20 Episode results for "Williamsburg"

Retire to Williamsburg Virginia

Move or Improve

24:44 min | 1 year ago

Retire to Williamsburg Virginia

"Furry and welcome to move improve with Debbie on Debbie Miller and I am pleased to. Welcome Ellen Smith guided today she is going to participate in one of our sessions that were doing on different places around the country to retire to and She actually is the owner and principal broker of Williamsburg Realty in guess where Williamsburg Virginia now I don't want you to think she's GonNa do a sales pitch because to me a realtor knows the area the best, and that's the best kind of person to talk to and Allen's been in the real estate business for about twenty years. Now, she's lived in Williamsburg for ten years and before that she was in old, town Alexandria. So she knows a lot of history. But I wanted to have her come on because she knows the neighborhood she knows the area she knows the history she knows places to go and things to do. She knows prices and I know how Popular Williamsburg is for retirees especially from in in the northern Virginia area, they wanna stay close to DC but they wanNA, have the Williamsburg Comfort. So welcome Ellen to the show. Thank you so much for having me Debbie. No problem with let's let's get started right away. 'cause we got a lot to cover and okay. Yeah. The devil listeners about Williamsburg what what sets it apart what makes it so interesting? Well Debbie many reasons why people choose to call Williamsburg Virginia home. I would have to say that first and foremost Williamsburg is a beautiful college town filled with a rich history and old world charm yet, it has all the modern conveniences that any other town does. So some would say that it's the best of both worlds. Interesting. Okay. So what what college is obviously, the College of William and Mary is down there. Yeah. What else is is that the main center of everything for people there are there other universities close by? We actually have other universities. We have Christopher Newport University in Newport News, and we have Thomas Nelson, community college we have Old Dominion nearby. So there are lots of Nice colleges and remember visiting Christopher Newport, and Odu when my kids were looking at colleges and Very very nice area but So what what about the weather talked to people about their tired of the snow and they wanNA move someplace a little warmer are they going to get that? Absolutely, I'd love to talk about the weather. We have a moderate climate. Most of the year Debbie I would say that you could probably play golf nine months out of the year. It's cold in December. January February into March with a high in the fifties lows in the thirties or forties and the rest of the year. It's probably between the sixties and eighties. So very moderate but July and August are hot and humid Kinda like DC weather. Yeah. You can't escape it but yeah. Is there if you're coming from Florida than might seem like a A. That's right. We. Actually do have people moving from Florida. Because Yeah, they can't they. You know I find the people who moved to Florida can take it for a short time like a couple of years, and then they just can't handle the humidity and the flooding and all that stuff. So. Of them like four seasons, they really enjoy the four seasons and if you've grown up in the DC area, you're used to that and it's hard to adjust to just having at one temperature all year round. So to speak wall tells Barrett is, are they high low? What you know what's the advantage to moving there at to save any money on taxes? Yes. Our taxes are very reasonable in James City County for example, which includes most of this area. They are point eight four per hundred assessed value. So for example, on a four hundred thousand dollar house, your taxes would be over three thousand a year. So that's very reasonable and in the city of Williamsburg, the taxes are even lower their point six of hundred of assessed value. So yeah, very reasonable. And I guess one of my questions is going to be I. I know what? You don't get up here for four hundred thousand. So right I dried, right. You can get something nice here for four hundred, thousand. Yes. I'll bet you can't hear what about the cost of living is it in the middle or lower or higher than? Well you know that's a good question I would say that Williamsburg has a fairly low cost of living. If you look at utilities transportation groceries, all of those are lower than the US average but we are not considered a low cost area I mean we have so much to offer here and we have the infrastructure, the beautiful location. So it's not low costs. So the housing costs would be the biggest part of that. That would probably make it a little bit above average. But it's still a good value. It sounds like, oh, absolutely yes. For everything you get here. Yeah. Low crime low taxes I mean I could go on and on. Well. So let's talk a minute about the walkability. Is it pretty much the kind of town where you could walk to places because I know a lot of baby boomers that I work with are looking for places where they can walk and they don't have to always be driving around is that or do you need a car and or what kind of transportation is available? well, we have communities and neighborhoods where you can walk to shops and restaurants, and we have one of our fifty five plus gated communities where you can walk to the grocery store and restaurants. However, for most of the communities, it is easier to have a car You can live in a place called new town, which is more like city living, and you can walk to restaurants and shops there, but we have buses and trolleys, and you know plenty of ways to get around. And I just want yeah. While we're talking about like how close everything is I just wanted to mention also about our medical facilities, we have wonderful hospitals here. because. I and awesome. Sorry. Oh, go ahead. Yeah. Great. People I always tell them. You know how far aways closest hospital how far are you going to have to go if you have an emergency because you don't think about that when you're younger but then when you get older and if you have a stroke or fall or whatever you need to get to the doctor pretty fast. So there's good hospitals and doctors around down there. Absolutely, we have wonderful medical facilities and doctors, and because Williamsburg is such a big retirement destination, the healthcare industry is booming here. We have highly rated five star hospitals, including riversides and Tara Doctors Hospital and just put it in perspective Debbie. You can be almost anywhere within Williamsburg from point a to point b within twenty five minutes. So no matter where you live in Williamsburg you're going to be close to a hospital and we have great doctors absolutely wonderful doctors here. Well, that's good to know. So do you do you have a rush hour? You know what? Yes, there is a rush hour on I sixty four but not if you're in Williamsburg there's maybe a little bit more traffic on one of our connecting roads of one, ninety nine. You will find some more traffic there in the afternoons maybe around five or six o'clock but it's nothing like a big city at all and it's not like a parking lot on the main road during that timeframe. No not at all, I'm having troubles issue men Helen. What? Shopping and restaurants, and there have art museums or nightlife what would people do while they're? Well there is so much to do. We have everything from cute little shops and colonial Williamsburg to more modern shops in a place called new town, which is kind of the center of town. We have outlet malls we have all the modern conveniences and we have wonderful restaurants coming from Old Town Alexandria. I thought I would be disappointed. because. I'm such a Foodie. I'm very happy with with the choices we have here we have five star elegant and we have casual places and even food trucks and Yeah. Dining endless that makes it. Yes. It makes it really nice absolutely, and there are yeah art museums and lots of history you know we have The colonial Williamsburg, historic area, of course, and there's a Jamestown settlement history museum and I have to mention the musk rally that has world class exhibits are, and we have art galleries and we have even a musical museum here so. There's a lot here. I wouldn't say Williamsburg is a hot nightspot though I mean most people if they're going to go out and and party into the we hours of the morning, it's not gonna be in Williamsburg, it'll probably be enrichment. Newport news but and Williamsburg. It's quiet after nine or ten at night, which is fine for some retirees so. By the time you know if your bedtime is ten o'clock, it's okay. You know if you WANNA stay out late like you said, go into Richmond is always something available there for sure. That's right. But we also have things like Campbell Theater dinner theaters. Virginia. Symphony we have the Ferguson Center for the Arts at Christopher Newport University in fact I go there for plays and concerts and in the Jersey boys is coming up soon I'm going to that and sound of music and we'd have Huge concerts in Virginia beach. So I love rock concerts. So I go to a lot of those in Virginia beach and that's about an hour and a half from here. Oh well, that's good because I know ferrall is having a a big three day bash enough Jones beach coming up so So tell me why would somebody want to retire to Williamsburg? If they're you know making a decision obviously, it has lots to to decide about but you work with clients who are making move. What is the main reason? Do you think made one or two reasons that they are doing it? Why are they? Using Williamsburg over something else. Well you know people just love Williamsburg because we have everything here yet it still has a small town feel and we have breathtaking scenery all kinds of activities, rivers, beaches, golf dining shopping are great, and all of these gated communities that we have here have their own clubs and Events and Fifty five plus commute their over forty clubs and the people are friendly here because everyone has come from somewhere else hardly anyone is from Williamsburg. So everyone makes friends quickly and easily. So when people come here, they see how friendly does it's like being back in the south and I can say that because I grew up in Georgia. So it's very friendly here. That's awesome. I i. think that's always a big plus I always tell people to go spend some extended time not only in the community they're thinking about but just driving around go to the grocery store how much things cost and it gives you a feel. For what places really like a aside from like salesperson saying, yeah you want this community or whatever. So right what are some of the price points of various housing like what would you pay for a two bedroom condo versus? You know a four bedroom house I mean, what can you get something decent for three hundred or five, hundred, thousand that sort of thing. Yeah. Yes. You can. You can buy a condo anywhere from the two hundred dollars to one and a half million. You can buy a patio home from the twos to the like maybe seven hundred you can buy townhomes in. The two and three hundred. You can buy single family homes from the to hundreds to the two million. We have a lot of different types of housing here and we have gated communities fifty five plus communities, and it's Williamsburg's always voted one of America's favorite retirement destinations and we we'll so many nice communities. So which which style of housing seems to be the? Most popular is, do people really want a condo where they don't have to deal with anything or do they like the single family patio home in a gated community and somebody else takes care of the ARD that Clinton thing a lot of them want lower maintenance homes and a lot of them want level homes or at least to have the master bedroom on. The first floor, and we have that in these communities like we have governor slant at Two Rivers, which is a private country club community, very exclusive with Tom Fazio Golf Course and dining full service marina than we have kingsmill, which has have the LPGA for many years and they have superb amenities and restaurants on site and and it's right on the James River. So. Beautiful you'd that's why. You don't have to leave the community you can just stay there. No. It's Like living in a resort and then the fords colony, which has over three thousand acres, golf courses, mostly single family homes with restaurants, country club, and then for those who want to really downsize, we have these fifty five plus communities in our major community where we sell is colonial heritage, which is fifty five plus active adult. So it's not a senior community. By any means, these people are active there over forty clubs and they're busy. That's what are some of the clubs and they have a most of these places have like a fitness center and a community center, and then they have bridge I have friends who moved down to Florida and she's never home because she's always out doing something and It never ceases to amaze me all the different choices you have. You go crazy trying to it down, but there's some things. And they do. They do have the clubhouse and they have all kinds of things. Colonial heritage for example, has travel club and wine and dine. Lunch Bunch Book Clubs You could go on and on with with things they do but really they take really nice trips with their travel club and they have Men's clubs and singles clubs and it just it goes on and on. Well, that's great because. If you can't find something to do that. It's your fault not because. That's right Debbie that is the truth you can stay as active as you want. So what are I know? We talked a minute about some of the places to see in and around Williamsburg but are there any like man -tations around or things like that where we're talk about the history of the co-? Absolutely we have so much I mean you of course, you have colonial. Williamsburg. which played a significant role in the American revolution and you if you look waves Berg that forms the historic triangle together with Jamestown and Yorktown, and the heart of all that is. Colonial Williamsburg, which is a historic district but also it's like a Living History Museum because you actually have actors they're in period costume who showed how what it's like on a daily basis in colonial life there in the streets and the taverns stores, they have workshops and in addition to that, we have all kinds of parks and museums and churches, and of course college. College William and Mary and we have the beauty of the colonial parkway and James River your town beach hominy revolver. So there's so much to see in you're close to Virginia Beach Richmond and Washington DC and Forget. The grandchildren right. If you have grandchildren and you're retiring here we have busch. Gardens. Water country. Farmers Market. Awesome awesome. We'll speaking of farmers markets. Are there any specialty items food wise that people would WANNA make sure. Oh, you gotta try the such and such down there in Williamsburg. Yes, we have excellent restaurants in fact whenever I have clients here I give them a restaurant list. Oh, because have so many nice restaurants in my favorite in places way point It's very European and it's just excellent. The chef there chef Hans Schodler used to be at the Williamsburg Inn and he was a chef there for many years and has. Even, been a chef for presidents, but we have other restaurants, likely Jakko which France and Fat Canary which is very Very famous because it's right there and merchant square and the Williamsburg in you have to see the waiver again of course, the Queen stayed there a few years back. There, which is, yeah I'm sorry. Do you have to Curtsey when you go in because? Oh Yeah I guess when she was there, some people probably did and you've got the law under, which is Spanish have all kinds of things steakhouses. A opus nine is kind of like Ruth's Chris are answered a ruth's Chris, and we have a place called a chef kitchen where you can watch them cook in front of you and there has. Yeah. Yes. So just great places we have a Greek kitchen too, which is fabulous and little pubs like the hounds pub. If they really want something historic could go people could go to the Christiana Campbell Tavern and see what it was like eating back in the colonial days. So, do you have on not recreation historic places but real historic places you know like plantations and things like that that actually are not reproductions. They are the real saying, yes. Yes, we do w we have the governor's palace. We have Jamestown settlement we have a place called the George with house which was built in the seventeen hundreds and George. With was one of the signers of the Declaration of independence. We have Bruton Parish Episcopal Church, which is famous and we have the College William and Mary. Boy There's a lot. It would. This is not a weekend trip for sure. Well a lot of people enjoy staying here for a week I. Stay busy. Yeah. I'm taking it. There's a lot of hotels in the area where people could stay for an extended visit if they wanted to really check out the the area. Absolutely, there are some nice hotels here I mean, of course, the best place would be the Williamsburg Inn it's beautiful and there's also place call wed more place which is out by the Williamsburg winery, and that is just a charming place to stay, and we have a lot of other hotels around and kingsmill. For example, has resort cottages ever resort program there. So you can stay at kingsmill and there are towns, shares timeshares at Ford's colony so you could stay there. and. We have hotels, Hiltons and. Well it sounds like there's no excuse for not coming. That's right. That is true. Topic of stain for Awhile, where would be the closest airport? Let's somebody's flying up from Texas or California and wants to fly in and see things where would be the closest airport that they would fly into. Well. If they would probably fly into Richmond or to Williamsburg Newport News International Airport, they're both international airports Waynesboro Newport News airports about thirty minutes away from where I am, and there's also Richmond, which is my personal favorite which forty minutes away because you can just pull right up and you know Valley Park and run in. You know it's just a charming small airport. Absolutely. Well, I can tell by your enthusiasm that you're glad you moved to Williamsburg I. Think it's obvious because you have been there ten years but what's your favorite? About the era I mean I'm making you narrow it down to one but if you have to it's OK. Okay well, that is so tough. Yeah. That's so tough deal because I love so much about Williamsburg but I love that I live on a creek in kingsmill which runs into the James River. I, love being near the beach we have our own beach in Kingsmill I love having the Williamsburg winery close by all the amenities the ability to just jump in the car and go to. Concerts and theater, and Christmas, is absolutely gorgeous with horsedrawn carriages and lights and I love sitting outside at restaurants on a nice day and and you know we have another little airport called the Williamsburg Jamestown airport and you can go there and have lunch and watch the small planes. So I like doing that to my goodness there's so many things. It's like having a master list just from this. Is, but so 'til. 'til the listeners ellen how they can get in touch with you. If they're thinking about moving to Williamsburg and need somebody who really has the expertise to show them around figure out from, they can afford what kind of lifestyle are you looking for give the website and maybe an email address that would be awesome and people could contact you. If they're insurer, it sounds to me like most everybody already knows about Williamsburg but I wanNA make sure that people who are in other areas would also be able to find out and they contact you and Allen's not a sales pitch e type person she loves the location and she's happy to share her excitement about the area with you so I feel confident that. She's going to do a great job showing you around, but you go ahead and give us the website and an email address ellen. Sure. The website is www dot williamsburg realty of the a that's Oh F., B. A. dot com. So Williamsburg Williamsburg Realty of VA, dot com, or you can even call us at the office My email address is ellen at Williamsburg, realty of via Dot Com? Our office number is seven, five, seven, nine, zero, three, zero, four, five, zero. That's absolutely great and Alan. I'm so glad you were able to take some time out of the busy schedule in your day and talk to us about all the excitement makes me want to come back and visit. I haven't been down here in a few years. So you may see me show up at your door myself because I I haven't. I have wonderful memories of taking my kids down there when they were young my son just absolutely loved the cannons going off at the Jamestown on. Site and just going to Williamsburg we used to go to the pottery while it without. Yeah. It's still there but that we used to love do make rebuilt it. Building. Little older. You know it was long time longtime. Well Debbie. I would love to have you come here and show you around and yeah I might have to come down this weekend. You Never Know Ellen but. W so much for having me on your show. You're coming on and talking to the people to give them a real flavor for what it's like in Williamsburg and it sounds like there's something for just about everyone. No matter if it's some places to go the restaurants to eat in or places to live, it's it's all there in Williamsburg and I do appreciate your time and thank you very much. Thank you so much, Debbie. You're very welcome. Thank you. Okay. Thank you. Bye Bye.

Williamsburg Williamsburg Williamsburg Real Debbie Williamsburg Inn Williamsburg Realty Williamsburg Comfort Williamsburg winery Williamsburg Jamestown Williamsburg Newport News Inte Christopher Newport University Virginia Ellen Smith Newport Florida James River Christopher Newport DC Jamestown kingsmill Richmond
Lets Move Live in Williamsburg Virginia

Move or Improve

24:44 min | 2 years ago

Lets Move Live in Williamsburg Virginia

"Furry and welcome to move improve. With Debbie on Debbie Miller, and I am pleased to welcome Ellen Smith guided today, she is going to participate in one of our sessions that were doing on different places around the country to retire to and she actually is the owner and principal broker of Williamsburg realty in guess, where Williamsburg Virginia now, I don't want you to think she's gonna do a sales pitch because to me a realtor knows the area the best, and that's the best kind of person to talk to and Allen's been in the real estate business for about twenty years now, and she's lived in Williamsburg for ten years, and before that she was in old town Alexandria. So she knows a lot of history. But I wanted to have her come on because she knows neighborhood knows the area. She knows the history she knows places to go and things to do. She knows prizes. And I know how popular Williamsburg. Is for retirees especially from in in the northern Virginia area. They wanna stay close to DC, but they wanna have the Williamsburg comfort. So welcome Ellen to the show. Thank you so much for having me, Debbie. No problem with let's let's get started right away because we had a lot to cover and okay, the devil listeners about Williamsburg. What what sets it apart? What makes it? So interesting. Well, Debbie, there are many reasons why people choose to call Williamsburg, Virginia home. I would have to say that first and foremost, Williamsburg is a beautiful college town filled with a rich history and old world charm, yet has all the modern conveniences that any other town does so somewhat say that it's the best of both worlds. Interesting. Okay. So what what college is obviously the college of William and Mary is down there. Yes. What is that the main center of everything for people there or there? Other universities close, by way, actually, have other universities. We have Christopher Newport university. And Newport News, and we have Thomas Nelson community college. We have Old Dominion nearby. So there are lots of nice colleges. Yeah. I remember visiting Christopher Newport. And ODU when my kids were looking at colleges, and yeah, very very nice area. But so what what about the weather talk to people about, you know, if they're tired of the snow, and they wanna move someplace a little warmer. Are they going to get that? Absolutely. I'd love to talk about the weather. We have a moderate climate most of the year, Debbie. I would say that you could probably play golf nine months out of the year. It's cold and December January February into March with a high in the fifties. Lows in the thirties or forties and the rest of the year. It's probably between the. Sixties and eighties. So very moderate. But July and August are hot and humid kinda like DC weather. You can't escape it. But yeah, it's there if you're coming from Florida than might seem like a. That's right. We actually do have people move here from Florida do because. Yeah, they can't they, you know, I find the people who moved to Florida can take it for a short time like a couple of years, and then they just can't handle the humidity in the flooding and all that stuff. So. A lot of them like four seasoned. They really like enjoyed the four seasons. And if you've grown up in the DC area, you're used to that in his hard to adjust to just having it one temperature all year round. So to speak will tell us about right is are they high low what what's the advantage to moving there to save any money on taxes? Yes. Absolutely. Our taxes are very reasonable in James city county, for example, which includes most of this area, they are point eight four per hundred of cesspool you, so for example, on a four hundred thousand dollar house your taxes would be over three thousand a year. So that's very reasonable in the city of weigh ins Berg, the taxes are even lower their point six of hundred of assessed value, so yeah, very reasonable. I guess a one of my questions is going to be. I know what you don't get up here for four hundred thousand. Right. I dried right. You can get something. Nice here for four hundred thousand. Yes. What about the cost of living is it in the middle or lower or higher than? Well, you know, that's a good question. I would say that Williamsburg has a fairly low cost of living. If you look at utilities transportation, groceries all of those are lower than the US average, but we are not considered a low cost area. I mean, we have so much to offer here, and we have infrastructure beautiful location. So it's not low cost. So the housing costs would be the biggest part of that. That would probably make it a little bit above average. Okay. But it's still a good value. It sounds like. Oh, absolutely. Yes. For everything you get here. Yes. Low crime low taxes. I mean, I could go on and on. Well, so let's talk a minute about the walkability. Is it pretty much the kind of town where you could walk to places because I know a lot of baby boomers that I work with are looking for places where they can walk, and they don't have to always be driving around is that or do you need a car? And or what kind of transportation is available. Well, we have communities and neighborhoods where you can walk to shops and restaurants, and we have one of our fifty five plus gated communities where you can walk to the grocery store and restaurants, however, for most of the communities, it is easier to have a car, you can live in a place called Newtown, which is more like city living, and you can walk to restaurants and shops there, but we have buses and trolleys and plenty of ways to get around this, and I just want. Yeah. While we're talking about like, how close everything I just wanted to mention also about our medical facilities. We have wonderful hospitals here because Williams awesome. Sorry. Oh, go ahead. Yeah. Great. It's just people. I always tell them, you know, how far ways their closest hospital. How far you're going to have to go. If you have an emergency because you don't think about that when you're younger, but then when you get older, and if you have a stroke or fall, or whatever you need to get to the doctor pretty fast. So there's good hospitals and doctors around down there after wenttly, we have wonderful, medical facilities and doctors, and because weighing Berg is such a big retirement destination. The healthcare industry is booming here. We have highly rated five star hospitals, including riversides and terra doctors hospital and just put it in perspective, Debbie, you can be almost anywhere within Williamsburg from point a two point be within twenty five minutes. So no matter where you live in Williamsburg. You're going to be close to hospital, and we have great doctors absolutely wonderful doctors here. Well, that's good to know. So do you do you have a rush hour. You used to you know, what there is. Yes. There is a rush hour on ice sixty four. But not if you're in Williamsburg, there's maybe a little bit more traffic on one of our connecting roads of one ninety nine you will find some more traffic there in the afternoons, maybe around five or six o'clock, but it's nothing like a big city at all. It's not like a parking lot on the main road during that time frame. No, no, not at all. I'm having troubles issue. Yes. Shopping and restaurants, there have art museums or nightlife, what would people do while they're there? Well, there is so much to do we have everything from cute little shops, and colonial Williamsburg to more modern shops in a place called new town, which is kind of center a town. We have outlet malls. We have all the modern conveniences, and we have wonderful restaurants coming from old ten L exander. I thought I would be disappointed because I'm such a foodie, I'm very happy with with the choices. We have here. We have five star elegant, and we have casual places and even food trucks. And yeah, different dining endless that makes it. Yes. It makes it really nice. Absolutely. And there are yeah. Yeah. They're art museums and lots of history, you know, we have the colonial Williamsburg historic area, of course. And there's a Jamestown settlement history museum. And I have to mention the musk rally that has world class exhibits are and we have art gallery. Stories we have even musical museum here. So well, there's a lot here. I wouldn't say Williamsburg is a hot nightspot though. I mean, most people if they're going to go out and and party into the wee hours of the morning. It's not gonna be in Williamsburg. It'll probably be in Richmond. Newport News, but in Williamsburg, it's quiet after nine or ten at night, which is fine for some retirees. So. Time is ten o'clock. It's okay. You know, if you wanna stay out late like you said go into Richmond is always something available there for sure that's right. But we also have things like Campbell theater. Dinner theaters Virginia symphony. We have the Ferguson center for the arts at Christopher Newport university. In fact, I go there for plays and concerts. And in the jersey boys is coming up soon. I'm going to that sound of music, and we'd have huge concert in Virginia Beach. So I love rock concert. So I go to lot of those in Virginia Beach, and that's about an hour and a half from here. Oh, well, that's good. Because I know Carell is having a big three day they ash in Virginia Beach coming up. So so tell me why would somebody want to retire Williamsburg? If they're, you know, making a decision, obviously, it has lots to to decide about but you work with clients who are making lose. What is the main reason do you think made one or two reasons? That they are doing it. Why are they using Williamsburg over something else? Well, you know, people just love wings Berg because we have everything here yet. It still has a small town feel and we have breathtaking scenery all kinds of activities rivers beaches, golf, dining shopping, or great and all of these gated communities that we have here have their own clubs and events and one of our fifty five plus commute. They're over forty clubs and the people are friendly here because everyone has come from somewhere else. Hardly anyone is from Williamsburg. So everyone makes friends quickly and easily. So when people come here, they see how friendly does it's like being back in the south. And I can say that because I grew up in Georgia so very friendly here. That's awesome. I think that's always a big. Plus, I always tell people to go spend some extended time not only in the community. They're thinking about but just driving around go the grocery store. See how much things cost and it give. Gives you a feel for what the places really like a aside from like salesperson saying, yeah, you want this community or whatever. So right. What are some of the price points of various housing? Like, what would you pay for a two bedroom? Condo versus you know, before bedroom house. I mean, what can you get something decent for three hundred or five hundred thousand that sort of thing. Yeah. Yes. You can you can buy a condo anywhere from the two hundred to one and a half million. You can buy a patio home from the twos to the like maybe seven hundred you can buy townhomes in the two and three hundreds you can buy single family homes from the to hundreds to the two million. So we have a lot of different types of housing here, and we have gated communities fifty five plus communities, and it's williamsburg's always voted one of America's favorite retirement destinations. And we we'll does so many nice communities, so which which style of housing seems to be the most popular is do people. Really want a condo. Where there have to deal with anything or do they like the single family patio home in a gated community? And somebody else takes care of the ARD that kind of thing a lot of them want, lower maintenance poems and a lot of them want one level homes, or at least to have the master bedroom on the first floor, and we have that in these communities like we have governor slant at two rivers, which is a private country club community, very exclusive with Tom facia, golf course. And dining full service, marina than we have Kingsmill, which has have the LPGA for many years, and they have superb amenities and restaurants on site, and and it's right on the James river. So it's beautiful. That's why live. You don't have to really leave the community. You can just stay there. No, it's it's like living in a resort. Then the affords colony which has over three thousand acres golf courses, mostly single family homes with restaurants country club. And then for those who wanna really downsize, we have these fifty five plus communities in our major community where we sell colonial heritage, which is fifty five plus active adult, so it's not a senior community by any means. These people are active there over forty clubs and they're busy. That's great. So what are some of the clubs? They have a most of these places have like a fitness center and a community center. And then they have bridge. I have friends who moved down to Florida, and she's never home because she's always out doing something and it never ceases to amaze me, all the different choices. You have you go crazy trying to narrow it down. But there's something ever on its, and they do they do have the clubhouse, and they have all kinds of things colonial heritage, for example has traveled club and wine and dine lunch punch book clubs. You could go on and on with with things they do. But. Yeah, really, they take really nice trips with their travel club and they have men's clubs and singles clubs and just it goes on and on. Well, that's great. Because sounds like if you can't find something to do that. It's your fault because there's. That's right, heavy that is the truth. You can stay as active as you want. So what are we talked a minute about some of the places to see in and around Williamsburg? But are there any like -tations around or things like that where we're talk about the history of the absolutely we have so much? I mean, you know, of course, you have colonial Williamsburg, which played a significant role in the American revolution. And you if you look at Williamsburg that forms, the historic triangle together with Jamestown and Yorktown and the heart of all that is colonial Williamsburg, which is a historic district. But also, it's like a living history museum because you actually have actors they're in period costume who showed how what fly on a daily basis in colonial life there in the streets, and the taverns stores have workshops, and in addition to that, we have all kinds of parks, and museums and. Churches, and of course, college college of William, and Mary, and we have the beauty of the colonial Parkway and James river, your town beach chicken hominy river. So there's so much to see and you're close to Virginia Beach Richmond in Washington DC and forget, the grandchildren. Right. If you have grandchildren, and you're retiring here, we have Busch gardens water country, farmers market cetera. Speaking of farmers markets of are there, any specialty items food wise that people would wanna make sure all you gotta try the such and such down there Williams for. Yeah. We have excellent restaurants, in fact, whenever I have clients here. I give them a restaurant list. Oh, good. Because we have so many nice restaurants, and my favorite and go to places way point. It's very European and it's just excellent. The chef there chef Hans Schodler used to be at the Williamsburg inn. And he was a chef there for many years, and has even been the chef for presidents, but we have other restaurants likely Jakko, which is French and fat canary, which is very very famous because it's right there and merchants square and the Williamsburg in you have to see the waiver were again, of course, the Queen stayed there. A few years back. Law which is. Yeah, I'm sorry. Do you have to Kurt see when you go in because she? Because she. Oh, yeah. I guess when she was there some people probably did. And you've got the Lahti under which is Spanish, we have all kinds of things. Steakhouses opus nine is kind of like a Ruth's, Chris our answer to Reuss, Chris. And we have a place called a chef kitchen where you can watch them cook in front of you. And there. So. Yeah. Yes. So just great places. We have a Greek kitchen too, which is fabulous and little pubs like the hounds tail pub, and if they really want something historic go, people could go to the Christiana Campbell tavern and see what it was like, you know, eating back in the colonial days. So do you have on not recreation historic places, but real historic places plantations and things like that that actually are not reproductions. They are the real thing. Yes. Yes. We do Debbie. We have the governor's palace. We have Jamestown settlement. We have a place called the George with house which was built in the seventeen hundreds and George with was one of the signers of the declaration of independence. We have the Bruton parish Piscopo church, which is famous, and we have the college William, and Mary boy, there's a lot. This is not a weekend trip for sure. Well, a lot of people. Enjoy staying here for a week. I can tell you. Stay busy. Yeah. I'm taking it. There's a lot of hotels in the area where people could stay for an extended. Visit. If they wanted to really check out the the area. Absolutely. There are some nice hotels here. I mean, of course, the best place would be the Williamsburg inn at beautiful, and there's also place call web more place, which is out by the waves, Berg winery, and that is just a charming place to stay, and we have a lot of other hotels around at Kingsmill, for example, has resort cottages ever resort program there. So you can stay at Kingsmill and their town shares timeshares at Ford's colony so you could stay there, and we have hotels like Hiltons and. Well, it sounds like there's no excuse for not coming. That's right. That is true on the topic of stained for while where would be the closest airport. Lissi somebody's flying up from Texas or California in wants to fly in it see things where would be the closest airport that they would fly into well, they would probably fly into Richmond or to Williamsburg, Newport, News international airport. They're both international airport. But Wayne's news airports about thirty minutes away from where I am and also Richmond, which is my personal favorite which is forty minutes away because you can just pull right up, and you know, valley park and run in, you know, it's just charming small airport. Absolutely. Well, I can tell by your enthusiasm that you're glad you moved to Williamsburg. I think it's obvious because you have been there ten years, but what's your favorite saying about the Enron? I mean, I'm making you narrow it down to one. But if you have to it's okay. Okay. Well, that is so tough. Yeah. That's tough too. Because I love so much about Williamsburg. But I loved it. I live on a creek in Kingsmill which runs into the James river. I love being near the beach. We have our own beach in Kingsmill, I love having the Wayne's winery close by all the amenities. The -bility to just jump in the car and go to concerts and theater and Christmas is absolutely gorgeous with horsedrawn carriages and lights, and I love sitting outside at restaurants on a nice day. And and you know, we have another little airport called the Williamsburg Jamestown airport, and you can go there and have lunch and watch the small plane. So I like doing that to my goodness. There's so many things it's like having a master list. Just from this. But so tell tell the listeners at when how they can get in touch with you if they're thinking about moving to Williamsburg and need somebody who really has the expertise to show them around figure out from I've taken afford, what kind of lifestyle are you looking for give the website, maybe an Email address that would be awesome than people could to contact you. If they're internal though it sounds to me like most everybody already knows about Williamsburg. But I wanna make sure that people who are in other areas would also be able to find out, and they could contact you and Ellen's not a sales pitch e type person. She loves the location, and she's happy to share her excitement about the area with you. So I feel confident that she's gonna do a great job showing you around. But you go ahead and give us the website and Email address Ellen. Sure. The website is WWW dot Williamsburg realty of VA. That's F VA dot com. Williams for Williamsburg realty of VA dot com, or you can even call us at the office. My Email address is Ellen at Williamsburg realty of via dot com are office number is seven five seven nine zero three zero four five zero. That's absolutely great in Allen. I'm so glad you were able to take some time out of the busy schedule in your day. And talk to us about all the excitement makes me want to come back and visit I haven't been down here two years. So you may see me show up at your door myself because I haven't I have wonderful memories of taking my kids down there when they were young my son. Just absolutely loves the cannons going off at the Jamestown. On site and just going to Williamsburg ways to go to the pottery while it without manner. You know, it's still there. But we used to love rebuilt building a little older, you know, it was a long time. Debbie. I would love to have you come here and show you around and have to come down this weekend. You never know Ellen. Debbie so much for having me on your show. You're coming on and talking to the people to get a real flavor for what it's like in Williamsburg. And it sounds like there's something for just about everyone. No matter if it's places to go restaurants to eat in or places to live. It's it's all there in Williamsburg. And I do appreciate your time. And thank you very much. Thank you so much, Debbie. You're very welcome. Thank you. Okay. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Bye. Bye.

