeting faster in that everything would be faster but I mean I guess not always running in the background but I think that's a bad behavior. Xavier always have a web server running in the back even after you've uninstalled. That's not nice anyway no before I downloaded zoom in on my desktop but I had my on my phone I deleted it anyway but it doesn't I mean <hes> you know it's not my preferred <hes> teleconferencing software but everybody all the time so <hes> if I was very excited when the Apple Watch <hes> series four was it the most recent recent one came out with walkie-talkie. I thought my wife and I oh we'll just press a button and say Lisa. Are you there and she'd press a button say hi hi can can can you bring me. Can You bring me a cup of coffee. What what no it's not working so apparently remember the facetime vulnerability lead bad guys to get an facetime conversation and watch you? Well apparently walkie-talkie same thing same thing you could <hes> listen the other customers iphone without consent apple is disabled the walkie talkie APP pending a fix apple pods is for the bug and the inconvenience of being unable to use walkie-talkie while a fixes fixes made all five walkie-talkies. Yes ECK and nobody to complain too. It's not working. I stopped using walkie-talkie like four days in it was so annoying yes. I thought this is going to be great. It'll be like nextel phone. Yeah I mean the APPs the do that have been around forever on phones and people are a couple of days what they call. It's not that cool. There is one apple feature that is being used to do God's work in Hong Kong where the protesters are you know protesting about it. The extradition treaty with China Yup the Chinese firewall of course is is keeping <hes> them from accessing content so they're using apples airdrop allows devices send photos and videos over Bluetooth Wifi to breach China's great firewall to spread information to mainland Chinese visitors in the city confused the protests airdrop open and you'll say they'll say oh friends going to send you something and you go really and you get you get some information. <hes> this is this is <hes> this is to let people know about the <hes> extradition bill and it's one way around the the great firewall China one of the things that the story highlights is something a lot of people don't realize that Hong Kong is a huge tourist attraction for mainland Chinese to it's fun. It's fight goes like wow this is very strange <hes> and this is the whole point because all of that there's a total blackout within mainland China of the fact that Hong Kong that that what is it one quarter of the population Hong Kong at some point is protests <hes> just a massive of unprecedented <hes> ongoing sustained protests which the mainland Chinese people have no that yeah blacked out completely blacked out so the so as they stand there gawking at these protests. They're sending details about what this means. What it all is it's attack? Here's a tweet from ALICEA. She arrived at T._S._T.. Station and immediately her phone is bombarded with simplified Chinese flyers by airdrop explaining. You know what's going on simplified. Chinese is the version that mainland Chinese people use whereas in Hong Kong they use classical Chinese. That's that's why it's newsworthy that the using simplified proves that teams getting Chinese visitors how I didn't know that yeah very interesting so this is fascinating but you know they're. You're always going to find a way around it. I hope it's just the the problem is trying to get mainland. Chinese people care because the big controversy in China is don't rock the boat we have or on the road to prosperity. Let's not go oh for freedom. Let's go for prosperity and I it was a futile nation fifty years ago hundred years ago and and has made amazing progress but at some costs yep. Here's among other posters. Did you know over the past month. Hong Kong seen seen three massive rallies with as many as two million people taking the streets. Don't wait until freedom has gone to regret. It's loss freedom isn't God given its fought for by the people. I think we may be using that soon here. Yes just remember the new yeah exactly <hes> wow that's <hes> so that's an apple technology that is working quite well really clever. I thought isn't that great. It's a feature but the Chinese Communist Party would consider it a bug yeah. We can't block it. Yeah Apple is is making T._v.. They've already said we don't want to be Netflix. We're going to do handcrafted Artisanal Block Brooklyn style shadowing millions of dollars per episode. This made one of the shows which is called see about <hes>. I don't know about a future to wherever that he's blind yeah. Jason Momoa is in it Alfre woodard <hes> fifteen million dollars in episode you know in the game of thrones here that doesn't seem like that much well the for for the first many seasons of game of thrones they didn't reach that level so they eventually aleve fifteen million and so they're going in just throwing big at first but so far apple has demonstrated a complete lack of ability to do compelling programming go ahead caroline yeah. I just think that's I don't know that's a huge gamble. Make up front. I duNNo. I remember that I don't even remember the name of it that like reality type or game awful the APP Yeah Yeah Yes yes. That's it. He had people pitching the so the idea was a time your pitch to the investors of Shark tank basically so they put them on an escalator and they pitch to be done with running for president. We'll see I put banner chuck in the <hes> Chat Rooms escalator. It's the escalator pitch. Janecek was one of the judges Gary along with his paltrow and <hes> will I am it was terrible quite a brain most they're terrible but that was made by other people they brought in Sony executives and they're they're bringing in major talent and all that stuff it's a lot of money. Apples got money but even when apple took over Carpool Karaoke they're kind of smothers. They took James Corden out of it right. What's Carpal they also did super high end cameras and it was good and better production values in the whole point of it was his cheesy and low-budget right and they didn't get that so anyway? We'll see if if a the planet of the blind people is going to be better. Did you see these stranger stranger things a are at. I didn't see this in the New York Times I I didn't see the actual ad but so if you had so google lands and you saw the ads for the Star Court mall which is the Hawkins Indiana Mall all this stranger things that by the way they took an old eighties mall that was decrepit an empty and rebuild this set the rebuilt it. It's so cool I haven't seen all of its no spoilers. NOPE <hes> but here's what would happen if you'd pointed your Google Lens at the print ad it would come alive. That's pretty neat. That is one of the stranger things I've ever seen. We saw we were in Hollywood couple nights ago and <hes> wandering around on Sunset Boulevard they do all the movie the billboards the movie billboards there are amazing. Yeah Stranger things is just like there's a whole several blocks where every billboard is stranger dangerous. Things and it's like you have to read it as you driving on the street. These are gigantic and it's like Burma Shave ads yeah caroline. Don't listen although you could use this for your things. boomers do group. Yes Oh my God. This is good research here. Uh beyond nobody that's twenties but you would sometimes see even though today sometimes maybe I don't know when I was a kid you drive around the country these old ads for this shaving cream and the and the whole idea was they would be sequential right now. They always be a poem and it would be a joke and would end with Burma Shave okay. I'm sorry I even brought it up. Do you WANNA see <hes> Burma Shave sign. Where are they now? I don't know here. It is if you so you'd go by. The first sign says if you then don't know who signs these are you can't have driven very far. Burma Shave Genius Marketing Permit Shay was out of business by nineteen sixty six coincidence. I had a whole book of them. One of my one of my new hobbies is <hes> taking pictures of ghosts signs which I see everywhere cosign. It's when when the head assign a building about it and still there we have something pedal. There's a really cool one we saw driving in what was it was like <hes> the chicken and egg hatchery or chicken farms. There's there's one that <hes> in France where it's like. They're actually Advertising Telegraph Services. Wow it's so cool. That's kind of a neat <hes> ending cartographic. Here's another thing you realize we got a lot of wine. Countries and everything used to be called champagne so you go to the Kava country in Barcelona and his his champagne because they say it anymore. Because it's a registered trademark. Everything used to be champagne. Yeah Champagne is in those places where they don't make champagne region said you can't do that so Amazon's making the remaking the Lord rings spent a Billion Dollars for the rights for the rights and they are also making a game and not related to which I'm confused lease please come on. It's an emo multi player massively multiplayer online game <hes> so this they're going to merchandise the hell out of this right. There was a lord of the Rings Online. I didn't know this in the mid in two thousand. Is Anybody Care about Lord of the rings anymore. Is that a thing anyone wondering okay. We got people like read. The Books Harry Potter's even over. Is it yeah yeah it's Kinda sad after like like eventually at some point down the post merger <unk> like after the books come out and you just merchandise everything and like adnew stuff to the cannon people get Exalted. I think that stupid kid with lightning on his forehead one more time I was in the bookstore last night and there's a whole table of Harry Potter Games and they all have Harry Potter vaccine. It's vaccine cop. Had you ever Play Cup had Great Game Right Cup head. No it's a probably the hardest game ever <hes> it. It's kind of an old twenties cartoon style Max Fleischer Cartoon Style <hes> they're making a Netflix T._v.. Show out of Cup head the Cup had show is in production it will channel the Games. Oh Mosh to Fleischer era animation very violent very violent. Yeah as cartoons used to be yeah but I think it'd be fun yeah yeah all right. Let's take take a break. That's more to talk about Carolina Haskins his here for motherboard. Oh love the motherboard. I just WanNa say love the motherboard. Could you do a freedom of Information Act request of area fifty one. Wow Oh good question. Wouldn't that be be similar invading it yeah an easier and if you get something that's redacted redacted redacted that's going to be that's something that's an article Yeah Yeah. She's excited excited about. It could tell Mike here elegant dot com. If you missed anything this week. We had a fun week on twit. Here's a little sample of some of the things on twit unexpected announced with this week. <hes> crater celebrates thirty years of sound blaster with of new eighty nine and as seven sound cards like Nintendo consoles have enjoyed a renaissance with the N._S.. Many of the S._I._D._S. million of capitalize on this trend by serving a market of ten to fifteen people globally with reimagined imagined game last or tards invented packaging rate if you're watching what by one bio west today the new Iowa's thirteen came out yesterday. If you're in the public Beta we all downloaded the public Beta. We should demonstrate on straight this but I don't know if we can really do it properly now. Look at me. Look at the camera. Look at me. You know we got there. I ran a marathon today. I'm so proud all about android you remember a couple of weeks. Go right brought on my Motorola's zoom could power hour you found it. I got the power supply ships to me play music number look at that look at the triangulation Bitcoin is based based off this <hes> wonderful horrible idea not that interested in what is the price of bitcoin right. I'm interested in the technology. bitcoins whole point is that it's decentralized but it's not as decentralized as you'd really like it to be to it. Technology isn't always pretty but we are that was a triangulation Bram Cohen the guy who invented bittorrent and maybe he's mad. That bitcoin took his a bit yeah. I just a bit here's a quote. This was a tweet from Theo fight. The question was explained Bitcoin to Grandpa and the explanation was imagine if keeping your car Har- Idling Twenty four seven produced solved soda coup puzzles you could trade for heroin. That's Bitcoin. I finally understand it makes sense now. I understand our show today brought to you by was sobbing Sabi not that green hot green stuff next to your Sushi but it is hot. It's hot cloud storage from two of my favorite people in the world. David friend the founder of CARBONITE HIS C._T._O.. Jeff Flowers was actually jeff who created a patented technology for writing a hard drives sequentially not in blocks. That's how every other hard-drive works but by writing sequentially they were able to get INCR- improved speed improve reliability. That's how carbon I was founded. They've gone onto found on this new was Saba cloud storage and it's incredible they are able to using this revolutionary process. Give you enterprise grade cloud storage. That's one fifth the cost of Amazon S. three and six times faster one fifth the cost six times faster. They never have hidden fees for egress or A._P._I.. They have a great A._P._I.. Because it's Amazon has threes A._P._I.. So they're completely compatible the you know already know how to use it eleven nines of durability or ability they do integrity checking on your data and this is so great in this day and age of ransomware they do immutable data so you can say this data may not be changed by ransomware not by a fumble fingered employees not by me me not by anybody. immutable data is the secret to keeping your data safe hip appliance finra compliant C._J.. I._S. compliant. We're everybody's moving to the cloud. Gartner Group says by twenty twenty five eighty percent of of businesses will have shut down their data center. Ten percent today are in the cloud. It's going to be eighty percent five years Zada Bites. We'll let me tell you. I know if you're a lot of businesses thinking about this right now. Maybe you're charged with looking into this. You'RE GONNA look at the Amazon Google Microsoft. I know you are can I can't afford name to the list. 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They've been supporting us for a long time that really twit fans and I thank you twit fans for supporting us by using the offer code twit at was Sabi Dot Com <hes> watch out by the way we were mentioning promptly. I just went a little public service announcement there. There are a number of phishing scams around Prime Day so you know it happens at tax time. The fishers are just terrible. <hes> Prime Day <hes> phishing scams that look like emails from Amazon. Just be careful. What you click on is that part of your things boomers do group Click on phishing scams? I think that I think to be fair. I think that I don't know reply all did a good thing about this like a lot of people fall victim to phishing scams like even your even. If you consider yourself like a generally competent person or a skeptical person who is yeah yeah very. It's really skeptical of everything my inbox now like I got a I got email like asking to do like a survey for work and I was like emailing all my colleagues like is this real. Am I being right because I if it's from work. That's almost a sir is guaranteed to be a scam or if it's from yourself or you want you know a relative. It's not from strangers were you. Were you a friend's Fam- Caroline where you a fan of the Friends T._v.. Show you're too young for that probably friends. I've I've watched friends. It's like it's fine realize it was the number one streaming show on Netflix that in the officer who didn't know that it's leaving. It's moving off Netflix. It's going to something the new called H._B._O.. Max Boy just another thing. You'RE GONNA WANNA pay for. Thank You A._T.. And T. H. B. O.. Max will be a over the top streaming service you know H._p.. Already has has H._B._O.. Go Right now. That's going to be sharing down that is H._B._O.. Max Launches H._B._O.. Now we'll shut A._T.. And T. is going to Ruin H._B._O.. I remember the executive came in H._B._O.. and Said we want to be more like Netflix flicks. I thought Oh boy yeah <hes> so you'll be able to get friends on H._B._O.. Max as well as fresh principal air who is hot programming pretty little liars Woohoo and I guess all the H._B._O.. SHOWS IF THEY'RE GONNA if they're not gonNA have H._B._O.. Go on H._B._O.. Now C._W.. Shows Including Batman and Katy keene will be the sounds like a flop. I'm sorry exclusive movies with Reese Witherspoon. There's a name mm-hmm that's GonNa to romantic comedies and four young that titles with Greg Berlanti. I don't even know that is not a young adult. What about US boomers and Anna Kendrick lead comedy series called Love Life An animated prequel series for Gremlins? This sounds like compelling very sounds like the the worst <hes> it's going to debut in Spring Twenty twenty with ten thousand dozen hours of material like Dune Sister Hall France is it right and at that flicks tweeted the one where we have to say goodbye. We're sorry to see friends go to Warner Warner's streaming service at the beginning of twenty twenty. Thanks for the memories gang and then there's a little Coffee Cup which I'm sure means something in friends friends language. We don't know what the price will be <hes> but I can tell you right now. <hes> if they got game of thrones on there I guess a wait a minute. It's over now that it's over. They should've timed at better and so France France at ten France. It's a tens in our studio. He lives in France has decided to tax tech companies three percent on digital services if you make more than seven hundred fifty million euros in global revenue and and twenty five million in French revenue in other words if you're Google facebook or Amazon you're GONNA pay three percent tax three percent of your total annual revenue. That's a ton and and what's what's wrong with that. Why the other question is why should tech companies be tax free? No they shouldn't be but they shouldn't be specially taxed either. Well <hes> right. Should there be a like a surcharge for being a successful U._S.. Tech Company U._S. Income Tax Amazon pay this year. You know that's that's kind of that. They yeah got a Nice Check H._&_R.. Block gave him an advance on it was nice. It was a you know but no it's not zero. It's not zero. Everybody says Amazon paid zero and I it's. It's very low. It's low. It's low okay because they spend money they made. They made they put news. You know here's the thing the tax situation and France is a really touchy subject you you can verify this. I've talked a lot. I got a lot of friends in France. We spent a lot of time in France. <hes> I've been told that the the income tax rate can be like seventy percent does that roughly zen exaggeration particularly high right yes hi services you get what you pay and so we pay high taxes and get nothing but but in that tax environment tax these big companies three percent or something is really tiny drop in the bucket and I think you know I think <hes> I personally am in favor of national governments doing more to police to to tax to do whatever they want with these international companies I was listening to this political podcast where they were saying how the British parliament called Mark Zuckerberg to testify and he's like now knocking. He said no he said and so in fact he can't he can't go to Canada. He'll be arrested. Does he said no to Canada enough but I but my point is the the the the podcasters were saying dumb things namely that Wow Zuckerberg the reason is that that facebook is more powerful than the British government. I don't know the differences. The British government isn't using its power. They what they say is shutting off facebook until Mark Zuckerberg appears before us is a problem though I think it's hostile Internet. We're going to have an American Chinese Internet a Russian Internet at a European Internet. That's a different things like the right to be forgotten. That's a splinter net but taxing or or or or banning a social network until their C._E._o.. Comes for the government. Is I think perfectly reasonable. I I don't mind the attacks. I just don't think should be more tax because you're a successful tech company. I mean lots lots of taxes levied for lots of reasons and you know in Europe like the cost of gasoline super high because they're taxing that for all kinds of reasons. I think it's the United Tapes Trade. Representative said we're GONNA investigate and there may be a tariff war as a result. Go Ahead Carolina. What do you think oh no? I think it's just that I mean if citizens are treated like a well of data that the company is being is using prophets is only fair to expect the company to pay back into services that will help who's people but then I think like sentiment that like the sentiment that it's like anti-american any kind of way I mean that's that's ridiculous. I mean they like the solution into that is just taxed the companies in the U._S. but obviously the people who are saying that it's anti-american with not be in favor of that kind of tax but I don't know that's just my opinion the big fines for example against Google for <hes> for for favoring their our own services in search results. All kinds of things are also said called anti-american. I think I've said that myself but but it's really American companies are complaining to European authorities about other American companies so it's like also favoring American companies for you know namely Microsoft etc <hes> to to to sorta ding these giant companies that are <hes> you know appear to be favoring their own search results one more break. Let's <hes> I got. I've got a a bit situation for a computer science pioneer. You never heard of but he's done to things that you will know one good one bad okay. That's coming up our show today brought to you by Ziprecruiter if you need to do we you just recently done a lot of hiring. I gotTa say Ziprecruiter is the Bee's knees as my people say it is it is the easiest way to hire. 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We've got a special address for your ziprecruiter dot com slash twit show your support for the show. Just as Ziprecruiter has shown its support by going ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash twit we love ziprecruiter with it's been such a great thing for us Z.. I. P. R. E. C. R. U. I. T. E. R. dot com slash twit ziprecruiter since that french-language messes not far spelling or cle- clete Ziprecruiter <hes> yeah we hired. We've hired <hes> one two three four new people last month some of whom you don't even I know about yet but you will hear soon niantic now I said I don't like Harry Potter but I can't stop playing Harry. Potter Wizards United's the Pokemon go replacement NIANTIC was a spinoff of Google remember. They were the Google maps guys they first APP. If you know what I ap was field trip remember that turn on Mike Mike Mike <hes> Yes yes that was great. Field trip was the apper you'd go round and we'll tell you it was fun in Petaluma because there's only like four points get this. Do you know the the movie remembering. The ABBOTS was shot in that house. Yes I know you told me every time I try to American Graffiti Shahzada here empty lot. There's four points of interest anyway. They're shutting it down. It's over for field L. Trip. which is another Google works? Isn't it yeah the new Yahoo Yeah now. There's chatterbox is this. Is this <hes> oh wait a minute. That's I save chatterbox for the end that wasn't it. There's a new google. What is it called safety pin? Oh shoelace bootstrapping common household object so what what a shoe leather do shoelace. He's a so I'm especially bitter about this one Leo so let me allow me to express my view you already you went. All in Google and in your heart was broken. Yes what is shoehorn GONNA do. Shoe leather is a shoelace. It's supposedly social network organized around <hes> events and other things that are geographically specific so from Google is <hes> research army area fifty one do not invaded this great. Although if you do invaded this'll be organized that right now. It's only a New York in fact you could use it Carolina. Have you tried shoe leather. I haven't okay. I'm just playing into this whole baby-boomer thing. Did you see I'm wearing a mint sox. Have you seen that remind <hes> yeah lovely so here's here's what is shoelace. It's this dumb thing that is basically supposedly a social network but it's focused on location location based so it's basically is basically it's like five percent of Google plus. They decided to come out with this attack Italy insignificant thing I have to point out. They did this all right yes. They did teamer which I try. That was the one with the mustache. This is basically schemer that one was shut down in three years. They just need more things to shut down so they can't shut down things unless they launch things so it's an invite only testing phase on Iowa android if you want though you can go to this U._R._l.. Docs DOT CO DOT COM slash forum size st E.'s sledge one F._A._A.. I P Q l._s.. Forget it. You could say keep me in the loop Abed that shoelace get it. Oh put a bow on this story and move on shoelace. What is with Google? They really suffer for from the inability to understand human will communicate yeah. That's the humans we don't get them. This was a great <hes> p. I have to say the privacy project and the New York Times have been very interesting Charlie Wurzel and ash Goo created. I don't know if that's how you ask you. Maybe clue you yeah created a comparison between Google's original privacy policy in the in the late nineteen ninety six hundred words to their current privacy policy for twenty years later four thousand thousand words. It's crawls all coming down the page here. It is really more. It's less about Google than about how the Internet has changed in. How technology has changed because in nineteen ninety nine line? There wasn't any smartphones. They weren't collecting mobile information at all in one thousand nine hundred nine they say Google may share information about uses with advertisers business partners sponsors and other third parties but we only talk about our our users in aggregate not as not as individuals that that was cut out three months later twenty years later. It's quite the opposite we will share information things we know how about you everything and we will share it with everybody and <hes> it's a little longer location information. They didn't have that before your android device type carrier name crash reports which APPs are installed so it isn't so much demonizing Google I think as just saying shit pointing out how modern technology smartphones is given them so much more information and it's really they're they're. They're stapling on new things every time. They get caught doing something every time they start with G._D._p.. Are To be fair Gina. I think like the average person just figures like if they've been using mobile for a long time like I don't think it registers in the average person's head just how many changes have occurred. I Dunno just between like two thousand five and now for example just like the scope of the information that they have on you that they didn't necessarily even have before I dunno I think that registers in the average person. I don't know why but the Times mark did a pro opinion piece. I guess everything on the privacy project isn't opinion piece but I think it's a really interesting article and is it is an eye opener. I don't think people are really aware of how this has changed because nobody reads it right. They didn't read it was six hundred words didn't read it when it's a thousand four thousand awesome. I think that Amazon's privacy policies are still pretty short because they don't WanNa talk about it and they don't want to guarantee anything. Short is in better you know not and I've I've read their privacy policy around and because because I was wondering you know do they reserve the for themselves the right to listen without the wake word they X._y._Z. and they pretty much give themselves the ability to do anything and their privacy policy doesn't say anything about them. Promises don't use it but <hes> we make no promises yep so and then as if you thought Google assistant or Google home devices were any less intrusive. Well you probably be you'd be wrong. Google workers listen to your queries but you know this is part. I mean all these businesses do this again. I I think this is like you as you said. Carolina's just a case of people don't really think about it and so they don't pay attention but if they thought about it yeah one of the things that happens with both Amazon Echo Google and I bet you Cortana and Siri to is <hes> they need humans to listen to it to see if the computer understood it and it is how they get better <hes> v._R._T.. News which is a Flemish public broadcaster in Belgian. We'll we'll watch. We all read that yeah well if you if it's if you you you speak Flemish is really the place to go right where else you're gonNA news. <hes> was able to so apparently somebody leaked the user voice recordings from within Google to this Belgian organization <hes> the Google subcontractor passed on more than a thousand assistant recordings V._R._T.'s at these recordings we clearly here addresses and other sensitive information. That's made it easy for us to find the people involved and confront them with the audio recordings I and they they said Yep. That's my voice. I said that wow here's my favorite factoid from the article. One hundred fifty three of the one thousand recordings of the command okay Google was clearly not given <hes> so understood or for some reason without people doing the wake word they started recording and they maintain and they retain that recording now remember they only got a thousand recordings more than fifteen percent of them didn't have the wake word and included bedroom conversations conversations between parents. It's in their children. Blazing rows and professional phone calls contain lots of private information and really blazing rows or the worst kind. That's gotta be a Flemish phrase. It's got we <hes> Google's response to ars Technica actually to V._R._T.. We just learned that one of our language reviewers has violated our data security policies by leaking confidential Dutch audio data our security and privacy response teams have been activated. Oh God I bet those are robots with laser is and are investigating. We will take action. We're conducting a full review of our safeguards in this space to prevent misconduct like this from happening again. This is GonNa Happen Right. That may be the really thing people always say oh. I don't want to Amazon in my home because I don't want Amazon. Listen to me bigger. The problem may be that. It's not just Amazon. It is not just yeah just like remember a couple of months ago when I think someone used <hes> Some G._D._p.. Are Clause and requested all of the data the Amazon had about themselves through their echo device and they sent the wrong person's information the wrong recording Saddam yeah. That's what I that's what I thought about. When I read this and it's there's going to be individual instances like this? It's just I don't know I mean obviously it raises the question like company actually ice cream trucks out front run out. Get Yourself. Wow I guess the audio is very good. Air Conditioner watches. The movement of Brooklyn is is the place to be. You got an ice cream truck down my block about five times a day. I've never got nice what you don't go chasing it now. That's the fun of having an ice cream truck some some people do. I guess it's stop. I am sorry I mean you're up to you but the thought of frozen tree got me excited nice life something boomers do. It's don't pay no attention we in my day. We would chase that ice cream truck. Mr softy missed a softy stop. I WANNA rock hiphop. What was your favorite drumsticks crop in Brooklyn? Okay didn't have the ice cream trucks. I'm sorry maybe this is just gone on too. Long to we cover every possible angle of the Tech Week. Everything going on twitter is gonNA try hi. It's hide replies feature next week in Canada not here it so actually this is a I think this is kind of a significant story because we'd had many conversations <hes> on this show and also this week you can google about my prescription for the problems that plagued twitter and my prescription has always been let users delete yeah mance if they come on if I tweet do a tweet and somebody comments on the I should be able to delete it for everyone so this is that's Google Google plus did plus did facebook. Does it too but this in in this case who kind of halfway there you can hide people's comments and they go into sort of a hidden area. It's not that great of a solution but it's a step in the right direction giving the original poster control over the comments. I think that's always they're going to do because I thought it was going to be. They would look at this is different from the one where they say if it's from a famous or political figure don't look at this site they put a thing. Are you sure this is different. Yeah this. It is different so you comment and I go in there with a nasty comment and you say you not hide that it's if people wanna go in and see the hidden comments they can. They know that people are lazy and probably won't so D- values the the comments that the poster wants valued and some of the criticism. I think that I disagree with quite a bit. which is that well where somebody's fact checking would if somebody's bothered about I think that ANA social network you should be able to manage and moderate the conversation that follows of your own tweets? Three two people want to disagree on their own stream they can but I think people. I hope I'm his works against traction. Hope so twitter's like better features is just the where where it hides the some of the bad replies at the bottom I dunno it's vastly improved my twitter experience. I got the new twitter and it looks very different. They it's no longer out. It's no longer chronological or anything. It's just like I I don't they really changed the fee they have an option option to to flip over to recent tweets first and then but that it only lasts a few days and then they go back to Algorithm Mickley sorted which is kind of to me. It's kind of a dark pattern yeah. I don't know what it's doing but <hes> I think clearly what people want in many people want is reverse chronological with no algorithm and that's why he's tweet Dick because it's still does that. Yes right Yep do like if you pull up like the mobile twitter you are l like because it doesn't like I can do the whole like display latest tweets tweets I on my on my mobile APP but on desktop. I'd like type in the the mobile U._R._l.. And do it that way ATIP Atip. I'll give you another tip of using tweet Dick. I exclude re tweets and the only reason I do that. Is I feel like that's where you get the viral inflammation happening like this sudden all these re tweets. I WanNa see the originals I I have a different approach to the same problem. If somebody re tweets something objectionable I just following the person who reach tweeted it yeah and send you get quality re tweets because I follow like like Matthew. Ingram is a bunch of other people who great reactors true form. I would want to say a lot of new twitter users by other people's retweets but I'm very as we need better moderation tools for selves. Yes get so that we can make our twitter feeds. Better twitter wants to maintain the control over much all that stuff and I think you know give control the people man that's what I that's what I say boomer boomer. I wanted to mention this because he was a very important person in computer science that I thought I knew everybody all the names in history but I had never heard of Fernando quarterback though I did you ever heard of him. He didn't know who your father was. The father of my computer he just passed away at the age of ninety three great eulogies <hes> obituary in the New York Times by Katie Hafner and here's why you want to remember for another caught about tall before he came along. If you wanted to use a computer you had a print print out a bunch of punchcards stack carry them carefully without letting them fall spindle folder mutilate to the high priest running the computer who would then Deign to run your job. Maybe tomorrow maybe the next day maybe next week and if heaven having offend the cards have gotten mixed up where there was a bug you can get a back and you have to start all over in this process again. Computing was not interactive in other words Corato realized that these computers are fast enough off that they could probably do something he called time sharing he added in the early sixties something called C._t.. S._S. compatible time sharing system which allowed multiple users in different locations to access one big expensive computer at the same time through telephone lines teletype remember that yeah and without that <hes> Bill Gates. Wouldn't you know very famously Bill Gates mom and other mothers at the Lakeside School in Seattle had a cake exhale to raise the money to get a timeshare teletype in a closet at the school he and Paul Allen Learn to use computers to program computers with that interactive timeshare device and that then that all eventually led to clip he the ski created clip <hes> the other thing though he had to invent in order to make time sharing system work. You have multiple people on the same computer. If I everybody was able to see everybody else's stuff he had a create accounts and passwords <hes> so corby also he gets credit for vetting time sharing he also gets credit and interact true interactive computing for creating the pass and really isn't that what cloud computing is isn't cloud computing basically time sharing right if you use Google Stadia you're playing a game on a computer in the cloud. That's right so <hes> I think huge C.. T. S. gave rise to multiplex which was a operating system which gave rise to UNIX get it UNIX as a singular version of MULTIDEX <hes> and in fact <hes> Multidex was the inspiration for Lennox because Linus torvalds balls didn't like multidex he wanna make his own version of multidex and created Lennox Solan. Ix is what android etc is based on and Still Mac O._S.. Right back is based on UNIX UNIX clinics both can be traced back to at quarterback though so next time you log in and give a password you can thank corby the father of the computer and the interactive computing and the Password <hes>. Hey everybody thank you so much for being here. I really appreciate Carolina. You're great you showed amazing fortitude and not chasing that ice cream truck and I admired <hes> Caroline Haskins you can catch her work at motherboard advice. She does such good stuff. I look forward to senior next a public information request. Look at all this stuff. She covers including rogue cyclist creating a bike lane with toilet plungers New York. Say Baby is a good city to live in. Isn't it Yeah Nice yeah the boring Oh no and neither is caroline. Thank you caroline for being here. We appreciate it. She's on twitter caroline hot a R. O. L. H. A. Underscore. That's what I think I think the underscores the hot plus stop yeah already had Haskins. I wish I had caroline Haskins but yeah I can't even change my twitter your handle even if I wanted to apparently or you lose the verification badge but no you're stuck now. You can give yourself a clever nickname. Just change your real name. Yeah Yeah true underscore and your legal name for state yeah the first <hes> the first night line hots very nice also Mike Elegant who could be Mike A.. L. G. A. N.. On the twitter Elkin dot com don't forget <hes> gastro nomad dot net and I want to give a plug to Kevin Your your son. Who is here today? Yes he's an Silicon Valley entrepreneur and the education created something called shoe leather. No no no no no chatterbox which is we've talked about it before. It is so cool to teach kids a little bit more about see. I think one of the things parents parents are doing which I think is a huge mistake. They're teaching their kids to say. Please thank you to their Amazon Echo. I think that's a mistake. That's basically defying something. That is a machine. I think more important the kid learns it's a machine and here's what the machine does. Here's how it works. Here's what echo is and so you see. This is a smart speaker. Anyone can build and program with Google blocks. It's really really cool. It's called chatterbox. Now was on kickstarter. You raised a bunch of money on kickstarter in about one week you can't help kids are pretty turned on that kid dabbed because he built a Jitterbug <hes> <hes> you can <hes> you can <hes> get one but you have to wait a little bit. It's going to indigo go next. They've they've used up kickstarter. We're just talking about the privacy elements of these virtual assistance yeah home this one doesn't listen to you. Push the button and then no data's retained all just period and those skills Gilles. Is it as an echo. Is it Google assistant or is it your own. What is the skills? Oh it's my Kroft yeah. Mike Groff is a very cool. I yeah essentially created a visual skill builder so the kids are all the skills are actually run locally on advice. Oh so you get to program the skill kind of model you keep it private insecure through just running it locally no ads no data collection. It isn't always listening. It's a chatterbox hawks and you can make your own. How many of you ship ship them yet? Shipping is for Christmas so what's the processors in Argentina. What's in there actually based on Raspberry Pi Pi Nice Nice French actually looking at for upgrading fourth? Oh yeah those new raspberry Pi foresee awesome awesome. Yeah you have to change your power supply Chad <hes> hello chatterbox dot com give you a nice big plug because I think that's fact I'm going to get one for the kids. I think that's really really the love it yeah. Thank you Mike Thank you caroline. Thank you everybody for being here. We had a great studio audience visiting from all over the world. You guys were very patient. That's all I can ever say about our studio. They have bums of steel. Fortitude is impressive what we do is we invite them here. They sit down in the most uncomfortable chairs we can find and then we make him. Stay hey there for two solid hours. Tim Nina from Orlando and rich from San Francisco and <hes> Mickan mic was from Dublin at ten is from Patty and a rod and Caroline there from <hes> you're going to have to pronounce it for me Stilo Cuckoo mccomb bellicose telecomm- in the great state of Washington and <hes> Aaron Caitlyn visiting of course Roberto great to have you visiting from Brooklyn Queens Sagan Stettin Staten Island he <hes> he got here on the ferry echoes long way. If you want to be in our studio audience email tickets at Twitter T._V. would love having a studio audience. It makes us so much more fun <hes> especially when they pretend to laugh at my jokes. I really appreciate that. It's always nice. If you WanNa Watch live you can do that too. We have live video and audio stream available twitter T._v.. Slash light but if you're doing that you know chat because the chatmoss a big part of all of our shows they're always there at I._R._C.. Twit T._V.'s family friendly and fun I._R._C. Twit Dot TV after the fact everything we do is available on demand. Just go to our website twit DOT TV. You can even subscribe in fact. That's the best way to get every show. We do subscribe that way. The minute the shows available you'll get it automatically on your smart device and don't be a chicken subscribe to the all twit shows feed feed for all. I I subscribe to it. Are you not okay thank you. It's if you see why not then you're not you know you. You got a ton of stuff. You get it all their. That's that's right. That's it sounds like a good idea. Thanks everybody <hes>. Did I do anything I need to do anything else Carson Bonnie our producer executive producer the man in charge. I'm all set. I'm done. I can go home. I can have lunch all right. Thanks everybody.