Williamsburg Debbie Miller Williamsburg realty Williamsburg inn Ellen Smith Williamsburg Jamestown airport Berg Virginia Christopher Newport university Williams Mary boy golf Christopher Newport James river Florida ODU Allen Richmond Thomas Nelson community colleg Newport News
Great Risk

The Awesome Gnome Letter

01:24 min | 2 years ago

Great Risk

"No matter what would you do burn opportunity i spent last week on vacation with my family in williamsburg virginia one of the pivotal moments in u s history a place that is home to jamestown williamsburg in yorktown places that defined our country the good and the bad these location of full of terrific in terrible things these places they're full of people taking risks for an opportunity thinking about it for a second you are living in a country things are established yet you decide to make a trick to new land that has been rumored away that has had developed stipulations resemble what you're accustomed to has there were many civilization already there a place that had the struggle in its own issues and problems that is very significant risk many people died making it to north america what

williamsburg virginia yorktown north america
The Lumberjack of Williamsburg

Not About Lumberjacks

27:56 min | 1 year ago

The Lumberjack of Williamsburg

"I want to make one thing perfectly clear. This show is not about lumberjacks. My name is Christopher Grundland and this is where I share my stories stories. Sometimes the stories contain truths but most of the time they're made up sometimes. The stories are funny other times. They're serious but you have my word about one thing. I will never ever sheriff story about lumberjacks. This time. Lingering cops be damned. It's the annual you will November story a couple weeks later than planned because my wife and I were sick over the Thanksgiving break in the US. But we're well again at least well enough to record this story that is fiction even though it sounds real. It's unlike like anything I've ever done for the show and I hope you enjoy this tale about an entrepreneurial podcast gun rather wrong. Check out the show. Notes for the episode's content advisory All right let's get to work the lumberjack of Williamsburg. Hi I'm Brooke. Ainsley early host of the creative ascent podcast where I talked with cutting edge innovative creatives about their treks to success. So you can walk shorter trail all to all your creative dreams. This week my guest is l j burke a creative innovator known to many as the lumberjack of Williamsburg Berg before we get started apologies about my voice. I've been a bit under the weather lately. I understand broke it. Hit me you too. I'll do my best not to offer SNARF through this. I know I know all right. Let's get the obvious questions. Out of the way why the lumberjack of Williamsburg and does the eljay in your name Stanford lumberjack. I get those questions. A lot broke and I wish stood for something cooler. But it's my given name Larry Jane and that's why an e as far as the lumberjack doc moniker it was given to me by another podcast. Her the three step Dick himself. Richard Costas everyone in Williamsburg. Doc was into that ironic hipster look at the time you know the one with the skinny jeans. PBR T shirts trucker caps and mutton chops. I wanted to stand out from the crowd so I try beard and started wearing flannels and hiking boots. It became my calling card. And when I was on the three step Dick Nick podcast refining my roadmap to success down to just three things Kostas titled the episode the Lumberjack of Williamsburg. And that name stuck with me cool. You've become known for your bespoke. Outdoor gear waxed canvas bags restored. Axes says painted canoe paddles and more were you into the outdoors. When you were younger not really? I grew up in Brooklyn Heights and move to the Burgh right after. It's a big boom. My Dad managed hedge funds. And my mom's a lawyer after design school. I didn't WanNa just become another guy. Making Logos and and managing ad campaigns for conglomerates when I saw field notes takeoff Aaron grappling. I knew there was a market for busy professionals. Wanting to feel that old-school outdoor John Moore asked that Eric I started with wax Canvas Messenger bags and it took off from there. One of my customers customers bought a lake house up in walk and he asked if I could create some things to make his getaway. Feel more authentic. And that's how I got into painted canoe. paddles axes and old rustic sign edge. I love hand lettering and weathering things to look like they've always existed. You mentioned design in school. How did you get into design? Oddly enough through the J. Peterman catalog. My parents always got it and I loved how it was full of paintings instead ahead of photos just how every item came with the story. It was so different from any other marketing. US off the time you look at the sears catalog as a kid. There's someone your age with a bowl haircut and wet lips playing with a Tonka truck and oversaturated high contrast photo that looked like it was photographed by circus clowns and that was all accompanied with boring copy. But the Peterman catalog made you yearn for a different way of life. You wanted to travel the world in those clothes carrying all the right accessories with you. It spurred imagination. It's the butt of so many jokes now but I can still pick up a Peterman catalog and feel like a little kid imagining all the many ways to take on a big world out there. That's beautiful your story and that way of marketing when you can shape the consumer and make them crave becoming something. They never even knew they wanted to be you. It's a win. Like inspiring them to be better than they were before interacting with your brand but anyway each just past the two hundred fifty thousand subscriber mark on Youtube. How did you leverage what you do with that? Love is loved photography and Video. I was lucky that my parents parents recognized and supported the things that I loved. I used to make little photo comic books and then it started editing video stories and not just funny things made with friends. Because if I'm being honest I really didn't have a lot of friends. I kinda lived inside my head and maybe because I was trying to appease as adults I knew I couldn't just make video about fighting a monster or something and be told I did something special jump forward and I saw a mini documentary on Youtube. About Cut Brooklyn's Joel buckle widths. There's a guy who started out as a novelist and he didn't make it so he started. Grinding steeled eases eases nerves. He ended up making incredible knives in his business. took off with just a couple of video features on Youtube shot like they were made for TV and not it. Just some little throwaway thing. So I dragged out my camera and made a four minute documentary about what I do and I uploaded it to youtube and then I contacted everybody. I knew to share it and it got passed on down the line to the right people who shared it on twitter. It went from something like twenty five us to a couple thousand overnight and then by the end of the week it was almost ten thousand views so I vowed to make a video a week. Sometimes I'm just telling my story and other times featuring a product. I was making just sharing how I did what I do. I know a lot of people think you should hold all your cards hearts close to your body but I find that sharing how I do all I do shows people that what I make is not just something made on an assembly line. They know it's me and my shop making a thing by hand especially for them. I mean sure they could try making it themselves but when they see all that goes into everything I create. They'd rather just pay me money. Great Point how else do you promote your brand. Do you work with any influencers Beyond Youtube it's mostly just word of mouth. I really don't do a lot with influencers. I don't need to pay somebody to hold my product on instagram or make a video. We all know that they're making simply because they've been paid. I go where the money is. My parents taught me that at some of the people I saw product to can afford to pay even more than I charge and I definitely charge. What I'm worth my customers? I I suppose are my influencers. Have you thought about offering lower priced items to attract customers on the way up. That's a common move for many but but I think it cheapens the brand I want people to aspire to my products. Not Work Their way up. You can either afford what I offer. Or you can't can't and that's part of its appeal. But I'd be lying if I said it didn't at least cross my mind early on things like beard oils. hand-carved pipes hypes things like that. It was more important to stay true to my vision though. Okay so you're not into influencers but if you could have any celebrity endorser product who would it be and why man. That's a great question. I never really thought about that. I sell to some celebrities and they talk about what I do with their friends. But if I had to seek someone out I suppose Nick Offerman. I usually don't go humorous with what I do. But he has that right blend of rugged in serious but he's also seen as trustworthy in down to earth that fireside video with lag and that he made is a good example. You know it's not necessarily funny. It's just him sitting beside a fireplace in and drinking product. Its whimsical at best. So maybe something like that just him. Taking a tree down with one of my axes paddling his canoe with something I made maybe or just like hiking and taking some gear out of a bag I created. Yeah yeah he'd be perfect for your brand all right. Let's take things back a bet. What's the first thing you remember? Selling mystery are- boxes. What are those started with me? Just taking things like old toys putting them in boxes and selling them to my friends you Mike Get old star wars figure or redemption coupon for a toy truck or something. That was too big for a box. I'd sell them in batches to kids in the neighborhood good and they went nuts for it at look at all the old things I wanted to get rid of and then I'd figure out a price for it all and then quadrupled that so say everything was worth about twenty dollars. I'd shoot for eighty bucks. Maybe even one hundred and say it was ten things I was getting red of. I'd be selling ten boxes at eight dollars a piece or maybe even ten kids in the neighborhood practically fought to be part of it. I mean obviously some things were worth far less than eight dollars but as long as I made sure that there was at least one or two decent things in the bunch. It's like created a gambler's ramblers reflex. And because I only sold ten boxes eventually I had crowds of kids wanting in it got so big that I started selling one dollar lottery tickets to be one of the kids who had the right to buy an actual box before long started making more money just from selling those those tickets. Did any other kids eventually catch on and then try doing the same thing. Oh Yeah what did you do. Then I got better boxes Better things in those boxes so my reputation was always the one people paid for and then I charged more then one year. I made enough to to start selling to adults. I buy boxes from antique stores in other things and do the same thing just on a bigger scale. I had an uncle who wound a bookshop. And he let me set up my little shop there. That's when I realized how much money adults had and how much they wanted to a help. An enterprising kid in be feel the magic of buying something. They couldn't see people will pay a lot for a surprise is going back to J. Peterman. I think that's why it works so much. You never saw the actual product until it arrived. You saw painted representation but it wasn't until you open the box that that lasts dopamine hit dropped and you felt like you were part of some elite club. Wow this is is golden any plans to bring back the mystery boxes. Maybe a subscription service. That's a really good idea. But then I'd have to hassle with employees. Okay let's talk about that. You do all of this yourself correct. Yes and that drives demand yet. Does I can only do so much. And there's a waiting time. I have to turn a lot of requests away if you've purchased product for me before I'm more likely to take that commission than something new you. That's the thing. So many people spend time chasing influencers in investing time and money and getting more new customers. But you can make a decent living ving from existing clients without that big investment of chasing down more people so no plans to expand into a bigger operation. No I think that would just ruin a good thing for everyone involved. How so I could probably make more money mass producing my work but at that point? I'm I'm just like everybody else. If anyone can buy what I'm selling then really what's it's worth. I don't say this to sound arrogant but my customers you see me as an artist and they have surplus of funds so that small base I allowed to purchase my creations are part of an exclusive group and I guess in that sense. It's kind of like offering the right to only ten kids out of eventually. Hundreds who wanted to buy one of my old mystery boxes. The thing with that was everybody knew the agreed upon worth of what was inside the boxes. If I tried selling the right to purchase for fifty or a hundred dollars no one would have brought in because they knew that the whole hall was probably worth eighty or one hundred dollars but now I can offer something I spend a week making and and I ended up making thousands in return all right. Let's just go there. How much do you make in a year? That is if you're comfortable discussing numbers. Sure I can do that I have a small shop space. I owned free and clear and then I shoot for about a quarter million a year. I know I could make more. But I'm not my mother or father who wanted as much as they could make and I'll be honest so I don't sound too much like an asshole. I'm sorry can I say yeah that on the show you just did. I guess I guess I did but that's fine occasional. Swearing is honesty right. I fucking thanks so but anyway just to be out in the open about things. My parents made sure I'd never want for anything other than what made me happy in life. They were both very Taipei's. I guess I have a little bit of that my blood but not like them. I just just need enough and seriously love what I make. I love hearing from my customers and example. Last summer someone I sell to was hiking Colorado Colorado and a storm came up everything he needed to keep dry stayed dry. I got a postcard from him while he was still on vacation sharing the story. I have a file cabinet over there full of letters postcards and things like that it might sound funny but if this place several went up in flames that particular cabinet is what I'd Russian to save. That's so sweet. It really is about the relationships. We build through commerce immerse. Oh it is all right. What do you do when you're not working on some level I suppose I'm always working at least always thinking about new? Do things and ways to make existing product better. But it's not like some of my friends who tease me about. Being a hipster people can make fun of what I do all day. But I'm not the one answering email from my boss at three in the morning when I wake up in the middle of the night and see my phone lit up from people working from their beds. When I'm not working and I let my mind go I enjoy reading? What do you read novels really? Yeah I know is an entrepreneur. Sherpur Noor people expect me to read business books but almost everyone. I've read his like ten to twenty pages of actual decent information expanded to hundreds of pages just so people feel like they got their money's worth and accomplish something. There's no challenge in those kinds of books. I can hone in on all I. I WANNA learn with a Google search and not waste of fifteen to one ratio of waiting through a bunch of bloat fiction just does something to my brain. I not only get a feel for how to tell better stories but I learned what different people deal with. When I read books written by people I might never meet business? Books seem to break everyone down into just a few things or types because easy sells most entrepreneurs meat no nothing outside their little bubbles goals because they see everyone is an archetype instead of an actual human being if your marketing anything and not reading fiction. And you're probably mediocre at best in very limited in thought and understanding. I see what habits or mindsets make you successful successful well reading novels but part of what I love about. Novels is the time it takes to read one. I'm not sitting there. Listening to audio. Books is at two times speed just to get him into my head and along those lines. I'm putting time in deeper uninterrupted. Thought into what I create I give idealism awesome processes time to incubate and I don't mean for a day or a week some things I think about for years most of those may go nowhere if I measured it but I find that in giving things so much time other things bubble up along the way that I'd never come up with otherwise I mean I get worse. South Godin is getting at when he talks about always shipping things but a machine gun approaches. Desperate don't you think I mean anyone can do it. Maybe you hit a thing Pinger to once in a while. But I'd rather take the time dial in my sights in not Mrs. Schott so you're saying you never make mistakes. I didn't saying that I said I never miss. When it's time to pull the trigger on an idea you'll have to forgive me if I don't believe you you're excuse but it's the truth so many people just throw so much stuff out there hoping that something sticks? I'm not the Kinda Guy who thinks about monitoring everything I mean Shit. People can't even have a hobby anymore without everyone asking how they're gonNA make money with it. I find that sad a friend suggested I turn my love of reading into into a side hustle and man. I hate that term. I'd rather make my one thing matter so I don't have to do other things on the side. I work work and then I enjoy my time not working but to this friend. I have this big youtube following. so He's like dude. You need to figure out how to monetize reading thing. No I don't need to figure out how to monetize reading because I enjoy reading and some of the other things. I do simply for the sake of enjoyment. I don't think people enjoy things anymore. Because unless you're hitting your numbers. Even hobbies have become stressful things for people now again. I know that I'm speaking from a place place a privilege and never wanting for anything growing up but I do know what enough looks like. My Dad's stopped what he did because it made him sick. You can't catch infinity infinity so find enough and enjoy what comes with it. I can't tell you the last time I stressed about. Something didn't have a good night's sleep that's worth worth far more to me than some five year plan that quadruples my income. I mean I appreciate what you do but I bet you in your audience would be happier if you we're always chasing things. Well this is taking a bit of a turn. I'm sorry no it's okay. Oh Kay can can I ask you in your audience. Something then share. What does enough look like to you? I'm not sure I guess I never thought about it like that. Brooke you have over or one and a half million followers on Youtube and you post three times a week getting almost a million views each video between your ad revenue. Money is an influence. fluence are in your products. I'm sure you make considerably more than I do. Yes about three to four times more each year from the numbers you discussed well. When does it ever become enough? Brooke narrow I suppose if I slowed down at all goes away. Well I think you have have more than enough. I think you need to stop chasing so much. You'd be a lot happier are you okay. No I'm really not I have you on the show to have a nice conversation about what we do and you pull some. Almost abusive mentor shed on me. psychoanalyze me tell me. I'm not happy. This show is a mutually beneficial thing for both sides. I really do hope it helps us nurse figure out something they'd rather rather do so. Don't you dare tell me what enough is because between your parents you grew up a billionaire. Who never wanted for anything? You can make nothing at all the rest of of your life and your good. I don't expect people to know my story but let me put things in perspective Larry. My Dad was a heavy equipment mechanic. Manik and my mom worked at a convenience store until I made enough that she didn't have to work. You grew up here in the city. I grew up in Flat Lick Kentucky and no. That's that's not a nickname that's the name of the actual town. I'm sorry I'm not done. I have four siblings and there were times at dinner when we were lucky to have pork chops purchase the day of expiration that and wild potatoes and a can of green beans often. It not even a big can of beans just a regular what fourteen ounce can or whatever it is so imagine this you fucking love green beans. But they're five other people going at it and if you wonder Y I didn't say six and include my mom. That's because I later found out. She used to eat saltine crackers and butter while cooking dinner for a says she could get some fat and carbs and leave something thing for her family. You mentioned your dad retired from trading. How is he today? He's fine. Yeah well my dad's been dead for years Mesothelioma from brake pads and clutches than Shit. So imagine how much all that fucks you up. I could be as rich as your family and still worry that one day I would wake up and it would all gone even though I know better. But that's the wicked thing about growing up in poverty. You really can't escape it even when you're rich I have to try ten times harder better than people who grew up with money and I'm still worried it will all fall out from under me and I'll end up back in the gap with nothing again like that's my destiny i. I'm sorry Brooke I had no idea I didn't expect you to but don't pull some abusive self help. Google shut on me. About what enough looks like Kay. I think we're done. I'm sorry I really am. Can I say one more thing. Sure why not. This is a mess of an episode as it is. I have a confession. What's that I don't make even a fraction of what I said I make? I wasn't kidding about the postcards from Colorado. were making things for a client with a Lake House. ALSOP walkup book. But that Guy's my dad's best friend Kinda sucked at design. Even though I did make it through school most of what I do isn't very original. I guess it's stuff that I kinda copied from J. Peterman or stuff. I learned how to do online. I'd probably be happier if I took my friend's advice and started doing book reviews. So yeah there's that one more question sure it's kind of a weird one but now that you have money. How often do you eat green beans? I can't stand them anymore. I I made myself sick on them when I was on my own and I can't even look at them today. Nugget get that. Well I usually wrap up episodes asking guests. What's in store for the future when I take a crack at that one before we got the short? Yeah sure because that's a that's a really good question. I wish I had a good answer. You've given me a lot to think about today. I guess I really don't know what the future holds for me and I suppose never having to worry about my future arrive never really given it much thought and maybe I should start. Okay thanks for listening to the creative sent podcast with me. Brooke Ainsley you can learn more about eljay burke at no lumberjacks dot com a year. He has time in his busy schedule for commissions. Yeah I do next week I'm talking with cellist Madeline Clark about giving up a career career with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra following the death of her husband. And how she found her true calling by making music her own until then climb hard hard and stay creative a big. Thank you for listening to not about lumberjacks. All music by ARGOT PHYS MS and April April Moon. Courtesy of epidemic sound visit no lumberjacks dot com for information about the show. The voice talent in music. And because I was sick you only have to wait a couple weeks for the annual Christmas episode Doc. This year enjoy three stories to that are kind of somber and one. That's well hits rather ridiculous. You might even hear a recurring character until next time. Be Mighty and keep your access sharp.

Youtube Williamsburg Brooke Ainsley Peterman J. Peterman Dick Nick Colorado Larry Jane Lake House Google Williamsburg Berg US Kay Christopher Grundland Doc Brooklyn Heights Richard Costas sears
Deep Thoughts From the Garage | Ep. 143

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

05:57 min | 8 months ago

Deep Thoughts From the Garage | Ep. 143

"Yoohoo you-know-who it is yup ozark thirty. It's time for deep thoughts from the garage. My friends are always telling me. Like when i send this out. Email my inner circle some deep thoughts from the garage and today. I'm sharing the deep thoughts from the garage with you. These are my thoughts. I'm gonna make you think about them today. To if anything was possible what would i do. What are the current world's greatest problems. And how can i be the solution to them. How can i better serve people that i serve my playing big enough. How can i play even bigger. What's that going to require. Do you know how fortunate you are to have what you have. You have your health your family your home in so many incredible people in your life. Count your blessings focus on them. Stop talking about covid. don't give it more energy. don't let it suck you dry. Focus on where we're going not where we've been think and talk about where we're going. What i'm doing. What excites me. Consume what serves you and fusion you. Not what drains scares or fears you. I don't care if there's another stay at home order. I'll find a way to create an opportunity. Find a way wit whatever it takes another thought. What's the high-octane fuel that you're consuming these days. What can i eat today. That all fuel me to be the best that i can be today. What can i do today. That will fuel me to be the best that i can be today. What can i do. What can i eat. And what can i do today. If the only day that count to be the best man or woman that i can be one three things through things. I must get done today before. The head hits the pillow tonight that i know that i left my fingerprint and my soul print on this corner of the universe in this planet. Those my friends are the thoughts from the garage in my head shot. All you mind right. Maniacs who continually drop me d. n. Emails about the impact show. I read and listen to every single one of your words and hang on him as their oxygen to my blood baby and this today comes from tyler cottrell. Check this out. Hey i apologize in advance for the length of this message. I've been wrestling with the right words for months now. But i just want to say thank you so much for the positive impact you brought to my life. I'm a finnish. Professional base out of cape may new jersey fist-bump and have been in the industry in varying capacities. Since i graduated college in two thousand thirteen. I moved from a college strengthen edition in world to the private sector. And i can unequivocally say there is. No one who has had has positively influenced by training style more than you. What's more than that though. Is this past summer. I had a college baseball team mate of mine. Pass away at the age of thirty from a very aggressive form of cancer. grappling with his death in the midst of kobe. Nineteen and maintaining a positive outlook was admittedly difficult. But it was your weekly podcast. That centered me and kept me in a good frame of mind throughout. I can quite simply never thank you enough for that man. I feel extremely connected with you for several reasons. My hometown is middletown new jersey twenty miles north of brick and actually chose my college washington college in chester town maryland because it reminded me of william and mary williamsburg williamsburg being one of our family's favorite places to visit on top of that i grew up vacationing yearly to san diego to visit my aunt uncle and cousins who live in scrips ranch and i believe my aunt. Laurie cottrell may have even taught a few of your children in elementary school in deed. She did tyler. Mrs cottrell is a great teacher. Long story short. I listen to your podcast with a smile on my face. Because i feel like you're talking to me at times. Thank you for everything you do. For the fitness industry. You truly are a beacon of light. I hope to one day meet you and introduce myself in person tyler. Cottrell thank you so much for those words. I can't wait to meet you. I appreciate you taking the time out to email that to me because man i've been lit up since receiving that last week folks continued a flood the email ways and the social media ways with the. Dm's i wanna know that you're listening. And it's making a difference. Because i will continue to produce these podcasts episodes to give you hope motivation inspiration light and love until the day i die. I love you guys and continue to create impact every single day.

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AT#732 - Travel to the Virginia Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

44:01 min | 8 months ago

AT#732 - Travel to the Virginia Coast

"The bags back on the road and read. It's real fast board. Our temperature traveler episode seven hundred and thirty two amateur traveler talks about settlers and patriots sailors and dolphins patrick henry and pocahontas as we go to the virginia coast specifically the james peninsula norfolk and virginia beach. Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host chris christensen. Let's talk about virginia. I'd like to welcome to the show. Michelle row from the travelling cheese head youtube channel. Who's come to talk to us about a portion of the virginia coast and we'll get into where but first michelle. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much chris. I'm happy to be here. Great and what. Part of the virginia coast. Are you going to cover for us today. Well we are looking at the historic triangle of williamsburg jamestown and yorktown with a couple. Little side trips. That i'm gonna throw in there as well excellent. We've done a show on this way back in the cretaceous period. I believe early on in the show. It's been a long time since we've talked about this area. I've been there a couple times. But i wouldn't cover my own because the last time i was there i quite distinctly remember. My son was just beginning to walk and he didn't get married next week so it's been a little while. That is a good amount of years years. Michelle wu should we go to this part of virginia. Well first and foremost. It's really the birthplace of american history. It's where the very first settlement was established here in the united states before it was the united states. So if you really are into learning about american history you gotta start where it began and began at the jamestown settlement. That was the very first place that people tried to establish some routes if you will before it became the united states before the revolutionary war before george washington. So it's really the birthplace of american history. And i enjoy history. Probably not as versed on it as i once was but my dad was somebody who is very much into history and could literally tell you everything about like how these people lived and where they lived and how they moved throughout and paint a complete picture for you so exploring those historic sites. I think as a family or even as like my husband. And i just as a couple it. It's really interesting to kind of reflect back on how these people like overcame so much adversity to build and establish a community and then eventually a country. Yeah so it's really. It's a really neat place to go with williamsburg. It's very neat. Because they kind of have the history coming to life and then yorktown is really the battlefield for the revolutionary war so you get kind of a full perspective from the very first people settling all the way through the establishment of a capital to a war. So it really comes full circle. It's very very interesting area. Excellent and get some letters so yes we know when she said that it was the oldest city in the us. It's really the oldest surviving english connie. Us be the oldest english one being roanoke island which went away. We don't know why and the oldest city in the us being saint augustine florida but was founded by the spanish. So what kind of i ten or are you to recommend for us. Well when we're talking about a week in this area. I mean certainly. If you are head over heels in love with history you could probably spend a whole week just in the historic triangle. But i'm gonna encourage you to spend a few days there and then work your way south because you are so close to norfolk. Which has the atlantic naval station there as well as virginia beach. So you can sneak in a beach vacation when you're in this area as well excellent so you were mentioning the triangular the history triangle area which were which one are. We going to start at lot. Let's start with jamestown because all right it makes us. We're not actually when we first. My husband and i came down here when we lived in northern. Virginia we want to jamestown i and it was it gave us a better perspective when we went to williamsburg and finally yorktown because doing it chronologically than the stories start to make more sense and they have a little bit more value and a little bit more meaning but what i started with honestly i went to the visitor center because it will give you all the things you need to know about. Visiting that area the jamestown settlement. What's really cool about. The settlement is it is part of the national park service and they have live excavations going on. You can see the archaeologist doing live digs and they will make discoveries while you're there it's it's so cool i've never been in a place that does that ring in front of you and you can watch them work. You can talk to the archaeologist and they'll kind of explain what they're looking for and what they've found and then what i love about that too is where the story of pocahontas comes from sure although a lot of people stories different from the disney version. Not only because they were raccoons and hummingbirds involved with the story. but it also wasn't. It wasn't a romantic relationship. We should say it was more strategic. Christ was john. Smith was trying to make a strategic alliance with the native americans so that they had a way to do trade with them and learn how to work the land so that they could have some food and some basic necessities and be able to hopefully survive. Even though a lot of people didn't was swamp land. It's not where is plan to stay. Which is one of the reasons why they later. On abandoned james santa moved further inland. And why we get williamsburg in fact is that. It's a little better place to live than than jamestown was especially at that time. Yeah for sure and when you leave jamestown and head over to colonial williamsburg what. I like about colonial williamsburg. I'll be honest. We've never paid for the ticket. We've only just walked the streets and enjoyed the free programming or the eavesdropping from programming. That you can do as you're walking around. Most of the shops erc sessile without paying for the admission ticket it is an open air museum with live re-enactors that are very good at staying in character and even in the shops. You can go into the shops and by little souvenirs and stuff but the shopkeepers are playing the part of being a merchant at that time. So it's a very cool because it's more living history whereas jamestown settlement is a little bit more of learning from the park rangers and seeing the archaeologists. This is a little bit more of your being invited into kind of fantasy or the reenactment of what life was actually like at that time as people who show no. I'm a huge history. Buff and american history being one of the areas that i'm particularly interested in because i've been there twice and have done a number of the different places so when you get a ticket you're going in usually to watch what a craftsperson is doing. And so i remember watching musical instrument makers making violins and things like that are going and watching the blacksmith or or something along those lines and i thoroughly enjoyed them. And i'm remembering some of them. From when i was there in seventeen in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy seven is patrick. Henry was actually the original. No well that's not true. So you nine hundred seventy seven. We did the bicentennial trip to the east coast from california but we did it a year late because we thought the crowds would be less. Although a lot of people had the same strategy that we did and honestly i saw williamsburg in one of the worst times of year to see it which is august and we were seeing dc and then williamsburg after. It was like the seventh or eighth or ninth or tenth day of an air stagnation alert. We would go see one of the different crafts people and then we go sit in the shade and drink a lemonade. And then we go see somebody else and we go sit in the shade and drink in orangeade or something like that. But i still remember how fascinating it was even as a teenager. Yeah it's it's really neat to see how all of it comes to life one of the things that people miss if you're going to buy a ticket one things. I recommend some of the night programming that they do. Okay is really interesting around halloween. They do full on lake ghost tours. They also do like christmas. Time they do the caroling and then the night programs are just they have the whole town lit up and you do a whole walking tour and it can give you a really good overview of absolutely everything in just that night program ticket and you can buy that separate from the overall ticket so if it's something you wanna add on and get a little taste of it before you decide if you want to invest on the full on ticket. It's a great way to try it out as do one of those night programs. They're really unique and they change up all the time. I don't remember doing that but again it's been a while. Remember the other thing that in terms of the history of it when you're doing some of the tickets you're learning crafts and some of those sort of things but for the history. I think the the tour of the colonial congress. I don't think that's the right term. But basically. That's the building where patrick henry stands up and says i don't know what others may choose but as for me give me liberty or give me death so this is where a lot of that history is happening. Yes and some of those buildings when the reenactment is not going on you are still able to go into with or without a ticket. It's just you won't get the benefit of watching the reenactment so we've been there and seen it it's very cool and all the buildings there aren't many of the original buildings obviously left but a lot of them were re built into the exact style that was at that time and then the other thing right in williamsburg there is the college of william and mary is one of the oldest colleges in the united states. If not the oldest. I'm not sure on that but it's right at the end and you can walk around the whole campus and it's a beautiful campus will in his. I recall the college pre dates the town by a few years because mary died in between the two. And that's why it's williamsburg william and mary college and don't hold me to that but And we're talking about william of orange basically the dutch king who's brought in because he's a protestant king and so when they go to Restore them well not the restoration of the monarchy but basically at at some point after james's second they bring in william of orange from holland or from the netherlands to be king of england. And that's who were naming this after. And so after. James jamestown is older. So james king first and then william as king later and so james williamsburg older. This is more recent right exactly exactly but there's a lot of really interesting places to eat right there. As well right in historic williamsburg the one that we ate at little on the pricey side but we decided to splurge because we were there and we wanted to try it the kings arms tavern they have like all of their food is very authentic to the time. So i it's it was need to dine there because obviously the atmosphere in the building and everything is really the setting is just really neat but then the cuisine as well as everything that they were serving at that time. But it's very. It's very good without christina campbell's tavern at least one of the two times that i was there which was also good and it was supposed to be george washington's favorite. So you know. I'm in good company when i say that the other two just for fact checking william and mary the second oldest college in the us behind. Harvard both or founded the sixteen hundreds although actually harvard is almost sixty years earlier. Got it okay. Good to know and it was old just all right so once you finish up with williamsburg and you've had you felt they're going to the yorktown national battlefield. The park rangers. There do a really great job of giving live tours and telling you about the battle what happened on that battlefield and they really paint a full picture of exactly like we're the troops came from they give all the dates and like the troops move this way and it's just really neat that they just bring it to life so even i remember being dragged there as a kid and kids in history. I would have been the ones who was dragging by parents there and correcting the park rangers when they said something. That was the way. I was as a kid so my dad took care of that but the way they told the stories. It drew you in even as a kid who didn't care that much at the time just the passion that they have four the storytelling and what happened there. It even kids. Who aren't that interested get drawn in. And they're very. They're very talented at what they do. As park rangers the battlefield. We see it many times on this show. But i have a great love for park rangers in the us national park system. They do a really good job. Yeah they're good people. I there are a couple of sites. Also just i've been talking about mainly the national park related sites but there is also before you to those. Let's just put a cap on your for those who aren't familiar with their american history. This is where the revolutionary war ends in terms of the fighting. This is the last at least major battle of the revolution. Where so it happens. We talk about seventeen. Seventy six until seventeen eighty one and fortunately for the americans by this point. The french have become involved and they get basically use of the french fleet for a short period of time. And it's long enough to blockade basically the british forces who've come down from where all the fighting happened earlier in the were up in boston originally and then in the new york area and near new jersey and pennsylvania and they've come down to where they're having more success in the south and they're basically trapped besieged at your town by the french and the american forces on the land and the french forces at sea and basically they have too much to the surprise of i think everybody involved the the british. I sure they have to surrender. They have to surrender this large army. And that's the end of the efforts of the british in the us. Well they sorry this war we we find another one not all that long from there the war of eighteen twelve but a very significant time period absolutely absolutely puts current events in perspective for sure when you look at how the country started and everything that it went through to become a country it puts a lot of what we deal with day to day in current times in perspective for sure so there are two other sites that are more commercial. I tend to think that there are a little bit more touristy. because they're private owned bloomsburg his bro. Don't also say that the way they go about it though it's not like it's a theme park that is gaining ticket to right. You can wander around if you choose to buy the tickets you can. Obviously all of those ticket purchases helps maintain everything. That's going on there so definitely if you have the time to spend and everything. It's worth the tickets. So you can get that added benefit is like you were mentioning seeing all of that stuff in action but the other two is there's a james towns settlement so there's historic jamestown which is the actual site that was founded and then there's jamestown settlement which is kind of nearby. You kind of actually pass it on your way to historic jamestown. But that's the tall ships are and you have more of the live reenactment and you can tour the tall ships and everything. So it's it's great if you have the history buffs who want the true historic spot. Stories told by the park rangers. But then if you have young ones that maybe aren't as interested in sitting and listening to somebody speak and are more visual that the jamestown settlement can be a lotta fun because they literally bring everything the like they let you tour the ship. They also sail the ships on certain times of the year. I know the even fire the cannons every now and then so it can be really kind of fun and exciting plus you have all the character actors so sure that is right nearby you say. The toll ships the ships. They came over and were pretty small ships. I call them tall cheviot anything about living these for some period of time as you were crossing over you see why so. Many people did not make the crossing but the historic ships from the time period recreations of historic ships from type period interest in their very neat to see and everything because yeah they had a couple of hundred people if not more crammed in those tiny little hollander hundred five passengers and thirty nine crew on the larger of the ship. But when you're on it and you think about those numbers large will not be the word that you were gonna comes to mind in your on top of each other and like it was. They were leaky ships to they. They didn't do a good job of keeping all the water. So and then there's also the yorktown settlement as well that are not the selma but the commercialized yorktown area. Which again is it's cool to see and everything it's just it's different because it has more character actors and that verses the park rangers telling the stories on the actual land so it's just there's something a little bit depending on everybody's you're gonna get a great stories no matter which you choose just whether or not like for my dad was always important to be on the actual land that had happened versus at the commercialized thing. The commercialist thing you're talking about there is the american revolution museum at your town which is affiliated with the jamestown settlement. Yes exactly yeah. They're the same entity it's just two nights. This episode of amateur traveler is sponsored by skylight. Frame please stay have skylight frame back as a sponsor you may remember. They've sponsored the show before and when they did. Chris is one of the patrons of the show a bought one and he bought one for his mom. Can you tell the. Chris is from the uk. And says i love the frame. And if i had money i would happily buy one from my dad again too. So if you're still looking for christmas gift ideas here's one for you. The skylight frame. It's a smart frame with a touch interface that you can email photos to and very easily setup setup. Take something like sixty seconds for your wife. I didn't time it exactly but it's very quick. I have one at my parents which helps them stay in touch with people in the family especially these days. Can anybody in the family who knows how to take a picture and send an email can send them a visual update and now as a special offer you can get ten dollars off your purchase of a skylight frame when you go to skylight frame dot com and enter the code traveler. That's right to get ten dollars off your purchase of skylight frame just skylight frame dot com and enter code traveler. That's s. k. Y. l. i. g. h. t. f. r. a. m. e. dot com promo code traveler and thanks to skylight frame for sponsoring this episode of the a traveler. Once you've gotten your fill of all this history because there's a lot of it now you can spend a ton of time there. There are other things in the right there in the williamsburg area. To go explore. You can go to busch gardens and water country. usa if you're in the mood for some theme parks but you also have some great shopping. Gangqi candle is like born and raised in that area. So going to the yankee candle factory and the shops in that area think that you can call it yankee candle town you can get some really cool things there and then there's also williamsburg katari which is unique to that area as well okay. So how did he yankee something. Maybe get started here in virginia. But i don't know exactly because yeah we're in the south right right. So there's this whole yankee candle town and it's where the factory was founded and started and still in operation and candles obviously sold at outlet malls and regular shops all over the country. And probably but that's where it all started in the williamsburg. Pottery is very unique as well and they are more small scale. They are more like by craft versus mass production. Which is her define. Nowadays a lot of stuff gets moved overseas produce there but this is still produced. Here i wanna take you a little further south. Like i said i was going to surprise you with some fun things that are very nearby to the williamsburg area. And you get to see some things that more than modern side of history if you will where history and the country started and now where the modern military power has come to life. And that is a norfolk. So norfolk is just cross the it's called the hr bt which is the hampton roads bridge tunnel. And it's part bridge part tunnel. That takes you across part of the chesapeake bay. And down to norfolk. So norfolk as you know is one of the two of the largest naval stations in the united states. There's the one down in san diego. And then there's the one here in norfolk and it's really the kind of base for the entire atlantic fleet. So there's very few other places that you're able to see the amount of aircraft carriers battleships even the nuclear submarines at an all of the things you hear about are all house there now. Those ships come in and out of port at all different times. There's a couple of really cool things you can do in norfolk. The one is you can take a boat tour that will take you out over by the port where all of the naval basis. So you can get pretty close as close as you can get without having being in the military and gang on base but you can get pretty close from a water view of these aircraft carriers and battleships. It is amazing. It was one of those things where i was kind of like. Did we really have to go on this. And then my mom wanted to go. And i was like okay fine. I'm so glad we did it. It brought the then. They're telling all like they're naming the ships and telling you which one is which in the history of like one it was built in one it was out at sea and what's cool is because it changes what ships are in port changes constantly. You could go on that that tour ten times every single time. You're going to get a different experience because different ships are going to be import. different aircraft. carriers are going to be there. Sometimes you're going to actually see the ships pulling out or coming into port which is amazing to see them in motion as well got it. And you say battleships. We don't currently have any commission battleships. There is still the. I think the. Us wisconsin is in norfolk. It is and you can tour that that was going to be my next suggestion. Yeah the uss wisconsin is. It's it's of nice 'cause you go to this. One spot in the boat. Tour is one place and the us. S wisconsin is literally attached to where you launch for your boat tour. So you can tour the entire us wisconsin and it. It's a neat chip. Like is just a really cool ship and you can spend good couple of hours going through the entire thing An all the ducks are open. They have some things with Plexiglass where they have it. Set up at just as is to show what the different positions were. You can go up on the bridge you can go up into the gunnery and it's it's really a neat experience. They do offer both guided and self guided. Tours we've done the self guided just because of timing. The guided tour wasn't going to be like another hour when we were there. So we went on the self guided. But everything's really well laid out really well explained. It's just a really fun to kind of. Walk around on a on a battleship. Like that for those. Who aren't familiar. So this is one of the last battleships. The us bill would have been built in forty. Three it's a sister ship to the missouri where the japanese surrender happened on the deck of the missouri. And really the the age of battleships by the time this was sailing was over. And so that's why it was one of the last ones that the us build over the last month built in the world to. I really don't think people are building battleships so much these so it is one of the larger ones ever built in one of the most modern ones ever built. But of course by the time it was by the time it really sailed. It was already obsolete for sure. The technology outpaced it. So norfolk is is a really great stop for both history buffs as well as those are just. Want to see what the us military is up to so to speak on. There's very few places that you can see the of an it's mainly the aircraft carriers and some of the submarine and things that are there. And then you might wanna just head on down to virginia. Beach because norfolk virginia beach. A lot of people think they're very far apart. They are literally about fifteen minutes apart from each other and they don't realize that they think. Oh it's like an hour away now. Fifteen minutes to get to the ocean. Front from parts of norfolk. So and virginia beach. Always the main attraction down here is the ocean fronts. It's a beautiful boardwalk very wide beach lots of parking nearby. But there's a couple really unique things about virginia beach that a lot of people don't realize and one of those right off the boardwalk. There's a whole district called the vibe district which is a whole contemporary art area. So they started something about five years ago called and actually they started about three years ago because this was the third annual. But it's ten murals ten days ten artists so the entire vibe district has all of these really incredible works of art. That are murals. That are all over the different businesses and and buildings throughout the vibe district and it's a couple blocks from the ocean front. You can walk there. You can rent a bicycle and go through a bike ride to check out all of the different artwork and murals but a lot of people don't realize that that's right there and the vibe district also has a ton of really cool local coffee shops and eateries and just really a unique vibe. They have live music going on constantly. And it's just it's a really fun area right off the ocean front that a lot of people overlook but yeah so i mean the beach vacation coupled in with a history vacation. I think you can't really go wrong. Excellent anything else. You wanna cover in terms of itinerary before we get to some of our wrap up questions. It's i think you're kind of wrapping it up here. Yeah i am the only other thing. That's in virginia. Beach that i would also recommend is there is the aquarium. That is right down. It's only about. You'd probably either need a bike or Drive but it's only maybe fifteen minutes on a bike in maybe five minutes by car from the heart of the ocean front but the aquarium is very neat. It's comparable to see where all they don't do. As many of the shows they have a lot of the marine life. Virginia beach are animal. Here is the dolphin where the dolphin city so there are lots of dolphins lots of dolphins citing trips that the aquarium runs but then they also educate the public on the marine life and the ecosystem in virginia beach. And the chesapeake bay. And you say here at virginia. Beach virginia beach. I believe is home. That is absolutely moved down here. Beginning of april from northern virginia. So we've been here for a few months now and kind of having fun exploring it as a local but getting to know everything so excellent any particular food that you recommend in virginia beach norfolk that down in that area so one there's a place actually in williamsburg and then there's another one here in virginia beach and some touristy but the food is actually really good. It's called captain georges buffet and its a seafood buffet. And it's so good. The food is so incredible. The one year in virginia beach. You can actually also order off the menu so if you're not a buffet kind of person and you want something specific you can also order off the menu but the buffet is insane. It's it's huge. It's massive and it's it's fairly well known. There are a couple of places. Right along the oceanfront here in virginia beach that i would recommend wasserman's is definitely a local favourite an alcoholic drink. That is very popular. Here is the orange crush. You'll have to come and try. It's i don't know what an orange crush use. it's delicious. That what it is and that hot weather you were talking about your perfect for that. It's perfect for that. I think i would rather have the hot weather at virginia beach that i wouldn't away of his brothers. You can just jump in the ocean if you need to. But wasserman's has three locations. They have the original wasserman's and then they have checks at the beach which is a blocks down and then they have what's called the shack which is just behind the boardwalk on pacific avenue. And that's more of an outdoor eatery but all three have little different menus but they're run by the same family and they've been here for decades and offer very great food. Great atmosphere is a really wonderful place to be and then i'm seeing that an orange crush is basically a screwdriver. Orange juice and vodka but also with lemon lime soda and orange core yes so delicious and refreshing because it's it's all crushed ice. Okay dan crush so and then one other area like i mentioned going into the vibe district. If you're looking for some great coffee shops there's a couple that i recommend there is bad ass coffee which that's what it's called but it's actually really good. That is in the heart of the vibe district. There is also java cafe and then there is three ships coffee roasters. It's right there as well. So there's those three coffee shops are great. They have great breakfast items and most of them operate right until lunchtime and they have a nice nice light menu and so those are all great places to have some wonderful cuisine in the area. There's others but i'll stick to those for now all right one thing. That's going to surprise people about this part of virginia. I think how friendly the people are. And i say that because you're talking about three really touristy areas and oftentimes when you travel and you go touristy areas the locals kind of roll their eyes if the tourist because as tourists sometimes we can be annoying and i suspect that they have their actions much if we ever get tourism back in twenty twenty one but now we feel exactly so hopefully in twenty twenty one here bite. I will tell you that the people here are are super friendly. You don't always know who's local halls. Who's until you actually are living here and then you can kind of figure it out but the locals are very friendly. The shop owners are very friendly. They're excited that you're here even when it's crazy busy. Even when it was non covid season right. People are just happy. And i think it has to do with being near the water near the beach and everything at least in virginia beach but even when you get up in the williamsburg the people there are also equally as friendly and i think they just really enjoy the unique part of the country that they live in and the appreciate it for what it is so i think that's the biggest thing that will surprise people this time of year to come not august. That part of the question yeah. September october is probably the best time in normal years. The kids have gone back to school. Which means that the tourism is as down a little bit but most things are still open as far as like. Some of the shops are more seasonal. So they'll close over the winter but in september there mostly still open even in october. The weather is gorgeous. You usually are losing some of that humidity that comes with the summertime months but the water still warm and you can still go swimming and you have a lot more beautiful days to do that without the traffic and the craziness of the peak of his tour season. Springtime is also beautiful. But you get a lot of school tour trips especially to the historic triangle area because they are fulfilling their field trip options for their history courses for their standards of learning requirements. So a lotta times. March april may are full of school buses of kids going to the three historical sites to get their shirt learning requirements. Done for the year but early june can be okay but it starts getting hot. We really start warming up here in april. So it's the end of the year. They're in september. October is beautiful. Christmas time is fun because you have all of the light up displays norfolk. Botanical gardens has a really beautiful walk through lit display this year. They're just doing the drive through one. But all the christmas lights and then here on the ocean front. There is a drive through holiday. Light display right along the boardwalk time to come down as well excellent best day of the year to be in the area particular holiday festival. Well this was the year of non festivals. We're just gonna ignore twenty twenty. But i know i know. It's hard for me to speak about all the festivals. 'cause oceanfront has a lot of festivals and all of them were cancelled so something in the water is a big music festival. It's probably the largest one that is in the area and that is in the springtime. So that's a really fun time to be here. The artists for ferrall williams. He's from virginia beach and he's the one who started that festival bringing in artists from all over the place the mural arts festivals very fine a little bit more low key because it's ten artists ten days that's a fun to be out because they do mural tours walking tours to all the different areas and you could see the artists working. Then ask them about what they're doing and how they came up with the concept so that can be very interesting and fun as well. That's usually held in august. So and then i would stay away from fourth of july and labor day. The two that even memorial day the three holiday weekends. It's insanely busy here in all of those areas and you can have a great time but you're going to be battling the crowds so if that's a turn off than i would say. Avoid those weekends in particular because it even cova dear. The beaches were very packed over those three weekends. Excellent to final question while three final questions one is. You're standing in the prettiest spot in this portion of virginia where he is standing. What are you looking at. I am standing at the end of the pier in virginia beach watching the dolphins. Go by at sunrise. You had me until sunrise but okay sunsets pretty but there's a bunch of buildings in the way. Sure i have my. But i know my wife won't be that's the one thing that makes you laugh and say only in this part of virginia the bikers on the boardwalk area and the walkers on the bike path. We can't get it right. There's a bike path that goes right along the boardwalk and then there's the actual boardwalk the boardwalk is for people to walk. The bike path is for people to bike and nobody can seem to get that straight and if you had to summarize this region virginia just three words. What three words are you gonna. I'm gonna say history military. Okay i'm gonna say beach. Excellent our guest again. It's been michelle route from the travelling cheese head youtube channel and michelle. If we wanted to send people to your best video on the area where we're going to send them. I you are going to go right to my youtube channel. I have recently started putting up a whole series on exploring virginia beach the less known areas of virginia beach and that vibe district that i discussed i have a whole guide coming up for people that they can do. A walking tour of the vibe district and discover all those beautiful murals excellent. We'll have a link in the show notes to michelle's video on that michelle. Thank you so much for coming on. Amateur traveler in sharing with us your love for virginia especially the coast. And especially this area. Here of the james peninsula norfolk virginia beach area. Thank you for having me. It's been a pleasure news of the community. I had you to the patrons of the show who helps support the show on patriot dot com slash amateur traveler and a special thanks to kirby lewis who recently increased his pledge. Kirby says love your work just got back from savannah to your episode asheville charleston and even west virginia queued up based on your episodes excellent. Stay safe as i heard from a friend today. Stay positive but not covid positive. I heard recently from rolla. Who comment on the episode. We did on egypt and said it was really interesting. Listening to your podcast about. My mom is gypsum. And i've been to egypt many times including the time that i used to live there for a few years as a child but i have yet to visit those other places mentioned outside of cairo. One day. i'll go back and make a detoured visit those places. While i visit my mom that includes alexandria by the way sally touched on the scams that can go on there involving tourists. I'd like to add a warning about the taxis as well. Taxi drivers tend to overcharge tourists and foreigners. So i would go with them until you get price that you can agree on. That goes for anything else to such as merchants in the canal. Colle- basically don't be so quick to pay for things. Unlike here in the states you have the ability to haggle prices down however now it might be better with services like uber. Great show by the way. I love your podcast. We'll thanks so much rollo despite some of the bad news and some of the terrible news that we're having right now about the pandemic and what's going on at this very moment we've also got great news. That's coming out about vaccines. And i admit that i gave myself the ability to hope for better travel in two thousand and twenty one as i was listening to some of the good news that was coming out and i spent some time searching for tours of myanmar and laos as i'm have a trip planned for thailand in october and hopefully that will happen and i'm thinking about other places i haven't been in the region if you're looking for things like that right. Now you might go to metro dot com slash affiliates. I was looking at tour radar as well as intrepid n. g. adventures in their affiliate links and therefore all of those speaking of things going on amateur traveler. I am always looking for new guests and some guests are in fact listeners. Of the show in fact some of our best guests have come to me through listeners of the show. And i'll tell you some of the places. I'm looking for right now. I'm specifically trying to find guests for the following destinations laos nicaragua american samoa. New hampshire labrador cape verde islands french polynesia estonia lithuania the channel islands. The belichick islands and vancouver. So if you know somebody who would be a great guest to bring on who knows. Those regions has been there within the last year or so and has spent enough time in the area to be knowledgeable about it. Please let me know. Send me an email to hosted. Amateur traveler dot com and with that. We're going to end this episode of amateur traveller. If you want to know the latest news you can always join our mailing list dropping email if you have questions to host amateur traveler dot com or. Leave a comment on this episode and as always. Thanks so much for listening. The cat said they want buildings is home

williamsburg jamestown the virginia coast norfolk united states virginia beach yorktown virginia william patrick henry james peninsula chris christensen Michelle wu atlantic naval station michelle james santa george washington mary college James jamestown james williamsburg
Episode 98: Sometimes You Need to Try

Be Great TODAY - Weekly Inspiration

03:02 min | 2 years ago

Episode 98: Sometimes You Need to Try

"<music> welcome to be great today weekly inspiration to start your week. I'm Jonathan Bloom or frazee. Spark span in the world of warcraft so this kind of a behind the scenes look. I'm trying out a new podcast editing program for this episode. The name is Hindenburg journalist pro. The reason I made this episode is because sometimes we need to try things. I was using logic pro ten after switching from W. Edition. I'd I heard about Hindenburg over the years but I didn't WanNA switch it was fine. It was working. Okay things here and there that I didn't like but I was like okay so I don't know why undo ahead but Thursday. I downloaded a trial and went to work on one of the podcast that I had to edit for. But this week there are features Henneberg that I'm really enjoying specially for products. Editing is auto level it links tracks when you're editing things like when I'm editing Fratto cast I can edit one track in it'll no to also edit the other tracks in working on when you work with multiple tracks for different different guests. It can get a little dicey but that isn't the point of this episode. I wanted to share a story about trying something new and sometimes we just need to try. I was relying others. Were doing or saying the perkins. They used what people said about like Oh. I tried Hindenburg. Yeah I didn't like it or I. This is better than this but I had to download the free trial for myself. Sometimes we are caught in a certain routine because we are afraid to try something different. We don't want to have to get into it because the first moment I opened up Hindenburg breakup like what things are similar when I was using if I had to learn new thing to watch him tutorials but sometimes we have to try something new last week. I even tried recording on the go. I did three podcast episodes while I was in Williamsburg Virginia who is using a different Mike. Like I was in a car with air conditioning. Sometimes you have to take that risk on the Father Kassim editing which will be website one fifteen. It'd be really some Monday I was talking with Brandon and they talked about meeting. My friend Allie and Brandon said you sometimes don't know until you take the risk. He took a risk and is now married to the love of his life so this week. What do you need to try? What are the project at work? They even doing a certain way. That might work better a different way. What some software that? My actual work better. This could be applied to many things. I've always tried to experiment in life. I've had many misteps. The trial of the Pike is editor. I'm using may not work or it. May revolutionize how I edit these shows i. I just need to try. Thank you for listening to this. Week's be great today. You can find the show at inspirational PODCAST DOT com go until next week when you don't know what editor I'll be using be awesome this show.

Hindenburg editor Brandon Jonathan Bloom frazee W. Edition Williamsburg Fratto perkins Virginia Allie Mike
The Best New Duo In Town

YEK YEK JE

08:22 min | 3 weeks ago

The Best New Duo In Town

"This is for busch gardens williamsburg spot titled bg w slash twenty-one slash census slash s in slash july fourth slash. Save up to forty percent slash fc slash tickets slash radio. It's a thirty second. Spot and the code is v. w. zero to one zero three nine are nothing ignites your sentences like the european features and will pass thrills of busch gardens williamsburg here the gravity defying drops and speed of our record breaking coasters. See the world's most beautiful theme park as you stroll through elegantly theme villages and treat all your senses to the live concerts nightly fireworks in costa in the dark at some nights. June twenty fifth to july twenty nine. Save up to forty percents on tickets. Some fun cards. Hurry offer ensued restrictions apply. Hi sweet chance. When missile to percussive you said a buggy package religion. They putting our way we wouldn't. I would stay safe that hamper okay. So alarmed clock wasn't mean burnett. Could young ga actually review to ben indie rock bottom bamborough. The pd biden llc nine all standing by more wti poodle. So ami is my life. Is monday movement dylan deal and i could be doing lagoon. As well lunatic edgy. Simple beat to review so collini depot thing we decree and according xuetong. I walk got montgomery bus busts up the bosnian mcleese Do from quantified is from slang. Oh and so it on the news. What i'm guessing yankee knock with talk a leader and what Soga polarity got guar della. Dig up from plo said gigi. So data bill de tuned to some of great music video in militia upper gross to the yes hands might hand hand in mind the nine to google from civilians that by he. So we'll do a google. Doc was powell powell you lou. Beurey mind to which i'm simple nucleus still should switch and did so his money will get your and bumba lagging and bison kit mitchell. Many we do clinton and dole been empowering. Remain willie swann instrument. And you got to go so didn't living utah Utah debbie been mentor. Money ben be down gun. I said i couldn't do. as good. a supreme room. With colors joe this is for busch gardens williamsburg spot titled bg w slash twenty one slash census slash s in slash july fourth slash. Save up to forty percent slash fc slash tickets slash radio. It's a thirty second spot in the code is vp w. zero to one zero. Three nine are nothing. Nice show sense. Is like the european features and will cost thrills of busch gardens. Williamsburg here the gravity-defying trump's and speed of record-breaking coasters see the world's must beatable theme park as you stroll through our energy theme villages and treat all your senses to live concerts nightly fireworks coasters in the dark eyed summer nights. June twenty fifth to july twenty nine. Save up to forty percents on tickets and fun card surrey. Offer ends soon restrictions. Apply suit up activity reduce lulu which You the doppler laghi mahara. Okay we looked by breaking up as you see you up bombers by emily shchukin uvira an image of what mind you could as you see. We don't budge a veg. Budapest will show ballers oklahoma. Is it do it so we took. It is mel. Shoot someone away. But the tumbler. Giving him. bussey and cutini rancho sweater. Is you get what you guys went. Missing power of course end up putting chill about putting on net and personally able to mental play attitude like goosen lewis by the indie rock band. So did roy role for our report. Maybe a diplomatic quarter smoothly mingo. You're so we don't put glass salang up in that. We're i'm pretty new buckling to operating eliminating a family. Futsi mama social security Negativity got a someone up. He said much. As i kick you go warning chill. Chill whose name mccain will the water see bustles w w aged shouldered acute on. Wgn much talk. Chuck what are happy and this W w dot children so he's a my own some elephant okay. Smuggled muggy So i guess you took up laguna megastar would a three year so maybe us credible you uncle got up and i think it was pretty rules. Follow the maximum follows. Get some full aged gone soon. You're done by just out. Finally abed that senses snoring an automatically responds meet the ergo smart base from tempurpedic our first system that detects snoring than automatically adjusts by raising the bank. And now during the tempurpedic summer of sleep all tempurpedic mattresses are on sale with savings up to five hundred dollars on adjustable sets. Get your best sleep all night every night. Learn more at tempurpedic dot com be the candidate. Investment firms are looking to hire become a cfo charter holder. Stand out for having the skills to thrive in the competitive investment industry visit. Cfa institute dot org slash. Learn to find out more about the level one cfa exam.

busch gardens williamsburg ben indie xuetong Soga guar della bill de powell powell willie swann williamsburg burnett ami emily shchukin google plo gigi costa cutini rancho dylan
Heartbreaking Realizations pt 1

Cafecito Break

22:01 min | 1 year ago

Heartbreaking Realizations pt 1

"Hi everyone this is recycled happy new year and I have a couple of stories that I want to show with you. I would like to share with you. What I have been thinking about In an how. I've been preparing myself for this. Twenty me twenty energy that we are all in now and how humbling the past. Ten years was as I like. Many of you also embarked in that reflection time and I have to say that between the years of two thousand nine and two thousand in nineteen there were probably some of the most. Most challenging grief stricken aw there were challenging so many levels so many and so many ways in physical ways and emotional ways in in life ways and having to grow up ways and and put on your big girl panties and we're very humbling In the Europe two thousand and nine that was when our dad passed away and with that ushered a new chapter in to our lives where I started to experience a void and loneliness like nothing I've ever experienced in my life and I realized that while our father was still alive because he filled he filled that void not just with his love with with his presence And I realized that we were pretty lucky in the family to have him and the people who were his friends in who knew him also felt how the void of him transitioning. And what do I mean by that. My Dad was one of those people who loved the simple things he loved to be with family. He loved food. He loved conversation he loved to speak week to everyone and he didn't master English very well yet. He had so many friends he had wealthy friends. He have friends who only spoke English. And I don't even know what the understood from him but my father was still able to find ways to communicate with people even in his broken broken English. He was never intimidated and he was always trying to be helpful. And if he had a daughter his pocket and you needed it he would give it to you and if he walked into building and he was there for doctors appointments he saw The man and the Front will the security regard. If he was walking out to coffey he would ask the guy. Hey do you want some coffee. And it was Dole's things that my sister and I started to see my dad and my mom to my mom is very faithful. We've learned her ways of faith she's got got. She's one of those multiple faithful human beings to God to being faithful and finding faith and courage when life is strong one the strongest people I know and it is influenced. I think that has shaped the influence. my sister and I and you brothers passed path as we we have dumped into the spiritual journey spiritual metaphysical life that we live in this urban jungle and my tad the honey he represented community family. Come together diplomacy he he. You would never see him. Taking sides in a family fight. He was impressive. He didn't see color. Heat saw the counter of the person's character actor and I think that we passed on my sister and I we took on the family baton and we have been very active as much as we can be and the community of Williamsburg Brooklyn where we were created. Were were raised and we were. We still recite now between that time to now. My sister and I have given birth to two two babies one scruffy break which is the podcast which really started as speaker events in the community and but on. The party's things about gathering having reason together community together even in its most basic ways one of the most heart wrenching. Things that we have discovered is that it's hard to get people to come out now and also through to us wanting to purposely focus these gatherings in Williamsburg Brooklyn one of the things that has has given us pause and what has been really evident in our face is just how many of our people have left this community have have been displaced among your friends and families have been displeased through the violence of gentrification. How hit this area and invite you to look into your research because Williamsburg Brooklyn was one of the hardest hit areas The has been gentrified Brooklyn overall role and We are starting to see. Some Patterson. People are speculating that there might be even other places within NYC area that might right give Brooklyn some competition for how rapidly gentrified It's becoming and this is. I know that it's been hard hard for you to understand. What is the break? What are the Perez sister's doing we have a shop called donning gull which If you've ever heard of Donnez there have been traditionally a place where you go for spiritual wisdom and consultations solicitations and we named our shop botanical. Because we wanted to pay or mosh to that both Johny Guney but we also wanted to give it our spin on a goal with the K.. for which e way embracing that witching is embracing the fact we feel LANC. Urban Shamans Shamanee's does blue. He does and priestesses and Hugh we've been in the past about eight to ten years and when he's Brooklyn and I guess one of the hardest things has been to acknowledge that that question. Have we been successful. Well how do you measure success. We've been successful in a way that we've been table to thrive in this wave of gentrification but we haven't felt safe we haven't felt safe not one indicate that we've been open at our shop when he's Brooklyn and dispatced two thousand nineteen. We had one of the hardest years and how it Moore's even in Copsey to break. Is that even though. Our newsletter has been expanding our numbers on social media are going backwards and is kind of sometimes discouraging because we know the impact Mr impact that were making on people through our sister wisdom Apple Donegal and the way that we've been reaching lives through do our community podcast because that's what it is. We're not doing officer to break to compete with other podcasters with other content creators. We're doing officer to break to raise awareness for this craziness of life that we're living in particular NYC IMPO facing be being to Latina's Dina's being to body was who are saying yes to themselves who are saying yes to to the way we we feel called to me are spirituality. You have no idea how difficult it has been to face your family to to face your family who is so traditional in certain aspects to say I respect a love your wisdom I see. Thank you for how you've influenced me through your religious upbringing but inside in this heart of ours were called to work with crystals else. We'll call to work with the medicine of the plants. Life is showing us the way we are connected to this land were called hauled to learn more about the indigenous aspect diverse that of which connects us to the land. And sometimes you see amy you see us and this I just want to clarify A lot of confusion. Sometimes you see the sisters being silly and it's thought of as oh they're so cute and they're so young sewn experienced and bubbly and that's an assumption guys. We are not lying when we say we're holding it down. We're one of the last Mohicans here. We're where people meet us. And they say oh your original Brooklyn that's rare that goes to show you and we're still there we're still thriving. I don't know how but I don't want to for twenty twenty. I don't WanNa keep saying that I'm thriving that I'm surviving. I WanNa say I'm successful. In part of the reason we've just been thriving and we and we've been surviving and part of the reason that we feel unsafe all of the time Especially especially when it comes to some of these things a Some of our communities have been learned. How appropriately support small businesses when entrepreneurs are daring Boli into meeting their dreams depending on? What your influence your in your culture? What your Family dynamic is that may scare the crap out of the people around you and for us like a saint. Guess to governor see to break us us saying yes to. We're going to open a shop is let's get. We were very privileged because we've seen examples in a family of people have had their own businesses including our father so this was not a strange path for us but definitely one that has been met even to this day where resistance when we have people who still pull list to the side saying to us. You know I don't really approve. That you guys have about Danika yet. They know nothing of what we do. They know nothing of how how we serve. They know nothing of the impact we make we have. People who walk into our tiny shop is tiny but don't confuse that with a wisdom being tiny or knowledge being tiny or experience being tiny all the people that have walk through those doors being tiny because we have met teachers who've walk through those doors. I mean high level teachers who come in to our tiny shop and they how bless and they walk in with this humility and at the same time we see the pop up new newbies. Who want to come into a little shop and just come in and judged and be all in the ego or committed like if the dueling like wisdom with us and does not? We're we're about. We've you mistreat a been lake. Hey what you guys do here. You know we say nothing nothing because me and my sister have our way of connecting to the divine to the spiritual realm and all we are doing here is holding space for for you to witness Yourself if US witness you what is it that you dream. How is it that you want to connect we? Will we ask questions. And as we as we can in In relationship to the crystals to the instance to the items that are in the shop which we all considered to be tools you see depending on which is you walk in so people are oranges closer shop or or did you just have higher some kids to to work there but that's not what we're doing 'cause again oboe Taneeka America in its tradition is a place gold for spiritual wisdom. My sister night cannot be replaced so we will not be putting other people there air to give wisdom that people are coming us four or maybe they just want the sisters to hold space so Mrs Stern when are so different you know and yet we have such a beautiful sisterhood. We may not see eye a- all the time we don't fight and I cannot tell you how many people feel threatened by that. You would think that that seemed people two sisters thriving you would think that the world will be coming over to support because this is rare yet. All we've got is people trying to cut the Sisterhood Hood People challenging the Sisterhood people trying to cut the beautiful energy between us. So there's there's so many things to living a metaphysical spiritual life. It's not fluffy Wafi. I'm sorry to say because the newbies becoming into the shop the people who don't know nothing or or is just surface level because that's another thing. This journey is in steps in a waves CBS. And you you know you have an open. You have an awakening. You have an remembering and a few amazing you feel charged up and then you go through more learning where you have to unlearn more such. The learning is one of the hardest things because you undoing programming programming. That's not just cultural thus not just religious educational programming. Between how should I how women should act what refuse right. What am I doing this because I'm watching this on TV? I'm seeing everybody else do it or is it that this is the way my whole beam. Intuitive self is asking me to be guided and that is the Perez Sisters two sisters in Williamsburg Brooklyn who are on apologetic about wanting to be successful yet that also has been such a threatening factor some of the people in our lives who get angry at us because we want to live. WELL THEY WANNA convinces that leading. A life with spirituality ability equals living a life of poverty. And we do not accept that that doesn't even make sense and unfortunately as I reflect liked my two thousand nine to two thousand nineteen experience which was filled with so much. Beauty Beget SOMOs heartbreaking realizations when especially when it comes with to our community and that's the poverty mindset the poverty thinking impoverished thoughts that are just emanating dating from our everyday thoughts are world are feel like like I understand our businesses but there's the also the business of of beauty of life. This is so funny. Guess who's calling me right now. This is routine guten. She must be feeling the confiscate the vibes in the air. But that's what I mean. I realize that's one been one of the hardest hardest awakenings for me to want to work so much with our community and keep hitting hitting roadblocks because people are so afraid. They're so afraid to share. They're so afraid to really actually commit but boy can they talk a good game. They could really talk a good game. And I have fallen for a lot of those games. And it's really disheartening. Because he's a people I love and these are people that are here here for and I'm still going to continue to fight for and and I'm still gonNA continue and my sister to to Lofa ways to serve our community but this recipe is working disapp- recipe of kidding the walling and working to you to till two till to your death for community and and they almost hating you in the process especially because you come in and with my ideas about. How can we work together? How can we live better? We have to stop looking for all all of these other people to save us for those people to come up with a better plan to to for those people to regard us for those people to ah remember us as a collective of fill in the blank those people that were waiting for us. And that's twenty twenty for us me Hinton I'm embracing what is organically within me. What is unapologetically the Rod that is done with with playing so tiny? That's done with having this. This poverty mindset or playing with people who refuse refuse to do anything but stay in poverty mindset. 'cause that's not helping happiness thrive and move forward and we don't have time to waste. They are very alarmed things happening within our communities that must be addressed and being in the book and all this other like like stuff that keeps keeps US distracted. We need to make time for the problems that are happening within our community. The things that are so alarming the the drug crisis with this happening within our communities to our babies this these this child trafficking human trafficking. That's happening to within so many our communities we need to speak with love. Love honesty with compassion with strength. We need to move. Who from being a victim to being a victim? So you WANNA come in Rockwood Gotha seat the break movement WanNa be a part of the debris tribes. They connected us. Thank you for your time. Thank you for your presence. My sister and I are cooking some things but I'm not allowed to share with that with you yet. But in the meantime stay connected to the break not just an I g Or on Apple. PODCASTS pass catchers stay connected us to the movement you know we have so much to share. ruthie myself my sister. And I'm lining up some juicy interviews and roundtables for this year and projects to come so. I hope that you guys can be a part of it. I love you. Thank you for those those of you. Who are part of our lives? Thank you for your presence. Thank you for your support. If you would like to help out the sisters we appreciate your likes your shares when you share things that we create opposed when you comment on your boosting us on the algorithms and if you would like to make a monetary contribution you could make it via paypal dot me slash slash gophers seat the break if you want to go to the break related stuff. Which is podcasts at community events or if you want to support the shop up and are You know visions to expand and is pay pal me. Slash Botanical Says B. O.. T. can't even spell right number. Tony Kyle with a K. L. I'll leave that in the summary of this post that will company this video. Love you happy New Year. Let's make this a very powerful twenty twenty. Thank you for your presence is resign and who better La Shamanism of Gotha see the rig by guys.