facebook twitter Amazon instagram Carolina Mark Zuckerberg Caroline Haskins Google Barcelona Mike Mike Algan Carolina Haskins Francisco Franco Spain Williamsburg O._E._M. Mike Albert Federal Trade Commission
Bruton Parish

5 Minutes in Church History

04:59 min | 11 months ago

Bruton Parish

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked traveled back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. We are on location in colonial. Williamsburg and I'm here with a good friend of ours on many times Dr Steve Lawson. Stephen is great to be with you. I can't believe for we all right now. We are in a great. We find each other in grades nine nine. That's right so something happened here on December sixteen seventeen thirty nine what happened here well the grand evangelist himself the Grand Randy Tenor at George Whitfield came to Bruton Parish Church and preached a powerful evangelistic message right here. What's the significance of seventeen thirty nine in the life of George Whitfield well it begins his first American tour it will take him through all of seventeen forty and he will leave in January of seventeen forty he won and he was a sensation. I think in his journal he mentioned that people travel on horseback fourteen mile just to hear this one message to hear this sermon yeah and I know they traveled even further and other places in fact when Whitfield would come to preach most cities would just shut down. They would cancel judicial hearings. Ah Shop would close farmers would come out of the field. They would all come flocking to hear Whitfield pre. No one could compete no-one no-one. What was the title the sermon he gave her the title of sermon is what think he of Christ and is drawn from Matthew twenty two forty two and it's intentionally originally evangelistic because he understood this was a very religious place but without regeneration and without the new birth and so he was intentionally probing the heart and the mind to the chase. Let's cut to the chase. He's got one opportunity what Thinki- of Christ and we are standing standing right here at the church yard of Bruton Parish Church outside and we don't know whether what field was inside or outside likely was probably outside yes so so we are here with him in spirit centuries later and I thought if you could read for us near Great George Whitfield voice a choice paragraph from this sermon yeah to treat S. two yeah this is just one paragraph and it's still early in the message and it shows how just energized he was in the very beginning of this message and so here's Whitfield some and I fear a multitude which no man can easily number are among us who call themselves Christians and yet seldom or never ever seriously think of Jesus Christ it all let me just hit the pause the tax what thinking of Christ what Winfield is saying is the problem is you don't even think about Christ it all and so he goes on to elaborate they think of their shops and their farms their plays they're balls their assemblies and Horse Races Bass for Christ the author and finisher of faith the Lord who has bought poor centers with his precious blood and who is the only thing worthy thinking of alas. He is not in at all and their thoughts or at most in very few of their thoughts but believe me. Oh you earthly sensual well Karnal minded professors however little you may think of Christ now or however industriously you may strive to keep him out of your thought by pursuing suing the lust of the flesh the losted the eyes and the pride of life yet there is a time coming when you will wish you had thought of Christ more and of your pleasure is your less so he is driving at the heart that you must give Christ the place of preeminence. You know it's earlier in the sermon in you. We talked about this earlier. Are this great line from Whitfield. He is unworthy of the name of minister who is unwilling to die for the truth of the Lord Jesus and Whitfield certainly was that he he was he was willing to die and he was often attacked for preaching sermons like this there were death threats on his life and actual real threats upon his life as he even be sleeping in bed and people break into the room and try to stab him to death but Whitfield was willing to die for the message to seal it with his own blood if necessary and a preacher who's not willing to die for his message is rarely powerful as he would live for the message and he did all that for the sake of the Gospel Amen Well. That's Dr Steve Lawson. Listen on George Whitfield on location in Williamsburg Virginia and I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening to five minutes in Church history for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in Church history dot com.

George Whitfield Bruton Parish Church Dr Stephen Nicholson Dr Steve Lawson Williamsburg Steve Nichols Karnal Virginia Matthew Winfield five minutes
Putting Yourself First with EFT  (Pro-You Choices Part 3) - (Pod #344)

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

10:29 min | 1 year ago

Putting Yourself First with EFT (Pro-You Choices Part 3) - (Pod #344)

"I've worn welcome to the tapping CUNY podcast every single week, we share resources, tools and answer the question. Do you have you can get the most out of your tapping to eliminate self sabotage and to take more action today, we are in part three of the pro you series. And what I mean by pro you is making choices that are all about taking care of you. If you haven't checked out the first two parts, you can find them at tapping podcasts dot com episodes three four to episodes three four three or the first two parts next week. We're gonna share one more with you if you haven't done so or ready, you can make sure that you get all of the podcasts delivered to your smart device. Your computer your tablet, just go to tapping podcast dot com. You'll find all the instructions on how to get every episode as we move forward. His g mantra stealing. Welcome to the tapping CUNY podcast reported live to tape from Williamsburg in Brooklyn. This is three hundred forty four originally aired January second two thousand nineteen. Hi, everyone. I hope this find you. Well, where ever you are in whatever time of day, you're getting a chance to listen to this. Thanks for spending some time with me, a very happy new year to you as we step into the new year trying to make choices where we're taking care of ourselves creating resolutions are great. But if we're not doing concrete specific things to take care of ourselves. It's going to be difficult for us to meet any of our goals. And so today, what we're going to do is we're going to spend some time talking about and tapping on being okay putting ourselves I, and I would we be willing to bet that some of you simply hearing that phrase there was little knot in your stomach because you are thoughtful. You're careful you want the best for others. And there's a part of you that recognizes the fact that you have so much and that we need to be caring for others. And both of those statements can be true. And at the exact same time, we need to be taken care of ourselves. Because if you are not taking care of you, if you are not making thoughtful deliberate pro you choices no one else is going to do that. I just know this from spending lots of time conversation with my audience that you were probably in a circumstance where you're the person that takes care of everybody in your life. When things go wrong, the first person they call when there is struggle. They reach out for help. And on some of them as a person that gets some of that as well that that's flattering. It's nice to know that people see as comfortable and capable and able to help them in their times of needs. But if we are not doing that in a way where we're taking care of ourselves. Then we're doing everyone a disservice. Because if we're not healthy, we can't help others. So today, we're going to spend a little time tapping on being able to put ourselves first and take care of ourselves and not feeling guilty for doing exactly that. So to begin with what I want you to do just tap on the side. You're hinting. Nice. Big deep breath for me. And just moved from tapping point to tapping point repeating after me. Whenever I think about taking care of myself. I feel guilty. I feel selfish. I feel mean. When I take care of myself. I feel like I'm wedding other people down. Because so many people are dependent upon name. The people around me are struggling. The people around me are in pain. I don't want them to struggle. I don't want them to be in pain. Don't want them to have difficult times. But if I spend all of my time taking care of everyone else. Then I'm not going to be healthy. I'm not going to be safe. I'm not going to be in a good position moving forward. I need to spend time taking care of me. Because if I don't take care of me, no one else will. Taking care of me as my responsibility. Taking care of me is something I must do. Taking care of me is important for the short and long term. If I don't take care of me. It's going to be impossible for me to take care of anyone else. If I don't take care of me. No one else is going to do it. I must take care of me. I know that's not just a suggestion. It is an imperative. When I take the time to take care of me. I am happier. I am healthier. I am safer. When I am healthier. The world is a better place. When I am healthier. It is easier for me to respond others needs. When I am healthier. I make better choices. I give myself permission to take care of me. I give myself permission to not feel guilty. When I am taking care of me. I am worthy of taking care of myself. I give myself permission to take care of myself. Nice deep breath. I have a feeling that this is a hard one to really let it sink in. Because again, I I've I've had conversations in Email interactions and social media interactions with so many of you that you are so kind you're so wonderful that you're always putting others first. But as we've been talking about in this little mini series. We need to be making pro us choices we need to be taking care of ourselves. Because if we're not no one else is going to do that next week is the fourth and final installment of the series. I can't wait to share it with you. It's a relief fun topic. I think you'll get a good chuckle out of and it will be good moment of transformation. Because again when we are healthier when we're happier. It is easier for us to take the choices that we want to make to move towards our goals to eliminate those sabotaging behaviors if you haven't done so yet, and there's someone in your life who could use a tap along. Just like this particular at the beginning of the year to start off the new year on the right foot. Please please, please be are. Ambassador pass it along. Don't spam. Inbox don't send it everybody in the world. But there's a person or two who could really use this, please let them know about this. If you have a question, if you've a comment, if you have a topic you'd like us to cover in the future, please let me now I can always be reached directly at gene GE, e tapping Q and aid dot com. If you're on the website, just click on the big contact link up at the top in the menu. If you're inside of our app where you not only have the audio recordings of all. These tap belongs, but tapping scripts as well, you can click on the contact link inside of the app, it's the tapping QNA app what you can find in both the Android and apple app stores. You can find all our past episodes at tapping podcasts dot com, we're closing in on almost four hundred episodes between full episodes bonus episodes and all of that goodness for the tapping Q and A podcast this gene mantra, I hope you have a great day. I hope the new year is started off on the right foot. And I will talk to you real soon. Bye. Bye. The tapping CUNY podcast is copyright, gene. Mantra steadily tapping Q in eight two thousand sixteen all of us expressed by guests are those of the guests and not necessarily of gene mantra deli or tapping QNA.