Brooklyn Brooklyn NYC Perez Europe US officer Apple Dole coffey Johny Guney gophers Patterson ruthie Hugh Williamsburg Danika Tony Kyle
TWiT 727: Artisanal Pickles from Williamsburg

This Week in Tech

2:21:06 hr | 2 years ago

TWiT 727: Artisanal Pickles from Williamsburg

"It's time for tweet this week in Tech Caroline Haskins is here for motherboard. Mike Albert is settled down from his trip around the world to this chair right here next to me. We're GONNA talk about the biggest fine and F._T._C. history instagram versus the bullies and Caroline we'll talk about what she's learned about. Technology local cities are using the spy on you and me. It's all coming up next on twitter that casts you love from people you trust <music>. This is this is twit. Is We could tech episode. Seven hundred under twenty-seven recorded Sunday July fourteenth twenty nineteen artisanal pickles from Williamsburg this week at tech is brought to you by worldwide technology worldwide technologies advanced technology centers like no other testing in research search lab with more than half a billion dollars of equipment including O._E._M.'s like net APP and it's virtual seeing you can access at twenty four seven to learn more and get insights into all it offers go to W.. W. T. dot com slash twit and by mid mobile mobile provides the same premium network coverage. You're used to but at a fraction of the cost because everything's online to get your new wireless plan for fifteen dollars a month and get the plan ship to your door free go to mint mobile dot com slash twit and by was Sabi hot cloud storage thinking about moving your data storage to the cloud was Sabi is enterprise class cloud storage at one fifth the price of Amazon S. three and up to six times faster with no hidden fees for Egress or A._p._i.. Requests calculate your savings and try was Sabi with free unlimited storage for a month at was Sabi Dot com code twit and by ziprecruiter hiring is challenging but there's one place you can go or hiring is simple and smart at place is ziprecruiter where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates try it free at Ziprecruiter dot com slash twit. It's time for tweet this week at tech show. We cover the weeks tech news and look WHO's here in studio. Mike Algan is joining us. He is off the road in town and whenever Mike's town they like to get you Tsuneo. Thank you the Oh it's great great to be in town. He's a gastro nomad in fact gastronome add dot net. What was your most was Barcelona? Your most recent event Barcelona's the next one. Oh it's coming to have some space open for this one. That's what this posted Barcelona so so what we do is everybody loves Barcelona but a lot of people don't know about the nearby Kava wine country now so we stay there for five nights six and we explore wine tasting we make cheese. We do all this kind of stuff. We Bake bread but we take a couple of surgical strikes into the city of Barcelona. <hes> and it's just the most fantastic thing in the World Trivia Food in Catalonia is incredible. We know exactly where the most authentic tapas places are. Where are they just like the best <hes> Baker in Spain that women there we she gives us an exclusive the best Baker in Spain <hes> two years ago? She was named the Best Baker Bain. She is mazing but she's a good friend. We go in and we explore if you go down. This is a good one see this one are here. There's a cave so this is a store in in office sparkling wine champagne but this guy stores it in a bomb shelter from from the Spanish civil war. How and it's in the middle of a vineyard? I can't tell you where it is or he'll generalissimo Francisco Franco's buried there but it's a fascinating region and the culture of Catalonian food which people don't quite get when you go to Barcelona on vacation quite get to it but fun we go straight to I could spend years in Barcelona. You'd never plum the depths. That's absolutely absolutely true. We also want to welcome a brand new member to our team. I'm really pleased to welcome from motherboard. The vice a publication Carolina Haskins Hi Caroline I have you welcome. Don't be intimidated. This is going to be a lot of fun. We are going to start my shaking. His head now says fun. We're GONNA start today with facebook. The largest fine in the history of the Federal Trade Commission <hes> The F._T._C. had a consent decree with with Facebook and twenty eleven that they would not do whatever it is facebook does as they did it apparently <hes> <hes> when they went in some of our our data went to Cambridge Analytica so the F._t._C. got together voted three two two interesting that was the Republicans have voted for the fine. The Democrats voted against the fine the largest finding the history of the F._T._c. five billion taller. That sounds like a lot of money right Dr Evil except facebook's stock price went up after the fine six billion dollars so mark Zuckerberg is smiling because he made money he made money. I guess facebook was smart. They had said in their annual in their quarterly report that they expected this five billion dollars they budgeted and so they prepared the market right and then when then fine actually was five billion as usual you US sell on the rumor you by on the news or you're buying the news and you sell them. I can't remember but whatever it was good news. Everybody laments the political division of society but both Republicans and Democrats can get behind crushing Silicon Valley. Yeah that is an on the issue so Carolina's five billion dollars a slap on that sounds like a lot of money. Is it a slap on the wrist. It kinda seems like a yeah dropping the bucket. I don't know I remember a couple of months ago. There were a couple of other their figures that were being thrown around and it seems like they were potentially going to be hit with a lot more money but it really doesn't seem like this is going to have an impact on them at all curiouser said you really WanNa find him. At zero to the Five Fifty Billion Elizabeth with Warren said facebook made five billion in profits in the first three months of the year. Actually that's not true. I think it was <hes> revenue not prophets the companies too big to oversee in this drop in the bucket penalty confirms that it is true that I mean look at anything anything with B.. Is is a lot of money for any company but it isn't you know facebook at fifteen billion in revenue. Oh I'm sorry it is fifteen billion revenue last quarter twenty two billion in Prophet so it was it was one one quarter profit <hes> you could see the stock jump there. Mike Isaac said the real stories that facebook shares surged with that fine so clearly the market saying slap slap on the wrist. Yeah what do what you're not on facebook fact. I use use an example Mike Allen because you have Mike Nice Book. Yes so what I did was last year. I said I was getting off Fourth of July and I I spent the whole all these months this year harassing and and criticizing facebook course it had no good at all because they were censoring my posts clearly <hes> but I replaced it with Google folder. I call my Nice Book and you can go public folder so I can they would on facebook yes so if you search for Mike Elegant Nice Book you'll find links to it and I advise you all but this is my personal. This is my family's really it's the kind of pictures you would have put us desperately text though or is it just pictures talks you can you can do post. Where do you play your Dank memes? Can you put them up there to you cannot so each person's. This is the beauty of it. This is our social network should work. Only I can post them. My Nice Book and I can follow your Nice Book and then I see it in the stream so if you're on Google photos and you go to sharing which nobody ever dies. It's the it's it's the I it's the tab on the far right. Yeah you get all the stuff that's been shared with you. All you know and it's it's kind of like a social so I think Google follow your <hes> Nice book there. It is yeah so I could make one of these. What what what I if I wanted to make one I would just set up a sharing and shaved public? Yes and it's Kinda. I believe that's the default actually that is public and then you just share the link okay <hes> with family and friends by email. People can choose notification in some people get it on their phones and people get email. Some people don't get the notifications they just see it in Google photos and they go but it's beautiful. This photos are full quality for click on these photos their full quality much better they face pushes them and you can you can add little of you know comments. You can like things and it's it's a stream without ads. wets Mike's wife by the way Amirah who so beautiful sitting in a restaurant apparently has parking meters called the naughty pig. That's on Sunset Boulevard and okay but it's it's a wonderful alternative is really what we want to do on facebook as we want to see a stream of of our people we care about and the photos because I get all the time I said get off facebook. I'm off facebook caroline you you have to it's an occupational hazard on all the network's probably yeah yeah. I feel like it would be sort of irresponsible for me to like not even know what's going on you. Couldn't you could get rid of instagram. I wish I could it would be nice. The strange thing is that a lot of my peers still use facebook for event invitations and I've noticed people a little bit more recently using different types of forums but it almost seems like for a lot of people at least in my immediate social circle gold that facebook is still a way to guarantee that someone is going to be able to see something but I don't know I want to go back to the days of like personal websites really nice to step on your <hes> your comment there Carolina but <hes> this is what I hear I talking to lots and lots of people all over the World Leo because in Europe but you have a blog I have a blog but I know lots of people in Europe who use one two or three social things and those things are always facebook properties so so I know people who do what's up what's up and it's and that was one of the hardships for me is what I got rid of facebook. I felt like well. I should also give it a fait instagram. I didn't really use what's up but I should also. I should get through all three if I've any one of them on my phone own I've given facebook an entree into my lab -solutely and this is the interesting thing about what's up Americans don't use what's at much everybody else. It's well and that's what I hear when I get off facebook. What I universally here is? That's a that's a privileged alleged point of view. I can't get off. This is the problem with facebook. We're on the brink where we everybody countries the Internet well exactly and some people some lots and lots of people say I don't use the Internet I use facebook right and so it's A._O._l.. For the twenty first century and the scheme that Mark Zuckerberg has hatching as we sit here is he's trying to turn it into we chat so in China we chat is everything is an ECOMMERCE. That's why Lieber coin. That's why he's got a currency because this to be everything goes through facebook and so we're already like everybody I talked to says. I'm not going to get off facebook because I need it for this reason or that reason. Caroline has her reasons. Everybody has a reason why they need facebook instagram or what's up and this is a problem we shouldn't i. I had heard that younger. People thought maybe maybe you're not as young as you look but younger people said facebook is like your parents social network and there and people under <hes> thirty say are are snapchat or tick tock. There are other places right right yeah. I think there's definitely still that reputation <hes> you've but in college did you use facebook. My daughter's twenty-seven still is on facebook because that's how she stays in touch with college friends I did did yeah I mean facebook was used in terms of like finding college remains freshman year <hes> during introductions and that's sort of pivoted onto instagram witches again so a facebook property so it seems like you're still sort of relying lying on this biggest common denominator <hes> like there's this assumption that you haven't account on at least one basic goods is really the reason facebook is an incumbent and it will be hard to unseat is so-called network effect. You have to be where everybody is. There's no point I mean on Mastodon. I'm on Elo but there's no point because it's me and a couple of other people but there's there's I don't even know and we're looking look at each other gone <hes> but but this is true that here's the problem so the only social network that's bigger than facebook is email which is about three or four times the size of face and you're not a male new big letters but the problem is people have lost control of their inboxes. Oh yeah they're they're afraid of yeah and so but but if people could just get a handle on their email inboxes email it'd be the ultimate social network because you could be on massive on and use email based notifications and be like everybody's on the same social but people are reticent even often say that if you want to stay in touch with your college friends or your or your grandparents email would work right but I guess it's not that there's not that but it's emails should be a delivery mechanism for the note. It's a one on one conversation. He doesn't feel feel like that. Stream like you're tapping into what Wade into the pool of Zeitgeist and this is how the social networks get us they they tapped into our psychology and makes us feel like we're got a finger on the pulse whereas email feels like your finger is not on the the pulse right <hes> and so it's it's all these feel feel based emotion based tricks that they use the little red thing with a number in it. People have to click on that should be would it does he does the F._T._C. have any solution. If it had been five hundred billion would've that of matter it doesn't it feels like the F._t._C.'s is helpless in the face of this right. It's hard to say I mean without a fine is one thing but I mean regulations that are going to be preventing something like an Cambridge medical situation from happening again would be I mean more ideal and I mean that doesn't look like I mean I know that legislation is on the way in California but why it doesn't seem like the regulations we need are on the way anytime anytime soon so well. It's hard to say whether a fine would be like a hundred percent the answer here in a lot of times when we talk about regulation. There's always this issue of unintended China Consequences Casey Newton has a great article this week on the verge talking about the ugly side of Facebook's pivot to privacy so facebook solution. Was this Mark Zuckerberg Post saying Oh okay no problem everything will be end to end encrypted private but as Casey points out now what you have is private groups like that horrific border patrol group that propublica found last week it's private. Is You know they had to dig to find it. LEMONDE lemonde found in France Group of fifty six thousand people devoted largely to making anti-female comments French group. The twitter users stumbled across a Facebook T._V. AD investigated one of the featured groups and Founder Fay who stumble across a Facebook T._V. AD oh he founded be and he posted something ugly posts large private. This is Elizabeth dwoskin writing in the Washington Post large private groups remain UNMODERN rated rated black boxes where users could freely threaten vulnerable populations. Actually she's quoting Jonathan Green Blat who's with the anti-defamation league without any A._I.. Are Human moderators. It's easy to orchestrate harassment campaigns it. It becomes four channel eight Janet becomes it becomes a secret place for for evilness so that's not a solution either I I'm less I mean this is going to sound horrible but I'm less bothered by this sort of thing because in private you don't mind well. It's not that I don't mind mind that people are evil. <hes> bothers me but they're going they're going to at least they're not in my face well. I mean if it's to me. This is more akin to just having a an evil conversation in your living room or whatever yeah that's what bothers the viral mechanisms of using algorithms to bring in lots of people in the end sort of changed their minds about the I thought I always thought maybe this was naive of me but that <hes> light was a disinfectant that you lift up the Rock and you let the world see this and the world will will rear back and revulsion and say no this will not stand. We don't want Nazis but what is in fact happened is that he's taken over twitter. It's it's not there's no revulsion Bondi. My producer unfortunate thing. Is that y'all who's our youtube. Algorithms sees revulsion as positive. That's engagement. I don't care if you're disgusted. It's engagement segment. It's it's <hes> who who is it said that it's like people slow down to look at a car accident and so the Internet responds by producing more accidents yeah this is the slavish following of the algorithm is a bad thing I would. I've often said that the a real problem with youtube is a recommendation engine the algorithm clearly the problem with facebook is the Algorithm and drives the newsfeed because absent any human oversight these are optimized for engagement. Does that's more revenue and that's where you get these horrible vicious vicious circles that promote offensive behave and to me the elephant living and that's not a G._O._p.. Pun By the elephant in the living room is <hes> is is <hes> which I don't think he's exploring here enough is that you talked about the disinfectant quality of light right what what Zuckerberg has proposed for his big privacy pivot which is complete B._S. is to unite all of his <hes> <hes> all of his messaging platforms and have end and encryption so nobody can see inside that black box and then and I and the other part of it is they all the solution to bullying and hate speech on stuff our algorithms that work behind the scenes that nobody can see how they work or what they're doing and all that comes up so we're entering into an era where all this stuff where the conversations are happening beyond anyone's <hes> ability to see it and also where the solution the algorithms are happening behind the scenes with nobody's ability. This is kind of a golden age of journalists can go and expose these things right articles Casey Newton's not going to happen as we're on the brink of him not how it won't be able to find these secret poor Carolina you know you're going on the grumpy. All men complain about the you kids today show day we didn't do this didn't have any of it. I just think it's strange that this whole pivot to groups and like emphasizing groups on facebook has been presented as this solution both to like hey speech and fake news and for making facebook just a place to want that people people wanna go. I mean anecdotally. It seems pretty clear that facebook groups is one of the only reasons that people would go on facebook for pleasure but in terms of vice mattress thing yeah yeah in terms of like I don't know mean groups or like the rise of certain facebook groups where it's like facebook group where we pretend to be ex like for instance a real popular. One is a group where we all pretend to be boomers. <hes> and everybody makes fun of their air. Their parents told me you're not in that group. I joined for journalistic purposes. I think we boomers should invade area fifty one on another one sorry. That's a big event. Oh that's interesting see this is where I am at a disadvantage so facebook has kind of pivoted from the original promise was you you follow the news feed and fees see what your friends and family are up to to finding affinity groups and we know affinity groups of the worst thing in the world because really what happens is whatever you know. It's a mob mentality whatever that <hes> prime factor for that. If any group is becomes amplified <hes> appenzell I mean they say that <hes> certain types of flagged post or fake news will be de prioritized even in private facebook groups <hes> which I mean I think personally at least in some cases I mean not in the case of like <music> outright hate speech but <hes> in terms of certain grey areas that might be a better solution than just pulling the stuff off the Internet entirely and just having really grasp on how different communities are spreading different kinds of information nation but at the same time pretending that facebook groups is going to be like solving all of facebook problems while I mean your feet is going to still be including a lot of the same type of content. I mean at the end of the day I it's just going to be like a category specific news feed with a couple of specific people <hes> and I mean when you open facebook right now almost every time I open it <hes> it'll say read at the top <hes> this many of your friends have joined facebook groups and you find new facebook groups <hes> it's so funny because Google plus in its last dying days to the same pivot didn't save it but they join a community joining community so there must be some research says Oh yeah people are happiest when they're in a community. Yeah people had terrible though because the communities are horrific. I my biggest my biggest or awesome yeah. Thank you KARSTON my face. What's what Karston what groups are are you in I? I also facebook refugee but oh okay. He's one of those guys who pretends to be a boomer. There's definitely something to be said for affinity groups where people can find people like them uh-huh well. That's what Geeks did in the very beginning. That's what we did. We found each other <hes> you know I. I keep thinking that the platforms can't solve this. It's not going to be in government can't solve it in humans can solve it but we're so flawed. There's a solution they're either. I feel like it's starting to despair but we have to be clear about what the problem is and I. It's why bothers me that you know that somebody is saying something mean on the Internet somewhere is not the problem right if people should be able to have private groups no matter what they say to each other in those groups <hes> private conversations people should be able to say on the telephone for example. You shouldn't have algorithm. Nobody listened to compensate. You shouldn't talk about and that's historically the case. That's what section to thirty of the Internet whatever's decency collaboration. What does I called the communications decency active twenty s <music> nine thousand nine hundred ninety six yeah <hes> sections thirty said that just like the phone system you can't expect platforms online services to police content? They're just conveyors yes content and so by the way people want to president. Trump trump wants to get rid of <hes> section to thirty. There's a move afoot to do that. <hes> so that may be actually under assault anyway but I don't know if that protects it either. I don't know what the solution I really don't. I I really think we need to focus on algorithms and an analyst that's what book says Algorithm and not know focus on the problem with Algorithm Oh and not the focus on private little groups where national people talk to each other things and they make it seem like a bigger problem. I think they could be plot plotting and planning they could be yes. You know that stuff is going to happen and when the break the law they need to go to prison right when they break the law in real life but but whatever happened to free speech we should have a place for free speech that we shouldn't have is a place where it amplify amplifies by putting and so Jason how a Kansas have all people <hes> proposed a new social network which he described as a simple feed with no ago rhythmic filtering one ad on the top of the page you can pay fifty dollars a month to get rid of the ad and it's just you get everything that the people you follow post in reverse chronological order end of story facebook was supposed to be in the beginning exactly but there's no money in that you can't be wildly you can't end up being the most powerful person in the world and one of the richest there has to be somewhere in between no money and twenty two billion dollars a year. There has to be some mid ground where you make you make a decent living. It's good service people use it. It's called message on the pro. I mean I. I don't give a crap if Mark Zuckerberg is rich I I really don't care if he makes a lot of money. What I care about is that people can have conversations? We have free speech we also have and we don't amplify. Amplifying negatives not creating this kind of stuff so that's where the problem is not these little private groups. I don't think and then there was this week social media summit at the White House where the president said to bunch of <hes> kind of conspiracy theory <hes> social media folks the crap. You guys think of is unbelievable. It is yes it is even though it's <hes> often believed I guess they did not invite facebook or Jack Dorsey from twitter anybody who who's actually from one of the platforms to this quote social media summit was really just a bunch of it was mostly right winged right wing pundits they had pull a few found all kinds of antisemitic and racist stuff and of course Josh Holly is proposed legislation that would eliminate section to thirty <hes> treat every political opinion equally because has of this. I don't think there's any evidence for this belief. That's in the conservative circles that somehow twitter and facebook con- you know are are biased against conservatives. I don't I don't see any evidence of that but the the the evidence is <hes> I mean can you this is this is actually one of the problems you don't have insight in how they why they make the decisions they make so for example. Let's there's some well. It is invisible isn't it. The person who posted alright type post and then gets band and then all of his followers numbers like hi you see it's conservative bias but what they don't know is twitter might tell you yeah but they were also had this other account. They had these five other accounts where they were orchestrating bots and doing all this other stuff in the combined effect of all those things were why we band and and again we take word for it because algorithms are our company secrets they don't have to reveal them and they won't so there. You know the facebooks in the twitter really on the spot. They're essentially the police and the judge jury and everything so trump's trump said evidence. There's a bias against him is because in the old days he would tweet that <hes> the Obama campaign was spying on them and it would in his words take off like a rocket and now it doesn't so much more. That's your evidence yeah and I you know he's got how many tens of millions aliens of followers. I think it's pretty clear twitter is not blocking followers. <hes> the president has narcissistic personality disorder. If Georgia were here she could diagnose it for us but <hes> but the pro this whole summit seemed to be a place for him to vent and say about him the fact that I don't have more followers than Obama. They should have more reason why there's something has to change and we're going to do something and he was threatening. I should have more followed associated. I yeah okay. I'm just saying Caroline tweet or printed on poster boards so that shows does your right. That's it right there. That's things bombers do print out tweets and put them on a poster board. That's what they do in the group that she's in <hes> so so instagram used to be kind of the refuge you would go to instagram all it's nice. It's pictures sure it's nice and now instagram is just as corrupt so nice and messed up caroline. You've written about it it just as bad on instagram right. I haven't been while so is it yeah. They've they've had a problem with arise of life certain types of extremists hey accounts <hes> with Cunanan accounts with anti boxer accounts and Instagram's men taking some steps to design infrastructure that block certain hashtags like in the same way that if you search <hes> say for things like Pro Anorexia those hashtags are blocked and so they're working on doing the same kind of thing for for anti vaccinations and those types of ideologies but I mean the last time I checked that feature hadn't hadn't ruled out but I mean yeah. It's it's just strange that you there was a period when I went on facebook and you know you search for antibiotics or content and there were I mean there were no results like like the group's seemed to have been banned but then when you went on instagram all those accounts restore up <hes> yeah I don't know in terms of the social media summit. I think one important thing to keep in mind is that he also invited <hes>. I think it was the C._E._O.. Or whoever founded that that social network network minds am I N D s <hes> which for at least a certain period of time was like a favored group among I mean yeah exactly <hes> I don't know I think it speaks volumes. It goes I think it goes beyond trumping angry about himself and trying to send a political message by I mean obviously the types of people that he invited to that you have to he he has to see <hes> these social networks as very powerful for the twenty twenty election as places that they can use he does he uses twitter very effectively yeah and they have to see these as the place where the campaign is GonNa play out next year right. That's that's that's where it's GonNa Matter Truth. Is that scares me. Everybody talks about how twitter is so influential in shaping public opinion all this kind of stuff and it just isn't true. Do what happens is the media picks up on twitter but that's the respect it's true. Is that yet twitter's only a couple hundred million people. It's not a big deal but the media trainees if it's the most important thing in the world and if anything happens on twitter suddenly that's a story to be clear. Another choices are what make everything that happens on twitter <hes> such a big deal. If the media completely ignored what happened on twitter they would have no effect and has really have you seen this yet on Carolina on an instagram where if you put comments in that are I guess bullying that it will will say wait a minute to really want right. Do you want to say that. Let's keep instagram supportive place rethink that comment. It's really interesting because I want to. I went to a meeting with instagram. <hes> a couple months ago when they were talking about the things that they were doing to try and combat bullying and I think a large part of the difficulty in modern moderating not type of thing is it's a defining bullying and be figuring out a way to do that. That isn't just that isn't preemptive. I mean they don't want to censor these one right. I mean even in the example that they used. I think they said like Oh. If you're using the words I mean it's clear that like the words I like ugly and stupid triggered that top up to say you WANNA say that but is that really the ways that are those really the mechanisms mechanisms that people use to make others feel excluded they were talking about also like induced Romo which is it's. It's difficult to define. It's basically aware and is made of foam. Oh problems like it like a whole idea. Is that if you post something at a certain place and a person may not have been invited and you say you at the person and you say oh. Don't you wish you were here. See people actually do that. I think that was that's that was one of the main questions that I had coming out of that but don't you think they do. Have you ever seen stuff way. I'll tell you where I see it. Every time I go sir every time I go to a concert now most of the Selfie taking is the person turned away from the artist videoing the artists singing and them in the picture and what's the whole point of doing that to show all your friends. What a great time how good your life is? I'm at the concert if you if it used to be you'd video the singer right because Oh you love the singer. You'RE GONNA like the video now. It's look at me at the concert that that's foam oh right so they clearly were trying to make it seem as if that sort of thing is malicious malicious neurotic. It's just it's just a narcissistic. I'm hesitant almost to judge people that WANNA like document those types of experience. You know if you want to if you WANNA share that if that's what if that's what makes you feel good. If you want to make you capture something that made you happy. I'm I'm hesitant to be like. Oh that's bad but when you when you're trying to define what actually is bad and what is harmful. I Dunno I mean it seems like a lot of the I mean the social ways in which people try and exclude an alienate and make other people feel bad. I mean that's not something doesn't algorithm can easily pick right and this is only rolling out on the English speaking part of Instagram so I mean this is only going to be affecting like a marginal Asian all part of their audience anyway. We're talking about children. Though right I mean adults don't like so one of the problems they they they have is that they talked about. How some bullying victims if they block somebody it's like a big problem because they the there with the bully every day in other words to go to school with the bully and so this even blocking and the mechanisms that exist for people to protect themselves don't work because of the fact that people are you know in real con <hes> communication indication that sounds to me like high school or junior high or <hes>? I have to say when I when I was posting stuff on Instagram I would. I would actually consciously not try to show off on instagram because it felt like it was about like look how great my life is and I was concerned it. You know that when you're looking at these people's lives that's not that's just the slice that makes it look good yeah. Everybody's life has equal amounts of bad stuff in good stuff and. It just put the pictures of the good stuff so I tried to take pictures of all the bad stuff that happened to me. Make people feel better very freeing to have los. It's very freeing have low standards. That's kind of that's going to go on. My Tombstone. Actually thank you Carolina <hes> we are. We're very pleased to have caroline with us. Carolina Haskins is a reporter for motherboard and vice great site. I WanNa talk about pallets here when we come back because you did stood a great piece on this software this peletier software is really kind of scary also Mike Algan off the road and in our studios great to have you elegant dot com and of course you could always subscribe to Mike Nice book yet so there's a lot of fumble for me yes of you in Barcelona drinking whining you WanNa see an example of this foam. Oh we've been talking about go to my nice book. What a life? He is beautiful though isn't it. It's not like cheese. Are there's definitely things baby. boomers say right in that. There's nothing like cheese say you're wrong. I know I'm not wrong. I know I know I'm the poster child our show did. They brought to you by worldwide technologies. 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Tomorrow is the eve of prime day are is everybody excited yeah. We'll <hes> first of all not everything in prime. Day is a deal right right. The wire cutter does a great job. The New York Times a wire cutter they great job of looking at Prime Day deals in comparing him to other prices to see if they are deals and oh by the way here's here's the best prime day deals between nineteen notice. They're not all on Amazon in fact Walmart is having their own version of prime date and they're they're doing it. I think for three or four days targets doing it. Even nordstrom later this week will be having their version of prime day. I think rapidly the middle of the year is going to become the week for for Christmas these Christmas in July as well Ebay to wired magazine called Amazon Prime Day aback canal of modestly discounted F._M.. Obviously this crap that you wouldn't ever buy I I liked what ebays doing because Ebay is. They're calling it. Crash deals in case Amazon crashes because I guess what Amazon crash last year during Friday unbelievable <hes> I I don't know what to say about this except I'm staying home tomorrow no I don't I don't want I come to work. You guys have much better bandwidth here. Oh Yeah we do we. We have a lot of bandwidth. Do you buy stuff Carolina on prime. Did you go crazy. Is that where you get your battleship. Yeah I've not participated in Prime Day. I think mainly because I mean this year last Sir definitely <hes> I mean there have been different types of demonstrations at warehouses <hes> and People Minnesota's shutting down shut down the weirdest tomorrow yeah like that's I mean you gotTa shut them all that if you're shut it down they just route around just like the Internet Minnesota's. Dan Lewis just use it. Let's get it from Nebraska I don't you here's a really interesting thing that happened to me. Regarding Amazon very bizarre last year November December something like that I went to law Gannon said your account has been terminated and I was like okay. That's terrible so I I've been calling and calling couple three or four times a month trying to get my Amazon account and the reason I wanna back is because I'm an author. You don't have an Amazon account correct. How do you do but I don't so so I have a an author so I have a book going this being sold? I get checks from them. I I've done some Amazon associate stuff. I get checks for that but they couldn't figure it out. I kept calling Amazon like we have no idea we can't figure it out your your and then we finally figured it out. They had a high level person. Look into it. I was one of the first like you were <hes> audible. Oh and your audible account I subscribed in two thousand and I don't know what it was in two thousand something like that and so I recently cancelled it because my wife had whoa tidier Amazon account and they couldn't figure it out but is basically they turned into my account so they're still trying to activate. Can you get back. They don't know is there any reason why you care why why don't you set up a new account because because I need access to my book Oh and fees well. There's all kinds of data in there that I need to. This is the new <hes> digital dilemma yeah. What do you do if you're I mean? It's bad enough if people lose their Google but if you lose your Amazon Account. Do you really exist not really the I'm shut out of prime. I mean for starters. Oh my God the horror. I have to pay full price on everything so are you so that's interesting that you brought that up Carolina because it is true we heard nothing but horror stories about people working in warehouses Amazon announced and now they're already doing it in our neck of the woods next day delivery which isn't GonNa make make gotTa make even worse in the warehouses I had I had an Amazon driver. Deliver a book at nine o'clock last night. I mean this poor. person's probably been out in the truck. All Day was a little van. Yes when it was prime is new Amazon vans. The headset Carolina's wearing was placed in an Amazon locker by an Amazon worker at nine nine P._M.. Last night just yeah just so she could be on the show today. Wow so yeah it's yeah yeah. I don't know it's I feel like in an ideal world. It would be nice to times the convenience of it is really a thou. This is the modern dilemma we want. All our conveniences and we kinda know in the back of our mind is it's. It's due to the suffering of some other human right. I mean in terms of the price price. I mean a lot of time especially. If you're buying things in bulk like there've been times that I've bought like food or certain types of food or cleaning supplies in bulk because that's really the only like money efficient way to do it but I think the important thing to keep in mind. Is that with Amazon I mean it's not just something that affects Amazon warehouses. I mean this is something that's creating going to Walmart's. No better yeah yeah pretty much any place. That's relying on on warehouses <unk> on. I mean it's but what do you do you live on Artisanal Pickett'll pickles from Williamsburg for the rest of your life. I mean you can't you can try Brooklyn to you. Only shop local merchants that have handcrafted your goods worst part is they're going to solve the the the the plight of their workers by replacing with robots and so is that better it's hard. It's so I thought Oh this is. This is Amazon announced that they're gonNA spend. They're going to retrain yeah what maniacs which hundred million. I can't remember what it sounds like a good plan to me. It's like seven hundred thousand or something like that. They're going to retrain people nationwide for seven hundred million dollars to retrain one third of its workforce but if you do the math it's like twelve hundred bucks per person. It's barely enough to send somebody school for a week. <hes> they're gonNA retrain a hundred thousand workers by twenty twenty five because they say well these people are going to be out of <hes> out of work and Amazon is very robots hotel -tarian in their P._R.. Approach if you're in the press you know this that they're very difficult to work with and they masters at spinning stories in their favor and and you know they talk about retraining and then they throughout some examples to get your mind thinking about advanced degrees in like doing all this kind of stuff but really they're going to be put retraining people factory workers to be drivers and they're going to be how many of those people I don't know but how many of those people can become coders appears in how many voters do exactly sleight of hand. They're going to be doing a lot of training like every other company every company all K- the seven thousand dollars a worker which actually decent it's a thousand one thousand two hundred dollars a year for five years so so that's why it's Bloomberg had an interesting analysis of it. They said breaking down the numbers they'll spend seven hundred million one hundred thousand employees by twenty twenty five one thousand seventy seven dollars a person annually according to an estimate from the Association Asia for Talent Development of trade group. The average organization spends already twelve hundred ninety six dollars per employee annually on training so in effect Amazon's committing to spending less and on its face. I don't believe that that's an apples to apples comparison. They say this is how much apple ah Amazon's going to spend how much of that is on leasing buildings and and and and and getting projectors you know P._r.. Move It. It's not a genuine effort retrained well. No I think I think they're doing every company company. Every enterprise has to train after training or and I think they're trying to get a lot of credit for something that is it possible for Amazon to treat its workforce humanely. Absolutely they make enough money they could do that. Well prices will go go up. I mean this is why things are cheap on Amazon. They're squeezing right squeezing everything yeah so it's a fifteen dollar minimum wage. I mean for most people still is in a livable wage and I think in terms of retraining the details are really important here. I mean is this something that's going to be happening. In addition to slash outside of work hours I mean for people who might have to work like more than one job or for people who have family I mean that might not be feasible and for what to stay within the same company company <hes> are they actually going to be making more money and their retrained physicians or the conditions going to be comparable on her. No I mean it seems like the stage like those kinds of details are unclear. I feel bad because this show us to be all about how great technology is is and making our lives better and you're going to have robots and the cars drive themselves and pretty soon. You won't have to wear glasses anymore now. It's all about dystopia is it. Is that what happened or is it just me I. I don't think well I don't. I don't think I don't think the story about Amazon's training workers as much of technology story. It's it's technology company and there's hardly what's happened. Is this is a type of capitalism business story. Yeah it doesn't story and and and <hes> you know the well. Let's do technology story. Amazon is building robots but not for the warehouse. It's a home robot with Amazon Echo when I heard about this. I thought it was going to be this little tiny robot that goes but but it's a waste high. It's like the size of that so you can put your beer on exactly that that's absurd assets. I I've been to cocktail parties in Sonoma where they have robot they bring you your tray of Hors d'oeuvres. They will actually one of the things that they had this was at the at the future of food conference in Sonoma they had robots with a tray on top and they were carrying little desserts that were pastry versions of robots with trays on little search on top of those. Is there inception mazing. We're the desserts top of the robot desserts. It just desserts all the way up. A robot is called VESTA and they say we can't yet get mass produce Vesta <hes> they had hoped to reveal it this year but it's just not ready now this isn't we had a advertiser. <hes> Bosch who had a robot called <hes> Caro- you remember it was a little robot would wander around. It was kind of like Amazon Alexa on wheels. They cancelled that project <hes>. I wonder if I don't think it's hard to make. I think it's hard to find a market yeah. Does anybody really want a little robot L. Amazon Echo that wanders around yes I mean it's it's like it sounds cute but I feel like I'm traveling. I'm struggling to understand this here so let's say you have an apartment like mine. That isn't that big. I mean this is a matter of walking literally. The three steps to wherever is or let's say you have an actually big house like is it going to go up. The stairs probably not like I'm right right. I duNNo. It just seems why I mean I think the idea of having Echo Roomba I mean that's cute. I guess rammed his kids at tape tobacco to a Roomba instagram a year ago. I think he's blaming a cat jeff but I think that's I think his kids heads are genius for doing that. Everything she just every product should just be placed on top of a Roomba and it would instantly make it better. I think all animals especially house cats should be placed on top of a run but the reality is that debt we boomers were promised robots in a home right. I mean <hes> never got them so anybody who's working on that. I think it's great. The problem is that Amazon is a is a privacy nightmare in your home but if you ignore that part of it it's like I'm glad that coming because look what Amazon did with the with the virtual assistant appliances or what we now 'cause smart speakers right they nobody believed in that stuff when they came out with Echo. People said the same things about the echo that we're saying now robot people who wants that silly is really changing the tech consumer technology world world <hes> in a major way so I would love to see <hes> you know virtual assistant robot type things I just would prefer that income from Amazon so mentioned like you're going to be having like the types of security issues. Yes I mean the same sorts of issues with like people being creeped out about humans transcribing and having access to voice recordings. I mean that's a shared problem with Amazon. I mean it seems like whoever's making these speakers. I mean if you're having a device advice listening to you and your home and has access to literally everything that's going on. I mean that's going to be there's going to be a security -cerned concerned. That's going to be a privacy concern. No matter which company is behind a I mean with companies like Google Amazon. I mean it's even more of a concern considering like a large amount of data. They already have about you and your customer profile but yeah. I don't know if it's an off it's strictly Amazon problem just to be clear. This is a much bigger potential risk than it sounds. It's not that this thing thing will be on wheels and roll around listening. It'll be three D.. Mapping your home. It will be videotaping your furniture and it'll be finding out who else is in the house which we recognize through face recognition. W surprised the next time you got an Amazon. If it says you know your couch the new Amazon's this couch will fit perfectly face. This rug were really tie. The room together really figuring to do that. I mean is that how valuable is that Amazon. Oh infinitely valuable I think I think they sit there. I think Jeff bezos sits in his basement Eastman at three o'clock in the morning seething because he has all this data from Amazon Echo products but it just doesn't know what's in the other room what's in there. WHO's in there I mean I really that's and I know we'll put wheels on this thing? In a role round have access to the high where you're sleeping go in the bathroom and go through and medicine cabinet. I mean who knows <hes> but it's lots and lots of data that I mean these Amazon sells everything yeah. They sell everything and they wanna see what you got this is I think this is one of the reasons for this. <hes> this version of the echo that takes pictures pictures of your outfit the whole point is I see what's in your life. Don't look but anyway the Stacey Stacey Higginbotham has my echo look. I'm sure it likes her outfits much better <hes> well <hes> This Week in Law Blinding Hal is super knew it like she paul she had she is a great look and she she's very put together and she's creating foam on instagram every day with this thing so he's an I'm glad I'm not so I have a new. I've been a new kick. I've been thinking about because we talk a lot. There's a lot of energy spent <hes> about artificial intelligence. You know I think Elon Musk and others have said oh no oh you know it's the terminators coming in this whole notion that A._i.. The fear of A._I.. Is that it's going to somehow at some point gain consciousness and it's GonNa Think <hes> we don't need humans. It's going to wipe us out or it's GONNA turn us into batteries as it did in the matrix or something like that and I've I've read a couple of people most recently. You've all nor Harari in his twenty-one lessons for the twentieth century said no one is ever demonstrated that if you get better at A._I.. At some point you leap this this gap into consciousness. We don't know where consciousness caused from. There's no evidence that you feed machine a lot of information's you know it becomes a great chess player and then suddenly it goes. I think I'M GONNA eat Gary Kasparov for lunch. It doesn't jump to that unconscious is thing we don't know where conscious comes from. Maybe someday we'll be able to so I'm going to submit. This is my new thing that consciousness is not the threat of A._I.. The threat of the I is the humans who use A._I.. Now you've been talking about this little bit <hes> on on motherboard there was a piece in slate this morning that creeped me out. It turns out license plate. Reading software has gotten so cheap and it will work with hundred dollar cameras that it's being installed everywhere license license plate readers they give an example of <hes> housing complex where people are using it to make sure that you know you're not abusing your rental agreement that you you know if it's they are everywhere. It's about one hundred dollars for the software on one hundred dollar camera cities we the city I live in Petaluma. I noticed was putting up cameras on every traffic light every street light and I realized they're not doc valuable if you have to have somebody sitting and watching them if you've got four hundred cameras in a town of fifty thousand people what are you just got a eight hundred officers looking at them. No you put licensed procreating software on and then if you WanNa know where Leo was last night you know yeah exactly and this is an example <hes> to me Pailin tears another one and I'm really interested that you caroline have been able to break through because Pailin tear has been almost a legendarily secret company. The in Silicon Valley funded by Peter Thiel <hes> Alex Carp is it's Secretive C._e._o.. And we knew it was some sort of what is it we don't I don't know what we do. Yeah Yeah I guess the best way to describe it is that it's an aggregate or it takes data from like all different types of sources and it organizes a and is able to find connections in ways that like if you're just a regular human analyst you might not be able to do it or if you're just a person with access to five different databases and you're looking to use something from there. I mean that's not actionable. Just having all this unstructured data so that's pollen tears roll <hes> it organizes it and it's able to make charts and sort through very very sensitive data very easily as easy as making a search. This is what's worrying me day. I it's not that it's going to become conscious and got want to get rid of the humans. It's that there are humans who will be using this. You wrote that three hundred California cities northern California cities. I I wouldn't be surprised if pedal Emma is one of them are using Pailin tear why did pedal Emma put up all those cameras to gather data and what are they going to do with the data noteworthy here the <hes> the noteworthy thing here is that I started this whole thing by sending public information requested individual cities and almost all of them came back empty. The only one that came back with information was through the N._C.. Are I see the northern Northern California Regional Intelligence Center so even if you're a citizen living in one of these cities and you want to find out about it. There's really no way for you to know I mean only by filing a public record quest to this regional center <hes> do you realized like because here's the thing like police officers can request this type of data from the N._C._R._I.. See <hes> but there's no paper trail for those individuals cities and there's really no transparency for the citizens that are actually living there so this is run through the Department of Homeland Security. Do they say it's to cut down terrorism right so on their website. They claim that they will they. Most of their efforts are focused on major drug operations and terrorism operations friends <hes> but at the same time there's they will pretty much investigate anything that a local police department request help with and this could be I mean literally any type of crime it could be it could be a robbery. It could be a domestic assault. It could would be really any type of investigation that a local police department is operating so this isn't just a <hes>. Let's catch people trying to commit like a major major act of terrorism this. Is You know local local operations <hes> and this is you know they've a massive amount of data on the people that are living in those areas on one hand. I would say oh that's good. We're going to be a safer city in pedal and by the way our county is one of the participating fourteen participating in northern California counties in the NC Yup our I see there are no. That's going to be safer. It's going to be safer here. I think I duNNo. I think that this is it's sort of reminds me about the arguments events that people make with respect to privacy like Oh. I have nothing to hide so I shouldn't have any reader worry about this. You know I don't mean yeah I mean if you have nothing to hide legal bathroom door open. <hes> tried that argument people the like that there's reason it's not that you have something to hide your criminals. Just that you we deserve to live privately rescuers the slippery slope you mentioned that you know why are the installing these cameras in Petaluma and it doesn't matter why now once they have the cameras they can later decide Oh. Hey we have all these cameras. Why don't we do X._Y._Z.? So it's really the infrastructure is is just another step director sliding down slope well. Here's another example I just wrote a piece for fast company about emotion. Technology cars cars read emotions understand what your mindset is understand. What's happening in the car? This is part of the self driving cars are like supercomputers on wheels with all these centers pointing outward what we're not talking enough about is the sensors pointing inward at the drivers and everybody else but what's interesting is effective is in the lead with this technology of being able to read emotions of drivers and they're not doing it by installing cameras in cars. They're using the cameras already installed in cars and they just tapping into that feet. It's it's like an it's like a <hes> you know after the fact kind of an idea where it's like well you know these high in cars have cameras why don't we just read people's emotions with them and so this is this is what they want the emotions. Can I stand for self self driving vehicles. It's important to know what that other drivers going to do. That doesn't bother well. There's so the big promise so yes vehicles whether the biggest the big thing is this is going to go online before they're fully self-driving but the MO- most urgently that Europe has as enacted legislation saying that by two thousand twenty one all car sold in Europe will have to have <hes> basic reading funk's they'll be able to they have to tell whether the drivers falling asleep whether the drivers now this is. This is a Cadillac in their C._T._X.. For their yeah <hes> autopilot feature yes because as you know with same with Tesla you gotTa keep your hand on the wheel. <hes> and you have to keep your eyes on the road. It used to be that was enough to have your hand on the wheel but Cadillac actually has a camera that sees where you're looking so that if you look down or away from the road it while the autopilots on it can actually vibrates your seat and then eventually disengages it I to trick it. I had a cover my eyes but I was too scared driving well. That was the thing I was scared to actually do that so I did like this and and you know I had my peers through my fingers and it did but while exactly I mean it does is looking at you driving the best thing and if they were able to get that and I guess with on Star they probably are getting Eh. I love that technology because you can be able to look at a store and say is that open and they'll they'll know what you're looking at and they'll say oh there so so starbucks is not open right so caroline you filed a public records request and got the Pal user manual for cops right so yeah this was a specific user manual that seem to be designed for COP Sabir operating in like the West North California area and full disclosure. The manual was almost unreadable. It took me several hours to be able to parse all of this through because of jargon because it was just poorly organized it was poorly worded <hes> they did not define any of the terms terms they just sort of said that the way it was organized was here's how you make a search <hes> and then they sort of introduced different charting functions <hes> confidential and proprietary not for distribution so please clarify. There is another another thing we would say in my day. We used to go through dumpsters to find that kind of thing go ahead well so searching for records in Pailin tear start start in the graph applicator. This is the worst this menu you're right caroline. This horrible like unreadable secure. Yeah my God right. I think it's the best way to describe it is in terms of what you can do and what information that you're starting with. If you're starting with just what's the name you can get. I mean if they have it in their data systems if they have it in police record management systems if they have it through other types of private data that they obtain things that could have access to people's <hes> email addresses is or bank account numbers really sensitive information like that I mean this is all polled instantly just from a simple name search and if you know somebody's license plate and you use this example in your article <hes> you can know where they because of license plate readers and cameras everywhere you can know pretty much everywhere. Somebody's been and win for any time period right so basically you set the radius and you say you're looking for a particular license plate plate number. That's traveled in like I don't know let's say a hundred mile radius or more than you can set a date range if you want and since they have time stamps and they have location stamps <hes> you can get all that information and they also have a picture ship the car and the license plate itself so all of this information is storage just by searching license plate number with the name this is I mean we've all seen this on T._v.. On N._C._I._S. and stuff but really this is even much better than anything with the name you can get a persons email address phone number current previous addresses bank accounts social security numbers business relationships family relationships license information height weight I color if it's an agency's database. You can get it so that's what Palim tears doing. Do they talk about the sources of this information. Are they getting it. Some of it obviously from D._M._v.. Department motorcycles is it all government agencies is it Google and facebook see the N._C.. Are I see specifically fusion center so they would use patterns here to take different. Police like local police records. This would be like crime arrest etc data and pollen tier also says that they get data really vaguely from government and federal agencies so this could be where you're getting information about like license plate data for instance <hes> where he could get information about like birthday whether you're married whether you have a business logged in your name that kind of thing right some public records in terms of email addresses or bank account records. I mean that would be something that would have to be acquired privately in most situations <hes>. Do you have any evidence that the for instance in their manual they show you examples goals of different databases. You can search including A._l.. P._R. is licensed automatic license plate readers. You could do L._A._p._D.. <hes> l._S._D.. border-crossing Vehicle Query D._M._V. Vehicle Query National License Plate eight reader vehicle queer and that's just a portion of it. I imagine this would scroll down quite away. It's an incomplete listen. It's also with only a sample search <hes> a lot of the examples that they have that they had <hes> you could see the search query was pound here and then they had like example profiles that were named things like John Bad Guy Smith when you can see on the right <hes> if you choose as a particular profile like let's say you Sir John Bad Guy Smith and there's ten people in the area with that same name you can click on one of them. You can see the specific details that distinguish him from the other John Bad guys Smith's in the area bomb view at home. If there's an area with ten bad Guy Smith's there don't go to that Area Day away that guy area yeah. I like the the icons they use for John. I think it's a hamburglar. I'm sorry but I think that's the hamburglar so you should subscribe to this because you always talk to the audience and find out here who is coming so. Did you know email address down with the U._S.. Dot Org say again. That's the down down with the U._S.. Dot Org that's the email domain. Oh Oh Yeah J. B. G. O. One at down with the U._S.. Dot Org because as you know anybody any malefactor you know as doesn't like the America that we we know I'm scared this now. Let me ask you because this came out. A couple of days ago was Ernie reaction to your article. <hes> Pailin tear emailed me once and said. Why did you say that we didn't respond to multiple requests for comment? I said because you didn't that's pretty much the thing that I've heard from pollen tier <hes> interpreted in terms of the response I mean I guess what sort of surprise me is that I generally hadn't understanding of. You've sort of how Pailin tear worked but in terms of in terms of getting the visuals and in terms of seeing the actual manual. It seems like that had <hes> it seems like that had an effect on people because I mean it's one thing to hear that there's like like this secret omnipotent data company that's operating in the shadows with <hes> with regional level governments and investigative agencies but it's another one to see the you can just search your name and find out virtually everything about yourself <hes> so oh yeah and this is accessible to any law enforcement agency in Northern California pretty much. It's only law enforcement though right right so it'd be it would be law enforcement and any local police department within those counties Arnie's would be able to tap into those resources you know who decides that that's who gets to see it or if they if anyone is in a position to make an exception to that like for example mall cops may be or help Mark Paul Bark. Yeah are usually aren't they usually private security forces. No private security force is a matter of law or is this company policy that they decide who gets to see it and who doesn't. Right so I think that's one important thing to keep in mind is that you know pound. Here is the infrastructure but exactly how it gets used. That's all in the hands of the regional intelligence agency. What's what's important is how the data that would not have been actionable is made actionable and is put into the hands of just other right in terms of? I don't really get into the article in terms of like you do have to enter for instance like a case number in order to make a search in the <hes> the P._r.. Database and in terms of the people search at least in that version of it. It's an open field so when you're saying <hes> the reason for your search it seems like you can just type in her words and that'll be accepted <unk> type the reason for the search search purpose field this could be a case number or a suspect night or I'm just bored. I'm sitting here. I thought I'd find out what my this is kind of timely because this is what ice is using this weekend end <hes> track down <hes> undocumented immigrants arrest them and deport them the big issue for me and I and I have to say on the one hand you want law enforcement to have good tools protected by courts and and warrants but you also want to have some oversight in the data and the big concern for me is a private company. Data sources may be corrupt may be inaccurate <hes> face face we know face recognition is often used in these cases. We know that's often full of false positives or I see does have access to facial recognition this was in. I believe it was an Oakland and the head of the Oakland. Police Department submitted a a letter to to the town when the because they're going to be voting on whether or not to ban facial recognition I think on the sixteenth <hes> and they said <hes> based on this band we wouldn't be able to access the facial recognition <hes> through the N._C.. R._I._C. Number here is that like data can be combined with all different other types of databases as well and for instance. One of the documents that I got back was how to use pound talent here with Thomson Reuters clear which is similarly giant database tool for police and I think that what you were getting up before is really important to keep in mind that you know the way that you act on data is is only as good as the data itself and you know we know that the state of policing in this country isn't perfect so I mean I think the important thing to keep in mind is how this could be used against marginalized populations and what we're seeing what the ice rates. I mean that's pretty much trope worst case scenario. I'm looking at your table of where this data comes from and of right so I think it's important to know this is through the D._O._J.. And this is in general how fusion centers work <hes> on because pollen tear itself is incredibly vague about exactly they may be getting it from additional sources but this one includes amusement parks cruise lines hotels motels gaming industry gaming industry sports authority security already well. I S peas email providers daycare centers mental health records physician patient records veterinary. Mary Record says veteran knows all about your dog annual so this is a very broad net and this is the D._O._J.. But this is their guidelines right and this is a right so the talents here I would bet because it's a private business goes beyond this yeah. I think what's important to know you know the N._c._R._I.. C. D. H. S. entity and if you have some sort of like subpoena or you can request certain type of data from these private agencies then this automatically can get pulled into Pailin tear which organizes the data in a way that perhaps it would not have been able to us to have been used poor people say oh it's public data big deal but we've seen already in many ways how <hes> public data is changed by companies like Pailin tear you know every time you buy or sell a house it's recorded at the county seat and in a big book and and basically you'd have to go to the county building to find out who lives at that address but now because so many data companies <hes> find this valuable they send people down to county seats they record all this. They put it in a database. You know who else finds his valuable Russia when they're trying to assassinate political dissident or China when they want to track I mean what are the chances that this is <hes> not a target for hacking by my God yeah the Chinese government and the Russian government the chances are zero zero either. They're trying and failing trying and succeeding to get this access so they can track their dissidents real palm. I think my major concern here is how this is going to be used <hes> by police departments against like bodies bodies that are already at risk <hes> you know I mean in particular like people of color living in these regions <hes> I mean yeah it's only. I think you know like I said earlier. It's these investigate this. These investigations are only as good as data this informing them and you know for instance with I wrote an article a couple months ago about <hes> police departments with <hes> that are that we're using prayed poll which is a predictive policing software and I mean dozens of police departments around the country using this and there was no disclosure at all publicly about this and what it claims to do is take crime records crimes that were reported or crimes that were acted upon and put it into this database and basically tell help police go back and look at those places so obviously the question that you have to be asking there is <hes> how good are those crime report records. You know I mean obviously not every crime gets reported and the types types of crimes that are prosecuted or like investigated by police. I mean that's going to vary place by place and there's going to be you know individual bias that comes into play there <hes> so there's a lot of like systemic factors that has to the plays into the way that the state is used on and I think you know principle. That's another good example and that's been combined with talent here. In places like Los Angeles crediple and Powell to your have been used simultaneously at the same time I mean that's a huge huge amount of power put in the hands police that at times have a contentious relationship with their citizens. You know and you know those underlying problems aren't being addressed and at the same time we have these like amplifying forces that are making it easier easier and easier to do these superpower investigations in a way that we've never ever seen before is applied to move. We're talking about the power V I in the hands of various people but you could you could turn this data loose with the right kind of I two essentially do <hes> a enhanced fishing expedition. They're doing that right now inside pal I guarantee you. That's that's the most valuable thing we data. We we now know data's hugely valuable and that the the differences that by connecting data from a disparate variety of sources you can infer connections that you couldn't see before and that is to me that I don't know if this makes us safer. I don't feel like it does safer. I'm all for police having to tools. They need to track down criminals but I don't think this makes us safer in the long. Every time there's advances in technology. <hes> political and police authorities always use those advances to change the balance of power between the citizens and themselves and so I've always argued for if they can track us we should be able to track them if they can record us. We should be able to record them. There should if there's a video cam room you should also have a video. There is a disparity in power that is yes you. Can't I mean I don't care if you could record anything but it's growing doing because of technology and that's not right we should always push back and you know technology is good but not when the technology when when one side of the equation has a monopoly police want to do their jobs they WANNA fight crime. We want them to fight crime. We want less crime all of that stuff. That's all true but every thing like policing has to be balanced against other consensus. We have a constitution exactly and that's why we have rights and that's why have all that stuff but if if it's being circumvented through technology that nobody's really paying attention to that's a problems. Let's take a break. <hes> Mike Algan is here Elkin Dot Com the Nice Book See Nice Pictures <hes> of books of books. No people of Mike is Family. He's at <hes> Mike Albert on twitter and <hes> his gastro nomadic adventures continue in Barcelona this fall in September right gastronome dot net take a look. It's going to be amazing if you like delicious food in wonderful wine yeah if you one of those people I guess you'd probably enjoy <hes> Carolina Haskins also here great work motherboard <hes> it's amazing what a public information requests can do. I think it's just a matter of time before we cut those off that freedom of information that is anti American that is a problem people like caroline going rooting around from. Did you ever dumpster diving for this kind of stuff. No no my computer. You're the modern you're the modern yeah reporter now. We don't have to go in the dumpsters anymore. Things baby boomers do yes. Hey I gotta show you something. I'M GONNA take off my shirt here. I gotTA show you something. It's really a superhero job for. I am allowing the Fox out. I even have eh I even have Fox Mint Mobile Socks Fox socks ladies and gentlemen. I have been converted to Mint Mobile. Let me tell you this is the best the best network for people with smartphones phones ever meant mobile dot com slash twit. If you're still using one of the big four wireless providers take a look at your bill. It's Cray cray. My Verizon phone is ninety bucks a month and I was you know I thought Oh it's a a good deal unlimited data and texts phone calls but they're inflating the price because they have those big retail stores. They've got all the hidden fees meant mobile provides the same exact premium network coverage. You used to at a fraction fraction of the cost because they've eliminated the middleman. Everything is online no retail locations and I gotta say this is the modern way to do a cell phone a smartphone every plan on minimum mobile's writing on the T. mobile double networks. If you've got T. mobile in your neck of the woods this is a great solution it comes with unlimited nationwide text and talk and you stop paying for unlimited data. You never use you choose between plans with three eight or twelve gigabytes of four four G. L. T. E. Data. I actually paid three hundred dollars. I bought a year ahead of time because I love that. That's a great price twelve gigabytes a month. I'm never gonNA use that up but if I ever do use more you can buy it at a very affordable price. Use Your own phone with any mobile plan. I'm using I love it too by the way the one plus seven pro it's by new favorite phone and I go around town. I do Harry Potter Wizards Unite Lots of data but I still well under twelve and it's costing me twenty five bucks a month month. It's amazing use your phone with any mobile plan. You can keep your phone number along with all your existing context all your ditching that old wireless bill. I am such a fan of the Fox. I can't believe in fact so much so that I'm I'm now have accounts with all the major carriers. I'M GONNA dump them all at because why not meant mobile dot com slash twit get your new wireless plan fifteen dollars a month. It'll be shipped to your door for free you get the SIM card great support support by the way these are not not suddenly <hes> at a adult luck with support their great mint mobile dot com slash twit as little as fifteen dollars a month meant is the Fox is smart. He's also pretty he cool mint mobile dot com slash twit of on the SIM card. They have the Fox playing guitar and the campsite. This is awesome mint mobile. Thank you meant for saving me a lot of money. I I don't want to say I'm all in on the men but <hes> <hes> on his essay mint mobile shop clever join the move mint I have to say I was really pleased when they said Hey we want to get ads. I said yes I've heard of you. Twenty five bucks a month twelve gigs. I've heard of you. He's actually drinking mint tea. Are they all the way down in my minimum among our our editors going to invade vade area fifty one in September by the way. Is that going to happen. You Know Air Force says we stand ready. I'm not sure that's a good idea. The last time I checked the facebook event for the area fifty one raid. I think <hes> three quarters of a million people had responded that they were going. Oh my God so the theory is that there's alien technology hidden away at area fifty one that the government is never told us about it so let's just let's just go on mass and just march in and get it. What could possibly go wrong? This is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. They can't stop us all new machine guns can you all embar wire in the air. Force has planes and missiles and I don't know I don't know if there's a good idea didn't didn't they try to levitated the Pentagon in the sixties or this is kind donald baby boomers. Do we try to the Pentagon. Your kids who are trying to invade area fifty one was this there was this name that I saw and it was just <hes> it was almost like a battle plan and they had like various types of Internet niche subcultures <hes> but all ones that were like a little bit little bit off center. You know you had like you would freeze. I think that was now that I'm only remembering is on that list. No no disrespect intended to phrase but they have different groups in different colors sort of combining on on area fifty one. I don't know if I were the government. I'd be scared. They're coming. This has been the best force. There's the attack plan this the best source <music> of me medication ever right. There's one people battle royale streamers foam. I Gosh yeah I play for it and I can. I can do this. I can do this. We can do this. Yeah yeah you know even so by now they've moved. Whatever was there out right so even if you get in there is not going to be anything left right well? They use the alien technology to sort of beam themselves to another part of the galaxy. You know what are the chances that a that a place that that flies experimental aircraft that people in would see strange aircraft in the area how does that <hes> <hes> so <hes> apple updated the macbook air macbook pro and I think this is maybe sad killed the twelve inch Mac book nothing it was sexy it was innovative was influential. It was the smallest Mac Book Harry mccracken writing a brief eulogy for the Twelve Inch Mac book machine of unfulfilled promise a tear a tear shed. I thought it was you know it was a little underpowered and I guess the macbook air probably scratches all the itches that <hes> the twelve inch did but I you know I like that old MAC book I I was a pretty sweet Willard reminds us back in the day. Hey when apple was so far ahead of everyone else in laptops so far they just they just have lost the plot. They keep coming out with things that people don't really want keyboards that don't really work and it's like back you know like five six seven eight years ago. There was just nothing like books nothing they were just perfect. They had like the MAG safe connectors. They didn't have the dump strip they <hes> you know etcetera etcetera but nowadays they <hes> and I noticed using Pixel Yep Yep do use Musa Mac Book Caroline I do yeah. I have an Air I haven't I love my air in the battery. Life is great and I carry around. I I'm not a fan of the butterfly keyboard I have to say yeah. My Work Laptop has the butterfly keyboard and it's awful. It's been causing me problems <hes> yeah. There's this thing where if I pressed the shift key it axes. If I'm pressing the command key so then the next letter that I press it will just open some random APP which is great. I love that never know what's is going to happen. It's kind of like a macbook roulette. <hes> there was an issue with zoom. This is bad behavior zoom which makes the you know we've all used it who hasn't used it <hes> teleconferencing software. It's kind of like skype Yep. <hes> and there's a lot of times you would use it <hes>. Maybe you'd uninstall it afterwards. Guess what even if you uninstalled zoom on your Macintosh it put a hidden web server on your computer that was continuing to run even after after uninstalled and bad guys could use to turn on your cameras who silently quietly put you in zoom conference with them apple <hes> to the right thing though they just pushed a Mac update without your knowledge disabling that Server Zoom Zoom did not respond to well to the calls to disable it so apple had to zoom released a fixed up on Tuesday eh but apple said it's actions will protect users past and present from the undocumented web server vulnerability without affecting or hindering the functionality of the zoom APP itself which means Zoom didn't have to do this yeah. That's what's that's what strange because that the whole the whole selling point of that was it would open up <hes> the meeting faster in that everything would be faster but I mean I guess not always running in the background but I think that's a bad behavior. Xavier always have a web server running in the back even after you've uninstalled. That's not nice anyway no before I downloaded zoom in on my desktop but I had my on my phone I deleted it anyway but it doesn't I mean <hes> you know it's not my preferred <hes> teleconferencing software but everybody all the time so <hes> if I was very excited when the Apple Watch <hes> series four was it the most recent recent one came out with walkie-talkie. I thought my wife and I oh we'll just press a button and say Lisa. Are you there and she'd press a button say hi hi can can can you bring me. Can You bring me a cup of coffee. What what no it's not working so apparently remember the facetime vulnerability lead bad guys to get an facetime conversation and watch you? Well apparently walkie-talkie same thing same thing you could <hes> listen the other customers iphone without consent apple is disabled the walkie talkie APP pending a fix apple pods is for the bug and the inconvenience of being unable to use walkie-talkie while a fixes fixes made all five walkie-talkies. Yes ECK and nobody to complain too. It's not working. I stopped using walkie-talkie like four days in it was so annoying yes. I thought this is going to be great. It'll be like nextel phone. Yeah I mean the APPs the do that have been around forever on phones and people are a couple of days what they call. It's not that cool. There is one apple feature that is being used to do God's work in Hong Kong where the protesters are you know protesting about it. The extradition treaty with China Yup the Chinese firewall of course is is keeping <hes> them from accessing content so they're using apples airdrop allows devices send photos and videos over Bluetooth Wifi to breach China's great firewall to spread information to mainland Chinese visitors in the city confused the protests airdrop open and you'll say they'll say oh friends going to send you something and you go really and you get you get some information. <hes> this is this is <hes> this is to let people know about the <hes> extradition bill and it's one way around the the great firewall China one of the things that the story highlights is something a lot of people don't realize that Hong Kong is a huge tourist attraction for mainland Chinese to it's fun. It's fight goes like wow this is very strange <hes> and this is the whole point because all of that there's a total blackout within mainland China of the fact that Hong Kong that that what is it one quarter of the population Hong Kong at some point is protests <hes> just a massive of unprecedented <hes> ongoing sustained protests which the mainland Chinese people have no that yeah blacked out completely blacked out so the so as they stand there gawking at these protests. They're sending details about what this means. What it all is it's attack? Here's a tweet from ALICEA. She arrived at T._S._T.. Station and immediately her phone is bombarded with simplified Chinese flyers by airdrop explaining. You know what's going on simplified. Chinese is the version that mainland Chinese people use whereas in Hong Kong they use classical Chinese. That's that's why it's newsworthy that the using simplified proves that teams getting Chinese visitors how I didn't know that yeah very interesting so this is fascinating but you know they're. You're always going to find a way around it. I hope it's just the the problem is trying to get mainland. Chinese people care because the big controversy in China is don't rock the boat we have or on the road to prosperity. Let's not go oh for freedom. Let's go for prosperity and I it was a futile nation fifty years ago hundred years ago and and has made amazing progress but at some costs yep. Here's among other posters. Did you know over the past month. Hong Kong seen seen three massive rallies with as many as two million people taking the streets. Don't wait until freedom has gone to regret. It's loss freedom isn't God given its fought for by the people. I think we may be using that soon here. Yes just remember the new yeah exactly <hes> wow that's <hes> so that's an apple technology that is working quite well really clever. I thought isn't that great. It's a feature but the Chinese Communist Party would consider it a bug yeah. We can't block it. Yeah Apple is is making T._v.. They've already said we don't want to be Netflix. We're going to do handcrafted Artisanal Block Brooklyn style shadowing millions of dollars per episode. This made one of the shows which is called see about <hes>. I don't know about a future to wherever that he's blind yeah. Jason Momoa is in it Alfre woodard <hes> fifteen million dollars in episode you know in the game of thrones here that doesn't seem like that much well the for for the first many seasons of game of thrones they didn't reach that level so they eventually aleve fifteen million and so they're going in just throwing big at first but so far apple has demonstrated a complete lack of ability to do compelling programming go ahead caroline yeah. I just think that's I don't know that's a huge gamble. Make up front. I duNNo. I remember that I don't even remember the name of it that like reality type or game awful the APP Yeah Yeah Yes yes. That's it. He had people pitching the so the idea was a time your pitch to the investors of Shark tank basically so they put them on an escalator and they pitch to be done with running for president. We'll see I put banner chuck in the <hes> Chat Rooms escalator. It's the escalator pitch. Janecek was one of the judges Gary along with his paltrow and <hes> will I am it was terrible quite a brain most they're terrible but that was made by other people they brought in Sony executives and they're they're bringing in major talent and all that stuff it's a lot of money. Apples got money but even when apple took over Carpool Karaoke they're kind of smothers. They took James Corden out of it right. What's Carpal they also did super high end cameras and it was good and better production values in the whole point of it was his cheesy and low-budget right and they didn't get that so anyway? We'll see if if a the planet of the blind people is going to be better. Did you see these stranger stranger things a are at. I didn't see this in the New York Times I I didn't see the actual ad but so if you had so google lands and you saw the ads for the Star Court mall which is the Hawkins Indiana Mall all this stranger things that by the way they took an old eighties mall that was decrepit an empty and rebuild this set the rebuilt it. It's so cool I haven't seen all of its no spoilers. NOPE <hes> but here's what would happen if you'd pointed your Google Lens at the print ad it would come alive. That's pretty neat. That is one of the stranger things I've ever seen. We saw we were in Hollywood couple nights ago and <hes> wandering around on Sunset Boulevard they do all the movie the billboards the movie billboards there are amazing. Yeah Stranger things is just like there's a whole several blocks where every billboard is stranger dangerous. Things and it's like you have to read it as you driving on the street. These are gigantic and it's like Burma Shave ads yeah caroline. Don't listen although you could use this for your things. boomers do group. Yes Oh my God. This is good research here. Uh beyond nobody that's twenties but you would sometimes see even though today sometimes maybe I don't know when I was a kid you drive around the country these old ads for this shaving cream and the and the whole idea was they would be sequential right now. They always be a poem and it would be a joke and would end with Burma Shave okay. I'm sorry I even brought it up. Do you WANNA see <hes> Burma Shave sign. Where are they now? I don't know here. It is if you so you'd go by. The first sign says if you then don't know who signs these are you can't have driven very far. Burma Shave Genius Marketing Permit Shay was out of business by nineteen sixty six coincidence. I had a whole book of them. One of my one of my new hobbies is <hes> taking pictures of ghosts signs which I see everywhere cosign. It's when when the head assign a building about it and still there we have something pedal. There's a really cool one we saw driving in what was it was like <hes> the chicken and egg hatchery or chicken farms. There's there's one that <hes> in France where it's like. They're actually Advertising Telegraph Services. Wow it's so cool. That's kind of a neat <hes> ending cartographic. Here's another thing you realize we got a lot of wine. Countries and everything used to be called champagne so you go to the Kava country in Barcelona and his his champagne because they say it anymore. Because it's a registered trademark. Everything used to be champagne. Yeah Champagne is in those places where they don't make champagne region said you can't do that so Amazon's making the remaking the Lord rings spent a Billion Dollars for the rights for the rights and they are also making a game and not related to which I'm confused lease please come on. It's an emo multi player massively multiplayer online game <hes> so this they're going to merchandise the hell out of this right. There was a lord of the Rings Online. I didn't know this in the mid in two thousand. Is Anybody Care about Lord of the rings anymore. Is that a thing anyone wondering okay. We got people like read. The Books Harry Potter's even over. Is it yeah yeah it's Kinda sad after like like eventually at some point down the post merger <unk> like after the books come out and you just merchandise everything and like adnew stuff to the cannon people get Exalted. I think that stupid kid with lightning on his forehead one more time I was in the bookstore last night and there's a whole table of Harry Potter Games and they all have Harry Potter vaccine. It's vaccine cop. Had you ever Play Cup had Great Game Right Cup head. No it's a probably the hardest game ever <hes> it. It's kind of an old twenties cartoon style Max Fleischer Cartoon Style <hes> they're making a Netflix T._v.. Show out of Cup head the Cup had show is in production it will channel the Games. Oh Mosh to Fleischer era animation very violent very violent. Yeah as cartoons used to be yeah but I think it'd be fun yeah yeah all right. Let's take take a break. That's more to talk about Carolina Haskins his here for motherboard. Oh love the motherboard. I just WanNa say love the motherboard. Could you do a freedom of Information Act request of area fifty one. Wow Oh good question. Wouldn't that be be similar invading it yeah an easier and if you get something that's redacted redacted redacted that's going to be that's something that's an article Yeah Yeah. She's excited excited about. It could tell Mike here elegant dot com. If you missed anything this week. We had a fun week on twit. Here's a little sample of some of the things on twit unexpected announced with this week. <hes> crater celebrates thirty years of sound blaster with of new eighty nine and as seven sound cards like Nintendo consoles have enjoyed a renaissance with the N._S.. Many of the S._I._D._S. million of capitalize on this trend by serving a market of ten to fifteen people globally with reimagined imagined game last or tards invented packaging rate if you're watching what by one bio west today the new Iowa's thirteen came out yesterday. If you're in the public Beta we all downloaded the public Beta. We should demonstrate on straight this but I don't know if we can really do it properly now. Look at me. Look at the camera. Look at me. You know we got there. I ran a marathon today. I'm so proud all about android you remember a couple of weeks. Go right brought on my Motorola's zoom could power hour you found it. I got the power supply ships to me play music number look at that look at the triangulation Bitcoin is based based off this <hes> wonderful horrible idea not that interested in what is the price of bitcoin right. I'm interested in the technology. bitcoins whole point is that it's decentralized but it's not as decentralized as you'd really like it to be to it. Technology isn't always pretty but we are that was a triangulation Bram Cohen the guy who invented bittorrent and maybe he's mad. That bitcoin took his a bit yeah. I just a bit here's a quote. This was a tweet from Theo fight. The question was explained Bitcoin to Grandpa and the explanation was imagine if keeping your car Har- Idling Twenty four seven produced solved soda coup puzzles you could trade for heroin. That's Bitcoin. I finally understand it makes sense now. I understand our show today brought to you by was sobbing Sabi not that green hot green stuff next to your Sushi but it is hot. It's hot cloud storage from two of my favorite people in the world. David friend the founder of CARBONITE HIS C._T._O.. Jeff Flowers was actually jeff who created a patented technology for writing a hard drives sequentially not in blocks. That's how every other hard-drive works but by writing sequentially they were able to get INCR- improved speed improve reliability. That's how carbon I was founded. They've gone onto found on this new was Saba cloud storage and it's incredible they are able to using this revolutionary process. Give you enterprise grade cloud storage. That's one fifth the cost of Amazon S. three and six times faster one fifth the cost six times faster. They never have hidden fees for egress or A._P._I.. They have a great A._P._I.. Because it's Amazon has threes A._P._I.. So they're completely compatible the you know already know how to use it eleven nines of durability or ability they do integrity checking on your data and this is so great in this day and age of ransomware they do immutable data so you can say this data may not be changed by ransomware not by a fumble fingered employees not by me me not by anybody. immutable data is the secret to keeping your data safe hip appliance finra compliant C._J.. I._S. compliant. We're everybody's moving to the cloud. Gartner Group says by twenty twenty five eighty percent of of businesses will have shut down their data center. Ten percent today are in the cloud. It's going to be eighty percent five years Zada Bites. We'll let me tell you. I know if you're a lot of businesses thinking about this right now. Maybe you're charged with looking into this. You'RE GONNA look at the Amazon Google Microsoft. I know you are can I can't afford name to the list. 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They've been supporting us for a long time that really twit fans and I thank you twit fans for supporting us by using the offer code twit at was Sabi Dot Com <hes> watch out by the way we were mentioning promptly. I just went a little public service announcement there. There are a number of phishing scams around Prime Day so you know it happens at tax time. The fishers are just terrible. <hes> Prime Day <hes> phishing scams that look like emails from Amazon. Just be careful. What you click on is that part of your things boomers do group Click on phishing scams? I think that I think to be fair. I think that I don't know reply all did a good thing about this like a lot of people fall victim to phishing scams like even your even. If you consider yourself like a generally competent person or a skeptical person who is yeah yeah very. It's really skeptical of everything my inbox now like I got a I got email like asking to do like a survey for work and I was like emailing all my colleagues like is this real. Am I being right because I if it's from work. That's almost a sir is guaranteed to be a scam or if it's from yourself or you want you know a relative. It's not from strangers were you. Were you a friend's Fam- Caroline where you a fan of the Friends T._v.. Show you're too young for that probably friends. I've I've watched friends. It's like it's fine realize it was the number one streaming show on Netflix that in the officer who didn't know that it's leaving. It's moving off Netflix. It's going to something the new called H._B._O.. Max Boy just another thing. You'RE GONNA WANNA pay for. Thank You A._T.. And T. H. B. O.. Max will be a over the top streaming service you know H._p.. Already has has H._B._O.. Go Right now. That's going to be sharing down that is H._B._O.. Max Launches H._B._O.. Now we'll shut A._T.. And T. is going to Ruin H._B._O.. I remember the executive came in H._B._O.. and Said we want to be more like Netflix flicks. I thought Oh boy yeah <hes> so you'll be able to get friends on H._B._O.. Max as well as fresh principal air who is hot programming pretty little liars Woohoo and I guess all the H._B._O.. SHOWS IF THEY'RE GONNA if they're not gonNA have H._B._O.. Go on H._B._O.. Now C._W.. Shows Including Batman and Katy keene will be the sounds like a flop. I'm sorry exclusive movies with Reese Witherspoon. There's a name mm-hmm that's GonNa to romantic comedies and four young that titles with Greg Berlanti. I don't even know that is not a young adult. What about US boomers and Anna Kendrick lead comedy series called Love Life An animated prequel series for Gremlins? This sounds like compelling very sounds like the the worst <hes> it's going to debut in Spring Twenty twenty with ten thousand dozen hours of material like Dune Sister Hall France is it right and at that flicks tweeted the one where we have to say goodbye. We're sorry to see friends go to Warner Warner's streaming service at the beginning of twenty twenty. Thanks for the memories gang and then there's a little Coffee Cup which I'm sure means something in friends friends language. We don't know what the price will be <hes> but I can tell you right now. <hes> if they got game of thrones on there I guess a wait a minute. It's over now that it's over. They should've timed at better and so France France at ten France. It's a tens in our studio. He lives in France has decided to tax tech companies three percent on digital services if you make more than seven hundred fifty million euros in global revenue and and twenty five million in French revenue in other words if you're Google facebook or Amazon you're GONNA pay three percent tax three percent of your total annual revenue. That's a ton and and what's what's wrong with that. Why the other question is why should tech companies be tax free? No they shouldn't be but they shouldn't be specially taxed either. Well <hes> right. Should there be a like a surcharge for being a successful U._S.. Tech Company U._S. Income Tax Amazon pay this year. You know that's that's kind of that. They yeah got a Nice Check H._&_R.. Block gave him an advance on it was nice. It was a you know but no it's not zero. It's not zero. Everybody says Amazon paid zero and I it's. It's very low. It's low. It's low okay because they spend money they made. They made they put news. You know here's the thing the tax situation and France is a really touchy subject you you can verify this. I've talked a lot. I got a lot of friends in France. We spent a lot of time in France. <hes> I've been told that the the income tax rate can be like seventy percent does that roughly zen exaggeration particularly high right yes hi services you get what you pay and so we pay high taxes and get nothing but but in that tax environment tax these big companies three percent or something is really tiny drop in the bucket and I think you know I think <hes> I personally am in favor of national governments doing more to police to to tax to do whatever they want with these international companies I was listening to this political podcast where they were saying how the British parliament called Mark Zuckerberg to testify and he's like now knocking. He said no he said and so in fact he can't he can't go to Canada. He'll be arrested. Does he said no to Canada enough but I but my point is the the the the podcasters were saying dumb things namely that Wow Zuckerberg the reason is that that facebook is more powerful than the British government. I don't know the differences. The British government isn't using its power. They what they say is shutting off facebook until Mark Zuckerberg appears before us is a problem though I think it's hostile Internet. We're going to have an American Chinese Internet a Russian Internet at a European Internet. That's a different things like the right to be forgotten. That's a splinter net but taxing or or or or banning a social network until their C._E._o.. Comes for the government. Is I think perfectly reasonable. I I don't mind the attacks. I just don't think should be more tax because you're a successful tech company. I mean lots lots of taxes levied for lots of reasons and you know in Europe like the cost of gasoline super high because they're taxing that for all kinds of reasons. I think it's the United Tapes Trade. Representative said we're GONNA investigate and there may be a tariff war as a result. Go Ahead Carolina. What do you think oh no? I think it's just that I mean if citizens are treated like a well of data that the company is being is using prophets is only fair to expect the company to pay back into services that will help who's people but then I think like sentiment that like the sentiment that it's like anti-american any kind of way I mean that's that's ridiculous. I mean they like the solution into that is just taxed the companies in the U._S. but obviously the people who are saying that it's anti-american with not be in favor of that kind of tax but I don't know that's just my opinion the big fines for example against Google for <hes> for for favoring their our own services in search results. All kinds of things are also said called anti-american. I think I've said that myself but but it's really American companies are complaining to European authorities about other American companies so it's like also favoring American companies for you know namely Microsoft etc <hes> to to to sorta ding these giant companies that are <hes> you know appear to be favoring their own search results one more break. Let's <hes> I got. I've got a a bit situation for a computer science pioneer. You never heard of but he's done to things that you will know one good one bad okay. That's coming up our show today brought to you by Ziprecruiter if you need to do we you just recently done a lot of hiring. I gotTa say Ziprecruiter is the Bee's knees as my people say it is it is the easiest way to hire. 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We've got a special address for your ziprecruiter dot com slash twit show your support for the show. Just as Ziprecruiter has shown its support by going ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash twit we love ziprecruiter with it's been such a great thing for us Z.. I. P. R. E. C. R. U. I. T. E. R. dot com slash twit ziprecruiter since that french-language messes not far spelling or cle- clete Ziprecruiter <hes> yeah we hired. We've hired <hes> one two three four new people last month some of whom you don't even I know about yet but you will hear soon niantic now I said I don't like Harry Potter but I can't stop playing Harry. Potter Wizards United's the Pokemon go replacement NIANTIC was a spinoff of Google remember. They were the Google maps guys they first APP. If you know what I ap was field trip remember that turn on Mike Mike Mike <hes> Yes yes that was great. Field trip was the apper you'd go round and we'll tell you it was fun in Petaluma because there's only like four points get this. Do you know the the movie remembering. The ABBOTS was shot in that house. Yes I know you told me every time I try to American Graffiti Shahzada here empty lot. There's four points of interest anyway. They're shutting it down. It's over for field L. Trip. which is another Google works? Isn't it yeah the new Yahoo Yeah now. There's chatterbox is this. Is this <hes> oh wait a minute. That's I save chatterbox for the end that wasn't it. There's a new google. What is it called safety pin? Oh shoelace bootstrapping common household object so what what a shoe leather do shoelace. He's a so I'm especially bitter about this one Leo so let me allow me to express my view you already you went. All in Google and in your heart was broken. Yes what is shoehorn GONNA do. Shoe leather is a shoelace. It's supposedly social network organized around <hes> events and other things that are geographically specific so from Google is <hes> research army area fifty one do not invaded this great. Although if you do invaded this'll be organized that right now. It's only a New York in fact you could use it Carolina. Have you tried shoe leather. I haven't okay. I'm just playing into this whole baby-boomer thing. Did you see I'm wearing a mint sox. Have you seen that remind <hes> yeah lovely so here's here's what is shoelace. It's this dumb thing that is basically supposedly a social network but it's focused on location location based so it's basically is basically it's like five percent of Google plus. They decided to come out with this attack Italy insignificant thing I have to point out. They did this all right yes. They did teamer which I try. That was the one with the mustache. This is basically schemer that one was shut down in three years. They just need more things to shut down so they can't shut down things unless they launch things so it's an invite only testing phase on Iowa android if you want though you can go to this U._R._l.. Docs DOT CO DOT COM slash forum size st E.'s sledge one F._A._A.. I P Q l._s.. Forget it. You could say keep me in the loop Abed that shoelace get it. Oh put a bow on this story and move on shoelace. What is with Google? They really suffer for from the inability to understand human will communicate yeah. That's the humans we don't get them. This was a great <hes> p. I have to say the privacy project and the New York Times have been very interesting Charlie Wurzel and ash Goo created. I don't know if that's how you ask you. Maybe clue you yeah created a comparison between Google's original privacy policy in the in the late nineteen ninety six hundred words to their current privacy policy for twenty years later four thousand thousand words. It's crawls all coming down the page here. It is really more. It's less about Google than about how the Internet has changed in. How technology has changed because in nineteen ninety nine line? There wasn't any smartphones. They weren't collecting mobile information at all in one thousand nine hundred nine they say Google may share information about uses with advertisers business partners sponsors and other third parties but we only talk about our our users in aggregate not as not as individuals that that was cut out three months later twenty years later. It's quite the opposite we will share information things we know how about you everything and we will share it with everybody and <hes> it's a little longer location information. They didn't have that before your android device type carrier name crash reports which APPs are installed so it isn't so much demonizing Google I think as just saying shit pointing out how modern technology smartphones is given them so much more information and it's really they're they're. They're stapling on new things every time. They get caught doing something every time they start with G._D._p.. Are To be fair Gina. I think like the average person just figures like if they've been using mobile for a long time like I don't think it registers in the average person's head just how many changes have occurred. I Dunno just between like two thousand five and now for example just like the scope of the information that they have on you that they didn't necessarily even have before I dunno I think that registers in the average person. I don't know why but the Times mark did a pro opinion piece. I guess everything on the privacy project isn't opinion piece but I think it's a really interesting article and is it is an eye opener. I don't think people are really aware of how this has changed because nobody reads it right. They didn't read it was six hundred words didn't read it when it's a thousand four thousand awesome. I think that Amazon's privacy policies are still pretty short because they don't WanNa talk about it and they don't want to guarantee anything. Short is in better you know not and I've I've read their privacy policy around and because because I was wondering you know do they reserve the for themselves the right to listen without the wake word they X._y._Z. and they pretty much give themselves the ability to do anything and their privacy policy doesn't say anything about them. Promises don't use it but <hes> we make no promises yep so and then as if you thought Google assistant or Google home devices were any less intrusive. Well you probably be you'd be wrong. Google workers listen to your queries but you know this is part. I mean all these businesses do this again. I I think this is like you as you said. Carolina's just a case of people don't really think about it and so they don't pay attention but if they thought about it yeah one of the things that happens with both Amazon Echo Google and I bet you Cortana and Siri to is <hes> they need humans to listen to it to see if the computer understood it and it is how they get better <hes> v._R._T.. News which is a Flemish public broadcaster in Belgian. We'll we'll watch. We all read that yeah well if you if it's if you you you speak Flemish is really the place to go right where else you're gonNA news. <hes> was able to so apparently somebody leaked the user voice recordings from within Google to this Belgian organization <hes> the Google subcontractor passed on more than a thousand assistant recordings V._R._T.'s at these recordings we clearly here addresses and other sensitive information. That's made it easy for us to find the people involved and confront them with the audio recordings I and they they said Yep. That's my voice. I said that wow here's my favorite factoid from the article. One hundred fifty three of the one thousand recordings of the command okay Google was clearly not given <hes> so understood or for some reason without people doing the wake word they started recording and they maintain and they retain that recording now remember they only got a thousand recordings more than fifteen percent of them didn't have the wake word and included bedroom conversations conversations between parents. It's in their children. Blazing rows and professional phone calls contain lots of private information and really blazing rows or the worst kind. That's gotta be a Flemish phrase. It's got we <hes> Google's response to ars Technica actually to V._R._T.. We just learned that one of our language reviewers has violated our data security policies by leaking confidential Dutch audio data our security and privacy response teams have been activated. Oh God I bet those are robots with laser is and are investigating. We will take action. We're conducting a full review of our safeguards in this space to prevent misconduct like this from happening again. This is GonNa Happen Right. That may be the really thing people always say oh. I don't want to Amazon in my home because I don't want Amazon. Listen to me bigger. The problem may be that. It's not just Amazon. It is not just yeah just like remember a couple of months ago when I think someone used <hes> Some G._D._p.. Are Clause and requested all of the data the Amazon had about themselves through their echo device and they sent the wrong person's information the wrong recording Saddam yeah. That's what I that's what I thought about. When I read this and it's there's going to be individual instances like this? It's just I don't know I mean obviously it raises the question like company actually ice cream trucks out front run out. Get Yourself. Wow I guess the audio is very good. Air Conditioner watches. The movement of Brooklyn is is the place to be. You got an ice cream truck down my block about five times a day. I've never got nice what you don't go chasing it now. That's the fun of having an ice cream truck some some people do. I guess it's stop. I am sorry I mean you're up to you but the thought of frozen tree got me excited nice life something boomers do. It's don't pay no attention we in my day. We would chase that ice cream truck. Mr softy missed a softy stop. I WANNA rock hiphop. What was your favorite drumsticks crop in Brooklyn? Okay didn't have the ice cream trucks. I'm sorry maybe this is just gone on too. Long to we cover every possible angle of the Tech Week. Everything going on twitter is gonNA try hi. It's hide replies feature next week in Canada not here it so actually this is a I think this is kind of a significant story because we'd had many conversations <hes> on this show and also this week you can google about my prescription for the problems that plagued twitter and my prescription has always been let users delete yeah mance if they come on if I tweet do a tweet and somebody comments on the I should be able to delete it for everyone so this is that's Google Google plus did plus did facebook. Does it too but this in in this case who kind of halfway there you can hide people's comments and they go into sort of a hidden area. It's not that great of a solution but it's a step in the right direction giving the original poster control over the comments. I think that's always they're going to do because I thought it was going to be. They would look at this is different from the one where they say if it's from a famous or political figure don't look at this site they put a thing. Are you sure this is different. Yeah this. It is different so you comment and I go in there with a nasty comment and you say you not hide that it's if people wanna go in and see the hidden comments they can. They know that people are lazy and probably won't so D- values the the comments that the poster wants valued and some of the criticism. I think that I disagree with quite a bit. which is that well where somebody's fact checking would if somebody's bothered about I think that ANA social network you should be able to manage and moderate the conversation that follows of your own tweets? Three two people want to disagree on their own stream they can but I think people. I hope I'm his works against traction. Hope so twitter's like better features is just the where where it hides the some of the bad replies at the bottom I dunno it's vastly improved my twitter experience. I got the new twitter and it looks very different. They it's no longer out. It's no longer chronological or anything. It's just like I I don't they really changed the fee they have an option option to to flip over to recent tweets first and then but that it only lasts a few days and then they go back to Algorithm Mickley sorted which is kind of to me. It's kind of a dark pattern yeah. I don't know what it's doing but <hes> I think clearly what people want in many people want is reverse chronological with no algorithm and that's why he's tweet Dick because it's still does that. Yes right Yep do like if you pull up like the mobile twitter you are l like because it doesn't like I can do the whole like display latest tweets tweets I on my on my mobile APP but on desktop. I'd like type in the the mobile U._R._l.. And do it that way ATIP Atip. I'll give you another tip of using tweet Dick. I exclude re tweets and the only reason I do that. Is I feel like that's where you get the viral inflammation happening like this sudden all these re tweets. I WanNa see the originals I I have a different approach to the same problem. If somebody re tweets something objectionable I just following the person who reach tweeted it yeah and send you get quality re tweets because I follow like like Matthew. Ingram is a bunch of other people who great reactors true form. I would want to say a lot of new twitter users by other people's retweets but I'm very as we need better moderation tools for selves. Yes get so that we can make our twitter feeds. Better twitter wants to maintain the control over much all that stuff and I think you know give control the people man that's what I that's what I say boomer boomer. I wanted to mention this because he was a very important person in computer science that I thought I knew everybody all the names in history but I had never heard of Fernando quarterback though I did you ever heard of him. He didn't know who your father was. The father of my computer he just passed away at the age of ninety three great eulogies <hes> obituary in the New York Times by Katie Hafner and here's why you want to remember for another caught about tall before he came along. If you wanted to use a computer you had a print print out a bunch of punchcards stack carry them carefully without letting them fall spindle folder mutilate to the high priest running the computer who would then Deign to run your job. Maybe tomorrow maybe the next day maybe next week and if heaven having offend the cards have gotten mixed up where there was a bug you can get a back and you have to start all over in this process again. Computing was not interactive in other words Corato realized that these computers are fast enough off that they could probably do something he called time sharing he added in the early sixties something called C._t.. S._S. compatible time sharing system which allowed multiple users in different locations to access one big expensive computer at the same time through telephone lines teletype remember that yeah and without that <hes> Bill Gates. Wouldn't you know very famously Bill Gates mom and other mothers at the Lakeside School in Seattle had a cake exhale to raise the money to get a timeshare teletype in a closet at the school he and Paul Allen Learn to use computers to program computers with that interactive timeshare device and that then that all eventually led to clip he the ski created clip <hes> the other thing though he had to invent in order to make time sharing system work. You have multiple people on the same computer. If I everybody was able to see everybody else's stuff he had a create accounts and passwords <hes> so corby also he gets credit for vetting time sharing he also gets credit and interact true interactive computing for creating the pass and really isn't that what cloud computing is isn't cloud computing basically time sharing right if you use Google Stadia you're playing a game on a computer in the cloud. That's right so <hes> I think huge C.. T. S. gave rise to multiplex which was a operating system which gave rise to UNIX get it UNIX as a singular version of MULTIDEX <hes> and in fact <hes> Multidex was the inspiration for Lennox because Linus torvalds balls didn't like multidex he wanna make his own version of multidex and created Lennox Solan. Ix is what android etc is based on and Still Mac O._S.. Right back is based on UNIX UNIX clinics both can be traced back to at quarterback though so next time you log in and give a password you can thank corby the father of the computer and the interactive computing and the Password <hes>. Hey everybody thank you so much for being here. I really appreciate Carolina. You're great you showed amazing fortitude and not chasing that ice cream truck and I admired <hes> Caroline Haskins you can catch her work at motherboard advice. She does such good stuff. I look forward to senior next a public information request. Look at all this stuff. She covers including rogue cyclist creating a bike lane with toilet plungers New York. Say Baby is a good city to live in. Isn't it Yeah Nice yeah the boring Oh no and neither is caroline. Thank you caroline for being here. We appreciate it. She's on twitter caroline hot a R. O. L. H. A. Underscore. That's what I think I think the underscores the hot plus stop yeah already had Haskins. I wish I had caroline Haskins but yeah I can't even change my twitter your handle even if I wanted to apparently or you lose the verification badge but no you're stuck now. You can give yourself a clever nickname. Just change your real name. Yeah Yeah true underscore and your legal name for state yeah the first <hes> the first night line hots very nice also Mike Elegant who could be Mike A.. L. G. A. N.. On the twitter Elkin dot com don't forget <hes> gastro nomad dot net and I want to give a plug to Kevin Your your son. Who is here today? Yes he's an Silicon Valley entrepreneur and the education created something called shoe leather. No no no no no chatterbox which is we've talked about it before. It is so cool to teach kids a little bit more about see. I think one of the things parents parents are doing which I think is a huge mistake. They're teaching their kids to say. Please thank you to their Amazon Echo. I think that's a mistake. That's basically defying something. That is a machine. I think more important the kid learns it's a machine and here's what the machine does. Here's how it works. Here's what echo is and so you see. This is a smart speaker. Anyone can build and program with Google blocks. It's really really cool. It's called chatterbox. Now was on kickstarter. You raised a bunch of money on kickstarter in about one week you can't help kids are pretty turned on that kid dabbed because he built a Jitterbug <hes> <hes> you can <hes> you can <hes> get one but you have to wait a little bit. It's going to indigo go next. They've they've used up kickstarter. We're just talking about the privacy elements of these virtual assistance yeah home this one doesn't listen to you. Push the button and then no data's retained all just period and those skills Gilles. Is it as an echo. Is it Google assistant or is it your own. What is the skills? Oh it's my Kroft yeah. Mike Groff is a very cool. I yeah essentially created a visual skill builder so the kids are all the skills are actually run locally on advice. Oh so you get to program the skill kind of model you keep it private insecure through just running it locally no ads no data collection. It isn't always listening. It's a chatterbox hawks and you can make your own. How many of you ship ship them yet? Shipping is for Christmas so what's the processors in Argentina. What's in there actually based on Raspberry Pi Pi Nice Nice French actually looking at for upgrading fourth? Oh yeah those new raspberry Pi foresee awesome awesome. Yeah you have to change your power supply Chad <hes> hello chatterbox dot com give you a nice big plug because I think that's fact I'm going to get one for the kids. I think that's really really the love it yeah. Thank you Mike Thank you caroline. Thank you everybody for being here. We had a great studio audience visiting from all over the world. You guys were very patient. That's all I can ever say about our studio. They have bums of steel. Fortitude is impressive what we do is we invite them here. They sit down in the most uncomfortable chairs we can find and then we make him. Stay hey there for two solid hours. Tim Nina from Orlando and rich from San Francisco and <hes> Mickan mic was from Dublin at ten is from Patty and a rod and Caroline there from <hes> you're going to have to pronounce it for me Stilo Cuckoo mccomb bellicose telecomm- in the great state of Washington and <hes> Aaron Caitlyn visiting of course Roberto great to have you visiting from Brooklyn Queens Sagan Stettin Staten Island he <hes> he got here on the ferry echoes long way. If you want to be in our studio audience email tickets at Twitter T._V. would love having a studio audience. It makes us so much more fun <hes> especially when they pretend to laugh at my jokes. I really appreciate that. It's always nice. If you WanNa Watch live you can do that too. We have live video and audio stream available twitter T._v.. Slash light but if you're doing that you know chat because the chatmoss a big part of all of our shows they're always there at I._R._C.. Twit T._V.'s family friendly and fun I._R._C. Twit Dot TV after the fact everything we do is available on demand. Just go to our website twit DOT TV. You can even subscribe in fact. That's the best way to get every show. We do subscribe that way. The minute the shows available you'll get it automatically on your smart device and don't be a chicken subscribe to the all twit shows feed feed for all. I I subscribe to it. Are you not okay thank you. It's if you see why not then you're not you know you. You got a ton of stuff. You get it all their. That's that's right. That's it sounds like a good idea. Thanks everybody <hes>. Did I do anything I need to do anything else Carson Bonnie our producer executive producer the man in charge. I'm all set. I'm done. I can go home. I can have lunch all right. Thanks everybody.