CUNY gene GE Brooklyn Williamsburg apple
How I Built Resilience: Live with Christina Tosi and Gary Erickson & Kit Crawford

How I Built This

30:13 min | 3 months ago

How I Built Resilience: Live with Christina Tosi and Gary Erickson & Kit Crawford

"Hey It's guy here and before we start the show a wanted to let you know about a short anonymous survey that can take to us know what shows and podcasts. You're listening to if you want to help you can go to. Npr DOT org slash. Podcast survey it won't take up too much of your time and this is a great way to support your favorite shows that's NPR dot org slash podcast survey and. Thanks so as some of you know. We've started a new series of online video conversations. Were each week. I talked to founders and entrepreneurs about how they're building resilience into their businesses right now and in case you missed his conversations when they happen live. We are posting excerpts. Right here in your podcast feed and today we're bringing you to conversations later in the show. You're going to hear from Gary Erickson and Kit Crawford the CEOS of cliff bar but I will start with Christina Tozi the founder of milk bar milk bar is a chain of bakeries with eighteen locations in the US and in Canada and when Christina opened milk bar in two thousand eight the country was crumbling in the midst of a recession but Christina was confident that her cookies were good enough to sell and she was right for two dollars. A piece New Yorkers would line up to buy her cookies even in those scary unpredictable days in those instincts the ones that have pulled Christina through the recession and hurricane. Sandy have prepared her for this moment. Since March only five of milk bars eighteen locations remain open for pickup and delivery and three of those locations are being put to work as online bakeries Christina and her team are sending cookies cakes and pies to anyone around the country including Health Workers Christina spoke to us after a shift at milk bars commissary Williamsburg Brooklyn where. She's going in every day to make sure that cookies are getting made and that her employees are taken care of so Just give me a sense. I mean you're in Manhattan. Are you still hearing like ambulance? Sirens all the time. Like what what? What some vibe like for you when you just outside the the vibe is strange. It's strange there's not a lot of people around which for New York City is incredibly cheap jarring in a way there's ambulance sirens. There's not a lot of people and at seven pm every night for two minutes straight people cheer on Doctors Nurses and people that are on. The frontlines is healthcare professional. So there's this really interesting juxtaposition of solitariness that comes with sort of a wait and a strangeness. Perhaps a feeling of being scared and then for two minutes at seven PM year reminded that the only way around this `esprit and we're going to get through it together and that's a reality right now. I think a lot of people are reading that that Robert Frost Poem Right. Now the only way through is basically through it How many of your employees have been affected? And how many have you been able to keep on what we've all been a but from some work stand way pretty early on about three or four weeks ago We had to furlough half of our team. We started the sort of decision tree probably two months ago. of stores five. Remain Open for delivery and pickup but for us first and foremost It's almost like we are a business but we're we don't think about ourselves as a business. I we think about our team first and foremost and ask them. Who's comfortable working? Who needs to come in? Who's WHO's comfort and safety and livelihood actually depends on a paycheck and benefits and so on and so on And so that's been helpful at least in setting the tone but we've most certainly had to make a lot of really difficult decisions. We've had to be really smart about pivoting. Once we got through the team element of it. Then we said okay now. Let's look at this as a business. And but we've seen is perhaps where we don't have the same opportunity in storefront or delivery. We are seeing such an incredible feat on E. Com that is like healthcare professionals are like okay. If I if you can't get more ventilators. Can you bring me some cookies? People that are you know that can't be with loved ones or friends on their birthdays. Graduations in these meaningful moments. That are still happening. Because we're still living life. They just want him to send something attentive cookies to say. Thank you thank you for showing up no matter how hard it is no matter what else it is. You're juggling in your life whether it's child care roommates or what have you. What we're seeing. Is that as long as our team is comfortable showing up and turning on the ovens our mentality in our mission milk bar is to show up for people it starts with showing up for one another but we have. We don't take for granted this incredible opportunity to show up for people that are going through their own individual realities of the now so right now our Williamsburg kitchen is baking and our la kitchen is baking and we're trying to be really thoughtful about that and we continue to realize and understand embrace like the simplicity but the power of cookie. I mean the kitchens in L. A. and Williamsburg in Brooklyn can't operate in the same way. They normally do like how you doing. Are you keeping people far apart wearing masks and they're spaced apart? I mean the way that we typically produced in our commissaries anyways is usually with larger pieces of equipment so there was already a lot of natural space. We already always wear gloves in our in all of our kitchens in stores the face masks have been a new normal for us and I kind of went through this wave of like. How do we show up for our team and my mom and my aunt who like make all of our head scarves I said. Hey if we get you every single person's name in their color preference or what have you. Will you make us face masks because who we are still the same? How we might be feeling is different but they all have like these really quirky homemade face masks. They set them all. I care packages to the kitchen but it was like how do we pivoted? And how do we bring lightness to it? And so we're just trying to make the most of a kind of like a rainy day. Which is how my mom raised me to think about. You know the trying times that are gonNA happen in life. Yeah and you talked about on the podcast that we did back in October of twenty nine thousand nine was so such a cool story. We're getting a lot of questions for Christina. This is from Jessica van doped a. Hey Zeus She asks him presumably for a lot of small business owners. There are lot of emotional challenges in furloughing employees right. I mean this is emotionally painful for the employees and also for the employer. I mean you know pretty much everyone who works for you and she asked. How are you dealing with your with your own mental health? You know just going through the agonizing process of of doing all those things and it's heavy and it's real and I've learned enough about my mental health because by the way when you choose working in a kitchen as a profession it really does test your mental health tests. You know about yourself and I have learned for myself right now that I need alone time I need. I need time I call it to more. I mean I guess I call it to mourn because I have lost friends over the last few weeks and so part of my alone time has been to mourn the loss of life people. I know until mourn the loss of life people I don't know and to mourn the personal realities of what it feels like when you have to call someone on the phone because you can't even sit in a room with them to tell them and I found that furloughing employees is hard. I try to always find the silver lining of it and what I say to myself is a half to make the hard decisions right now to guarantee the realities of the business right. If I don't do it now than I kick guarantee anyone a job that they're passionate about in a company that stands for something and it doesn't come without Hampton in my personal realities. I gone really long walks in. I kind of segment them out. And they're like my morning my morning. Emo You aren morning Loxton. Sometimes they come with tears and sometimes they come with like a heaviness and all those things just remind me that I'm a real person that has real feelings and that those really connected that commitment to my team still remains the same despite the fact that the decision might look or feel otherwise for someone in the moment I mean. Can you give us a sense? Like I mean does your given the fact that most your stores are closed and people can't really go up there except for you know pick up and obviously even pick up. Traffic is going to be vastly reduced as your revenue. Just just dramatically down. I mean I I would imagine it is. Yeah it's it's in a scary place. The storefronts to your point like five of of eighteen twenty s not alive and they're doing you know a percentage of what they were doing. I opened Milburn. Two thousand eight in the middle of a recession. We barricaded down during Hurricane Sandy. Obviously nothing has been anywhere near as intense as this but we know how to hunker down. We know how to get Nimble. We know how to do a lot with a little. And this is where we dig in and say. Where are the opportunities online? They're totally different margins. So even where we can earn back some of what we've lost in stores No matter how far we go online our margin structure is still really in a tricky place. Our silver lining is that we have in. We talked about this in the fall of last year when we taped we just launched into whole foods and I think week on Amazon I mean the grocery stores are tricky place to be right now too but I'm always thinking in my head. Do I stay multiple steps ahead? I was certainly not thinking that this is where the business would be but in the spirit of how do we show up in people's lives? I always try to be thoughtful about being super open minded. And so I'm I'm grateful for some of the small wins despite the really big hits and the business is totally different right now. This has always been true for some reason. It feels so much more true now than ever is like we have no control. Everything is breakable. We have no idea. And that's not because we're not intelligent. Well researched data driven humans. That run a business because we have no control over it and I don't know how it will all change and we don't know how long it will take to get back you don't know just even as if we take ourselves out of the business of running nope barged as consumers right like as on the world. What will make us feel safe? What will make us feel indulgent will make us feel joyful. Just what will our new norms be? And how much will change in six months to twelve months to eighteen months and so it is a fun but scary game to play. And that's just that's reality and so you have to just go sit because you can't control it and you can't get stuck in it and there's no rear view marine u-turn look back there's only forward and to what we said earlier like in in frost terms like it's through it so let's just take a step forward every day. I just totally energize me. I'M GONNA run out of the studio and just jump up and down. But it's like health arrives right like. Yuck about like the occasion. Yes to to that. Point this idea of kind of just pivoting and thinking creatively for those of you. Don't know I'm Christina. Does a daily Baking Club? I think two PM Eastern on instagram. It's so fun I'm Tori Parsons Tori says it's been such an important part of her day Helping her stay connected with your family or friends. helping me helping her to adjust to the new normal so she says thank you. I'm how did you decide to start that you know when we started closing stores and we started to realize we realize ahead of time what we started to dig into this idea of? Let's make videos. Let's put them out. People are going to be at home in baking in cooking and curious more than ever about food. So let's show up for them and we filmed all this stuff and after a day of it and seeing the cuts I was just like man. I feel like it's only halfway there like A. I think we can do better but in a really funny way better means more human and better means less reduced and better means making a commitment to something to people to doing something every day because I think our reality is so shattered. And how can I be a part of that and I just had a moment where I was like? I'm not in an officer kitchen every day. Baking and I missed that sense of community Kinda just put it out there one day and it was like. Where did all these people go? Fra What is this engagement about and I pretty much overnight was like okay. It's on vacation club two. Pm Eastern Standard Time. And what? I thought what I love about. It is as much as it is for every single person out there that might ever want to tune in for me to like it is like how do I deal with the half to furloughs and like scary things that make me Crawl into a corner in cry. I go like it's one forty five. I better get my act together. Baking Club is happening in it forces me to say we'RE NOT GONNA hold it heavy today. Christina like there's one way into it in it's GonNa be through it and it's just a fun way to be like. Oh you don't have flour guy. Do you have oats. You can grind them down into a flower. Do you have pretzels? You can pulverize them into a flower. The ingredients gradient swap part of it is also really really really fun because it fuels Mike Creativity and it makes me go like we're GonNa get through this and when we get through it. I have like fifty great ideas about what needs to go on the menu at no. I know totally Before I let you go in five years when we talk about this time period. What do you hope will come out of this for you for Your Business? That will have built resilience into what you're doing. I think for me. My look back is that I don't WanNa waste it like Miami father-in-law Franken deras like saying that he raised my partner on and that sits with me is adversity is a terrible thing to waste. I don't necessarily mean in like developing the business. They're certainly plenty there but I don't. I don't WanNa waste the hardship. That's happening right now. Like this is what we build on. This is what grit is sweat. Perseverance looks like it's what humanity looks like. When have we ever had the time to say like I'M GONNA write people? Handwritten notes and put them in the mail. I haven't done that in a long time and I did. A whole swath of the other day and then for me as a person it's like. I am realizing that my like alone morning time is an important part of what I do. I was traveling around like a crazy person in doing all these things because I thought that is what a being someone committed to their business being someone that was driven and successful and hardworking looked like and I'm realizing I love so much on the table with that mentality and I have so much more in me now because of the way in which I body guard certain parts of my being in my health in my life and for me it's like I will. I will not go back. I cannot go back I will not go back. There's no U-TURN. There's no turns allowed and to make the most right now. I love it Christina. Thanks for being here. It's so great to see you hope to see you soon. Bye Guys. That's an extra conversation with Christina tozi founder of milk bar to see our full interview you can go to facebook dot com slash. How I built this or to. Npr's youtube page when we come back. We'll hear from Gary Erickson and Kit Crawford the CEOS of cliff bar who donating millions of bars to healthcare professionals around the country. Stay with US guys. And you're listening to how I built this from. Npr support for this podcast and the following message come from comcast business. Comcast business knows. There are times when the need to connect really matters to keep customers and employees in the know and keep business moving. Comcast business is prepared. Four Times like these powered by the nation's largest GIG speed network to help give you the speed reliability and security. Your Business needs tools to manage your business from any device anywhere and a team of experts here for you. Twenty four seven to learn more go to comcast business dot COM Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition so since the pandemic began retail sales have dropped massively across the country is customers are staying home but cliff. Bars actually seen a spike in demand because their bars are really popular among healthcare workers. I spoke to Gary Erickson and kick Crawford from their home in Berkeley California. The company's been distributing cliff bars to doctors and nurses while also trying to boost morale among their employees to me a little bit about cliff bar. What's been the situation for you guys? We're lucky you know. We're an essential food products. We on March twelve was the day we decided to close. Our office is just in one day. All of a sudden. We're like we're not in the awful. How do we run a business when people are are not in the office running into each other and having meetings and and coffee together out trying to throughout so we have been adopting ever since? Yeah it's it's interesting because we have like certain to businesses going on we have our office business and then we have our essential business are two bakeries one in Indiana twin falls. Where making sure that everybody's safe unhealthy. It's really different to have to do this right now. What's crazy so your headquarters. Essentially in Emoryville is closed down right now but you also. Your manufacturing plants are still operating because presumably. There's a demand for cliff bar. People are kind of want to keep things that that are shelf stable and lasts for a while I guess is. Have you seen a big increase demand for cliff bars redid and we did? There was a pretty good spike. And I We were maybe in third place behind the paper and Sanitizer But it's calmed down. You know I think the the object has mellowed out a little bit. But we're still there's demand demand is high and also you know we know that our product is a really essential food for healthcare workers. So far we've given out the first art march three point six million bars to food banks and healthcare workers frontline and then on another where on the second round. Brunell committed another three million through programmer calling Baked with love incentive gratitude Gary when you have been in crises in the past certainly with this business and when you think about it from a leadership perspective. What kind of advice could you give to somebody who is a leader? Even if it's a small business and they're kind of dealing with what's going on right now. I helped would sell duster couple. Things one is Don't be afraid to ask. Question has no answer Kind of off of Wendell Berry mad farmer manifesto of his about four decades ago. I mean we are asking questions every single data we have. We don't have any answer to but you can't be afraid to ask those questions and then if you don't have an answer today maybe tomorrow we've I can't even count. How many of questions. We've had to ask that. Don't have an answer. Maybe one could be like What are we? What is it GonNa look like when we go back to the office like when we first asked the office when is can happen? And what are we going to be walking around with right vase mouths on? And Are we gonNA be social distancing when we're back in the office and how's it going to work people you know. Eat and you know we. We don't have an answer for that right now but we're talking about and then the other part of it is just inattentive. You have to be hyper attentive to everything every day minute by minute hour by hour day by day and went and if your attention to something that comes up and we have people emailing US sane. Have you thought of this? What about this? How come this does happen? We're not doing this. Then you connoisseur out that you have to go to like how are we going to doubt and then as soon as you can't take some action and don't sit on things because we don't have time to sit on things we've been making decisions where we have to act now or tomorrow and we as sorry? We're screwed so adapt and take some action. I'm curious I mean. Obviously you are a bigger company much beer company than than a lot of the vast majority businesses in the United States. But if you think about this crisis and this is a little bit tricky because it's a sensitive word to use but as an opportunity are there ways to think about opportunities or to kind of focus on on the other side like how I mean because even with your business you're GonNa Change. They're going to be things about your products that change when when we come out the other side of this question. We don't have an answer to yes. Go ahead well. I mean I'd like to take a shot at it. I think long you know it. Does you double down in refocus on the things that matter for us? I think it's refocused us to consider what's really really important like taking care of our people but also how we work being efficient with our time being creative looking at a problem imagining scenarios. That don't exist yet like what if this happens. What how are we GONNA REACT? It's really made us much. Nimble in some ways yeah for sure. this is a question from about supply chain which. I think is is interesting. How are you dealing with your supply chain and and are you looking ahead to because it's you rely on nuts and on oats and on a variety of ingredients mostly domestic but some imported? So how are you kind of dealing with? The the possibility chain will be disrupted. That's another question that we don't have a full answer to because we don't know you know we're hoping that that were on getting close to the other side but it's still going to be of months we right now good and because we were in that essential category so we're not super worried about supply chain but were daily back to the daily attentive to it and always kind of ask our suppliers like we're good right. We're right and we do have our frontier team on our side chain. Every morning we we meet together with recalled the coveted nineteen task force. So were meeting every morning with this task. Force made up of ood manufacturing lead our legal team our HR team Our community team and our communications team. And we're we're doing that. So we can keep track of all these things and so we have teams under them that are tracking supply chain all the cliff bars that are going to the stores are. GonNa want in the future inside of balancing. That out is just a big rash or is this going to happen. You know slowly and then you know what level are being of yet but it's interesting that this is a time. This is the first time that our business models to kind of a full test like it's easy when you're not easy but so we have this five lines business model you know sustain Your Business. Our brands where people are our community and our planet and it's worked but now we're in the crisis trying to keep this model ally We're not just a successful company over here. Supporting our community and giving thousands of hours of community service not no work in the fire and we're trying to continue keeping those values in tap and living values so so far so good but Has Not Been Easy. Yeah is a question from Claire. Murashima she asks about the you know you mentioned that the bars are going to health. Care Workers And you know she asked. How can a small company? That doesn't have the resources or financial stability of a cliff bar. How Um to to give away their products. How what are semi thoughts ideas? You might have about ways. They can contribute really great question. I mean I don't know the answer everything like that but there's always some way you can get if whether it's supporting someone who can. It's it's something that it's A. It's an introspective question. Rather than US giving the answer to it's kind of like everybody can help in some way. Maybe it's an encouragement. Maybe it's a note you sent to the hospital workers. Maybe it's You know sending Someone just a little love package You know there's always ways we can help in. It's kind of the individual to figure out how they can do that to that point to. This is the time where you know you can do things with your business but you can also do things for your family. I my mom turn ninety seven last week and I baked her A Lemon Chiffon cake. And fortunately she's not in a in a senior living facility. She's with my sister so I could take it to their home. We at a distance sanger happy birthday. She kept wondering why we have this mess. Honor face and what was wrong with us but you know it was like just stuff like that you know so. That's really personal level. There's there's a wave can do something that's awesome. Do you have any advice? I mean I'm just even thinking about for me and other people listening. Who who who work with you know with small teams had you had with your teams like how are you making sure that the morale is kind of at least at a certain baseline. It's hard because Morales dropped probably across the board. But what are some strategies that you're using just to check in on people trying to be China asking personal a little bit you know as? How're you doing? Really? How're you doing? Not just how you doing. Don't really tell me but no how are you doing right that. That goes a long way that some you know. Some people are struggling with health. Issues some people. Are you know doing different things that are really difficult trying to work and have children next to you? Is Extremely hard sometimes So you know trying to support people on a real human level I think in business I mean. Business is utterly separate from our humanity. It's just all tied together and this is just a big magnifying glass on situation. I think when when this first happened it happened slowly all at once. You know sort of like. Where's this going where she's going to win all of a sudden? Bradley awful but we are communicating everyday with our our people. I sent on Monday. Email she sends out a Friday email. On Thursdays we have an all companies zoom meeting so we have five hundred thirty people on Zoom while. We're giving everybody update. We have several people in the company. Give updates on different things. We're whether it's our donation program to health workers or we read customer ladders. Do all this stuff. So there's a community. There people really appreciate that and I tell you. People are just stepping up there just stepping up during this time. Yes amazing I don't and I don't think leaders can lead on their own at this time. I think you really need each other right. That's our daughter. Don't but you need to rely on on people and even if you have small teams There's something that all each can do right and it. Just it's the it's the little little Anna big thing this is. This is about a long-term journey but it's about the people that are moving us forward. Gary San Kick Crawford of cliff bar. Thank you so much for being with us for joining us. I hope this year in person soon. Yeah and your family. Give them our best. That's an excerpt from a conversation with Gary Erickson and Kit Crawford. Ceo's clipper to see our full interview. You can go to facebook dot com slash. How I built this and if you WanNa see all of our past live conversations you can also find them there or youtube dot com slash NPR. We're going to be putting these episodes in your feet. Every week and hosting the conversations in real time at noon eastern nine Pacific on Twitter Youtube and facebook if you WANNA find out more about these conversations or other virtual NPR events you can go to NPR presents dot org. This episode was produced by Candice. Limb with help from John. Avella Julia Carney. Jeff Rodgers and Neva grant. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we will see you next week. I'm Cairo's and even listening to how I built this from NPR.