facebook twitter Amazon instagram Carolina Mark Zuckerberg Caroline Haskins Google Barcelona Mike Mike Algan Carolina Haskins Francisco Franco Spain Williamsburg O._E._M. Mike Albert Federal Trade Commission
4 Reasons Why We Sabotage Taking Action (Pod #395)

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

13:27 min | 1 year ago

4 Reasons Why We Sabotage Taking Action (Pod #395)

"This is gene mantra stolen welcome to the tapping cuny podcast recorded live to tape in Williamsburg in Brooklyn is episode three ninety five originally aired January thirty two thousand fourteen re edited for October Fourteen Thousand Nineteen and find you wherever you are whatever yeah application for these four ideas so conceptual stuff here application their combined it's GonNa make it really easy for you to take action safe and so this is a presentation from a number of years ago as I've been cleaning up the PODCAST archive which goes into that into great detail make it easier for you to tap and to clear those resistances so you can take action in addition to these four ideas I've created a ten part you don't know how to sit down and create the vision you know they're people who that's their gift that's genius they say Oh this is where we're going in these are the seven steps that we need to take between here and there task is painful and being successful at the task is painful and in each of these four areas it's possible that we can have a mechanical issue to eliminate self sabotage and on a very base fundamental level the reason why we don't take action is part of our system that's trying to keep us a little bit how we can approach each one of them so the four reasons why we don't take action art we don't have a clear vision we don't know how to do the task doing the and you can see how that kind of permeates through the way we think about things and how we take action and so if you look through these lenses it's going to give you an opportunity to we take action the reasons that we don't take action are founded in four released simple things and I wanna go through those right now apps behind the work that I've done for the last five to eight years I have been as you know focusing really hard on how we can use to happen guided helps you to eliminate self sabotage you can get that by going to tapping Q. and A. Dot com clicking on the big blue button if you happen to be listening to this right now in the website up in the having visions or can be two parts to that like I said they're going to be a part of it where either you haven't sat down to create vision or do the steps I don't know about you but they're few things I liked less than looking stupid and being lost where hint corner on top of that sidebar you'll see a blue button there and so basically the four fundamentals that I'm sharing with you here in that ten part guide we'll give you cat is do I know how to do that am I capable of doing that too I need to get help doing that another also can be an emotional component to this when you are not taking the action that you want so number one you do not have a clear vision when we don't have a clear vision of where we're going wing it's really hard to take action because any step that we take is going to feel like it's not going to be a useful step because it's not going to be heading so if you're heading trying to do something but you don't have a clear vision of what it's supposed to be or a clear vision of what the steps are the first thing that I would therefore I'm not going to take action the emotional is when we don't know how to do something we can fear how it looks it might be scary to create a vision because there might have been a time in the past where you created this really excellent precisely incompetent I actually am I don't want to ask for help because they look down on people who weren't self starters I don't want to ask for help direction towards our goal because we don't know what our goal is and so when there's a foggy mess about where we are heading it's really hard to take I'm having a clear vision because it's afraid the last time I had clear vision it ended in pain so this time if I have clear vision it will end in pain therefore you a practical issue or it's possible that we could have an emotional issue and so I'm gonNA walk through the four of these and then we'll talk really briefly how you can apply that awards that so there could be part of you that is preventing you from creating a clear vision which is preventing you from taking action but it's preventing you from action because there's a part of us that doesn't WanNa waste that resource at energy of taking action towards something that isn't there so when you're in a circumstance of not so again when it comes to not knowing how to do something is a practical and there can be an emotional to the practice I don't know how to do it because I don't like looking incomplete or incompetent and so if you don't know how to do it and there's this emotional penalty for asking now the third reason that we don't take action is taking the action is painful in taking the can have clear vision which leads us to not taking action the second reason that we don't take action is we don't know how to Asian you knew exactly what you wanted you got your hopes up and then something happened and you never got there and so became devastating because so clearly the fourth reason that we don't take action is it's painful to be successful in that might seem a little odd on the surface but if you've spent in different ways you know if I have to build a website I don't know how to build websites the last thing I'm GonNa do is go fight around trying to create a website because I wouldn't even know where to begin when we don't know how to do it or we can fear how it looks when we ask for help I don't Wanna ask for help because if I ask for help they're gonNA see out talk so today what I WanNa do is I want to talk about the four reasons why we don't actually that problem it's going to prevent us from taking action because we don't want to deal with that pain so you can see as we put ourselves into a circumstance where the getting getting to success is the problem but having the success is and when we oh you knew what you wanted but since you didn't get it it created the level of pain that came along with that and so you don't want to be in a circumstance where you're working in all four of these areas not having a clear vision not knowing how to do something it's painful to do it it's pain having to deal with the pain of any of these things so the next time you have an action that you are not doing it's really really it means that I have to continue to be the successful all the time it took me a lot of work to be successful that means I'm going to have to work hard all Shen Bhai itself I'll give you example tarring a a roof on a hot summer day that's painful action to do doing math and it's not something that you're strengh and it's a lot of work and it's really really exhausting sleep painful because of how we are going to be perceived if we're doing that action and if either of those two things exist we're not gonNA take action it's that we're not going to step in and try because we don't WanNa look lost we don't WanNa look foolish and this is similar to the vision problem we talked about in the last one but it shows don't know how to do it so it's possible that we're going to render roadblocks at any of these four areas but he walked through them one at a time it can also be the emotional reason that it's painful to do something you know if I do this ongoing to be judged if I do this they're going to say that ending up in front of a group of people and talking and dealing with all of the nerves so those are mechanically painful reasons why it is to do something any time at all in this self care type world you'd know how true this can be that can happen in a number of fashions if I am successful all the time to keep being successful if I'm successful this is what everybody expects from me all the time and so it happens ripple out and make it easier for us if you haven't done so already please make sure you subscribe to the podcast and remember in podcasting parlance subscribe is free you don't have to pay anything for it you can get this podcast absolutely free in apple podcast Google podcasts spotify Pandora stitcher fool to be successful at doing it when we have any of these four things were not going to take action because there's a part of us that wants to prevent us we know what the outcome is supposed to be and for the life of me I can't see your out the steps and so we don't know how to do something it makes a great deal of sense singled as a community if we do that will add three thousand new people tapping and that will make a huge difference in all of our lives as they show healthier that will intact area if you haven't downloaded the APP encourage you to do so you can get it in both the apple and android APP stores in addition to having access to the entire even if you know someone in your life who could use that sort of framework to see how they are moving forward or how they are not and the places that they're being stuck please please in a word of warning it is possible that you could have tasks that you're not taking that might show up in one of these areas or it could show up in multiple of these areas for help or being seen not knowing how to do it you're not going to take action either so we don't know how to do something it's really easy for us not to take action description tap along audios just sitting there on your smartphone this happen Qa podcast this is Jean mattress I hope you have a great day and I will talk to you real yes in the beginning of not taking action because I don't have a clear vision we do it we need to do we get the clear vision now we feel really apprehensive because since it's such a New Vision we take a chance to listen to this thanks for spending a little time with me today today we're going to talk about one of the most fundamental con it is pretty straightforward in those four lenses and how you can look at things were practical in an emotional way so that it's easier for you to take action Q. and A. Dot Com if you're on the website just click on that contact link or if you're one of the thousands of people who've downloaded the tapping Q. and A. App just click on mccown find a new piece of content via video an audio be an article is from a recommendation from a friend because one we're going to be recommended things from people we know Iheartradio you can even get it on your a. l. e. x. make sure you subscribes he do not miss an episode going forward and our entire he's be our ambassador don't spam inbox and send it everybody in the world but if you know one or two people could use this please pass it along because the way that people are most likely to archive of audio on the website if we have done a tap along in one of those podcasts the tap along has also typed out in a script form apple to walk through these four things and look it's a practical assurance or shall issue and then you can bring in whatever resource you need to be successful rest by guests are those of the guests at not necessarily of gene mantra steadily or tapping QNA odd cast archive can be found there with over four hundred and forty episodes if you have a question if you've come I can always be reached gene. GE In e tapping my goal is foolish.

Williamsburg Brooklyn GE eight years
AP Headline News Jan 11 2019 08:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

05:30 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Jan 11 2019 08:00 (EST)

"Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the dominion energy reliability investment. Our new investment product offers competitive returns, no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money. Make the reliable investment in reliable energy, the dominion energy reliability investment to find out more. Go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com. The airline gates January sale ends Tuesday. It's time to bring on the sun. Bring on the scene sand bring on sand castles book, spades and beach bowls bring on the days by the pool and summer nights in the city bring on four star service and convenience central airports. Bring on the sun and the airlinks January sale with three million seats on offer up to fifty percent of flights to Europe and flex to North America from one hundred eighty nine euro each way as part of a return trip. Hurry, Salan Tuesday smarts books now at air Lingus dot com. Offer subject to conditions and divinity. AB radio news. I'm Rita fall. Lay a thirteen year old Wisconsin girl missing since her parents were shot dead in October is alive and safe after what appears to have been a dramatic escape from a suspect. Who's now in custody. Jamie Kloss appeared at Kristen Kosinski his door asking for help. I would I guess I would describe her at looking unkept Kaczynski told the today show, Jamie appeared to know the person from whom she had escaped she did state who she believed had her. And she didn't give us a little information about the person's car. Been that she didn't gives a ton of detail. Police are confirming a suspect is in custody, but they aren't saying much else at the moment. No paycheck today for hundreds of thousands of federal government workers who are not being paid because parts of the government or shut down over the border. Wall battle between the president and congress reporters asked the president several times yesterday about the human cost of the shutdown each time he talked about victims of crimes by illegal immigrants. I feel very badly for people that have family members that have been killed those federal workers not getting paid today. Many of the people that we're talking about they agree with me. But while he was in Texas. Federal workers here in Washington protested mortgage and rent saga megani, Washington. The US has begun its withdrawal from Syria. A military spokesman isn't giving any details for security reasons. But a human rights group says the withdrawal began last night with a convoy of about ten armored vehicles and some trucks pulling out of northeastern Syria and moving into Iraq. We've learned that over the past decade. The US government is approved thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides. This is AP radio news. With this partial government shutdown will leave a Mark on the economy Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell says typically these shutdowns do not there's plenty of personal hardship that people undergo but at the aggregate level, the economy, generally does not reflect a much damage from shutdown a longer shutdown is something we haven't had if we have an extended shutdown than I do think that that would show up in the data. Pretty clearly this shutdown has gone on now for twenty one days if it lasts through tomorrow as expected to it will set a new record for shutdowns supreme court Justice. Neal Gorsuch has been elected the serve as a trustee of the colonial Williamsburg foundation, colonial Williamsburg, Virginia is the world's largest living. History museum in a statement released by the foundation, Gorsuch said colonial Williamsburg is a place where people can reconnect with our nation's founding principles. Rita Foley, AP radio news. I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lack your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only about on certain thirty year fixed rate loans. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states MLS number thirty additional conditions or exclusions apply. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey, hey trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll be fine carbo jopstone to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limb. Knitted by state law.

Jamie Kloss America Williamsburg AP colonial Williamsburg foundati air Lingus Syria Federal Reserve Kristen Kosinski Wisconsin president Quicken Loans Neal Gorsuch Washington Texas Europe Rita Foley History museum
Boundaries, Love, Sisterhood, Medicine Wheel

Cafecito Break

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Boundaries, Love, Sisterhood, Medicine Wheel

"It's not working. This is when you know you have to practice when you do something but this is working blessings to you. I really love working with sage. We're just GONNA have to take care of this later. Calls here the Ghetto version when you improvise plaza. This thing is not right anyway. That's why preparing before you turn on. The camera camera is something that's important but since this is a Compassi to break little report on the fly without a microphone just you you guys I just wanted to check on a check in more often. I've been really quiet a heavy. We've done a Monday morning. Show routine I are intended to be back this coming Monday. Eleven o'clock so tune in you could visit CDC dot org to tune into our Monday morning. Live show which is hosted myself and my beautiful. AMIGA my my friends my sister Ruthie Goodson who lives in Plano Texas and we have been friends for ten years and when you tune in you hear US talking. You're listening to two women that have seen each other under ten times in ten years. I think we've seen each other five times yet. We have such a beautiful four sisterhood. And when you think of a break I want you to remember that when you to remember that it's created by women in who really are sisters and then you know my sister and I alex like really sisters and three sisters and we just look to adopt so many family members and we have so many family members of all ages or colors or income brackets. And it's it's beautiful to us our teachers when we sit in circles with our data friends or medicine. Teachers Mentors tors reminders. That the medicine wheel has all the colors in. And sometimes that's the response announced to. Hey what do you think about all of the `ISMs and in all these color wars and the response is always simple bowl. And I've been contemplating about that a lot that message of simplicity. Don't forget that the language of love language of God of source. The Language of nature is simple A smile is simple. Those are really take much effort to do it. This is like fix mile almost constipated on you. When you see someone you light up you're like high hi. And it's like real like it's like a multidimensional exchange and when we realized that and and my my medicine. My sister's medicine. Ruthie where we shared their with technical capacity to break to remind you guys that this is important and support that we go back to simple. Sometimes we say such long sentences. Sometimes we take up so many words. Maybe it's just more powerful to sit into stare lovingly. Engage the person that you truly love and want to build with. And that's what we offer you the Perez Sisters we witness you. We listen maybe we. We offer sister guidance. We always encourage you to trust you. Intuition my message today is about boundaries. How class earlier today. which was so amazing and I felt guided to talk about boundaries in that class? Because sometimes you know when we're out there and putting our best foot forward and wanting to serve since we forget that it is important to have our own. Aw Juries so that we could communicate to those around us. What's okay what's not okay. You know like for example someone my boundaries is. There are times where. I don't want anyone to even hug me. I don't want anyone to come close and yet I may have to be in a space like apathetic functioning in a metaphysical way. So how do I balance the fact that may be. I need to be in my own space. Ace with setting a boundary and communicating lovingly. So that the personal is of fuel like rejecting them but that they understand this is focusing on working on something so I need to be in my own space. I want to just be in it. And that's okay that's totally okay and when you have friends who understand that and. I'm very lucky that I have a powerful circle. They'll be like symptoms of a little bit stinky about it because I'm wiggle so so there are times where absolute don't want anything taking my oxygen and I get so feisty about it and I remember in the past I are we get more frustrated and then I would just blow up and then I would realize that is because anthony set of boundary was because it didn't communicate that I wanted a certain distance that I didn't communicate that I rather you talk to me from over there and not like here because we speak to so close. I feel like you're taking on my oxygen L.. Lake it rain. It's okay you you communicate your boundaries. Lovingly without being dramatic would love. Just being could just be like. Hey I just laughing locate today and I just want to have a little space however fuel Gadafi to suchet so luckily communicate boundaries. As you move into that secret space with yourself and also a news to share my sister and I got featured in an article written by Gloria Malone. And it's a be Latino Latina and it's I guess surged press sisters and you'll see an article that was written about us our journey and our shit our space but then he got in Williamsburg Brooklyn so thank you so much guys. tune-in much when these owners to each and everyone you love you. Remember the break dot org where Itunes IHEART spotify. We also post. Ag Different things and we're trying to build up our youtube a two channel. We get less loved there. What we do postings that will not ever get posted on our podcast feeds or I G so check out three sources see some.

Ruthie Goodson CDC Gloria Malone Perez Texas Plano Itunes Williamsburg spotify anthony Brooklyn ten years
Putting Yourself First with EFT  (Pro-You Choices Part 3) - (Pod #344)

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

10:29 min | 2 years ago

Putting Yourself First with EFT (Pro-You Choices Part 3) - (Pod #344)

"I've worn welcome to the tapping CUNY podcast every single week, we share resources, tools and answer the question. Do you have you can get the most out of your tapping to eliminate self sabotage and to take more action today, we are in part three of the pro you series. And what I mean by pro you is making choices that are all about taking care of you. If you haven't checked out the first two parts, you can find them at tapping podcasts dot com episodes three four to episodes three four three or the first two parts next week. We're gonna share one more with you if you haven't done so or ready, you can make sure that you get all of the podcasts delivered to your smart device. Your computer your tablet, just go to tapping podcast dot com. You'll find all the instructions on how to get every episode as we move forward. His g mantra stealing. Welcome to the tapping CUNY podcast reported live to tape from Williamsburg in Brooklyn. This is three hundred forty four originally aired January second two thousand nineteen. Hi, everyone. I hope this find you. Well, where ever you are in whatever time of day, you're getting a chance to listen to this. Thanks for spending some time with me, a very happy new year to you as we step into the new year trying to make choices where we're taking care of ourselves creating resolutions are great. But if we're not doing concrete specific things to take care of ourselves. It's going to be difficult for us to meet any of our goals. And so today, what we're going to do is we're going to spend some time talking about and tapping on being okay putting ourselves I, and I would we be willing to bet that some of you simply hearing that phrase there was little knot in your stomach because you are thoughtful. You're careful you want the best for others. And there's a part of you that recognizes the fact that you have so much and that we need to be caring for others. And both of those statements can be true. And at the exact same time, we need to be taken care of ourselves. Because if you are not taking care of you, if you are not making thoughtful deliberate pro you choices no one else is going to do that. I just know this from spending lots of time conversation with my audience that you were probably in a circumstance where you're the person that takes care of everybody in your life. When things go wrong, the first person they call when there is struggle. They reach out for help. And on some of them as a person that gets some of that as well that that's flattering. It's nice to know that people see as comfortable and capable and able to help them in their times of needs. But if we are not doing that in a way where we're taking care of ourselves. Then we're doing everyone a disservice. Because if we're not healthy, we can't help others. So today, we're going to spend a little time tapping on being able to put ourselves first and take care of ourselves and not feeling guilty for doing exactly that. So to begin with what I want you to do just tap on the side. You're hinting. Nice. Big deep breath for me. And just moved from tapping point to tapping point repeating after me. Whenever I think about taking care of myself. I feel guilty. I feel selfish. I feel mean. When I take care of myself. I feel like I'm wedding other people down. Because so many people are dependent upon name. The people around me are struggling. The people around me are in pain. I don't want them to struggle. I don't want them to be in pain. Don't want them to have difficult times. But if I spend all of my time taking care of everyone else. Then I'm not going to be healthy. I'm not going to be safe. I'm not going to be in a good position moving forward. I need to spend time taking care of me. Because if I don't take care of me, no one else will. Taking care of me as my responsibility. Taking care of me is something I must do. Taking care of me is important for the short and long term. If I don't take care of me. It's going to be impossible for me to take care of anyone else. If I don't take care of me. No one else is going to do it. I must take care of me. I know that's not just a suggestion. It is an imperative. When I take the time to take care of me. I am happier. I am healthier. I am safer. When I am healthier. The world is a better place. When I am healthier. It is easier for me to respond others needs. When I am healthier. I make better choices. I give myself permission to take care of me. I give myself permission to not feel guilty. When I am taking care of me. I am worthy of taking care of myself. I give myself permission to take care of myself. Nice deep breath. I have a feeling that this is a hard one to really let it sink in. Because again, I I've I've had conversations in Email interactions and social media interactions with so many of you that you are so kind you're so wonderful that you're always putting others first. But as we've been talking about in this little mini series. We need to be making pro us choices we need to be taking care of ourselves. Because if we're not no one else is going to do that next week is the fourth and final installment of the series. I can't wait to share it with you. It's a relief fun topic. I think you'll get a good chuckle out of and it will be good moment of transformation. Because again when we are healthier when we're happier. It is easier for us to take the choices that we want to make to move towards our goals to eliminate those sabotaging behaviors if you haven't done so yet, and there's someone in your life who could use a tap along. Just like this particular at the beginning of the year to start off the new year on the right foot. Please please, please be are. Ambassador pass it along. Don't spam. Inbox don't send it everybody in the world. But there's a person or two who could really use this, please let them know about this. If you have a question, if you've a comment, if you have a topic you'd like us to cover in the future, please let me now I can always be reached directly at gene GE, e tapping Q and aid dot com. If you're on the website, just click on the big contact link up at the top in the menu. If you're inside of our app where you not only have the audio recordings of all. These tap belongs, but tapping scripts as well, you can click on the contact link inside of the app, it's the tapping QNA app what you can find in both the Android and apple app stores. You can find all our past episodes at tapping podcasts dot com, we're closing in on almost four hundred episodes between full episodes bonus episodes and all of that goodness for the tapping Q and A podcast this gene mantra, I hope you have a great day. I hope the new year is started off on the right foot. And I will talk to you real soon. Bye. Bye. The tapping CUNY podcast is copyright, gene. Mantra steadily tapping Q in eight two thousand sixteen all of us expressed by guests are those of the guests and not necessarily of gene mantra deli or tapping QNA.

CUNY gene GE Brooklyn Williamsburg apple
Bruton Parish

5 Minutes in Church History

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Bruton Parish

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked traveled back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. We are on location in colonial. Williamsburg and I'm here with a good friend of ours on many times Dr Steve Lawson. Stephen is great to be with you. I can't believe for we all right now. We are in a great. We find each other in grades nine nine. That's right so something happened here on December sixteen seventeen thirty nine what happened here well the grand evangelist himself the Grand Randy Tenor at George Whitfield came to Bruton Parish Church and preached a powerful evangelistic message right here. What's the significance of seventeen thirty nine in the life of George Whitfield well it begins his first American tour it will take him through all of seventeen forty and he will leave in January of seventeen forty he won and he was a sensation. I think in his journal he mentioned that people travel on horseback fourteen mile just to hear this one message to hear this sermon yeah and I know they traveled even further and other places in fact when Whitfield would come to preach most cities would just shut down. They would cancel judicial hearings. Ah Shop would close farmers would come out of the field. They would all come flocking to hear Whitfield pre. No one could compete no-one no-one. What was the title the sermon he gave her the title of sermon is what think he of Christ and is drawn from Matthew twenty two forty two and it's intentionally originally evangelistic because he understood this was a very religious place but without regeneration and without the new birth and so he was intentionally probing the heart and the mind to the chase. Let's cut to the chase. He's got one opportunity what Thinki- of Christ and we are standing standing right here at the church yard of Bruton Parish Church outside and we don't know whether what field was inside or outside likely was probably outside yes so so we are here with him in spirit centuries later and I thought if you could read for us near Great George Whitfield voice a choice paragraph from this sermon yeah to treat S. two yeah this is just one paragraph and it's still early in the message and it shows how just energized he was in the very beginning of this message and so here's Whitfield some and I fear a multitude which no man can easily number are among us who call themselves Christians and yet seldom or never ever seriously think of Jesus Christ it all let me just hit the pause the tax what thinking of Christ what Winfield is saying is the problem is you don't even think about Christ it all and so he goes on to elaborate they think of their shops and their farms their plays they're balls their assemblies and Horse Races Bass for Christ the author and finisher of faith the Lord who has bought poor centers with his precious blood and who is the only thing worthy thinking of alas. He is not in at all and their thoughts or at most in very few of their thoughts but believe me. Oh you earthly sensual well Karnal minded professors however little you may think of Christ now or however industriously you may strive to keep him out of your thought by pursuing suing the lust of the flesh the losted the eyes and the pride of life yet there is a time coming when you will wish you had thought of Christ more and of your pleasure is your less so he is driving at the heart that you must give Christ the place of preeminence. You know it's earlier in the sermon in you. We talked about this earlier. Are this great line from Whitfield. He is unworthy of the name of minister who is unwilling to die for the truth of the Lord Jesus and Whitfield certainly was that he he was he was willing to die and he was often attacked for preaching sermons like this there were death threats on his life and actual real threats upon his life as he even be sleeping in bed and people break into the room and try to stab him to death but Whitfield was willing to die for the message to seal it with his own blood if necessary and a preacher who's not willing to die for his message is rarely powerful as he would live for the message and he did all that for the sake of the Gospel Amen Well. That's Dr Steve Lawson. Listen on George Whitfield on location in Williamsburg Virginia and I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening to five minutes in Church history for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in Church history dot com.

George Whitfield Bruton Parish Church Dr Stephen Nicholson Dr Steve Lawson Williamsburg Steve Nichols Karnal Virginia Matthew Winfield five minutes
Every Grown Woman Has An Animal

Mojo In The Morning

08:13 min | Last week

Every Grown Woman Has An Animal

"In the morning. Follow us on instagram facebook. Tick-tock check out and search mojo in the morning. Meghan says that every grown woman has one of vagina. No i was wrong. They don't oh okay. Wow wrong wrong. Manhood is way bigger than yours. But i do think that every adult woman has an animal and when i an animal i think a lot of guys are like like a fish dog. No no ladies. Why do we all have a weird animal that for some reason as bestowed upon us at some point in our life maybe for me it was like in passing. I said i liked the reprint. And now for the rest of my life will only ever get things that are zeba printed or has on them. I don't think it's the trashier animal print and for some reason it is. Do i have a lamp with easy brennan and a pink feather bore on the rim. Because somebody heard one time that. I like zebra print when i was eight. Yes i something. I don't think i can ever get out. I actually like other animals. Entire world may be careful the rest of my life but like why is it. We are bestowed an animal that we have to live your life. Do they get you gifts like at random times. Because it's like oh. I saw zebra print and thought of you. He's not even like birthday. It's like zebras are so close to you. That if they see zebra print you'll receive a president one hundred percent. This is man elephants and you mentioned some at some point you love like. I don't know the sticks out in anyone else's brain but like a few years ago it became a thing to talk about like spirit animals. Like what your spirit. Yeah my family was talking about at dinner or something when i was like. What's your spirit. Animal i was like. Oh elephants and i think i was just the only one with an abrupt answer and since that day if there is an elephant it will be given to me and i got elephants for like as part of my like senior gifts from girls in my sorority. My mom got me elephant planters and prince. My dad got me an elephant scar. Like everything that you can think of. That has an elephant on it so so so for meghan. She likes otters. What do you like. that's not an real i mean. I like elephants decorate. I don't need. I don't need annual. It's so funny because you guys were talking about this and i kind of have foam. Oh i don't think. I have an animal but you got senator skinny jeans. That's the animal thinking about it and like my sister has an animal hysterical one when she was little my sister. Emily had this stuffed beaver. That's her animal. I did have a stuffed elephant from birth. So maybe that's why it was like my answer but right from birth. It's elephants were summary and lucy. My seven year old loved owls and so for christmas every year until we have a an entire many christmas tree that is only decorated with owl ornaments. And i'm pretty sure one year she's going to be like i. I was too when. I don't like owls anymore. Not just women. I because it's happened to. Its crutch like parents here. A trigger for them like an easy gift. When i got the big tattoo of the octopus on my leg. My mom's like why do you like octopus. And i had a five minute conversation about how cool they are now for the last two christmases last two birthdays. Last every time she came that will housewarming gift in my apartment. Everything's occupy at least yours is like emblazoned on your body so she has a reason to thank you still like it. I have not said the word elephant to my family into mightier. Three time chelsea's grandfather called us out for the fact that if you go into his house he's got penguins all over the place their gifts that people have given them over the years of penguins and it was probably five or six years ago. We were visiting her grandfather in arizona. And i said to him i go. Danny can you tell me. What is your obsession with penguins. And he goes all right and he goes. I don't like them and we're like what are you talking about. And he's like it all started with one of the kids. We're out me a penguin thing. And i said oh. That's cute next thing. I know everybody keeps giving me penguins. I don't like england's he's like eighty five years old and the guy finally came out and said i don't like penguins so that's what you guys need to do. Meghan you need to come out and ellen and spike you know come out and say that you don't like it so hard because like i said i get those gifts not even for my birthday or whatever. It's like someone was thinking of you and trying to do something nice out of. That's the hard part. I can't just say i don't like them mojo because my mom probably seek out that stupa gift for like two months and it's all we know your mom. She bought it a year ago on a sale than she saved it for you. What's up. Sam hey how you doing more. So my little sister used to have a stuff rabbit and we used to share a room when she was like two years old so this rabbit choose to take throw off for every day so every morning i used to wake up with a stuffed rabbit looking right at me and this wasn't a regular rabbit. It was like a life rabbit. And every morning i used to be like this rabbit. Look talking so finally when she turned like six years old. And i wanted to get away from her. I actually had to take it and throw it away and logistically hill. This day. i still hear about that. Revenue issue twenty four years. But it's actually something that she does like. You just took it away from her and now it's taken away from her. I kidnapped it. Threw it away and made sure that i'd never had to get waking up to another rabbit looking at me. Sure one person who wanted to have an animal and he took it away jagath. What's up leah. hi So mine's not animals. Like people found out that. I like pineapples And now i don't stop getting pinal but do you know what pineapples mean. They don't mean that defense growing up. My mom was also pineapples. Leah because we lived in a colonial style home like a saltbox now the colonial sign of welcome. So we'd go to colonial williamsburg and she would get the colonial door size using my mom's swinger. I will find the body. Do you wanna meet her her. Mom would you like to trade stuff. Knowsley you're not the only one i i've all the swingers know each other shine what's going on not much Just my wife animal She really loves cows. Flamingos and bats and Does she. Here's the thing sean. Checking on. that makes maybe double check with her if she actually does well she did And since passed away Last august she loved them. so much. that Actually got a tattoo of a big flamingo. And it's got it's one leg up in the air and has got three bats hanging off of that kind of don't you feel like a bunch of a holes this guy's wife passed and you guys are sitting there telling him that his past wife doesn't like the is that he will never have to ask her that question. I'm thinking looking down on him. Gone why do you get that probably is.

penguins Meghan brennan meghan facebook Emily chelsea jagath Danny arizona ellen leah england Sam pinal Knowsley williamsburg sean
The Pursuit  E21  Austin Horse