cliff bar Christina Tozi United States Npr Gary Erickson Kit Crawford founder Robert Frost Manhattan New York City Brooklyn Sandy comcast Williamsburg Indiana Hurricane Sandy E. Com
Blacksmiths

Pants On Fire

21:52 min | 3 months ago

Blacksmiths

"Two people claim to know everything about something but only one knows anything. President Roosevelt more anti gravity belt source had two brains kids live on Mars and go to school and flying cars or at least they will one day leave me. I'm a historian and astronaut or Dr Lori Allied to the other telling the truth ads on. Then you figure out who's from Michigan this Cat Song Fire. And now here's your host in two time. Battled the pants on fire. Hose Championship wetter. Wow I did not know that I was the winner but for me well next time. Welcome depends on fire. The game show where kids choose between steely resolve of truth and the jagged and rough borough of lies. I'm your host Deborah Gold scene and in the studio today is our sound Effects Robot Lisa which stands for life in studio audience. And if I'm going to continue to download all of the latest digital audio files necessary for this podcast. I need to delete a bunch of files and make some room. Well that sounds like a good idea like all these photos and videos taking up space. Let's see Deborah and Lisa stealthy tic TAC videos. You're going to delete all the photos of the two of Deborah and Lisa. The Holiday Work Party ALP. Okay are hilarious. Do you really want to get rid of these are good? These are all the photos I take of you when you're really annoyed about something on there's so many of you looking right at me with a cranky face that one. Yeah okay well those you can delete. But why don't you just save all those files in an external hard drive or that cloud or something? I guess I could do that but I'm also going to this one out and frame for the studio love how your face looks so reading twisted when you're all mad great great okay well in the meantime why don't you tell us how our game works certainly Denver. Every week we bring onto grownups. One is an expert. The other is an L. I. A. R. E. R. E. W. Liar job of a human child to help us figure out new because no one can spot a liar better than a kid. What are we lying about today? Deborah we are lying about blacksmiths. People who Hammer Hot Nedal at an angle to change its shape or create things like tools or artwork. Do you know if any of your robot purse were created by blacksmiths. All as a matter of fact my face was forged blacksmiths and really oh yeah you can't manufacture these high cheekbones impressive jawline line and a factory. My face is the work of an artisan. Yeah and your face looks so human too sure if humans were all incredibly handsome. Yeah I think the most beautiful part of a human is the wisdom and generosity of spirit that comes from inside and speaking of wisdom and generosity. Why don't you be so generous as to tell us about? Our contestants high will on my face awesome are human child. Contestant is a ten year old who loves his cat. Percy told me Rob Toby Hi how are you? I'm good thanks. I'm so glad. Tell us about your cat. Percy Percy look like what does he do? What's good about it. He said Tuxedo cat hall. You means he goes to lots of fancy balls when he goes and he's like I'm fancy cat. Does he do any tricks or anything or it's just now no. Can you believe the keyboard now file taxes? Probably not? Oh can you Barshop hairballs you? He can sleep a charming and is it also true that you play the piano true. It's true what do you like to play are. What are you working on now? I'm marking on MENU IN D minor. Whoa that by by Bah It sounds like you're disgusted. We want to know some more fun facts about you. Toby but we need to Test our own lie detection skills. So we're GONNA play two truths and a ally. Toby you're gonNA tell us three things about yourself but to those things are going to be true one's going to be ally and we're GONNA try to figure out which is true and which is a lie so go ahead toby. Tell us your three facts one is. I've tested for black belt last bait. Whoa for Taekwondo to. I've been on kick to call the Tulsa world question the World Kate Three on flute in three languages man. Those are all very impressive things. I hope they're all true. But what do you think Lisa? Black belts see him. Fight a man to the death before this show. You did. Not so that I think is true. Coulthard at least then the tallest roller coaster. He does his hair's all straight up in the air like just got off a wrong and fluent in three languages. If there's English pyan areas even another. I don't think there are three languages two or three more a lot. Okay toby which one of those things is a lie. I tested for Black Saturday. That means you are fluent in three languages. So you've got finery did you say no high? Neri's number SISTO LANGUAGE. That's how we text each other okay. What up robot. All Right which languages English. Obviously German and Romanian German and Romanian. That's so cool. Can you say I love robots in German Ashley Behold half? Can you say that in Romanian implacable? Whoa wow you know what I forgive you for lying to me earlier. Okay thanks amazing. Well just so you know. The remainder of the show will be conducted in English. I hope that's okay for you. Wasp find okay good. Our first expert is Philly. Barret goes enthused yourself toby. Toby my name is Billie Barrett. I am a blacksmith. Thank you. Let's meet our second expert. Linski Chris. He's introducing yourself to toby toby. I'm Chris Ski and I am an artisan and a welder. And I am a reenactor of a female blacksmith at Colonial Williamsburg tells about those hot and Molten. Sounds Lisa. Oh did you hear them? I did I think everybody else heard them to painting. Topsy time. That is correct. That is when we put our experts on the hot seat while they answer toby's questions. Lisa should we put on the hot? I totally buried because his initials are be just like the initials of my nickname nickname batboys. Okay Yeah I'm a math for sure. I don't WanNa mess with me fat boy okay. So Toby we're starting with billy. What is your first question for? Billy Billy would you rather get a heavier envel- or a hotter forge I would rather get a heavier and bill? Why is that? I just like heavy things. You're GONNA love your parting. Gift today. I don't think we have mice. Okay Chris and Billy what have you made the most of I'll answer I 'cause I work at colonial Williamsburg work at a historic forge. So we mostly do shoes. Oh that's cool. Do you do like high heels only for the fancy horses? How about you belly? I mostly make A little bit of everything with a specialization. In knives you make knives like knives that you cut food with everything from cutting food to serviceable tools. That you use every day very cool. Do you name any of them. Like Mac or sure to name a lot of them really. Yeah who and. What's the name of your favorite favorite favorite Tomahawk? I call stabby stabby. Okay Toby Billy What would be your second? Most favorite thing to do is make besides knives One of the things. I'd really like to do before I move on from this. Life is make a a really nice replica of an old style. Lock which is one of your skills as a Smith that you really want to try to. Master cool is homes for both of you. How old were you when you gone? Interest IN BLACK SNIFFING. Yes I'd like to know. I'd like to know how one decides that. They want to be a blacksmith. At what age does that happen? You just wake up one day and say hey I wanNA. A blacksmith. House is on fire. Let's make knives. How does that work? I studied had a minor in art in in university And so I started with glassblowing actually and then I started working at colonial Williamsburg and I saw some of the cool. Things that the blacksmiths were making in. That's the way I kind of got into it. How about you billy? Ironically when I was about twelve years old my parents took colonial Williamsburg. Is that true? Absolutely and It was a rainy day and I was begging my dad. Let me stay and watch the Blacksmith and the gentlemen still alive today and left me there for two hours and that clinched a deal for me. That was it as Peter. Ross it was Peter. Ross yes it was who is being arise. I guess he's a black one of the most well respected smithson. The World Master Blacksmith at the Anderson Forge words. Okay so Chris what what I see if I went to colonial Williamsburg. Mcdonald's like what would you see if you saw her there? Ya Okay and do you do any acting? Over's voice overs So we all portray real people that you know really lived in Eighteenth Century Colony of Williamsburg Virginia and there was a real forged called the Anderson Blacksmith Forge. And I play someone named Loretta. Frye who real person. And she was a female blacksmith. During that time we reenact what you would do or what I would she would do. I would do in the the daily routine of that person. In the eighteenth century I be dressed in eighteenth century clothing specifically what she would wear while she was working as a blacksmith. Clocking fear are going to be burned. Probably not a good idea. Kristiyo like my name is way. All your guy's name again. The Red Fra Loretta. Our blacksmith just like that old timers. Yeah pretty much. Do the voice better killing you. Just Hi I'M LORETTA. Fry and I. You know my a Blacksmith Year. They Anderson four bit of a southern accent. Yeah I hear that good okay. So for billy what are the steps to forging something that would depend on what you're making you it's It's all for your favorite thing knives for knife. It would be for me to determine what type of knife us what type of material I'm going to use. And then if I'm not sure about how I'M GONNA FORGE IT. I would forge it on clay. I deceive it's GonNa come out like I wanted to and then I just go from there. Say I'm just going to make a simple Chef's knife the first thing I'm GonNa do is forged my tip out dumber. Draw the blade out to the length that I want I'm GONNA taper down taper my blade down figure out how went to look and then just finish up so when you say you forge. Something does that mean. You put like a chunk of metal on the end of a big stick and put it over. Fire depends on the methods that you're used to work in many people do many different things. But yes you heat a piece of metal to well over a thousand degrees and then you use your hammered to shape it into the shape that you would like you ever makes more than there. Didn't they tasted terrible. I bet they had a lot of iron metal. This Chris how have used your angle personal best. Is You know. I'm not sure I've never. I've never waited but it's pretty heavy right. Do they come in many different weights and different sizes? Okay so is for both of you Is it true? That all blacksmiths are really bulky. Big Burly Guy. Sure okay. No I don't I don't think so at all. I do need a certain level of strength To use the tools. But there's a lot of intricacies to two blacksmith thing And sometimes a less bulky person could do that better I see. What do you think about that billy? I think it's Agreeable and sometimes you do have to have a delicate touch and it's one of the hardest things ever taken me to learn is that you don't always have to bash stuff small. Yeah that too but you only do that once. You've passed your fingers before. Oh No I don't WANNA know la La la La but does that sound like something. You'd like to try one day toby. What try doing some blacksmith out to? Your House is safe as long as it's safe. Yeah thing like one of you. I could like higher museum or something. You're looking for anyone. Whichever one of US want to be an Apprentice Liar. Hi. It's Deborah Gould. Seen with my gift to you a recommendation for the superfund game best beans I am completely hooked and I know you will be to using my collection of fiends to defeat slugged is deliciously satisfying. And I get to do it again. And again with every new level now you need to be strategic there are new goals and challenges and every level and you can choose different fiends in your team depending on their specific abilities. He can't just phone it in what I'm saying. That's what makes it rewarding to play and you can stop playing in the middle of a level. You know detour. Listen TO PODCASTS. For when you pick it up again. You're exactly where you were when you left. Engage your brain with one puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. Trust me with over one hundred million downloads. This five-star rated mobile puzzle. Game is a must play download. Best fiend free on the Apple. App store or Google play. That's friends without the our best female. It's time for the short on fire round when our experts have to answer as many questions as they can before. Time runs out experts. You have to go quickly and strike while the iron is hot toby. Let's start with billy. You can ask your shorts on fire questions now okay. What colored steel. Turn one three to end. What is the most important to us by giant Hammer? According to the American Blades Smith society level comes after anticipate. Why do you put a chain on an annual quiet? What temperature does bend over? Does what kind of soap do you to get your hands claim Irish spring new heavy metal band? Cdc DOT COM sometimes up no more time. Hey Toby cool it in the heat of Toby Lake is okay and that is time. Lisa will restart the timer for Chris. WoN'T YOU LISA? Yeah you don't WanNa go. Yeah Yeah I appreciate it. Okay Toby you ready to ask Chris. Your shorts on fire questions. Now was the most difficult metal to forge Anything that is like cast iron. Who's the Greek God of Fire Haiti's what is the origin of the word? Black and blacksmith. Black metal is what they used to call iron. Okay where's the first known location of BLACKSMITHS and History Egypt? What kind of clay furnace was used during the Iron Age to replace charcoal fires patent? What do you call the nozzle where you forced into a furnace or forge a two year but we use the Nice? We'll blacks object vile cloudy. Try TO DROP ON THE ROADRUNNER. Be and full. You must be stoked that that's over experts. If decision time now are contestant. Toby must sold her all the sax he's heard today to identify our liar. Toby thing is our liar. Liar pants on fire. Billy why do you think billions are liar will sometimes? He took a lot of time to answer questions. And he usually just agreed with Christina because she went I or Chris some of them his answers in December. Leave you okay. Making up on spot. I see you thought very hard about this. We'll the actual true blacksmiths expert. Please tell us who are you know? That's right billy. Barrett is a blacksmith and knife maker. And you can see his work on the instant at Billy Barrett custom knives by beautiful work. Oh my goodness well. It's time to do some back checking and Ville see where we saw. That was tough. That's the whole point of the game. All Right Billy I WANNA ask you. What did Christina Tell? That was more than just. Ironic Blacksmith. Wow A walk Smith. Oh my goodness okay Chris. What facts did you share? That cast a shadow on the truth. Oh my I can't believe Peter Ross's she did some homework. I think she was the one who brought up for solid Lenka right. I know see they do a little bit of homework. Don't they? Anything else Chris Egypt was not right. Oh where was it that little shorts on fire Taymiyya Haiti's is not the God of Fire Thought have vested? Yes okay well we started. His name was hepatitis I also have no idea if anvils come in different sizes. I don't know either billy. Do they come in different sizes? Have actually one of my shop. That's seven hundred eighty pounds. How do you move that from one place to another to do? No Oh my goodness all right. Well we've finished and polished our show for today. Thank you to our contestant. Toby whose role is out today. And thank you to our expert in Liar Chris and Billy Anta Lisa for spelling out sound and of course many thanks to our listeners. Tuning into pants on fire where we hammer out the truth and blast away. Lies Hits production of genesee media for more great chose visit bessler DOT COM. While you're there you can send questions for me to read on. Ask Lisa and find out how you can participate and follow us on social media pants on fire gastro behind the scenes photos and more Baxter. Hey there Christine. Are you a fan of the shows? We make here at Gen Z. Media if so then. Head on over to our patriarch page at Patriotair Dot com slash gs 'em and become Gen Z. Superfan for only five dollars a month you get access to shows. Were working on months before the released behind the scenes interviews with producers and cast members scripts for six minutes Mars Patel and so much more. It's a great way to show your support and get access to a ton of exclusive Gen Z. Content sign up at Patriotair DOT COM SLASH GS. Em shows that's PAT REO end dot com slash g z. m. shows and thanks for your support. Best robot ever DOT COM.

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Speed-Round Sunday: Travel Planning

Parenting Roundabout

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Speed-Round Sunday: Travel Planning

"Welcome to speed round Sunday on the parenting roundabout podcast where we share a mini episode from our past for your weekend listening pleasure. We'll be back tomorrow with the brand new episode. I came back from well. It's been about two months now from chick to Arizona. We like to do some kind of trip at least a couple times a year. And you know what to be honest. We don't plan in advance for them. They're very last minute. So I'm wondering. What do you do Tearing Catherine about your your family trips or your personal trips you plan in advance. Are you pretty much a wing it? Let's see what happens. How do you work with it pattern when we went to Italy last summer boop twist you know a two week long big trip we we plan some basic things like we had placed a day Everywhere we went and we had some train tickets and we rented a car at one point and we took care of all that ahead of time but in terms of thinking like okay on this day. We're going to go to this museum or know attraction. We didn't do any of that. We just said we're GONNA figure that out when we get there and generally that worked pretty well because we didn't. I just didn't want us to feel over scheduled and have a lot of pressure to do you know today's Tuesday. We got the calcium so we it was better. I think to just see how he felt. We did miss out on. Maybe one thing like there. Was this really cool tour in Venice of the like dungeons and underground parts of the Doges Palace That we could've gone but it was all booked up by the time we read the Guy and figure out that it was there so we missed out on that but you know we also had some fun things that happened where that we couldn't have planned like we. We left to the last day to go to Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome and then we turned up in. Oh the pope was outside doing in audience so so we didn't actually get to go inside because it was closed because the was outside but we saw so that was pretty hot and it was totally about Cherry. Are you much of a planner when it comes to travel? We usually plan our destination ahead of time because we have a timeshare Sui trade it for other locations and we kinda start looking way ahead of time when there's more selection and so generally we know where we're going in terms of knowing what we're doing. When we get there I have not had success really either way there was a time to Williamsburg Virginia and I bought all our tickets in advance and plan that what day we would go to each place. And then there was a hurricane hurricane Irene it was and the power was out in everything for like two or three days including the amusement parks and then they had to have a day or two to get things back working water out of things so that didn't work out so well other times I just I. I'm always the one who has to plan I. I would really just like to go someplace and sit with a walk for a week. That would be my ideal vacation so you know. I. I don't like planning stuff so much. So then in that case a lot of times we'll just go and then see what there is to kind of decide where we go but when I was growing up we would go on some really fancy vacations that my dad would plan to the day and that was nice. I think the key is. It's nice when somebody else is doing it for. You could just found out now. I have a friend. Who's going to be become Disney travel agent so I may have to have her planned vacation for us just to support her. You know not because right. I don't WanNa have to plan anything. Well I think from the sounds of it. We're kind of we lean towards the non planning site of the most part. Yeah so maybe our listeners can tell us what they do when it comes to putting their trip.

Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome hurricane Irene Arizona Catherine Venice Williamsburg Disney Italy Doges Palace Virginia three days two months two week
Living History pt. 1, an interview with Cheyney McKnight

Dressed: The History of Fashion

51:26 min | Last month

Living History pt. 1, an interview with Cheyney McKnight

"Umberto, day Thurston and I feel like we're having a moment. When officer Derek Chavez Killed George Floyd. Something in America broke. I'm going to try to explain. From the covert connection to what de-fund the police actually meet. When Donald Trump encourages cops not to choke people. You know something different. Listen to. We're having a moment on the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts and wherever you get your podcast. Jess the history of fashion production of iheartradio. Over seven billion people in the world, we all have one thing in common. Every day. We all get dressed welcome to dress the history of fashion, a podcast that explores the who what when of why we wear, we are fashion stories and your host. Cassidy Zachary and April. Callaghan Okay Casts I. Have a question for you. Have you ever been to colonial Williamsburg I have not, but this has been on my sister Hayley and is list like wishlist bucket list forever I would absolutely love love love to go to colonial Williamsburg because I love going back in time and those places like that. You know it's like living. History brought to life. Yeah, absolutely and I had been, but I was in high school at the time, so I really wasn't so into history. Way So you you, Haley let me know we should plan a trip. Yes, absolutely I would love to go back because I think I would. I don't think I know. That I would see it in a very very different light today, so let's do it. Let's plan a trip I'm in okay. Just have to just have to wrangle, Haley. So listeners whether you have actually been to colonial Williamsburg or not, I'm guessing that many of you have probably been to other historic sites or historic houses were around the area where you live where reenacting or interpretation, maybe part of their programming, and if so you may have also wondered about the individuals portraying a particular trade how they learned that or maybe they were even portraying a specific person I mean. Mean I know I certainly have and casts several weeks back I had the pleasure of sitting down with historic interpreter and Educator Cheney McKnight to learn more about this profession of living historian. Yes, in Cheney, is the living history coordinator at the New York, Historical Society, where she actually develops programming and oversees a team fellow historic interpreters who literally breathe life into history. They sure do and casts I have. Have to say Cheney and my conversation was so engrossing that we just kept going so friends. This is actually going to be a two parter. In part one of this episode we discuss the profession of a living historian and Cheney specific experiences and in partout. We discuss some of her research. The dress and fashion history of enslaved women, and the United States during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries particularly in terms. Terms of the styles of head wraps. They were so please be sure to tune into part. It is really fascinating without further. Ado Cheney welcome to Dress Cheney. Thank you so much for joining us today undressed I really really wish that we were doing this interview in person in studio, but alas you and I are both on pause here and NYC. How are you hanging in there on that front? I'm doing well. you know as well as can be a in the middle of. And Derek as well as all. The struggles that were going through right now in our country. I think it's I. Think this time is important for us. I think it actually was kind of a good thing that this happened during a and direct, because we are all free to participate and focus very narrowly on this issue, so It's also. In a way of very hopeful time right now, so I'm very interested to see how the young votes. Push this through. Absolutely I think I sent you an email like a few weeks back and I was like. I go through alternating bouts of rage and faith. and. They just keep going back and forth. So you and I first met last fall. I think, and that was when you came to fit with abby and Loren of American Duchess, and you all did a talk and a demonstration to promote your book, which is called the American Duchess Guide to Eighteenth Century Beauty, and our regular listeners will of course probably realize that we've mentioned this book a couple of times on the show now and you contributed an essay to the book on how African? African hair was perceived in eighteenth century, Europe and its colonies, and that topic is ten general. Some of the things that we're going to talk about today but I. I was hoping to ask you about your path. What led you to study us? Because you are a living historian? And what does the living historian do? And perhaps you might explain the difference to our listeners between historic reenactment and historic interpretation, because there is a distinction there, yes? So I actually at times. Go by all three and a very specific signs. So for my definition of a living historian, it's person who actively studies participates in historical trades, methods, activity is I would consider people like coopers and blacksmiths. Historic Cooks, people in food ways even drafts makers. I would consider them if they are doing it. In a historical manner using historical techniques, I will consider those living historians. There is so much debate over what is living historian. What is not with? That's my definition someone that specializes in historical trades in methods. Now going over to a reenactor I always go back to the webster dictionary. What a reenactor is because I? Think it's the best definition read. A person who participates in reenactments of historical events. That's an. Over Rod and usually it is very much a hobbyist someone who does it on their free time on their own dime, and then for historical interpreters. I actually found a definition at the University of British Columbia and I thought that they had really good definition for it. A historical interpreter matvey gate the public through history. There are guide who bridges the past to their audience as they take them through curated exhibits, historical sites and landscapes so for me when I think of a historical interpreter, I think to the his hikers guide to the galaxy. You read the books I've read. The book and I've seen the movie more than what's. Age. And so when I think of that I think of. The both book and the movie in how. Need to approach it just like if someone's coming from another planet, and you have to explain everything to them, because in reality, a lot of the methods and the basics of living have so much. I didn't have to start from. You have to start from crown so I would say a historical interpreter is someone who is guiding you through a world of the past. And it's it's a skill. However, differentiate between re-enactors, historical interpreters historical interpreters. Are in a profession. A times time have training the. National Association of Interpretation I'm certified I went through years and years of training to get the where I am now in my career, and so when I have interpreters I'm in charge of interpreters and I spent a lot for my interpreters. They're wonderful so's Allen. In so I expect that when guests leave, they have had an engaging an educational experience where coach hustling. When you get a hobbyist or reenactor, you get what you get right right? And I would say that. I am also three at times I. Maybe twice a year I worked with Iran acting group that specifically a civilian black reenactor group called the Sundowners of am. And then ask for a living I'm a historical interpreter and is specialize in Greek creating. The clothing, thin slate, so also living historian now. How does you first come to living history? And were you a hobbyist before you turned pro? So how I got A to reenacting was through Marvin greater or magnet historian. You should definitely go check about use another mazing historian. And historical interpreter, so I went to middle school was Marvin, and so it was right after college and I was looking through facebook, and I saw Marvan in historical garb, and I was a little bit taken aback because he's black. I was like. What's going on here a? Have you been kidnapped? Come and get you and he explained to me that it was clearly something that he was very interested in a sense. He explained to me that this was something that he really loved. It added up. In Middle School, he loved history. He was obsessed. It used to bring old rusty things. To School? And? So it would make sense that this would be what he grew up to be so. I got an rain acting through him. The Hobby side I was very lucky I got in with black people I think is so important that would black people start. They should start with black people There's a lot of things that interpreting while black is a thing in. It's crazy. You need a guy there with you. I the potential impact on people who were viewing this, very. Interesting stories as we are moving through the reenactments that we attended at times, the conversation that has sparked they were very powerful and I knew right away that this was something that I wanted to do and I wanted. To utilize historical interpretation as well as historical costuming to tell a larger story. As well as connect with my ancestors I felt for the first time in my life, that I was complete in some way once I started really connecting with the things that my ancestors into doing what they were wearing in what spaces they were at, and so I came back from my first reenactment. Quit my job. Long arm. And I've been I went to a I went down street. I used to live on the upper east side Manhattan. I went down the street to Mount Vernon Hotel. Museum and garden knocked on their door and was like. Hey, do this chime. Lawrence here Right Charlton Interior. Can I get a job? And they were like you can volunteer within two months I had a job there and then I work my way up. And so that's how I really jumped. That's amazing. I feel like a lot of historians, or maybe even fashioned historians have a similar moment that spark that connection and they're like. Oh, no, I'm all in now. Off The window. I'm doing this now. I don't know about you. But I definitely forgotten about laundry, being in the washing machine, and come back few days later defined it a little bit less than fresh, and sometimes, even if you wash it again, that musty smell just won't go away, and if that's the case tied one wash miracle, your new best friend from sweaty workout gear to pet items tied one wash. Miracle Works on any machine washable fabric that needs a fresh scent overall. Sit out throughout those smelly linens. Clothes tied one wash. Miracle is powerful, deep cleaning laundry solution that. That can remove particles that are deeply trapped in fibers, causing impossible odors that linger even after washing it uses a neak dual chamber canister, which combines powerful liquid detergent and odor, eliminating agents which are stored separately until the time of wash once combined, the solution helps breakdown, body, soils, and other grime, providing your favorite fabrics with a deep, clean and complete odor removal. Order Yours today from tied one wash. Miracle Dot Com and get twenty percent off using code dressed again. That is tied own e Wash Miracle Dot Com. Hey guys, it's bobby bones I host the bobby bones show and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio show. We share our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world. World if he possibly can, and we look through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music to so wake up with a bunch of my friends I ninety eight point seven W M Z Q in Washington DC, or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP? So so research is very very much at the core of what you do. Can you tell us a little bit about your research process? And where do you go to find some of the very specific primary sources that you use in your work? I ever go deep today. So. Again. I was very lucky that I started with Marvin because from day one. He let me know that. Research is so. Important in key, you cannot tell these stories properly, unless you are doing correct and deep research, so the first place I started with an everytime every time I go to a site. The first. That I wanNA hear are from than, slade people. Because they are the flies milwall they are the people that are going in and out of every on scene. They know. where, everything is they? They see all. They actually see also. Trying to find this Mimi of primary records from. Specific sites as well as the region from actual enslaved people. And then I start doing a bird's eye view of their entire lives. Who are the people they're interacting with? Are they going into stores and if so I need to read every journal from that store I need to look at every leisure that is coming out of that store. If these enslaved people are interacting with this person. I need to see the correspondence between that. There are enslaved over and their enslavers. Relatives because enslavers speak to another. They're getting advice from one another. They're passing along. Tips and tricks to being enslavers. This is something that is passed on. It is hereditary, Chattel, slavery, and so two is enslaved met. The practice of enslaving people, so they're talking to one another and if you see this. Growing. Power lay around your plantation most likely you're enslaved. Women are aborting babies. Trying to prevent getting. Pregnant and so these are the type of things are talking. About the WPA slave, Merida's at the library congress anyone can go online library of Congress and look up these slave narratives. There are hundreds from Akasa America. What happened was in the nineteen thirties. The government started collecting the stories of formerly enslaved people because they realized they were getting their eighties and nineties, and even up into hundreds. And these stories? Were about to be law, so they started collecting those also in the thirties they were trying to create jobs as well so those for jobs that were also created for a purpose also newspapers Oh my goodness. People love to complain. Goodness if you want to find out what was really being be, someone spun it. In a certain period read the newspapers just like today. There's always A. Of Indian yet or Complaining. Sitting all over the. Place or sitting on the state but yet. You see those there as well. They complain about black people not getting off the sidewalk fast enough. When white he? May Talk about How sometimes they're wearing to sing high high above their station. And my favorite art journals I. Love Journals from people who have come into contact with enslaved people I. Really Prefer are people who are coming from a different place, so travel journals are really amazing, because when people are writing in a journal about their day to day lives. They aren't as detailed because they assume it's also for 'EM, but they're assuming that. If it's right by someone else, they will know those intricacies. Whereas someone from another place are describing the most insignificant details during the period in I love that. And they're also very opinionated. So dodgy of Americans. Wonderful. Of course laws? You have to look at the local laws every place I go, I'm like give me all the laws having to do with enslaved people, free black people as well as the indigenous population, and you get a lot from those broadsides twelve, and the most one of the most important for clothing runaway ads I on your recommendation I. Am Reading Shane. Whites Book Right now. and. I, just I just started only like a quarter way through, but I'm through that first chapter where he talks a lot about the runaway ads in the descriptions of clothing in these ads are unbelievable. Absolutely they were especially in the eighteenth century man. Some of these people were running away with a whole closet. I know you were running fast. One woman she had three gowns. Two of them were WOHL was sell. She had to Bonnets, one white self one black silk. then. We're not talking about her. To quoted Keti oats another bearish shoes I was like. And then there was a gentleman I think who had a Velvet Cape. I loved that chapter so much and I. Think, maybe at the end of the episode will give a little more details about that book for anyone who wants to read it so. So. You've already touched on this just a bit, but the type of work that you do involve quite a bit of emotional labor, you know. In terms of researching and portraying the history of slavery in the United, States is actually something that you've talked about frequently in the videos that you create for your Youtube Channel which is called not your Mama's history and one of them you remarked. It is not just putting on a costume and I found that very powerful. I'm hoping you might share some specific experiences with us about some of the aspects that are really rewarding about what you do, and of course they're bound to be some challenges as well so there are so many rewarding aspects of my job. Person for most is when children have a bad. Moments. Where they start connecting history, not by using jumping from war to war. But connection as a whole as well as on connecting people. And so I that really brings joy to my heart I think that I I can measure that actually made a difference also. I realized that. Parents don't necessarily teach their children. HOW NOT TO BE RACIST? They teach them. How not to appear races? And I I. Don't think I don't say that in a in a hurtful way or chew satory way, it's very complicated. Races buried complicated and I think right now. Especially in our society, your instinct is I. Don't want people to think that I'm racing. and. Children's say the darnedest things. And we have to allow space for children to save the darndest things, but come in and say. Let's talk about this had spread down where where this comes from and and doing it in a way that you don't squash their curiousity. That hurts so much when I see children's curiosity or they're inquisitive nature. Push style. You have to be so careful when interacting with children, I, very rewarding I can feel when I love a question. Bachelor I'll and I hesitant, and then they kick it that to me a and I send him back to them MMA. Get so comfortable in the conversation that they forget that they're talking about race, and they're talking about slavery, and then they start asking the questions that they always add, but they've been a little bit afraid to ask because everyone tells them not to talk about it, or you'll save the wrong thing and people will call you racist. I really appreciate that children can ask these questions but then really explaining to them why we don't use certain words because I've also realized that a lot of people don't can't really explain. Something like black face, or what is based in why black face wrong all they can say is. It's wrong so I think educating people on why it's wrong, also it makes people want to not do it. Because, on, said they really understand. How hurtful it is! We're all in it together I had a wonderful experience. Of few weeks ago when I did my. Mondays where I I do a post on instagram where I do a deep dive into something that. Is problematic or possibly racists and give more explanation about it and why it's power. Spark a conversation and it was about a maim about Martin, Luther King, having to do with looting and how Marley. Didn't harm anyone or damaging property. He changed the world's It was a very problematic me. in, so I posted a explanation for why that being was problematic and a gentleman. Who have hosted the previous day I didn't know him. I was calling him or or anything, but he contacted me, and he said it changed his mind about the mean. It also made him look at Martin. Luther King's legacy a bit differently, and it really forced him to really a look at two as to why he posted that me. Of and he admitted that he kinda wanted to change the conversation of it away from protest, and why we were protesting to looting. So. That's I think that was a big win. If, I can just changed one line or open one person's a heart to. What's going on? That's a win for me. Love Story I would say ninety nine percent of the people who interact with me. They are not malicious. They just don't know they don't have a PhD at Afrikaner Studies. I can't sometimes. If you listen to the questions, I get a lot of them. Sound our offensive. I like to say as an interpreter. It is my job to people's questions into what they're actually asking. And so really very curious. They're also very nervous, but I do get a one percent of the people who off are intentionally, but ED's. That includes sexual harassment so ching me. Sometimes crowding a of I've been called the inward. been called be multiple times on the job. And I also appeared that to our identity is so heavily tied to our our history. And what the stories that were told to us about who we are. Who are people are? In so it here I. Come along, really telling them that a lot of what they were told were flat out lies, and so this this could mean that this is. Shattering what this person has based their entire personality on or their entire life story on and it kind of that's your foundation in this, and so of course, a lot of people feel very angry about that and so I. Do get a lot of Iger I also. Black. Interpreters joke that we are people's racial confessors. I do not want to be people's racial confessors, but for some reason when they see a black man dressed as slade person like I need to admit to every racist thing I've ever died or read terrible thing I've ever done to a black person Lao. People Kinda feel like. Gap at a high chest. and. That's in itself is very problematic. But that's just it comes with the job. A common experience and I think that's probably why you said it so important when black reenactor start out that they start out kind of under the wing of another black interpreter. Right absolutely. PTSD, who were starting to see now is very common amongst African American historical interpreters as well as black rate actors, yeah. Well I. told you guys that we were going deep today. We're going to take a short sponsor frank with Cheney but more when we come back. I'm Bertam Day Thurston. A writer, activist and comedian. I wrote a book called gave a Ted talk about white people, calling the cops on black people for no good reasons and I feel like we're having a moment in the US right now. You probably feel as to. When officer Derek shot and killed George Floyd something in America broke. Where this moment goes, we can't say yet, but right now. Something big is happening involving race and in particular policing. So I'm going to try to explain it. From the covid connection to WHO's allowed to protest to what fund the police actually meet. When Mitt, Romney the man who tried to keep Barack Obama's second term away from US joins the black lives matter, March. WHEN NASCAR FANS, the confederate flag when Donald Trump of all people encourages cops not to joke people. We're having a moment. You can listen to. We're having a moment on the iheartradio APP apple podcast and wherever you get your podcast. Comeback Kenny adopt a little bit deeper into this whole big world of historic interpretation, because it really is this whole big world and I'm guessing that many of our listeners probably don't know a lot about this. What kind of events do you work at? And how is your kind of narrative within that event? How is it decided beforehand? WHO MAKES THOSE DECISIONS? I guess just flesh a little bit out in terms of like an average day in the life of Cheney McKnight. Heard. It all depends on where I am at the time, and what I'm doing so in my day to day nine to five job. I am a living history coordinator at museum in your. City and my job is to develop living history, programming and train historical interpreters to add on that. As well as bring in people from the outside, but there are times where I do interpret in Austin, I? Also do freelance. Sometimes so I go to historic sites and train staff on how to talk about race and slavery. I'm also as a consultant for some sites that are putting up exhibits so I'll go through and kind of say you need more explanation here. This whole thing is problematic all-business ago. So I act time at a conscious sometimes or some sites. And then when I am interpreting, which is my favorite game? Seems to be maybe twice a week. Now of which I cherish those times, so my day usually starts with me going over the program. She which is who will I be interpreting if anyone usually haven't says is an informal interpretation. I'm just an average person in near city or wherever I am on that day. MAYBE LESS THEY CAROLINA or upstate New York or even Boston. and. I look over that and I. Get ready, most likely. My clothing has already been laid out because of course with historical garb after prepare. I usually end up as sewing, patches or a terrorist because I am so brought. STORMS ARE A. Poor clothing. And so usually I know already when I arrive at a site what I'll be portraying, but times I will meet in the morning and sometimes they'll say actually. Could you re do a Redo and in an hour? Can you come up with a new interpretation and it depends if I've already done that interpretation, let's say I am a dressmaker in seventeen, seventy one New York and then they come to say actually which you like to be a tinsmith. New York and I'll say. That's not in mind will house, but what I can do is talk about trade in general, and so that does happen sometimes. Then I get dressed, and then I hit the floor or the site wherever it is. And it, really sometimes I am doing just interactions with people, which I really enjoy and then other times. I am actually doing something so maybe cooking. Maybe I've been asked to Do some work with the chickens may be milk, a goat or a cow. I love those. I cannot stand cows for something. You know the sites you know who you are a retired. I go to certain sites I end up milking cows. COW's anyway. So it really it really all depends, but. I love how versatile my job is. I, do so many different things, said I think I love all aspects. Wait I think April work so yeah. The two days I'm struck at my desk. That's probably the days I'm not happy. But I'm so glad that you brought up cooking because I would love to know more about your work on historically accurate cooking techniques and recipes, and end this like the overall scenarios that are being depicted in your cooking, because more than one of your videos actually shows meals, being prepared over the Campfire, and I'm like no, no, I want more of that I want more of that. What is that? That how is that being made? I'm such a huge food ner dot. Honestly if I wasn't a fashion historian, I might just have been a food historian, and you are a little bit of both, of course, so what role does food play within your work and I'm hoping you might tell us a little bit more about how you research recipes and even techniques, so there's a few things there. I unfortunately am not a food, historian, but I I do hearth cooking. and. I spend a Lotta time. Food, historians I am not the best hearth cook, but I am not the worst. I am a average I can throw something on the Har. I could give you a little less than about it now. There are people who can make magic with the heart. So, I had the pleasure of learning from some great hearts cooks, I learned from Michael Sweaty. I learned from Champs candidate at colonial Williamsburg I, also learned from heralds at Colonial Williamsburg, and those people they are black food historians, and I learned almost everything I know from them, and I learned exactly how an enslaved person, a hundred and fifty to two hundred and fifty years ago would have learned they would have learned they would win thrown into the fire. into the kitchen and they would have been They observed and they would learn. What on. Why from? A skilled cook outs now I think the most important thing to know is that you have to already be a good cook? To go cooking in on a campfire or hearts I mean you could make something if you're an advocate cook, but no one's going to heat it. is so I so I would have to say that I learned from some amazing cuts. I learned from southern Black Lemon. So of course, my mom Mama McKnight's by a t, Val. My Not Donna Goodman. Who she has a book. Something Miss Shout about and she is a Vegan soul. Food Cup. Were learning from these women. And of course Antena Laura's and Gammy. I mean these are just I learned from? Black Southern Lennon how to cook and I think when I pick up a a eighteenth or nineteenth century recipe. This is why it makes sense to me. Because I learned from the women. Learned from those women who were actually working and living in these households. And I think that that makes a huge difference. I I just feel so grateful that I've just been in the right place at the right time to be a hard cook now as far as learning about hearth cook repetition. And you'RE GONNA burn a lot at stake. Be Days where you have burt all your food and because. That is all the you have. That is what you're GONNA eat. So I have. A lot of food with a lot of experience with food also. That's the WPA narratives lots of goodies in there and of course receipts I learn a lot from modern west African women, so women from Ghana. Sierra Leone a from Nigeria, I learned a lot from modern women because there's this intersection of African food ways in European food ways. That asleep pop spot and you start seeing the actual food raise of the eighteenth century. Of a quarter site or what these people were cooking in these households. Also archaeology reports they can find the bones of small animals, said you got to figure out what type of meat they reading Also you know the lot meant and how much food that enslavers for purchasing. And also like in terms of embodiment like how we have historically satisfied, our basic human needs for sustenance, food, clothing and shelter. The I think that I would guess. Correct me if I'm wrong that all of these those probably are big top three for people who work in this field of living history in terms of like that's where you start. So I would like before we start to talk about style. Specifically I'd like to as you a little bit more about the textiles say you used for your clothing and do you make your own clothes? Oh, yeah, ask so that's a yes and now. To? Burst so most of my eighteenth century clothing I, Lake myself by hand because Eighteenth Century clothing is a lot easier to make depending Allah Jamaican like a Penny Code is just too rectangle psalm together, but on a string. You're a once. you start getting into nineteenth century. It's more complicated. I personally despise selling, but I love clothing construction. So! I learned from a Woman Jessica Brag to look at original pieces, and to look at its construction and Jessica Craig Jus-. She took me under her way, and she has this wonderful collection of original gowns and dresses from through out the from the early part of the nineteenth century to the later nineteenth century, and she's just opening dresses showing me that a lot of these stresses are just terrible construction on John's, so you can tell when it's just you know a woman at home sewing address, and then you can tell if it's a man to make your own dressing. And so I learned a lot from that I also learned how to pick out adverts, so most of the fabrics I've picked out myself for the clothing I. Do a lot of the design. How I what my clothing to look, so it isn't eighteenth century. Most likely someone else soda I am doing. A project now where I'm recreating. Dresses that would have been made on plantations in South Carolina. So. Out or that, but yeah, the answer is yes. But I love fabrics I love going through the fabric store, and just adding everything and I also looking at original pieces. So could you describe maybe for our listeners for just just say for a typical day of interpretation? What would you be wearing? And what is this process of getting dressed? Again I do so many time periods, but generally speaking it's either it's either mid to late eighteenth century, early nineteenth century or mid nineteenth century and layering for those are very similar even if it's a different state or Worse it. So I would say socks, stockings and shoes always i. Don't make the mistake. Where I put my courses on and then looked down I. Am not been so. Stocking shoes been shit. Ships are a wonderful garment that Wicks moisture keeps your fabric your outer fabric. Juniors skin it usually for nineteen century. The Sarah goes away from your forearm, and it covers all the way down to maybe mid. Mid caps maybe lower it depends. It's a wonderful keeps you cool, wonderful garbage I think we should bring back eighteenth and nineteenth century underwear. To says on the matter. Bring back the Shimmy. Save so much on dry plating. And then I put by stays or Corset over the shift or she me. And then I put my notes on. It really depends on again. What I'm where they CH- usually for all periods. It's at least two, and then of course, if you're doing like eighteen thirties or even forty, she wants to put on more 'cause she wanna get. That might shape, but I'm usually someone who is depicting the average person, the average glac person which a lot is these are people who are enslaved. so I have to be able to climb stairs and I do a lot of clothing checks before i. Before, I leave the house so I put on the two petticoats than I put on my jacket at jacket or Gal, or if it is later out, put on my dress, it is mid nineteenth century. Then occur sheets. And, of course, my apron I wear a crime. It doesn't matter what period is because? An Apron is very important. Guard and then I will either put on a cap or rap. Most of the time as you know is a head, Ram and we are going to get into the wonderful world of head rafts here in a minute I think. I've been very lucky. That I have interpreted at a now. At thirty two states and I have interpreted in all types of climates in snow in rain in hundred degree weather in a four degree weather it's. Aretha so a location means everything as ours clothing, and I tend to try always trying to figure out what are the period solutions of the correct solutions because they're usually the best I mean. These people knew what they were doing, so I started cutting corners a little bit. I think a few years ago and so I use modern long underwear. And then I realized that might editor does botch? And if you just use the correct undergarments like. Any votes and the proper stock gains everything worked properly, and works away was designed to work, and so that's usually what I do. I look at the weather reporter what it was the year before? I, start planning for that type of weather also. At some sites they have an amazing. Wealth of research, so they can tell us what meal the hammer came from, so we can then look up what fabrics what patterns so they have. Or what dis were they using during the period in? We can actually come up with a fabric. That's actually unique to that particular site That's usually real exciting like this is something that someone. Is exact pattern. That someone was swearing. Cheney thank you so much for doing this for being here with us today I mean if this is just part one I cannot wait for part two I. Know and at the top of the episode I mentioned a book that we would detail and I cannot recommend enough. It's called style an African American expressive culture from its beginnings to the zoot suit, and it was written by Shane White. White and Graham White and again like I said can't recommend it enough. If you are a fellow fashion story in who has not yet read this book. Put it up at the top of your list. In fact, everyone at the top of your list. It's really great. I will also be putting at the top of my list. I have not had it so thank you for the recommendation. Okay, dress listeners. That does it for us this week, but we will be back with more from Chinese, so stay tuned in the meantime. Perhaps you will consider the legacy of history and your closet next time you get dressed. Please join us this Thursday for Minnesota, where we answer listener questions, and our keep you up to date on the latest things going on in the realm, the fashion studies you have a question you'd like to submit for a future fashion history mysteries. These emails addressed IHEARTMEDIA DOT COM. Of course you can also damn us on Instagram at just underscore podcast where we post images to company each week's episode. Thank you as always to our producers Casey P, grim, and holly fry and everyone else Iheartmedia who makes the show possible? Each week? We will catch you on Thursday. Dress, the history of fashion is a production of iheartradio from our podcast for my heart video, iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever else you listen to your favorite shows. What if you could make yourself happier every day in every aspect of your life? There is a way. Ninety percent of Americans say that grateful people are happier and more satisfied, and they're onto something. Find out how appreciating your spouse changes the neurons of your brain, and why saying thanks help CEO, succeed discover how you can use gratitude to sleep better and lower your blood, pressure and stress levels amazingly, gratitude works to improve your mood, no matter what's going on in the world so even if you're feeling a little grumpy these days, you can start changing your perspective and feeling more positive about yourself, your friends, your family, and even your job in finances, I'm Janice Kaplan join me for the gratitude diaries every Monday through Friday on the iheartradio APP. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Guys, it's bobby bones host the bobby bones show, and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later. I get all my friends together, so we get into a room and we do a radio show, which is we tell our stories? We try to find as much good in the world if you. You possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W M Z Q in Washington DC, or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP.

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Tapping To Move Beyond Bad Choices From The Past (Pod #445)

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

11:02 min | 4 months ago

Tapping To Move Beyond Bad Choices From The Past (Pod #445)

"Welcome to the tapping. Q. And A. podcast recorded live to tape from Williamsburg in Brooklyn. This is episode. Four hundred forty five originaly aired January first. Two thousand fourteen re edited and remastered April. Six twenty twenty everyone. I hope this fine gene. Well where you are and whatever time a day. You're getting a chance to listen to this. Thanks for spending some time with me today today. We're going to talk about and tap on moving forward in the face of resistance. Now this is the third in a three part series where? I have taken audio directly from a client's session now. The order of these three episodes isn't the order. We did them the show but the order. I think it makes sense for US outside of the context of that session to tap along to so if you go back to episodes four forty one in four forty three. You will also hear more audio from this particular tapping session. All you need to do is go to tapping PODCASTS DOT COM. You'll see the entire archive of the show. Click on episode four forty one or forty three if you want to do more of this tapping the other thing that is important to recognize because this was recorded in a client session the audio of the TAP. Alongs a little different. I use a different microphone in a different rigged to my client sessions. So it's not gonNa Sound Crisp and clear as this particular moment but the audio is certainly good enough for you to tap along to right now. So let's do a little tapping on moving forward. Oftentimes we feel like we are trapped by the choices we made before leading this moment because there are consequences to the choices we made and the impact this moment and we feel trapped inside the circumstances that we are end because oftentimes. We don't have control over the things that are impacting us and we combine the circumstances that were in and our history of our choices. Let us to this moment often times. We feel like pets and it is true. We have to respond to this. But it's not as sticky as one might think so what we're GONNA do today is we're gonNA tap on this idea of. How do we respond? And how do we choose a do regardless of the choices that have led us to this moment and regardless of our circumstances? It doesn't mean we ignore those things but they're also not as imprisoning as we thought so. We're GONNA TAP to that. I am in this moment. Because on mazing confluence of choices choices by me choices by others I know intimately and people will never ever know her but I found myself in this moment. In every choice that has proceeded me by me and others has created. This moment has informed this moment but do not control this moment in this moment and every moment I have the opportunity to choose something can choose staying in the same place and I can choose following the same patterns or I can choose something else and some choices are going to be much harder because of the weight and gravity you of the choices before this moment. Even though previous choices hold incredible sway over the next choice they do not control the next choice. They do not predetermined the next choice. What is much more important than the infinite choices that led to? This moment is the choice that I make next how I choose to see myself and how I choose to define my world. That is the most important thing in some of the choices I want to make are going to be hard to make. Because I'm going to be fighting. The habits of other choices the habits of other beliefs. It is much easier. It's much neurologically. More efficient to make the same choice again but that doesn't mean it has to be the choice. My history is important. The history of the people around me as important it is shaped me to be who I am in whom I history is but what I choose. The next moment is only informed by that. It's not imprisoned by that. It's not predestined by that. Regardless what has come before I can choose something new and in the moment after that I can choose something new. At any moment I can return to the old patterns. I can return to the old beliefs. I can do that by choice. It takes effort. It takes conscious work for us to choose something new but I was given that capacity to choose something new because I am more of the of that choice. I don't earn that choice. I don't deserve that choice. That choice is my birthright. That is what I've been made for. And in this moment I give myself permission to trust myself enough to make the next choice. And that choice will give me feedback. Choice will give me insight which will allow me. What I'm going to choose. It will inform me to what I'm GONNA choose in the next moment. Each choice is they knew choice at a new opportunity. I hope you've found that really useful again. I would encourage you to go back and check out episodes for forty one in four forty three or we do more tap along with this particular client if you know someone in your life who ceiling stuck right now and could use a little tap along like this please pass it along. The our ambassador. Don't spam your inbox and send it every single person in the world but there might be someone out there you know who this would make a difference for and if they are feeling better today if they are moving forward if they are taking action it's GonNa make their life better as well as everyone around them slice better. I know that sounds cheesy because it is cheesy. But it's true but we know when the people in our lives are happier and Healthier. It makes a difference for all of us and that is the true way. The transformation happens on a much bigger scale. If you haven't done so we're ready. Please subscribe to the PODCAST podcasting. Par Lawn subscribe is always free. It's not like Netflix. Or Hulu were Disney plus where you're paying a monthly fee subscribers free but what subscribe means every single time. A new episode comes out. It will be delivered to your smart device. You're not looking for something. It's just there in your time of need. You can subscribe at the show at Apple podcast and Google podcast in Pandora spotify stitcher iheartradio aac cast luminary Himalayas anywhere. You Find Audio. You can find this particular show. Sometimes it says subscribe. Sometimes it says follow. Whatever the buttons has click so you get the future episodes. She getting these amazing free resources. Delivered to your smart device absolutely free every single time a new episode comes out questions and comments and I can always be reached gene in e at tapping Q. and A. Dot Com. If you have a topic that you'd like us to cover in a future show. Let me know how some of the best recommendations I've ever received some of the best shows we've ever done have been from those recommendations for the tapping. Qna podcast is g mantra stealing. I hope you have a great day. I will talk to you real soon by tapping Q. and A. PODCAST. Copyright Gene Mantra Story Tapping Q. And A. All views expressed by guests are those of the guests and not necessarily of g Mantra Stella and tapping Q. and A.

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How the Measles Outbreak Started

The Daily

26:46 min | 1 year ago

How the Measles Outbreak Started

"From the New York Times, I'm Michael Barr. This is the daily. Today. The number of measles cases in the US has now risen to nearly seven hundred the highest annual number since the disease was declared eliminated in this country in two thousand many of those cases can be traced to to orthodox Jewish. Katie's in New York. It's funny able to six. And the heart of near city's religious Jewish enclave. Williamsburg Brooklyn around me are men with black hats the sidelocks that traditional payout. Religious garments. And about a block away. There's your Sheba's religious schools synagogues school buses keep passing with Hebrew lettering on the side. Reporter for the New York Times. Holly Jonathan we are here during story on measles. What else everyone's talking about it? So what's your opinion? You've got kids. You've. Vary. I definitely do. And I feel like besides the safety of my children. It's for the safety of the ones with come. From is helps. The anti vaccine community is very lound trying to be very loud. They're trying to have a very strong voice. And it's okay. You know, what everybody can do whatever they want. But don't put us into bad light. Don't represent the entire community and meeting between us. Absolutely. Yes. I went to rocklin. I had a very interesting conversation. A woman said a non Jewish woman. She said, I don't want to do this. But cross the street when I'm with my baby. And I see a person in the so isn't this embarrassing for us? My sister was on the train today. And they were bunch of school kids say let's not sit next to juice because they don't vaccinate. She was so disturbed. She was extremely disturbed. She felt very hurt by her fellow community members that made her look bad in the eyes of others. It was very sad, actually. Sara Maslin near writes about New York for the times. Sir. Where did all of this start? How did measles? Get Toya's Burke, this amick started more than five thousand miles away from New York City in Israel. So Israeli Jews tend to go for the high holidays to Ukraine and Ukraine is in the middle of a serious measles outbreak. So some unvaccinated people went to Ukraine picked up measles there. Brought it back to Israel. Now, you have Brooklyn Jews traveling overseas to visit family and friends to Israel where everyone goes for holidays to see grandma and grandpa and those children mostly took ill over there. Brought it back. New Jersey a warning people who are at Newark liberty airport last five that they may have been exposed to measles. A learning about measles cases in Brooklyn officials confirmed a fourth case this morning, the number of children contracting, the disease continues to grow just in the last week health officials have confirmed ninety new cases there about one hundred seven reported cases, so far up to one hundred fifty five cases that we've confirmed as early this afternoon. And the thing to know about measles is it's insanely contagious. In fact, measles is so contagious that. If one person has it up to ninety percent of people close to that person who are not immune. We'll get measles. Measles. Symptoms. Are usually mild at first runny, nose, cough, watery eyes and low fever, then the fever worsens and Arash starts on the face and spreads most people can recover fully. But it can lead to pneumonia even brain damage, which is why the US has worked for decades to get this under control and actually won the bad. Title in two thousand the United States declared measles eradicated from the country. Well, given that why was there a measles outbreak in Williamsburg versus just a couple people coming back from Israel. So to understand why this spread like wildfire in this particular community. You have to understand the unique nature of the Hasidic Jewish community in Brooklyn. It's a very communal religion to pray as a Jew you. Need a minimum of ten people to get together. So at baseline it really centers around community families have a large number of kids. I think on average six compared to the national average of about two and sometimes many more people babysit each other's kids. They spend a tremendous amount of time together and within this already combustible situation. A number of parents just don't vaccinate their children. And why is that since the invention vaccine's? There has always been resistance to them. People. Just didn't understand them initially me of get it right there administered to a little baby. They require a needle vaccines contain a version of the germ that they're trying to prevent, but I think you can trace the modern route of this anti vaccination to about the seventies one girl in three misuse of actually sometimes because of absentees sometimes because parents object. That's when study came out linking extra the whooping, cough X, and we're not talk about measles here. Whopping cough too serious childhood side effects, like seizures believe that risk of damage from the vaccine is now greater than the risk of damage from the disease, and it was essentially debunked. But nevertheless, it sent whooping cough. Vaccination rates pretty in the UK where that study was plummeting from about eighty percent to thirty percent about. About. I have decided on. I just think that she could be one in the million that something might happen too. So I just decided to leave then a number of documentaries came out. Also peddling wrong information, what we have found are serious questions about the safety and effectiveness of the shot really created a resistance among some parents vaccinate their kids really, particularly these ultra liberal enclaves, Berkeley or Washington state. And why there there's already among that group at that time skepticism of big pharma of drug companies pumping things into our environments and bodies that we don't need just to make a profit and an employee of a pharmaceutical company that manufacturers vaccine be objective in designing experiments to show fault in a product that generates close to a billion dollars in sales for his company these communities pushed for what's called a philosophical exemption that you can send your kid to school without being vaccinated based on philosophical belief and. By the nineties that's spread really across the United States. So now, you can send a child to school without having them vaccinated as long as you have this exemption. What should parents do? After report. Linking the measles. Mumps and rubella vaccines with autism in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight at this ratchets up exponentially these viruses lie a researcher deemed, Andrew Wakefield publishes. A study in a British medical journal called the Lancet establishing long-term infection, and they're capable of producing term adverse events, and it claims to find that measles vaccine causes autism in children as a very small study. It just included twelve children nevertheless wildfire. So you ask any mother in the autism community. If we'll take the flu the measles over autism. Any day of the week. Do you remember Jenny McCarthy she was the host of singled out I used to love the show. I watch him when I was a kid. We'll she picks this up she has a child with autism. And she goes on the anti vaccination rampage. I am a mom of a child bet on who has a voice that is willing to shake the Brown. Those responsible until our children. Publishes a book Jenny McCarthy is here to tell us about her latest book healing and preventing autism a complete guide, and she becomes really the poster child mom for the anti vaccination movement. So I think they need to wake up and stop hurting our kids, and we're not meanwhile, yesterday, a respected British medical journal retracted a study that said the M our vaccine may trigger autism study. I told you about the set this all off debunked. This publication which was wrong with scientifically implausible, which should never have been published to start with the researcher. Andrew Wakefield turns out he'd accepted money from entities that wanted him to reach a certain conclusion that vaccines were harmful the charges were he'd paid children at his son's birthday party to give blood samples and that he'd had a financial interest in discrediting, the m our vaccine and a journalist found he'd fabricated tremendous amount of data. But even the fact that this study gets totally trashed doesn't stop the idea that vaccines cause autism. If you happen to be apparent, and you say, I'm sorry. I God gave me a brain. God gave me personal choice. I'm going to say no to those vaccines because I've done my homework. It gets picked up by the tea party. Where is anybody saying my gosh, we're living in the days of Galileo because it's sort of plays into that. Government. Don't tell me what to do kind of thing. Third around shots convulsions within hours. Alex Jones, the founder of Infowars. This known conspiracy theorist gets behind it up, and we're working on getting any McCarthy on and then it comes from the future leader of the free world himself, Donald Trump. Dr Carson, Donald Trump has publicly and repeatedly linked vaccines childhood vaccines to autism, which do you know, the medical community adamantly disputes Europeana Trich neurosurgeon, should Mr. Trump stop saying this. Well, let me put it this way. There have been numerous studies, and they have not demonstrated that there's any correlation between back summations and autism in a Republican presidential primary debate in two thousand fifteen Donald Trump who'd been tweeting. And speaking about the subject of vaccines and autism for many years is asked a question, Mr. Trump as president. All right to you. Mr. Trump as president you would be in charge of the centers for disease control and the national institutes of health both of which say you are wrong. How would you handle this as president autism has become an epidemic and his answer? I am totally in favor of vaccines. But I want smaller doses. Over a longer period of time seems to link vaccines and autism because you take a baby and I've seen it. And I've seen it. And I had my children taking care of over a long period of over two or three year period of time. Same exact amount, but you take this little beautiful baby, and you pump. I mean, it looks just like it's meant for a horse not for a child, and we've had so many instances people that worked from just the other day two years old two and a half years old child of beautiful job went to have the vaccine and came back and a week later. Got a tremendous ver- got very very sick now is autistic, and now we have groups that won't. Let go of this discredited science actually, dedicated to spreading almost evangelists for the cause of anti vaccine called peach anti vaccine group and in two thousand seventeen we start to see a really targeted push by this group and others to bring the orthodox community in Williamsburg in New York into the anthrax fold. Why target orthodox Jews? What makes the antibodies people think that this community is going to be open to their message anti vaccine targets community not because they want to get their message specifically out to CITIC choose. But because they think they're protecting children and they wanna protect everyone's children. That's what they think they're doing here they fly their doors with pamphlets that are in Hebrew. And yet they've set up hotlines and robo called them to spread this information, not meant to persuade you in any direction rather to create an intelligent discussion about what we are putting into our children the purpose of these scenes where and why we? Don't know more about I listened to one of these calls, and I was stunned by the misinformation being peddled. As fact this community is particularly vulnerable to this kind of misinformation really because of how it's structured you're not really permitted to dig into the secular world for outside. Sources. That's why it's been so affected for these groups real use the tools that speak to this community, those hotlines, for example, people already listening to them. So when one robocalls you in your kitchen with all of this false information about vaccines. You're already primed to listen up for Larry flipped you. So big. A dell. How are you to talk to you thought? There's no proof that unvaccinated children are the news. And that's actually children don't and there's this other thing happening here, which is a cultural trauma that's been handed down through the generations from the holocaust where Jews were experimented on. And so make sense that there's this skepticism of government and medical intervention by the government. So this is not a religious belief among us Jews that they shouldn't get a measles vaccine. No, not at all actually, quite the opposite. And number of the people interviewed were really keen to express that. There's this phrase from the Torah finish Marta code Lynagh show safm. It means you have to take care of your body in order to do God's work. They actually believe you have to keep your health, but like any community you're gonna have people who do their own thing. And for whatever reason number of them chose not to vaccinate and given the insularity community that individual decision became. Everyone's problem. It set off a medical crisis. Measles is spreading this month throughout the orthodox Jewish community in Williamsburg and by March in both rocklin that's a little bit north of New York City, and in Brooklyn, it's reaching hundreds of kids and adults. Now later today, the city's health department coming together with the left it officials and rabbis to hold a meeting right here in this community. They wanna make sure families here and across the city understand the importance of getting back Sonate it and officials do something extreme health officials appearances through schools to keep their kids home. If they have not been vaccinated if you're vaccinated fine. You do you don't come to school, then they up even more yesterday's executive order called for nearly six thousand unvaccinated children to be removed from schools children under the age of eighteen who are not knitted are now banned from going to public places in Rockland county, New York public officials in Rockland county make an order that children. Without vaccination can't go into public places to later. We're here in Williamsburg today to deal with the very serious situation. In Brooklyn, the mayor of New York City, build a Blasios today, we are declaring public health emergency effective immediately. This whole mandate vaccines for people living in the affected area. It said everyone in certain zip codes hotspots had to be vaccinated. Armagh health will issue violations and fines to people who remain unvaccinated. We cannot allow this dangerous disease to make a comeback here in New York City. We have to stop it. Now. Can the government for somebody to get vaccinated when they don't want to be vaccinated, especially on religious grounds. If that's what they choose to say though, in nineteen five the supreme court ruled that a state Ken mandate vaccines, and that there can be criminal fines for people who don't comply. Actually, there's a great quota came across of a judge throwing out a case by people who didn't wanna vaccinate in Brooklyn. And he said the following. He said a firemen need not obtain the informed consent of the owner before extinguishing a house fire vaccination is known to extinguish the fire of contagion. And that's what's happening here. Yuba city that views this as as dangerous as a fire, and it's going to do everything can to protect citizens whether some people like it or not, however while I can burst into a house to put on a fire. If cannot force anyone. To get a vaccine to confine them afterwards. But it can't stop people from making these complex individual choices that endanger everybody else it can't. But it can find them and find them and find them and keep them in their homes and keep them out of public spaces and make it very worth their while to get onboard in what has been the response from the Hasidic community to the government attempts to end the outbreak. There's been a lot of fear and a lot of anger. They feel that they're under attack. And it's actually not a civic Jewish problem. Right. It's an anti vaccine problem that happens to be in this community. There are anti vaccine all over the world and across the United States, but they aren't usually visually identifiable, the Jewish community has a real visual signifier. So they say that by being targeted by these different interventions that have cropped up. It's creating a stigma about them that stigma is feeding into antisemitic tropes that are already. There. I heard some very upsetting things as I interviewed people in the streets of rocklin about people wiping bus seats, when they see a Hasidic persona- sat there about crossing the street and covering their baby. When a person with a black hat walks by those really, call to mind uncomfortable things that have happened in the past for the Jewish community. At the end of the day. It feels like we are all kind of powerless to stop individuals and groups from not getting vaccines or from not getting vaccines and stepping out of their house as an evidently if I was like they will. So that means that is we have to convince these people that it's in their interest and an hours to get exited. Yeah. And when I was in Williamsburg, I met authentic man who pretty staunchly anti vaccine actually stone, relative what have with autism. And like she said that child will decay to give since. We and always have a complication them. He's not feeling well, and then he pulled out his phone, and he showed me a picture of his brother the lips. If you see his lips whole like with listers swallow and his whole body and the young man was covered in hustles. He had measles when I spoke with complaining himself on the feel most just can't eat and feeling like horrible and hugely ill fever hit exposed children to it. And this change something for him. When you start to see your own community get sick when he had seen his brother, so unwell. He started to rethink his position change your perspective about this vaccine situation when it came so close to home. Avenue vaccinating might get my children I could of his community. I think the Husted Jews in New York are having that experience. And I think this epidemic is going to change a lot of mines about the validity affects nation. Sara. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me. on Wednesday. Federal health officials announced that the measles virus has now been detected in twenty two states. With most cases linked to the outbreak any orthodox Jewish communities in New York and to another outbreak that began in Washington state in a statement the center for disease control and prevention said, quote, the longer these outbreaks continue the greater the chance measles will again get a sustained foothold in the United States. We'll get back. At fidelity, you get value. You won't find anywhere else decisions. They're clear costs they're lower and account fees. There's zero so you can invest with zero trade trade-offs opening account today at fidelity dot com slash trading zero account minimums zero account fees apply to retail brokerage accounts. Only expenses charged by investments such as funds managed accounts, HSA's commissions interest charges or other expenses for transactions may still apply. See fidelity dot com slash commissions for details. Fidelity brokerage services LLC member NYSE as I Hello daily listener, my name is Andy mills, and I'm one of the people that make this show before coming to work at the New York Times. I didn't quite understand what the reporters here did. And now that I've gotten a chance to see how much hard work. How much persistence goes into just one story that goes out? I feel like my subscription to the New York Times is a way of me becoming like a stockholder in what it is that they're doing. I almost feel like a sense of commod ary when they blow open the doors on a big. Estimation. It's my subscription money. That's helping them find the complicated and difficult truth of the world and put it into the public sphere. None of the work that we get to chance to do would be possible. If it wasn't for people who subscribe, if you're already a subscriber, thank you. If you're wondering how you could pitch him to help more reporting and more shows like the daily exist. Just get a subscription to the New York Times. The daily is the New York Times. Here's what else you need to noted on Thursday morning. FBI agents raided the office and home of Baltimore's mayor Catherine Pugh escalating a criminal investigation into her conduct. Pugh has been dogged by questions about lucrative financial deals in which local businesses paid her. Unusually large sums of money for copies of a series of children's books that she wrote and self published called healthy, Holly. Twenty ten canned cheap. First children's book. The character. Talk to young people. Could improve the deals amounted to more than seven hundred thousand dollars in payments. Many by businesses that rely on pews administration for funding raising the possibility that the book purchases were of form of bribery. I never intended to do anything than not stand up to scrutiny Pugh has denied any wrong. But hours after the raid, Maryland governor Larry HOGAN called for her to resign saying she had lost the ability to govern. And the times reports that in the weeks leading up to his announcement that he would run for president former vice president Joe Biden, privately apologized to Anita hill for what she endured during the nineteen ninety one confirmation hearings of Justice Clarence Thomas, as chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, Biden oversaw those hearings which involved aggressive and skeptical questioning Bill. As she testified that Thomas had sexually harassed her after her conversation with Biden hill told the times she was unsatisfied with his apology and could not support his candidacy. The daily is made by feel Belkacem Andy mills Lisa Tobin, which will quest her Lindsey garrison any Brown, Claire tennis getter page count. Michael Simon Johnson Brad Fisher, the ricin Anderson Wendy door. Chris would Jessica Chung Alexandra Leong Jonathan wolf Lisa Chow. Eric Kripke, Mark, George and Luke Vander blue. Our theme music is by Jim Bromberg, and Ben Landsberg of Wunderle special. Thanks to Sam dole MC McCabe. Ooh. Chard Stella tan. Julia Simon and Samantha Hanoch. That's it for the daily. I'm Michael Barr. See you on Monday. Hey, there the daily his created a weekly newsletter that takes you behind the scenes of how we think about the news tell stories and make this show every Friday, you'll hear from me and the producers who create the daily wash your feedback from listeners good and bad. And we'll let you know what podcast or listening to to sign up. Go to NY times dot com slash newsletter. That's NY times dot com slash newsletter. And thanks.

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Feature: A Tribute to May 2020 Graduates

Next Up. Student Success!

16:45 min | 3 months ago

Feature: A Tribute to May 2020 Graduates

"Hi I'm Dr. Felicia Beden Executive Director at Norfolk State. University and I trust in White. Current peer leader. This is next up. Student success. A podcast about tips tools intakes for academic. Hi guys thank you for Tuning in welcome to a unique and special episode of the next step. Podcast this is our tribute to Norfolk State University. Graduating class of May twenty twenty. These students have work so hard to earn their degrees including dealing with the KOGO nineteenth epidemic. So we thank you for joining us as we celebrate their journeys and achievements. Dr Mab. An-and I want to give a personal congratulations to each in every senior. We also want to thank the participants that came in spoke on the podcast today behold graduates of agreeing. Ango guys dating. My Name's nate listen KNOSSOS. Dmz Will Russia genuine course almond graduating senior. Assoc LOOK MAJOR. Who plans to gradually a carry on my greer? An education Aspirations data saying you but first and foremost congratulations to automate. Greg's from your very wrong than Ashim. Principal to the student buying wrestling twenty twenty graduates are just want to say. Look you made it through a an issue pertains to believe in us. See what teaching us. Just ask me watch you on. It's always been extremely seriously the cigarettes officer. That of course is designed to continue being the change that she wished to see. I love you deep with my heart. Depreciate initiative you just mean having shaped more his last four years to the person will young rating firewall state. Say I will always favelas you. Student Body will always be a sound. We stayed at a contract. Cheat embody family Rain so that being said. It's now together but around around the corner. Some douse out on Hong Kong Island. Always be hollow the gray and go. Madam Pres- out. Hey everybody my name's admiring homes. I'm from Long Island New York. I'm a political science major and I'm graduating. I will like to say everything had this or reason and I will also like to finish out to everybody and anybody who has supported me in motivated. Thank you was going on class. Twenty twenty Monday. Ms Nihil from Richmond Virginia majoring in mass communications Like the shadow all the twenty twenty graduates all the rising seniors rising juniors and so forth. We've got to walk across the imaginary stage and into our next next chapter of our lives. So congratulations to everybody. Who made it through Continue to push persevere in strive to be better than you were yesterday I'm looking to be in y you in the fall to attend film school in the MFA Program Super Excited about that looking forward to all new beginnings and new chapters in my life. Enjoy your family right now. Enjoy your loved ones indefinitely. Definitely rest and celebrate your huge accomplishment. This is incredible fee in. I wish the best of luck to all of you behold other would be one Monday Mr Quentin Jones. I am a senior theater. Made it from Chesapeake. Virginia major sat out to professors stock over that issue. Peter Company and the initiate theater in the books. That university My plans after graduation. I will be attending Brown University to pursue my infant active. And I'll be a part of the class of twenty twenty three good afternoon. My name is Patchy Douglas. I am a mass communications general broadcast major at Norfolk State University. I am graduating this. May I'm from Tuscaloosa Alabama I WANNA give a special shout out to Miss Katina Roberts. She saved my wife ahead balance. My count freshman year basically told me that I had to come back home if I didn't pay that balance off. And she put a hold on my account and I'm super excited that she did that because I wouldn't be here today Future plans I plan on being a news reporter in a small local market around the country. I do have a job interview in Georgia next week. So wishing luck revisiting the station and also talking to the news director I want to just encourage everybody to keep hope no cove. Nineteen is in the way right now but to stay positive and do what you have to do for you because he will be a spartan forever. Hello my name is not. I'm majoring in Fight College. I'm from Williamsburg Virginia. I would like to give miss out all my friends and family who helped me along with Long but necessary journey. I play pool calculator to help The youth of today get to where I am. Now thank you. One name is Kelvin. Schubert my major is electrical engineering. And I always. I grew up in Virginia Beach. Your Gingrich is like thirty minutes away from Norfolk state. Being that was really convenient for me. Ring a Mike Mike Quote Michael Want TO LEAVE BEHIND. Is People like blows. It doesn't matter which way you planted. What matters is how you to the blue and my plans right now. I guess become a full fledged engineer with a with a with a with good Kunia. Hi everyone my name is Leeann said. I'm a political science major hailing from Decatur Georgia as an aspiring attorney. I like to thank God. My friends my supporting family forgetting college. I also had two big shots outs number State University for help me get my degree in my career for the other twenty twenty initially grads. I'll say this darn is over but a whole nother was to begin on. I guess I'll leave it off quote from Thomas Carlyle. No pressure no dominance these everywhere. Hello my name is Sierra warn. I am from the area. My major is help service management. I just want to give a big shout outs. All my first generation college students. Because we're not leave on his far sales. What we're doing. His family is time for a generational shift entitled to build Generational Wealth For the future generation and at planned to become a health administrator at a hospital. Hopefully CEO running everything and opening my own practice. Hello my name is Shamanee's Turner from Richmond. Virginia I'm a mass communication major I I wanted to give a shutout classes twenty twenty. Woo Woo I WANNA give a shout out to my mom for being my biggest supporter. I'm also WANNA give a shout out to this program. The spar leisure margin ban. Because without this program I wouldn't have been able to learn skills. Time management The meaning of a family slough spirit being one of the big ones so I wanNA give a shout out to the barn lesion on my future plans I plan on being hopefully having my own photography studio I also wanted to design maybe hats or clothing so hopefully that out in the future but shut out to everybody. So Yeah. Thank you alot. Fellows warden just wanted to congratulate my fellow twenty twenty class for graduating. I know the corona virus and everything going on now. It's said time for all of us but my name is Debbie Jefferson from Richmond. Virginia Helping Instruction Major. And I'm also I generally j college graduate I JUST WANNA congratulate us again in. Just wish everybody good local near future endeavors. Hey this is Jackie. I'm from the Bronx New York and I'm graduating with my degree. While my bachelors in political science this process actually took me seven years so seven number of completion and I say that to say no matter how long it takes continue. Keep pushing and don't give up. I WanNa thank God I because I never would have made it without him. I want to thank my mom. Because without her continuous support amd prayer. I would have never made it through these obstacles And then I want to thank my team at work. My boss is because they have been flexible. They've been empathetic and they have definitely helped me through this journey as well and then tomorrow friends who I have neglected I love you all and we can finally celebrate because your girl just got one degree hotter. Hello my name is lakisha Whitley. And I'm from Norfolk Virginia. But have resided in Chesapeake Virginia. For Nine years my major is interdisciplinary. Study with concentrations in elementary education In mathematics. I WanNa send a huge shutout. My biggest supporters in my fellow redwood may twenty twenty. Do Hey everybody this is Chevron banks. You know from Hampton Virginia. Msw student at Norfolk stay. I'm a graduate. I would like to shout out everybody in Clinical Social Work Program. We made our. I'm so so officially happy there. Everybody stuck through the program and I'm very excited that we get to take our MSW clinical social debris to the next level. I'm very very happy that everybody got through and I'm excited to use my. Msw actually practice. Now I'm out in Seattle. Y'All rapid in issue great to the fullest. I can't wait to do my traveling social work and I can't wait to see you. All am best luck to everybody in the endeavors. Congratulations everybody made it. Palo. I'm Xiangyang. My hometown is Suffolk Virginia. I majored in the. Es W program at Nafa State University and my future plans as to actually retire in the next six years and may maybe go back to school. But other than that I will be retiring from the city of Chesapeake Human Service Division Xiaowei affair and we did my name. Is Tim on a? I am from Alexandria. Virginia I studied mass communications and I would firstly like to God because without him. We wouldn't be here. None of this would even be possible and also shouting at my friends and family members who have just stuck by me through thick and thin even when times got really hard and it was so hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel. They never left in a quote that I live by is to never look down on anyone. Unless you're helping them up. That really just shows the importance of volunteering. Most of these only take like an hour week. Just an hour of your time in your really serving as a mentor. You're serving as a symbol for you to see what the possibilities are. Because let's face it. Graduating is not something that everybody does really extraordinary for doing that in. It's really important that we show. Are you just what they can do and they have someone that they see doing it? So that's me T- again. I'm so thankful for North State just for everything that they've done for me in my life in Congrats to the classic twenty twenty. Good luck to everyone else. Good afternoon. I'm Dr Andrea Neil. The Office of academic engagement and on behalf of all of our units which include the Patricia l stiff students at center student pathways academic formations and the Msu Riding Center. We want to say congratulations. We are so so very proud of you all. I have one quote that I want to leave with you. And it's by Ralph Waldo Emerson and it says went lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compare to what lies within us and I want you to know spar that you have greatness within you. Don't ever forget it again. Congratulations Good morning to all the seniors. We are so excited for each and every one of you. I want to say I. Congratulations and well done. I know the road was long but I know that it is well worth it. I hope that when you leave Norfolk state that you will always remember those times and let us hear from you. I wish for each of you much success. I hope that you all will follow the stars and also follow your passion again. Congratulations and well done. Congratulations class of twenty twenty. Although this one was different it is certainly one for the record books. Congratulations on reaching invaluable. Milestone graduation is priceless. Best wishes on all of your future endeavors and much success. Greetings spontaneity congratulations to you on your accomplishment graduation. I wish you much success. And behold the Green. And go for ever congratulations again good afternoon. Class of twenty twenty. Congratulations on graduation. Although we are not here I'm physically together know that our spartan spirit is with you. I know what it was a long road. But the road is over. Behold the greening goal congratulations I wish you the best in everything that you do. Classes Twenty twenty congratulations. There are a few times in life when you will put as much work into a single accomplishment as you did for the last four five or even six years. Congratulations on finishing what you started. We're also proud of you. Remember your initial family will always be here for you again. Congratulations and behold desk up student. Success was created by Dr Lilia Bevin for the doctor. Patricia Lynch Stiff Student Success Center at Norfolk State University. A unit of the Office of academic engagement next up is produced and hosted by Dr Medicine. And Trust in white with these by Dr Shirley Bennett. Make sure to tune in each week and for more information visit next update student success dot org or follow us went instagram at next step dot pot and twitter at next hot.

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Shattered Souls episode 9: Pain

Thinking Sideways Podcast

27:43 min | Last month

Shattered Souls episode 9: Pain

"The. Somebody Park by. He. In concert if somebody out? Over. The stream. Time until I'm okay. Family to? Try to Ron and thank you. This is shattered souls on your host Karen Smith this podcast contains graphic language and is not suitable for children. Real. Christmas the time for peace, joy and goodwill toward your fellow man. For one young man's family. Christmas time would never be the same again. One would think that Christmas time might give some respite violent crime, but often it's just the opposite and one area of the criminal element never stops. It churns twenty four hours a day seven days a week, three hundred sixty five days a year. Drug deals. It's no shock that not everyone on this planet is on the up and up. Some people make a living doing things that go against Seattle norms and mores and a lot of the time they fall victim to violent crime. I am not the judge and jury regarding anyone else's life decisions I'm also not privy to their background circumstances, economic disparities, perhaps things that were completely out of their control from the beginning. My job is to work the scene. Find the evidence and use objective means to do so. My job is not to judge. It's to solve. In the following case, the victim was a drug dealer, and maybe someone who's choices would cause conviction because his life was different than your own. As a detective, I would obviously caution you against that to us. A victim is a victim. Regardless of the reasons were called to the scene, and there will always be. Somebody left behind. Who loved them? But let's move on to this story. On December seventeenth two. Thousand Twelve at about two thirty in the morning, just two blocks down from the zone, three police substation. Twenty two year old Jesse bracelet lay bleeding in the parking lot of Williamsburg apartments. Patrol units race to the scene from every direction when a call came into the nine one one call center reporting screams coming from the area next to Toledo road. One. A car at thirty seventy Leila role somebody the park lot by. He beat me in a concert. You're ambulances. Feeding head and mccaren Corey. Hurry up. You have already been stand. On the phone with me, not Dr Driving over there, okay? Somebody ground south. What what? offending. You know these people. St Rescue until I'm okay. Jesse bracelets friend Maurice Johnson also called nine one one and he was out of breath. THROWS ON ARRIVAL Areva. The. Person Three. From Three. To patrol officers were nearby at another call and heard the screens. They pulled their cars into the complex parking lot just a couple of minutes later. They immediately saw Jesse lying on the pavement. When the first officer approached him, he was still struggling for breath, but he died a moment later just before the paramedics arrived. A perimeter was formed, and while officers searched the complex and the surrounding area for the perpetrators, Maurice Johnson appeared from the shadows and collapsed next to an ambulance bleeding. You exactly. Are you at the Intersex? Out! Paramedics attended to Maurice and transported him to the Trauma Center. He had been stabbed in the upper left chest. Jesse. Bracelet remained face down in the parking lot that was now encompassed by patrol cars and yellow tape. Bright, red blood flowed from his body, and spatters covered the pavement in every direction. Onlookers began to gather, and they leaned over balconies and crowded the stairwells to watch the controlled chaos, and a few eye witnesses came forward. Robberies and assaults were very commonplace at this apartment complex and sometimes witness accounts are not completely accurate. It was still way too early to figure out loyalties and rivalries between everybody involved including the witnesses. Detectives were sort everything out. During the interview process including Maurice Johnson's statement to the nine one one dispatcher, being the victim of a robbery, any information he could provide about the assailants would be crucial to the investigation. At the Emergency Room Maurice. Johnson was treated by trauma surgeon who said that his? were, not life threatening the cut on his chest, had gone through the muscle, but it had missed all of the major arteries. My cell phone rang at about six in the morning with a request from detective Kim long to come to the scene and assist her. She said the scene was pretty extensive and that we would likely be there most of the day. I rolled up to the complex as the sun peeked over the horizon, illuminating the area around Jesse Bracelet. A temporary shield had been placed by his body to prevent the crowd and news crews to the north from seeing the details, but his body was still visible from the East West and South Kim briefed me about the evidence aside from the body that had been marked so far a blood trail, leading between two buildings that extended to a back porch, bloody shoeprints on the pavement and sidewalk, and a beige Toyota four door with bloodstains on it. Kim Long worked on the blood trail, taking photographs and samples of each stain, and she asked me to do an analysis of the blood stains around Jesse bracelets body on his clothes, and on the surrounding blacktop. This is detective. Kim Long they had located a blood trail, leading throughout. This is a large apartment complex that went in between buildings. You could see the you know. The blood trail on a sidewalk in look crossover a parking lot. There was a large pool of blood, especially round his head. His body was face down on the pavement. His white tank top was stained red and pulled up to the middle his back. The majority of bloodstains were situated on his right side, and a closer look at the injuries to his neck showed the reason why. His attacker was clearly right handed. The slices to Jesse's neck started on the left side and pulled across the front and ended near his right ear. His left arm was outstretched above his head, and his right hand was tucked under his face. His legs were straight, and there was no blood on the bottoms of his bare feet. Blood covered nearly every square inch of his upper body, but the backside of his blue sweatpants was pretty clean with very little blood anywhere on the except along the waistband. His lower back and the bottom left side of his white t shirt also lacked any bloodstains. Moving away from the victim onto the BLACKTOP, the bloodstains were still wet and very bright red. They had definitive directionality evidenced by the long spines that moved right and back away from his neck and his body. These repeated patterns were indicative of throwing motion. Close to the ground as the weapon was moved from left to right and back. They were cast off created when an object is swung through the air, and blood is released in a ten general line or ninety degrees from the point of departure, continuing in a straight line until the droplets land on an intervening surface or are overtaken by gravity and come to rest on the ground. In this case the stains had pointy ends that landed on the ground and a semi circle, starting at his neck, and continuing all the way back to his right knee. A large pool of blood surrounded the upper half of Jesse's body and was concentrated mostly on the right side as well. The Sun was shining, so it was much easier to visualize the bloodstains, and I moved backward past his feet to the Beige Toyota Salora part about fifteen feet to the south. The car was pulled into the parking space and several evidence markers near it identified shoeprints and additional blood drops on the sidewalk near building number one. The rear of the Toyota was covered small bloodstains. Some were circular in shape and others were elliptical. These were the end result of that castoff forced off of a knife or some weapon as it was swung backward. Because the car was parked fifteen feet away. A. Great Deal of force was necessary to send those tiny droplets that distance. Little droplets of blood like that lack the mass required to travel very far without a good deal of kinetic energy or energy possessed as the result of motion. This broke the blood into droplets that flew through the air, and ultimately landed on the rear lower half of the Toyota and all over the intervening pavement, the circular droplets located at a near, Ninety degree angle, and the elliptical droplets landed at an acute angle. The important aspect of the droplets on the car, besides the fact that they existed at all, was that all of them were located on the lower half of the vehicle, not one droplet was present on the roof on top of the trunk or any surface higher than about forty inches from the ground. This meant that they originated from a low position to the north of the car. Right were Jesse's body was. The perpetrator was low to the ground when the blood was released from the weapon, and it required a great deal of force to send those minute stains fifteen feet through the air. The medical examiner investigator arrived, and she took her initial photographs of Jesse's position and injuries to his neck, his back, his hands, and his arms, the medical examiner in the body removal. People refund if you start him over. I actually remember we all kind of kind of gap. Because it, they had to literally told his head. To keep it. From basically tactic. But just the brutality of. The march on, you know. FOLIC head off you know cutting. The investigator asked for our assistance and were very carefully rolled Jesse over onto a white sheet. He also had cuts along his BICEP. Both forearms and fingers. which suggested that they were defensive wounds, and he tried to put up a fight against killer. One of his fingernails had been ripped off. and was found under his body on the pavement. Along with the tip of his index finger. The investigator picked both of them up. And place them into envelopes for the pathologist. I took swabs of Jesse, bracelets, hands his arms and his neck. Just in case, the suspects blood might have been combined with his. Blood covered most of his body, but now that he had been rolled over. One area on his right side stood out to me immediately. Just above his saturated boxer shorts. There was an abrupt change in the blood that stained his skin. A ninety degree. Angle void pattern. This area looked like a capital letter ill, and whatever caused it had blocked blood from being deposited onto his skin. I took photographs with scale and put that image in my memory bank for later. In case, it became important. Paper bags were SLID OVER JESSE'S HANDS and. He was transported to the medical examiner's Office for an autopsy the following morning. As. We work the scene into the afternoon. Maurice Johnson was brought from the hospital to the Homicide Office for questioning. They had stapled the three inch laceration on his left chest, shut and put a large compression bandage over it and sent him downtown. He was placed into the ten by ten room. He immediately wrapped himself in a hospital sheet and put his head down on the table for a nap. In the parking lot now that Jesse's body had been transported I could do a more detailed documentation of the bloodstains and their direction -ality to show the jury during trial. It would also help jog my memory if years went by before I testified. I used a yellow grease pencil to mark the direction of each major stained group on the pavement, which ended up looking like a warped clock. Stains by the Toyota were marked and the arrows all aimed out in a way in a semi circle from Jesse's original position. I used sticky scales to delineate each stain on the back of that Toyota and I measured their height then I swabbed each one for DNA I knew that blood likely belonged to Jesse Bracelet, but I couldn't make that assumption. Just in case, the suspect had been wounded as well. Kim Long continued to work on the blood trail and along the way. She found a black T. shirt. Believe there. On the ground or expert and collected, and they said that to wear the suspect who originally. Came out at the second victim. had been standing when he said he had been stabbed, he'd been hold and rescue took him off all the hospital. Kim Package that shirt for us to do an analysis the following day. She followed that blood trail down the sidewalk between the buildings and back to a courtyard where they abruptly change direction. Halfway into the courtyard, leading to the back enough where the same stop, but then you follow the trail and they started going back hord the theme. A clot of blood was on the sidewalk pavement next to an outdoor patio where a number of drip stains were located in a cluster. The trail led back to the Toyota in the parking lot and the area where Maurice Johnson had collapsed. We looked at the interior of that Toyota. There was very little blood inside with the exception of a couple of drops on the driver's seat, a swipe mark near the door. And there was no blood on the passenger side at all. A fact that would become very important later on. One of Jesse Bracelets flip-flops was on the driver's floorboard, and the other was on the driver's seat. The center console. Lid was up, and there was a small swipe of blood on the top of it. Down the homicide office, the interview room door opened and Entered toss notepads on the table and sat across for Maurice Johnson. Wake up, the detective said. Maurice. Slowly lifted his head and rock back in his chair. The lead detective read Maurice his Miranda Rights and had him sign a form that he understood. Maurice waived his right to an attorney and agreed to speak with them. After some small talk questions about the events at the Williamsburg apartment complex began. Maurice immediately asserted that four. Suspects robbed him and Jesse. Bracelet while they sat in a car in the parking lot. He said that he fought off two of the suspects. One of them had a gun and the other one had a knife. I, I. Try to ride the and. You. Gun? Through? Those three on Blackwell's. His story continued to say that he and Jesse were sitting in a car and Jesse had fronted him some weed. Out of nowhere, some dudes surprise them on both sides of the car to on Maurice's side and two on Jesse's. He said the suspects pulled Jesse out of the car at gunpoint and pointed the gun at him as well. He said the man with the gun pulled the trigger and he heard it click. The detective interrupted him and said wait. You fought a guy with a gun. And Maurice said that he was quote shellshocked from doing eight years in the Marine Corps. Maurice Than said that one of the other men had a knife. And the detective him, and said so one has a gun and one has a knife. And Maurice said that he told Jesse to just give up whatever he had. and. The detective cantered. Wait. You took your eyes off of a suspect holding a gun on you. And he's got a little flustered. And he said that he was about to tackle the guy when the gun clicked, and he said at that point, he thought there weren't any bullets. The following is Maurice Johnson's verbatim answer from the court transcripts and one note. Maurice Calls Jesse Bracelet bill the nickname given to Jesse by his grandmother. And that's when I heard it like. Click or whatever bounce you know, so. It didn't sound too real, and that's when the other dudes starts attacking with the knife. He's jumping on me so bill they all got, and they start jumping on bill to because I hear him scuffling with them and Shit. So now you're fighting two guys. The detective said. I'm fighting to dudes. I'm fighting to hurt somebody now. Because I already know, the gun is useless, so now I've got you know this guy with the knife, and that's when one comes across right there like he when I went to swing at him, and he went like this and hit me like you know trying with a knife. What kind of knife was it a razor a box cutter? The detective asked. Like a pocket, not a pocket knife, but you know like a regular blade so this. I grabbed the blade after he started stabbing after he was stabbing me and Shit, because I got stabbed in the leg so I'm hitting him and he goes to like. Stab me again, and that's when I grabbed the knife and shit, so you know that's where so I go to the knife and shit, and then I guess the other dudes you know. They get whatever off bill, but I don't hear bill like you know. They're scuffling and Shit, so I told Bill I was like. Hey, the guns, not real and Shit, so I me and the dude. We get the scuffling and shit and I'm hitting one dude and one due to stabbing me. Can you smell the bullshit? Good Lord I hope so. While the homicide detectives tried to sort through Maurice. Johnson's rambling story Kim Long asked me to go head over to the homicide office to document meritas injuries and get the rest of his clothes. A packed up my camera and my DNA kit and I drove downtown and I met with the lead detective. What's he saying I asked? He is full of Shit. He says they were robbed by some dudes. He said enrolled his eyes. I asked if I could go in and take photos and collect as close and some DNA samples. Yes, sure go ahead. Are You GONNA book him? I asked. He yeah, he's not going anywhere. So I went and looked at the video monitor and I saw Maurice Johnson wrapped in the hospital sheet snoozing away. Where's a shirt? I said hopefully at the scene he came in with a sheet tie, smiled, and said Yeah Kim founded in the Bushes Willa. We'll give it a check out later I. grabbed my camera and my DNA kit and I opened the interview room door. Hey Maurice. Wake up! I need to get some things from you. He lifted his head and looked around. What's up? What's up as I need to get photographs and some swabs of your hands where you injured? He pulled his left arm out from under the sheet, and look down at his shoulder, which was covered by a large white piece of gauze and tape. Took a few photographs of his whole body in the bandage I couldn't remove it because I didn't want to risk any type of infection. Anywhere else I asked. He tilted his head back my nose, he said. He had a couple of stitches at the base of his nose, so I took some photos of that and said where else. My leg, he said, and he proceeded to stand up and turn sideways. I could see tiny tears in his jeans. One of the injuries was located just below his butt cheek, and the other one was on his thigh. They were really small, superficial stab wounds that barely broke the skin. They didn't even bleed through the material. Knowing that everything I said, and did was being recorded. I told him that a male detective would take photographs of those injuries. I grabbed a couple of cotton swabs. Some distilled water envelopes from my kit and I changed my gloves. The collection of DNA doesn't require a search warrant when it's considered a noninvasive process so I, wanted to be sure to collect any blood or transferred skin cells. That would directly link Maurice Johnson with Jesse Bracelet at the scene of the crime. Let me, see your hands. As I photographed them, I could see brown stains between his fingers and I took swabs along with saliva sample, known as a buccal Swab, which is known standard for DNA analysis. Hopefully the lab work a mixture of blood from both men on Maurice's hands, which would place him directly at the scene and in contact with Jesse Bracelet after his wounds were inflicted. I'm going to step out and leave you these paper bags. I need your genes in one bag, and your socks and shoes in the other one, okay? Yeah. What am I gonNA wear. He asked A. we'll give you close not telling him that it would be an orange jumpsuit with pretrial detention stamped on the back. I left and watch. The video monitors. As he complied with my request, he was wearing red shorts underneath his jeans. And I would need those as well since there were bloodstains on them I, told the lead detective to have. Maurice put those shorts into another bag once they finished his arrest docket and gave him the orange jumpsuit. I took is jeans out of that bag to make sure the blood was dry, so that any patterns on them wouldn't get all messed up. They were dry and absolutely covered in blood so i. put them back in the bag and I went back to the scene to help Kim finish up. When I got back to the complex Kim and I looked at the bloody shoeprints on the sidewalk, and I retrieved Maurice Johnson sneakers from my van. They were red and white Jordan's size twelve with a pretty unique tread pattern. Any. Reasonable person could see the similarities right away. We took several swaths of blood that had been embedded in the tread for comparison to DNA samples taken from Jesse Bracelet and for Maurice Johnson. Kim and finished her documentation at that point, but the one thing we were still missing was the murder weapon. We called a canine unit to help us complete an article search, and we looked through every hedgerow on every patio in every crevice, trash, cans, dumpsters, and even on the rooftops. After two hours, the sun started to set and we had to call the search off. And we never found it. It's really hard to walk away from a scene without the weapon used. But sometimes the best intentions don't work out the way you'd like. So. Kim and I released the scene and we took everything downtown to the property room. The homicide detectives were now into their second hour of interviewing Maurice Johnson. They put each detail. He gave them into their notes in their memory bank for later. And, after more questions and bullshit stories about the alleged fight and robbery. They began to ask Maurice about the extensive injuries to Jesse Bracelet. When asked, about Jesse, Maurice Johnson said he didn't know what happened to his friend. Nor did he inquire? Next week shattered souls the conclusion of the JAZZY BRACELET CASE Real real. Opening Music by Sam Johnson at Sam Johnson live dot. COM, underscore music by Kevin mccloud AT INCOMPETENT DOT com. All rights reserved by angel heart productions.

Maurice Johnson Jesse Maurice Jesse Bracelet Jesse Bracelet Toyota South Kim Kim Long Maurice his Miranda Rights Homicide Office Jesse Bracelets Maurice Than Seattle Williamsburg investigator robbery Karen Smith Ron
Sometimes the worst choice is not choosing anything (Pod #409)

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

14:08 min | 8 months ago

Sometimes the worst choice is not choosing anything (Pod #409)

"This mantra telling welcome to the Q.. And A. podcast recorded live to take from Williamsburg in Brooklyn. This is episode four nine Originaly Aired August twenty seven two thousand fourteen eighteen re edited and remastered for December. Second two thousand nine you wherever you are and what time of day. You're listening to this. Thanks for spending a little time with me today on the tapping. QNA podcast against the most common and uncommon questions about tapping an emt get the most out of your tapping in practice eliminate self sabotage and take the action that you want today. We're GonNa talk about something that directly impacts that when we are in a circumstance where we have a choice in front of US typically us not taking action or not moving forward as quickly as we want falls falls into one or two camps. Either one we spend way too much time trying to get something exactly perfect subconsciously. Believing if it is perfect victim is going to be easier for me to be or guarantees me being successful. Therefore we keep refining and refining and refining though consciously in intellectually. We understand Stan. Nothing will ever be perfect but we don't take action because we're looking for that perfection. The other is when we're in a circumstance where we've multiple choices. We don't want WanNa be in a circumstance where we make a choice where we're heading in the wrong direction. Therefore avoiding spending a lot of time on something that is unuseful and so when we don't know what to do we don't take action at all therefore we ended up not choosing and since they were talking about what happens when we don't choose and how that that is actually a choice. Now one of the things that is rooted hid in a lot of not making good choices is a sense of perfectionism and perfectionism shows up in one of two ways. Either either way too hard on something or we don't take action because it needs to be perfect before we take that action so I I have to make this perfect before I put it out in the world or the world needs to be perfect in everything needs to be in place before I can take that action Shen and when you look at perfectionism through those two lenses you quickly come to understand the fact that it's just a form of fear fear that something is going to go wrong and so on perfectionism shows up it showing up in a way to protect you and to keep you safe and so we can see what's happening. Is that simply something that is over functioning and making it too hard for us to do what we need to do. And so what I want to spend time with. Today is the piece of perfectionism where we need to have everything right eight or we need to prepare everything perfectly before we take action and oftentimes this is rooted in and not wanting to take the wrong path because when we take the wrong path it feels like not only is it a waste of time and energy and what I'm doing now but then and I have to reset myself and I have to find the new path and so there's a part of us that holds on that refuses to take action and refuses views is to move forward because it wants to make sure so desperately to make the right choice into doing that to keep us safe and so we can intellectually appreciate what this perfectionism is motivated by but intellectually we understand. There's the problem that we're not moving anywhere and we're not getting any closer to our goals. It's keeping US safe and it's also preventing us from having what we want the other problem with if this disposition that the system takes which preventing us from taking action is it miss understanding. What's happening around us? So I want you imagine what is in front of you is a map. And there's roads that lay out in front of you in their forks in the roads at every single one of those forks represents a choice that you could make it each time you make a choice that send you in a different direction. It limits your options. Kind of like doc. Choose your own adventure book for my childhood and so we don't take action because we're so afraid that we're going to walk down the wrong path and we're gonNA miss an opportunity and weren't get lost in our way to our goal in the problem is that is an Accurate analogy because we're not sitting on a static map with options laid before us. What's really happening is as as we stand? Still options are moving towards us. So don't imagine standing on a map but instead almost a mansion mentioned standing at the edge of a stream with all of these things floating by and the instant something floats by us we now no longer have a choice to go after that and so when we don't take action not only. Are we not moving forward but often times were missing things that are coming towards us and we're missing opportunities and if we fall into the trap of having to have everything absolutely perfect before we act often times what happens is we missed the best possible opportunities opportunities because they've passed a spy and as a share that you know what that's like there's been lots of opportunities in your life. Where after the fact you're like oh how I wish I would have insert whatever that choice was and so when we're responding to this perfectionism what we need to do is we need to recognize not only are we preventing ourselves for moving forward but we're also missing opportunities? 'cause they're passing us by why in so once. We have that in mind. What I wanted to do was just spend a little time tapping to help? You put put yourself into a position and take some action so much to tap inside your hand to speak deep breath as you move from tapping into tapping point. Just repeat after me. There's a part of me that is afraid that I am going to make the wrong choice. Then I am going to go the wrong way that I am going going to waste time and energy or I'm going to head in the wrong direction. Making it impossible for me to get where I want to go but the truth of the matter is as long as I don't take action. I am missing opportunity. I am missing chances. I don't take action when I don't take choice. What I'm really doing making a choice? I'm choosing to say no to the opportunity in in front of me. I'm choosing to save the opportunity in front of me isn't right for for me. I'm choosing to do nothing. And that is a choice. It is good there is part of me trying to keep me safe. It is good. There's a part of me that's trying to keep you on the right path but it is working too hard and it is keeping me from the things I need to be doing I give myself permission to make choices and to take action knowing that I can choose again knowing I can learn from my choice knowing my choices. Don't have to be perfect for me to end up the place I need to be. I give myself permission to make choices and make the choices that I am in control of because when I make choice I'm choosing to let Opportunity Pass me by I. Now choose to be in control by consciously taking action and take a nice big deep breath. Hopefully that will put you into position to making choice. The last thing that I think will be really helpful in understanding. This is part of the reason that we don't make choice or were scared to make choice is because it feels like each choices a really big deal and when you make very few choices the mets true because because there's so much weight that's on each thing if I wait to get it just perfect and then put myself out there and hope it works out that it feels like an all or nothing proposition. Listen but if I make twenty five choices today or a hundred fifty choices this week about the action. I'm taking the each and every single one of those actions has must let's at stake because there's so many more choices that are coming after it and so it's not an all or nothing but it's a one one hundred fiftieth proposition which is feels like a much safer thing and an easier thing to do so. I hope that's a helpful way to think about the perfectionism. That's holding you back. And the fear that is underlying. It's breath I found that process useful in that little tapping instructive. If you'd like to be able to tap along to this again and again if if you go to tapping podcast dot com click on the link for episode four zero nine. You will see how you can download a printable script of tapping scripts. You can take it with you. Don't need to be listening to the audio or if you download the tapping Q.. And A. APP. which is available both in the android and I o s storage search for tapping Q. and A. in addition to getting all of the audios from our entire archive which is over four hundred and fifty? At this point you also have access to written out versions of the script in the APP. So if you click on the tab that is labeled text t e x t you will see all of the tapping scripts that we've been tapping along to currently. There's over seventy seventy-five scripts in the APP. So those are free scripts that you can take with you and tap along even without listening to the audio APP store search for tapping Q.. And and a if you know someone in your life who could use an audio like this please be our ambassador and pass it along. Don't spam your inbox into every person in the world but if you know someone who could use something like this ambassador pass it along the easiest way people find content is from recommendation of a friend and I would appreciate if you did. Did that if you have a question if comment if your topic you'd like us to cover in the future we're in the process of planning the spring right now interviews and all of the goodness for the podcast. Just let me know. Some of the best episodes did this. Calendar Year came from recommendations from readers and listeners just like you can always be reached gene G. E. E. Tapping q eight dot com or click on contact link on the website for the podcast. This is Jean mantras toy. I hope you have a great weekday and I will talk trio soon by the topic. Cuny podcast is copy right gene. Mantra steadily tapping eight two thousand sixteen all views views expressed by guests. Are those the guests at not necessarily of gene mantra tapping. QNA

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