Out of Bounds Podcast

1:08:39 hr | 2 weeks ago

The Pursuit E21 Austin Horse

"What's up, everybody? This is mr. Automax. You're listening to the pursuit on the out-of-bounds network, so I geeked out over my guest. This week, his name is Austin horse, if you don't know who he is dead. Look him up on Google, Austin horse and listen to this episode cuz you can learn so much about this, dude. He is the reason I ever bought a fixed gear. The reason everyone loves to ride a fixed gear. He was sponsored by Redbull, Oakley All City, he basically turned currying into a career with sponsors by riding a bike off. He Everest he ever stood the Williamsburg Bridge which if you don't know what that is, you just do the vertical gain of Everest and you did it on a bike rack Williamsburg Bridge. We talked about that, the guy he's just insane but really he's the I reached out, I geeked out, I praise him a bunch because he's in a game. Using athlete. Who doesn't give himself enough credit, he still ride his bike, all the time, he cares about our environment, we talked about all that about how. I mean it's just an amazing episode Austin's, amazing dude. I'm geeking out cuz I never thought I'd get to have a one-on-one conversation with this dude. So here it is episode 21 with Austin horse Okay. Austin one of my cycling Heroes, tell everyone who you are, what you do. Wow. All right, well thank you very much for that. My name is Austin horse since 2005. I've been in New York City as a bike messenger. And I've really seen a lot of the the way that things have changed over those years. It's it's pretty remarkable to have been there at that moment and to be where I am at. You know, the moment that I am now off, the bike world has changed a lot. I actually started, I guess I guess I became really involved and enamored with bikes as a teenager. It was my first job as soon as I could legally be employed was at a bike shop and it's just been It's been hard to leave bikes ever since. Where, where are you from? Originally grew up in Houston. Okay, and what brought you to New York City? My grandparents are, from my, my fax from New York. My grandparents were in Upstate New York and I moved, I moved in with them in 2004 to take care of them. Okay. Go ahead and they were doing good. So I came to the same thing. That's amazing. I mean, that's best case, then all angles. So 2005 you moved here. Were you were you a fixie guy? Cuz you're like the fix, he guy for people who don't know, and maybe you don't think of it that way. But like, if I do well thank, you know, I I remember, I mean, I'm not the originator, you know, I'm not, well, yeah, I know that, but like your home so many. Oh geez. That are that have that go deep deep deep. You brought it into the Limelight whether you wanted to do that or not like you, you pig. Saved a giant wave for like this fixed gear movement, in like the, I don't know. Late early 2000s, I don't know. 2010 to 2015. Ish in a New York. The the moment was really, like the last half of the of the 2000s. It was it was really kind of the at. It said it's at its most like ice tea for me. It was, I think in, in two thousand, my friend Alex Purdue had how to fix. He was probably a Bianchi Pista and that was the first time I rode a fixed gear long. Did you fall in love immediately or like why am I on this stupid bike? It was more like, you know, so back then it was really tough to get one, right? It would like to go and buy one. You had to be very intentional about it. You couldn't just go into a bike shop, Bianchi was the first one to really distribute them and and get any sort of distribution before that. It would just be like something used that you bought from a velodrome or from Japan or something like that. It was really impossible to get a fixed gear before Bianchi started to, to make theirs. And, you know, a lot of credit goes to sky a car there over at Bianchi with them. Was it a like were you part of these conversations with them or is this before your time? You or me? That was just like that was what's available? Cuz that's when the flip-flop hubs started coming out and so it was like I can get this cool single speed but also like you can run brakes and like, you can run it fixed or not. Well, you can always do that. I mean, the thing about the football Hub is that's just, that's just cost-saving. So the it's the threading for a free wheel or a cog is the same, right? And so, all that fixed freehub is a flip-flop Harvest is a hub that they just didn't do another Machining pass on and do the reverse threading for the lock ring. I guess in there I mean you're right. Yes yes it just never actually there's no reason you can't put a single Freewheel on a fixed Hub. Why do people fix gear? What, why do people fix here? Like is it just a status? Like when you were there and you could like, rolled into this scene, that was like clearly a scene and like, from what I read and like the little research, it sounds like Fast and Furious, but I'm like messenger bikes and like fixed gears. But like, they have like these underground, like non-sanctioned races and you can, and you fill me in on this cuz this is like what I picked up from my research off. Like I'm picturing like Vin Diesel like hipster Vin Diesel. They're like throwing a flag but they give you a point on a map. Basically, in the first one, get their gets their correct. Or is that not by making all the way up a little more involved. And you know, these these are things that come and go. They they you know, that they haven't flown they Wax and Wane and I was fortunate to be around. I think some of the most creativity in in sort of this alley cat seen off or whatever where organizers You know, the internet has ruined many things, right? Yes. And you know, Alley Cats had their Genesis in a, in a, in a free social me that time. So for a lot of us, this would be like, okay, I've seen people sort of like in the street and not to them when I go by them. Maybe I'm like waiting in a messenger Center and like I'll get a chance to talk to them at that point off. And and then this is an event where it's like, hey, it's just something to unite us. And so it was, you know, if you're passionate about the job then yeah, you're probably going to come in on the weekend and do something that is basically fake work, if it's just a job to you, you don't give a fuk then you're, you know, wasn't for you and there were, you know, there were all kinds of people thought was really cool about Alley Cats and still can be and still is at times, is that there is no set format. It's totally up to the creativity of the organizer home. And so, there's just been some really Innovative formats and I think I think I got a close, some It's okay. I'm stuff working. I better exit slack before it starts kicking off. Okay, I think I'm in a different workspace. That'll probably save me from that. So yeah. So you know, there was this one really talented individual out of Boston. Jacob and a lot of a lot of people know, Jacob and Miss Jacob. He we lost him. I guess eight years ago, seven years ago. I'm sorry to hear that already a lifetime ago but he, you know, he was brilliant. When it came to just coming up with with cool neat stuff to do. And one of his there was this really cool. There was this one I look at it that I won in Boston, you know, which is a hard City to race in because it's a complicated City to get around in when you say a leak at this, just like what you call the races. Yeah, so that has its own history too. So the Alley Cats were were a bunch of. It was like it's basically like a messenger Cycling Club kind of thing out of Toronto in the 90s and that's where the that's where the name came from for the event was because they had a weekly ride that long just through the use of language, became known as like an alley cat, even though they weren't the group's name is the Alley Cats. Okay, so, it was an alley cat to do this ride, that competitive people being competitive turned into, kind of a race. And so, the original Alley Cats, actually were more more like a standard rates where you know, they're almost be you would get your check points and a map and maybe even you would have to double check points in order. But a very quickly, you know, evolved into something that people decided to utilize whatever format suited them. They found to be the most fun and for most messenger races, I'd say the Hallmark Alley. Cat is that The checkpoints do not have a set route to go to them, so it's up to you as the as the participant, determine your route to look for the most efficient way to, you know, be just just know the city the best. Okay, so, okay, so that that helps a lot more than you cuz for you, it's just not like that's what you did. So that was like made it made a lot of salsa. I mean it's even like not even necessarily a race allowance their point space store. You know, there's another another way to mesh or something and it becomes that and not just who is the first person to finish. So it's often that cuz that's a real easy way to to measure things, okay? So you go to Boston and you, you end up winning which is probably not normal for someone coming from New York City to Boston till like win. Oh yeah. Yeah. I mean I don't mean this like sorry this was That was the pony up race, which was a just a cool format that Jacob came up with, I went to Boston for a lot of races, okay. I mean that was, you know, when I'm Jacob was really in his prime, he was there was a lot of events happening in in Boston and there was a lot of reasons to go to Boston. It was, it was really cool. There's a new crew in Boston and with a bunch of emojis, it actually. So you're supposed to be hosting the Knack. At some point, when covid-19, And it costs $5 to enter the race. Okay, With that $5. You got basically a token that you could place on essentially like a bingo board or you know, like with home for football but just basically a grid of all of the the people participating. And so you know, if you if you if you believe in yourself, you place the bet on yourself, right? If you thought that you were just going to you were doing it, but you thought maybe someone else would win, you put that on them, okay? and then, And then you could buy in more, you could buy more tokens if you wanted. There was no limit, could not Racers buy tokens as well or no. And yes, they could okay, yes they good. So basically you'll just round up with a betting pool of a bunch of people that, you know, a bunch of people bet on some locals and some and some other people bet on me. And then I didn't get myself. I remember, I bet on a friend and then yeah. And then and then I won and then it was, it was cool because a bunch of people were like, oh you made me a lot of money and I'm like, yeah, it's awesome. So then then the first was split, you know? That's awesome. It was a really good gambling racing format. It was it was a pretty brilliant one that I think should see some more time out there dead and that's all thanks to Jacob and it seems so cool. Cuz you like like you said you're like I didn't even bet on myself like you're going in this to win it clearly and you're like I didn't I wouldn't waste $5 on me. I'm going to get smoked by what my friend. I think I think I had an arrangement with a friend where we bet on each other. Oh, well, that that blows the story then. Did you know, you were going to beat him? Yeah, I mean, I, I mean, it's a crapshoot in Boston, right? Especially back, then, that was before smartphones. And this, I was, I was really lucky. So this month in 2005? So, in 2004, I spent a lot of time in Boston, actually, working on a political campaign, and so, I part of that race turned out to be in a part of Austin that I had just walked around a whole lot of So you knew it. You had the unfair Advantage even though you didn't, but you were the outsider non-local, who knew your way around, it worked out, yeah. Yeah, and this is all fixed gear. You can be on single speed too. You can be on anything. Usually why do people fix gear? I know, that's a really general question but like I don't, I only fix. Yeah, I owned one for cuz of you. You were like, literally, like, I'll geek out but like you were the reason you made. It look so cool and I'm sure all of your friends but like you were the guy you were in the spotlight, whether you wanted to be or not, there was a time that and I, we talked about this for a second, prior to recording that. Like I worked for Red Bull for. I don't know. Five to eight years and those were like you're extremely hot five years when like you were Red Bull athlete. You were in Oakley athlete. For they like, and we're going to talk about this. So they like made events or you helped create the events with them. But I am almost curated for you at the time, which was blew my mind. But I live in Buffalo, New York and grew up in Buffalo. It's a very flat City. So fixed gear kind of makes sense like and like you're a machine. And so you probably don't care about hills, but like I do cuz I'm not a machine. So it's like, oh, this makes sense. I'll get one and I like got it and I was like, I'm running fixed. I'm not running any breaks and like I got out, I picked up on it, I can ride one. Well I can like control myself at speed and then we took a trip to New York City and I brought my fixed gear and I was like, I thought I did never wanted to like walk into a store more like a bike store more in my life and like by brakes and flip my Hub because it's so like Buffalo's easy. Like they, it's there's nothing, there's, I mean, there's traffic but like not New York City traffic and not so, yeah, I have owned a fixed gear to end my Ramen bowl and rant and like, praising of you. But I still understand the why like maybe it took her clicked but like it might have never clicked. I mean I will say like I'm the same way with running maybe where people talk about a runner's high you know and how people just go nuts for running off. The same thing yoga is a giant multi-billion-dollar industry and I'm I don't get into it, you know what I mean? Yeah. But definitely like riding bikes, you know? Really like almost any kind of bike but also very much especially fixed gears. There is sort of that magical connection. There is like that. It hits me on another level. Then just then just like, oh, I'm doing exercise and so I imagine that's what people feel when they're just really thrilling to running or yoga or or whatever. Is there like passionate sport. So, with good skiers, There is there is like a level of control you have on the bike that you cannot get from anything else. Any any, any input is instantaneous? There's no, you know, there's no waiting for the the Paul's of the month free will to catch up. There's no. You know, it's it's it's it's it's a hundred percent, you know, there's no like oh I have this type of break on instead of this other type of brake. Yeah. It's literally a direct, it's crazy. It's thought it was never written it. Like it's just a direct drive train to your wheel and your legs like you're connected. You're one hundred percent part of that machine at that point. Yeah and so that's I mean that nearly you, you do need to like really commit and you tap into that and then it's and then why would you not want to be there if you've done, if you've made that commitment? Yeah, there's there's nothing really I actually started writing my old. My Old Brooklyn like my first fixed, you know, the orange one that everyone knows. Yep. I did kind of like dust it off and inflate the tires and was it was right in it. Kind of recently how did it feel on and that is that is such like a perfect bike that it really does bring it all back and it's just like You know, whatever I'm rolling into on that. I know exactly the move to make on it that it's going to do exactly what I want. It's it's really comes down to balance. Like skating is only balance nothing to do with strength, it's only balance, right? And so any sort of any any Endeavor that is primarily Governed by balance when you're attuned to that balance. It's it's Perfection, you know, it's Grace and it's it's it's it's, it's amazing. And that's what, that's what it is. That's why I was so good about it. It's everyone, who, who loves it fix you, they nailed that balance. And they're just, they're just doing that all day long. Let's talk Red Bull for a second. Did they approach you? Did you approach them? How did that come to life? And I don't know if there's contractual stuff, you can't talk about, just skip it. If you can't talk about stuff, but how did that come to life like, where do they find you? Who, who found you? Oh wow, I hope I can remember. Everyone's name and do right by then. I'm like, did you think and you get think while I'm talking but did you think like it was ever going to be? So no one gets on their bicycle and like goes to fund races with their friends to like think it's be kind of come like a career for a while for you cuz it really did unless I'm wrong. But like, I remember outside magazine, I think it was outside magazine. It was like from courier to career. And I thought that was like such a great but like, I don't think you saw that coming. No one gets on a bicycle, a fixed gear, for sure. And it's like, I'm going to get signed by Red Bull and do this. Well, I didn't I think maybe afterwards that might have been some, some thoughts. But yeah every I think I remember hearing that they were gossiping around Seth Roscoe definitely was I think a huge part of why they Of the introduction and and just making sure that steering them to me. And and then also, I was fortunate in that like, my results could speak for themselves. That was, that was, you know, that's necessary. And it was, especially necessary off in like, 2007 or 2008 whenever it was. Yeah, to continue to like, be on the program, right? Like everyone wants to get who's hot but then to stay on it is a whole nother story, right? Yeah. Yeah. No. It's just I was just fortunate the New York office back then was you know as you know there it was full of really great people life. I mean Jeff Regis and Wendy. Her more are Totally. I mean, there there are definitely the reasons that I was on Red Bull. A hundred percent. Yeah, it was cool to see him take. I mean they took a risk on you at that time for that brand to sign someone, like you were probably like a micro influencer to them. Like you weren't like the the Superstar but then they created what was the name of? It was like the same any, any drama many Jerome that actually didn't come from New York that came out of Florida. I mean the whole thing is, you know how it works, people like pitch ideas and some of them work and some of them don't go anywhere and sometimes you pitch something, and by the time you pitch it five times, then it's finally, it's picked up and that actually came that came out of Florida. If it came didn't come from New York, I'm from but that, that was such a cool event. The first time we did it in New York, we did it in this church in Bushwick. And it had this, it was the perfect spot, it had this mezzanine. So, you know, like, you could, everyone could be up. If you look over it. Yeah, it was the best, Harry Schwartzman. And he he met the guys that were running the church as like an event space and he's like, hey, found it. I I know where you're going to do the man, the many draw. You gotta make sure this happens and so then we make sure it happened. How involved were you with that event? Like, with the series cuz it was a full series, right? Yeah. I wasn't really, you know, like they would you know how it is. They there's you have like activation contractual activation requirement so it'd be like maybe like hey we want to fly you to Mexico for many drama like okay great, you know, like I really didn't say no to anything but Yeah, you know, I I never said no to anything about it but I also, you know, I didn't build any of the, any of the series or any any other parts of it like that, okay, I always thought you, I mean, I just assumed I guess that you were like, it was your idea cuz to me it was like that event was built for you until like, obviously help showcase you and their athlete. So it was cool. That's cool. That's super kind. But, you know, at us and really like crushes, the mini-drama, right? But that is his event. Yeah, I don't even know how you would ride that were there. Any like was there was the track always the same or was it always different was always different cuz it usually just be built on site. It was always built on site and so long it's there's like so many factors. There's the actual building that's doing it. You know. There's the the venue that they found that maybe I mean they it's not like they all have the same floor plan for plan off. So that's all different. I'm just trying, I can't, there's no way. There's no way I could ride that. How long did that last? That series? Was it a year or two years? I was probably like, Three to five years, you know? Yeah, somewhere. I mean we're not we're not holding you anything. Just an idea of how long. Yeah, where did your idea to Everest? The Williamsburg Bridge come from Williamsburg Bridge. Yeah, I live I live at the base of it. Okay. But okay that's still that's not a good reason took out the window and see it. That's still not a good reason. so everything I don't know when I first heard about it, but it's one of those When does Dumb bike? Things that people do because it's it's it's average hard and yeah and exactly. Yeah. It's like well this is pointless and will be paying full and not a long time. Okay I'm in. So I wanted to Everest Williamsburg for a long time, the Williamsburg Bridge, I was like to me it just you know there was a good it was a perfect fit you know and then it's daunting, it's pretty daunting. Yeah, I think about it and then like, oh maybe it's going to rain, I don't want to do it off and then we actually we're facing the L train shutdown. And so there was a lot of energy around pressuring, the city to make sure that the bike routes would be a safe as possible because it was something that was going to be over life. And if the administration kind of just went to their Norm, then we would be over-reliant on the month, you know, all the app based Rideshare vehicles and that's just a one-to-one. You know, it's one, occupant usually in one car with a driver and there's no way that we can meet we would have been able to meet the Subways what the throughput of the subway. Is is is incomparable. It's it's massive. It's like 80% of all of the East River traffic and to have it just be cut off completely. Yeah, a lot of it was going to go to the buses off. A lot of was going to go to the buses, a lot of it also was going to go to, you know, Ubers and stuff. And so we had to make sure that if this car traffic goes up, also a lot of it was going to go to bike home. Sure, that it was going to be safe to ride a bike over the bridge and to, to your job, all that stuff Grand Street has been. It's still a problem. But you know, someone that we know happy all and he he was killed on Grand Street in the bike lane in the unprotected bike lane by a car that ran him over. And this was just all these people were going to be coming this way. So there was, it was pressing was to put pressure on the city to do more of But to have better infrastructure for all the Williamsburg Bridge bike traffic. Did you organize anything? Did you fundraise for it? Did you or were you just like, woke up one morning and like, like, was it supported? I mean, you said, you live right there. So you could just, like, go and take a break. But, like, did they? They didn't shut the bridge down for you right now is on the bike path. Yeah. But like, you just woke. I mean like it was like it took 36 hours but that's what I mean. Oh, that's what I know these things, but the people listening don't like, but you did this with full. I mean, I know an extent of them but like full traffic, which even bike traffic can be traffic. Yeah, even in the middle of the night there was never a moment moment when I was a young person on the bridge, do you think that helped or hurt? It was all pretty fine. I think there was there was, you know, it was There was some rain, there was some chilliness there was also some like there was one point of the day was really hot. So I remember one time like, at one point I was starting to like, I'm feeling just like way too hot wage, like, it's just that the sun is out there. It's hot. And one guy wanted to race me and I'm just like, not into it. I'm like yo this is not. You know what I mean? It was that was that was probably the only time I was just like, oh, know how many laps was it? Should have, I should have looked it up before coming on this. If I recall it was a hundred and thirty two laps, so 264 separate Crossings and the mileage was like, 600 something, and it took 36 hours. Very little last maybe like thirty two hours and you did it straight. Like, I mean, I'm sure you took like breaks and like but the rules forever resting are Basically, the Only Rule is that you cannot sleep. Now it has to be in in the effort, you can take breaks along the way you can stop and, you know, eat dinner, which way did you know, you can do all these things, you can have bathroom breaks whatever but you just can't go to sleep. Does this get recognized anywhere like? Is it like? Yeah yeah yeah is what is there's a club that that's formed around this and they recognize it? Okay, I didn't, I did not know that off at the rule. So I needed to, I actually needed an exception to recognize my effort. So in general, the rule is that the You need the, the, the incline has to be can only be like one interrupted incline, right? So, this is to avoid basically, where somebody gets the ever seen record by using a valley to go right side and then like down and we and then partially up the next side and then to the top of that and then repeat over and over and over again. And so then a lot of their climbing effort is going to actually just be aided by inertia and so it's not, you know, it's just not as pure or whatever, it's not, it doesn't count. so, but because I was going Over a Crest instead of and I would have to like actually slam on the brakes and stop and turn around at the base. There was no Advantage like this so it's pretty easy. I mean it wasn't a problem for them to grant that to me. And it also just symbolically, it's like no, you got across the bridge and cross that bridge and cross the bridge and cross the bridge. And if they hadn't had made the exception, then I would have had to go from, you know, the Brooklyn side to the top and then back down. And then, you know, over it with his Pawn. Yeah, it would have been weird. Did you have people out there? Supporting you like, like, was it? Yeah. It was like, well, received them. So I I worked with Transportation Alternatives, it was a fundraiser for them, they publicized it and I publicized it and they were very pleased with the amount of money they raised off of it. Strava also was a partner they helped amplify it and and you know Red Bull supported of course as well, and yeah, all my friends stepped in it was it was really great. I think there was probably towards the end where I'd go five laps and I could only keep going. If somebody had brought me in a slice of pizza that I would eat and then I do another five laps and it was just like it was, it was the end, you know. Oh I can't I can't. I literally cannot every time I watch it first thing or like read about it like everything leads me to know like I wouldn't do that. No way. I don't have it. I would quit. I'm pretty sure I will never do that again. That was my next question. Would you ever do it again? Not definitely not. I wouldn't do a repeat and I don't think I would just I don't think I would do another Everest. I don't, I don't know, maybe I would, I probably would. Yeah. I mean there's a Never Say, Never but. So what was harder? How much should Everest the Cambridge. The new Cambridge. That would be a really good Everest. Put it out there. Well, hopefully, someone will pick it up and maybe they'll challenge you. Then you have to do it. That's going to be the worst. You're going to rope yourself into it again. I'll support I'm a Brigham, you know, cookies or some pizza off, what was harder, cuz you wrote okay, and correct me if I'm wrong. But again, this is my diligent research. You rode? The dirty dozen in Pittsburgh, on a fixed gear which I thought was tougher. Can you explain what the dirty dozen is? For people who don't know? Okay, The Dirty Dozen. It's a it's a reset that was started and it's still run and led and championed by Danny choo. But it's the 13 steepest Hills in Pittsburgh essentially. And it's also a a pretty cool Alley Cat ask for Matt in that it's not your typical racing. Matt, everybody rides as a group to the base of the Hill, Danny, or someone else from the amongst, the organizers will blow a whistle and then the race is on And then it's just points-based for the people who are to the top of the hill so I I forget how deep it goes. It's by either 20 or 10 Deep, they get points and then everything else is just doing it to do it, right? If you put a foot down, Your effort doesn't count. So you're, you know, you have the option to turn around and and try and go again. Obviously, if you're like in the running, if you're in the points, then you're if you put a foot down that point won't be counted. If you're if you're doing it for the satisfaction of doing it, then it's between you and yourself whether you start over again or not. But most people do because it's off. Like the only reason to do that is to say that you did it, right? Right. So okay, so I did it on a fixie. I don't remember my ratio. Someone asked me recently cuz that's nice looking to do it to, you were the first one ever do it, right? Like it was kind of or no. Am I making false claims? Oh, I don't know. I don't think so. Cuz I remember you know, Pittsburgh has a lot of bike Cooks, right? Oh yeah. But I remember being like a thing. That no one had done it on a fixed gear. I don't know really, I did a really good. I think someone else is done it once before. Okay, at least I don't recall actually, we won't make that claim. I thought that, but I like I said, I don't I remember being a thing that no one had done it yet and they were like and this was years ago but like yeah, I don't know. I mean, maybe you weren't, maybe you are. I have no idea. Damn. We get asked someone, yeah, I don't know. I'll look it up later but How do you play? How do you do so? Well there's I mean the reason I don't the reason I think you're incorrect there is that there's been a single speed division for a while. And like I said, Pittsburgh is full of bike. Oops, wrong. But single speed isn't fixed gear necessarily, right? Yeah, it's not. The hardest part about doing it on a fixie. Was that, I So so the reason actually that it was harder to do that than ever seen ever seen. It was just, you know, managing my body and like pacing myself and being like, Oh, okay. You know, I can't eat any more food. Cuz my belly is going to explode or, you know, just like staying within my effort and then and then also it has had like an unlimited time window. So I just had to make sure that it didn't blow myself up and and and fatigue. My said it was more mental struggle. Probably Than Physical, I mean, Loosely keep doing it. But the The Dirty Dozen, you're, you're climbing with a bunch of other people would like three hundred other people. And so you try to position yourself, so that you're not going to get an out by somebody who falls over in front of you or whatever, you know, the it takes place in the fall. There's, it's sometimes it's wet. There's leaves on the ground there, slippery, you know, there can be any any little thing like that. And then I'd have to reset and start over and it would just, it would just totally mess things up, right? so, so that was that was That was the most nerve-wracking thing because on the fixed gear, like, I'm limited in how quickly, I can go down a hill, we climb a hill and then we ride to the next spot, so that means we're always going downhill. So everybody on the road bikes were just they they climbed the hill and I'd probably climbed the hill that passes and most of them. But then when we started going to the next spot everyone would have passed me and so then I but the time were starting the next climb I'd be Missin pack or something like that and having to like we've through all these people, that were also doing, you know, competing in the race. But not in the not in the single-speed class and just like the Open Class. So it was tough. That was really tough. There were a couple of the. So there's like the general, like, all of the all of the single speed climbs, I'm pretty sure. I just saw those, maybe not, but like I, I had it and then there were some of the, some of the the general classification climbs where I was also like, You know, in the top top three top two to finish so that was cool. How do you train for something like that? Like are you a die-hard trainer or do you just ride your bike? Not bike. You just naturally. I mean, there's some natural ability in there to you think it's your natural ability to suffer like physically or like you're just born with like Powerhouse legs. Well yeah, both Yeah it's it's helpful. I think it's actually like more like my heart and lungs and stuff like that. But yeah, my legs are good too. Yeah, you know how it is. It's you kind of get a package that just works and you don't have to do that much for it. Riding riding bikes messenger rain. It's actually a lot more It's a it's a better tool for Fitness than you might think. You know, it's certainly also a job that can just beat you up and mess you up and wear you down and do all sorts of bad things to you. But off this is actually something I was talking to Tim Johnson about. Back in the day. When I was like, oh, you know, I work too much as a messenger, I'm like worried about like how a might affect my training and he was like you know, actually like messenger work is probably a really good training tool because something that's really hard to do. To do in training. Like if you're, if you're going out on just a ride, when you're trying to get fit, pretty hard to motivate yourself, to do these, like, these periodic bursts, where you're at home, you know, you're going flat out for a while and then riding and then flat-out and then writing like that's just not something that mentally is it it comes naturally to us on bike rides right off. But that's often the way at least back then that's often the way that messenger work would be. It'd be like, okay, you know, I've got my regular pickups okay. Now, I've got a triple Rush, it's totally in the wrong spot and I have to like a blast over to there and get it. Knock it out, okay? Now I can go back to cruising, oh, shit, I got another one. And so, just over and over and over and over again. So, that was really good. I'm you know, I'm fortunate. Were you you were working the whole through all of this, right? Like that was your you were ideally sponsored because of your job like in a loose say you're off so lazy. Yeah, you're not though, you can say that but like you're a psychopath on a bicycle so it's in there. Okay. It's in there. Whether you want to admit it or not. But it's so fun to hear people who are like, I'll just shower you with compliments. You're going to have like the best day of your life tomorrow, cuz you, but like Superior athletes. And I'm like, hey, do you train your like no, like your diet? Yeah. Pizza like yummy food. Give me like a bicycle. did you ever run into what was like your and this is a, well, actually, before I even segue there, tell me about this Texas trip You like something? That was that, that was that I was thinking about for a long time. Before I did it just like the Williamsburg Bridge. I mean, I love looking at Maps, right? And looking at maps and be like, man, it'd be really cool to ride a bike there. And it was actually a Doonesbury cartoon that I read in the 90s. They're on. I think it's I forget if it's Matagorda a Mustang Island doing bird watching like in this island in the middle of nowhere in Texas, on the Gulf. and so that made me look at it on a map and then it made me look at everything and be like, oh yeah, Texas has these Barrier islands that are that run the length of the coast of the state, essentially. And You know, growing up in Texas. I was a new about, like just the beaches and, you know, people drove cars on the beaches and stuff like that. And then as fast bikes became a thing I started thinking like man it'd be really cool to like do that entire ride on a fat bike on the beach. And then I started thinking like it'd be even cooler if you could just go between the islands with a fat bike. and then, I Make sure, but you would my neighbor with my with my, my sister's friend's pool, that that like smoked. But I'd love to see the testing. I made sure that they would flow. And then, yeah, I just, I just flooded with a firefight between the dial and please tell me that was like, the all the prepping you did for that, we're like, oh, this'll float, I can do this. I also bought some some paddles. Swimming like a permit. Me. Grab a mushroom to you like some fins. I talked to a really nice lady on the phone. These our favorite, these aren't normal swim fins, right? Right. There's like duck feet off. Yeah. So there's there's like I didn't want to get the really long ones cuz how do you put those on a bike? But I also didn't want to get swept out in like a river current or a tied into the Gulf of Mexico wage. So I was I was, I was one picture. I Could Kick this had to be supported, right? Like you would a boat there to help you. If you were like drowning there was there was one time I rented about And it was the longest Crossing and how, how long was the trip total for about four hundred miles and how what was your longest Crossing? Probably. I'd have to look at the map. I don't remember. I mean ballpark were you swimming a mile at a time? No no, no, no. Okay, no I mean like there are like so the I mean the Port of Galveston, there's a ferry where there was a fairy or a bridge or something like that. I definitely took that, you know. Okay. I just remember you like swimming with a fat bike. I don't, I did that. Yeah. Where there wasn't a farrier Bridge, that's, that's how I got across. Just for fun just because you like looking at Maps. Well because also there was no other way to get to these some of these islands which is so it's really I mean I I really would recommend that, anybody took that trip it was magical you're going to have to boost your post your your trip Tik on the internet so people can replicate this. You should name. You gotta like name the ride and then people do it. Put it on stage and then everyone will just start doing it. Cuz anything on Strava is oh yeah. What I actually I fried my phone in the middle of it. There's this one slew that I forgot. It just it was just like a little cut between two of the the islands that very title and you know, sometimes it's there sometimes, it's not there. so when I rolled up on it I was like oh I could probably just walk across that some walking across that walking across it and then it gets you a really deep heart and suddenly like I just dropped down but you weren't you didn't have like a crew with you. Like this is just you are you in a friend or the first day? A friend of mine rode with me. There was a film crew with me on the second day. Back then it was just me. That's amazing, just for fun. Just to go do it. Well, not just for fun. Also to celebrate the open beaches act. See, there's always a reason, there's always a reason with you and that's why I enjoy it cuz wage. Now, this is my Segway and I knew you'd get there. You've become like an activist and maybe you weren't always an activist and maybe you don't like to call yourself an activist with an active. In fact, anything? I'm I'm less, I'm identifying less as an activist today. As I was ten fifteen, twenty years ago cuz you've always been who was it? Who did that? I think it was like casing asset or whatever the YouTuber. Who, like Road into all the bike. Everything that impeded the bike Lanes? Yeah, that's been a problem forever. But like you've always been And still are your private on Instagram but somehow in that crew but like you are always posting about those things and like Shining Light on those things and like you know we don't you don't want us in our lanes and we don't want to be in car Lanes but then they impede on the bike Lanes. So how do we fix that? Like you just get every everybody to like get out cuz it's not just a problem where you are like obviously New York city. That is Crazy to someone who Cycles in Buffalo often. But like, how do we get these people to actually care? there's a lot really speak about there, but New York has been working on implementing congestion pricing for over a decade. We're right now, it's we're actually in a point where things need to happen and things are approved to happen. So we're, we're just waiting for that to happen. At the end of the day, we need to have fewer cars in the city. You know, whether we get there through congestion price, you know, some other and some other means to make sure that there are fewer people choosing to just go into downtown Manhattan. And the car, because they can or because it's, you know, right now, people will wait 4 hours on some of the bridge scenes because they don't want to pay a $10 at all, you know? And and the quality of life everybody who's around that is it really suffers? And it's just what it's like, you're driving into Manhattan because this is going to allow you to avoid the toll and the Triborough Bridge on your way from upstate New York to Brooklyn. I mean that's ludicrous, but that's also what's happening and and unfortunately even with congestion pricing, that will continue to happen because the FDR will be exempt from the congestion pricing. So we're still going to have people that are trying to beat the arcade tool and come down the FDR and then come over, you know, one of the East River bridges for free. As people have always been able to come over in a personal vehicle, the East River bridges for free, and it's it's a big problem. It's it's why we have a city that looks the way it is. Now instead of a city that Would be would be safer, would be healthier would be more inviting. Would however have fewer dead people that I know in it. So how do you think we get more people on bicycles in general? And this is obviously a giant question, but like how do we get? Cuz like it's easy for someone like you to be like, ride, a bike and easy for someone, like me to page a ride, a bike. Like I'm going on a very short, very, very short. But I'm going on a bike tour with my friends, Friday, Saturday Sunday this week. Like, that's what we do for fun. That's something like Jack. You flew to Texas with a fat bike and swam with it for fun. How do we get the general population to not only look at it for a tool for fun but also offer reliable viable, cheap Transportation. I mean, that's the most important use of it. Is when people are using a bike for a practical reason. That's, that's really, that's why, that's why I do anything on a bike so that people will choose to do that. Cause I talked to people that don't ride or don't write a lot and The main reason that people don't do that is because the safety safety concerns. So as long as we have unsafe cities where where people don't feel safe, riding the bike, we're not going to get the type of ridership that we need that, you know, some places in Europe, or even in California are able to get there or, you know, they're, they're approaching that So I'd say that's number, one is safety. And then after that there's I think there's a more necessary configuration of some of the aspects of our housing and our job sites. You know, if you're concerned about being sweaty at work, if you don't have a place to park your heavy, electric bike at home overnight, these are all things that are preventing people from from from writing off. There are there are solutions there and we just need that. That's really just going to come from pressure from people. And then there should also be government incentives to do that. So the e-bike parking Right now, if you have a car you can park it on this on this on the street usually free and it's pretty secure. You don't need to really worry about it that much, but if you have an e-bike, You can't park it on the street and, you know, that this probably going to be more of a problem for you than it is for someone with the car. So that's that's not right, you know, that's not something that It's not going to lead to the world that we want to see, and there are ways to correct that and one is just having more bike parking around. So, like parking garages for cars. They didn't used to accept bikes but it's actually city law that they have to accept bikes now. So it's, it's things like that little systemic changes like that, that get us to a point where people can choose to use a bike and and, and use it in a way that makes sense for them. But the number one thing is safety. If people don't feel safe, if they feel like, you know, they feel like the infrastructure is inadequate, if they feel that drivers are going to be hurt them and get away with it. People aren't going to ride bikes. So do you think it's start again? I'm like probing because I think you deal with it more often than most people. But like you think it starts with like government, local government officials, Or like just people like you and me out there like educating our greater group of friends cuz our core friends know, right? Like we're we're in this world of cycling and I don't consider myself a cyclist, but I do ride my bicycle but like our friends know. So like I don't know. I just I'm so and it's just intimidating. It's like, skiing, it's like all these sports that I love. They're so intimidating. Like you ride your bicycle and like, you start your driveway as a kid, maybe. And then you hit the street and the streets, very scary. And how do we get? And there's no answer but I don't know. There are answers, you know, we need legislation into the curb vehicle size and vehicle speed. So you know there's this giant giant loophole that. Now we have all these SUVs all these pickup trucks will just treat like a personal vehicle. You know, it's not like a work vehicle, it's not a sport utility vehicle. That's used for off-roading, know, it's just a loophole that exists where they're exempt from emissions and stuff like that. And so and and and and size and weight limitations. And people have these huge cars and trucks. I mean it like people the car ma'am. She's don't even sell cars anymore. They're selling trucks and SUVs because it's the this giant loophole that is leading to less safe cities. And all of the, all of the hybrids, all of that Energy Efficiency that we've that we've got, you know, electric cars. It's going to be the same thing. They're just using that to make something that's even bigger. Now have you know, like a hybrid pickup truck is insanely large? And it's got maybe the the fuel, the gas mileage of a pickup truck that was Hathaway. But from twenty years ago, Yeah, it's interesting. You say that it's it's just so much. Like, I don't think of it like that and I love that. And like I drive a big stupid van around. And like I spend eighty percent of my night off in this van. So, I like to think that, like, I'm an Asterix on that, like I kind of use it as a tool, like I sleep in it. You're looking at it like this is my van. But like yeah, like I mean like I'm living in my van but oh my God, I'm such a consumer of things and it's and it's you know, we want these big trucks and these big and then like you go to Europe and I spent four months in Europe years ago but they they have like these little of fish fuel efficient cars and like they carpool and we live in such this the United States of America where like we took when we go mountain biking four of us drive from different places separately. With and you're like, like, but like the way it is, but it's nice to have this conversation and maybe next time I go to Trailhead, I'll think twice and maybe I'll pick up my friend or like, and that's those little things matter. And those little things keep, instead of having five cars on the road, maybe we have one and there's five people in that car. So, it's, I mean, I think a lot of it is consumer choices, but it's also consumer choices that have been aided and abetted by the system that our government and the corporations that that we live with have built around that long. So the automobile industry, they love that were, were, were consuming this way, you know? It's they, they're encouraging this right? The only reason they're going to. Change course, just either from government pressure or consumer pressure, consumer pressure would would be something that would happen from saelig. Gas prices going way up and everyone being like I can log I don't want to have, I don't want my gas mileage to be as crappy as it is anymore. But then, but then we're dealing with technology where there's, you know, hybrid and, you know, all the different systems that make them slightly more fuel efficient. But at the end of the day, you know, You have you drive a six thousand pound vehicle into a city? And you're, you know, you're using a road that also has hundreds of people that are just people in it, you know, it's the disparity is, is is massive, the speed and the and the weight that modern cars are able to operate at is really It's, it's a problem and it needs to be addressed. What you were talking about with the way that most of our most of us to get to Recreation? It's very difficult to get direct creation, anyway, but by driving a personal vehicle there. It's all oriented towards that doesn't have to be, you think, think about you? You're if you're in Europe, I'm sure you're familiar with you probably like gone skiing at a place where you're able to take a train there, you know? Yeah, it's totally different and it would take such an infrastructure overhauling to do that and just a month. Unfortunately, like a social media overhauling, in fact, Like Trains aren't cool, right? And, and you're in New York city. So it's a little different. I think everyone takes a train. A lot of people rely on trains for, but like a city like Buffalo, we have one train, it goes in a straight line. It doesn't get you anywhere. And a lot of people cycle in the city and the city has done, I think they've promised over the next. I think we're five years into that plan, but over the next ten years, they were going to put over three hundred miles of bike trails in and like they're crushing wage. If you can never get a chance to come bike in Buffalo, you should cuz there's bike paths everywhere and we don't have the traffic and they're beautiful and they're like, it's amazing. There's a trail that I can leave or Buffalo and ride to Manhattan. There's a there's now like a and that you hit some roadways along the way. But like I've been hearing lots of good things about Buffalo lately. It's it's the city's rat. I do love life but we have this really great cycling infrastructure and it's getting better but they are, you know, the cities like trying to be cool and like hip and let go bike Buffalo, but like it's such a bad branding that people. Like now I'm going to, I'm still going to drive my car and I'm still. So it's like we'd it needs to be a cultural shift and not a social media shift. That's a cultural shift that it's okay to arrive. Like you said like sweaty at work like cuz it's not really cultural except why are you sweating while I rode my bicycle here? It's like well it's ninety drive your car tomorrow. Like it's not. It's not cold, dog. Accepted to show up sweaty at work or like, so, when you set, you mentioned government incentives for cycling or skateboarding or any other home, you know, organic healthy say, safe, I mean, are safe as a loose term, but you don't even have to think about it as incentives. Just realize that there there are. So many incentives are pushing everyone towards driving cars right now, in either just eliminating those or tipping, the needle, slightly back the other way. So like any new development, Most of the time like depending on the size of the development. It's it's at all like kind of at at any sort of scale, they have a parking minimum, they might be on top of a subway station but they have a parking minimum. But there's no place. Like oh, let's have showers for people that are that are commuting on Bike Tour. There's no requirement for that. That's something that maybe they'll pursue for like, lead status or something like that. But, you know, it's like, well, we made this giant parking garage because we had to write and that that sucked up all the budget that we might have put into something like a shower. Yeah, shower, or, like, somewhere safe, to put your e-bike like this again, it's it's a New York more of a New York City problem when you're talking to me cuz like we have those problems but not as drastic cuz we're not overpopulated like New York City. But it's, it's all true and it's all really cool for you to shine light on it because it's something that gets me even being in the sport doesn't recognize. So it's It's just a thought-provoking conversation and for that. I thank you. Oh yeah, I'm curious about y'all's Mayoral race. That's really exciting what's going on there? It's crazy. So we just so we just have like a socialist mayor Wynn. Well, she didn't win. She won the primary and it's now y'all. Now the incumbent is going Challenger. Yeah. And like it's funny cuz our mayor fire and brown, he's been mayor for ever. Like, I don't know how but like forever, but he didn't really campaign and because if he would have campaigned, it would have shed. It would have made it a Race So he just didn't say anything. He's like very silent about it and then he lost so it'll be it's going to be an interesting cuz now he's doing. He's coming in as a write-in or something and they're it's crazy. It's but it's writing campaign. I think now is what he's going to do. So we'll see. But I think he's, I do think he's Scrooge. I think change is good. I don't know. I should know more about her, but I don't, but I'm just excited for Change and I'm excited for someone who seems to care. I don't know. I don't know. I hope I really do and it's, it's fun. It's cool. It's exciting. Yeah, and buffalo is, I'll die in Buffalo. I love buffalo. It's a red City. Where on the water again are biking. Infrastructure is like, Beautiful and just getting better and better and better. I'm actually going, like I said, I'm going on a small bikepacking trip this weekend like six, dudes. We're going. We're doing a hundred fifty thousand miles in three days, which is New York. Yeah. In New York but we can leave. We're all going to leave from buffalo meat on the bike path and go out to like, Rochester and back. Oh yeah, we're all busy. So you should have time to do anything last year. We did Pittsburgh to DC and back which is the Gap trail. If you've never done it or don't know about it, you do not touch or road for three hundred and something miles, which is that is that is Probably the right. I I haven't done that. I'm most want to do. You could do it in a day cuz you're a machine. I mean, I mean but like it is 800 foot of gained over 330 miles or something. Like but it's a riot and like if you want to go with your friends who aren't necessarily a machine or like, we load up our bikes with sixty pounds of gear and we there's it's the greatest bike trail I've ever been at my entire life as far as like every ten miles, there's an iodine treated well, so you get water, the whole way, there's primitive campsites. It's along the Potomac, the entire way. So, every night you swim so you get like, a fresh reset, get all salt, it's It's like intro to bikepacking and it's it couldn't be easier and more fun and beautiful and there's we did it during covid-19 years so we were fully self-contained like oh nice cuz we felt back on doing it in general with that guilt. But it was also like we brought all our own food. We didn't shop, we didn't stop. We did one. Restock at REI, we had everything delivered to our faith in D C. Like Drop shipped, we picked it up and then we kept going. So we had like that was our miniex but other than that like fully off, cuz when in our lives are we going to have? 8 days that six friends can just go on a bike trip, like doesn't happen anymore, so that Trail's fun, but it's so easy. It's such a gift. It's like a, it's an old railroad. So it's just smooth and flat and some saved. It's amazing. But Austin, anything else you want to talk about your private on Instagram? I don't want people to follow you. There, everyone look up, Austin horse, cuz he's he doesn't like to pretend, like, he's this big Guru, but he's literally the king of fixed gear. I'm sure there's greater Heroes out there, I'm sorry, but you were my inspiration forever wanting to ride, a fixed gear. You put it on the map. You made people realize that like this could be a career or you can make money and you could do really read things and travel the world by writing a fixed gear bicycle. So thank you so much, anywhere people can follow you. Look at what you do or they can just listen to them. And that's all they get. Well, I guess my Twitter is not private so I'm Austin. Horace on like all my things and I guess the Twitter is the only one that is a good one to follow that. I'm active on home, mostly, I'm just sort of like shouting into an echo chamber of people who followed me ten years ago on Twitter and then stopped using it. It seems like. So Twitter's back Twitter is back and popular again. So everyone everyone go. Follow Austin on Twitter, he's a super activist. Although he's saying he's not anymore donate to any campaigns. He's doing which dead-ends like he's not doing anymore, but he's out there and thank you so much for taking the time to have a conversation. What I mean about the activism just is that you know, it was something that really did Define me in a community in a lot of ways and From like two thousand to like the Iraq War onwards. And last year, it was just so phenomenal to see the outpouring of people into the streets and, and the way that it became this thing that was that I could no longer even really consider as an identity, because it was just, like, normal of a sudden. It's just like, oh, yeah, I'm I'm really heartened to bye-bye, everyone. The the extent of of Engagement that I really see amongst my committee. Yeah, it's refreshing to see people care again, and that's sad to say. But ten fifteen years ago, people didn't care, it wasn't their problem. And now it's extremely refreshing to see people care, but I love how you tone it, like that, how you say it like that, like now it's just normal, it's become normal in our communities to care, so you're not an activist anymore. Your job. Functioning member of a community who cares and gives a shit about what happens to the people in the community and why they happen. That's such a great way to put Adam. Yeah, exactly. Cause it's amazing but I'll let you go. It's 10:00 on a Wednesday. So thank you so much for taking the time. This is my pledge good. Thanks for reaching out to me. Adam. Yeah, this is amazing. Thank you so much, cool. Take care. That was episode. 21 of the Pursuits on the other box Network. I am mr. Edimax! That was at Austin horse off on Twitter, look them up, Google him. He's too shy to say already is but he's Super Rad. He reminds us that riding bikes is important. It's important for your health, it's important for the invite it's important for our City's growth. So take that do what you will with it? Scroll down, leave a review, five star reviews, or rad follow at mr. At a Max, follow a table. Out of podcast, listen to jabber show. Listen to the new show called big stick energy, which is coming out next week, maybe. I don't know, pay attention, have fun, live your life, hug your friends, hug your family, call an old friend calling old pal, ride your bike, go outside roller, blade skateboard, do hacky sack. Do kickflip live your life, friends.

Boston Williamsburg Bridge Austin New York Jacob Bianchi New York City Alex Purdue Bianchi Pista Buffalo Miss Jacob Hallmark Alley Oakley Seth Roscoe Pittsburgh Jeff Regis Harry Schwartzman Redbull
#413: My 2020 Year In Review Part 7 of 7 - Resolutions and Goals for 2021 - Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank podcast -

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

18:30 min | 6 months ago

#413: My 2020 Year In Review Part 7 of 7 - Resolutions and Goals for 2021 - Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank podcast -

"All right welcome back. The final part the final pitch in the fucking and twenty twenty year in review. What if long podcast at patrick. I'm sorry i thought i was going to do an hour and thirty one. Take all the way through my. It's also tell part. So when i'm those effigies so we're in this neighborhood behind us like graffiti and in ecuador burn this thing family like half a block down there lighting off fireworks. The kids are out. it's midnight you hear people like who they cannot here or there but the police like it's not allowed and some people get mad. The police like how come you know. They're having a part of the can do. it's not my law enforcement. They're supposed to be enforcing it children's like a little worried like if they call me. Gotta fuck born sidestreet. So it's recording. Yeah so We see they see asa wave ecuadorians. they don't wave. i don't get it. I mean it's like this. you don't get much way. You get a lot of one of stars you know when you pass by what else. Ds shit. Like that but holloway's anyway stewed from down there starts coming over. We're like okay. What is this. And he's like omega philli's on your new ever lease underway. And then he's like we're talking and he's like he's starts saying in spanish you know it's like i'm merely a no knock yet. S no kid. They don't wanna Do this whatever And they were like yeah. I got it Tony start speaking spanish llama. Cc's today today. Like i guess there's recognizes where you from dante on the aviva. You'll this somebody that never you're never york seek an in spanish how did you. How did you find out about this like you know. We did research it. Looks like such a cool six. Such a cool tradition exceeded on would have had. I can't speak spanish speaking english. And i'm trying my best. How can figure it out. And he's like Like you know. Tony's are saying about the people you got to forgive number grass and he's in the in the pants pocket like yeah the pocket we put it in. We burn it. He's like you know all the stuff in spanish you know and dotto and And then he's like we start talking but when he goes from new york he goes only thing he said in spanish. He goes to her police. Ya I don't know they say No permissible by a all. This you know. And then he goes like yossi. We're worried we're we're in spanish. We're rio so by up. And then he goes. Fuck the police english. She knew the police okay. Here's my resolutions. You guys got to leave yours in the comments below. Whatever reason i do this is because i find that if you list your resolutions something my ex manager wants to home is like what is your resolution sierra. All about like business but Show it to somebody. He hold yourself accountable when you quit smoking. If you don't tell anybody you eating quit smoking you know but if you tell a bunch of people will then you did quit smoking because they're gonna fuck in. Call you on it when you start smoking again. Okay here's my resolutions re to full books. That's harder than it seems to me. I barely i'd. I might have done more than two last year. But i don't know but i did finish jon benet. He's a legal. He'll be on the podcast. Show you do next week the week after week after will age your next week regardless finishes december thirty first. I wanna to full books. It's seems easy. But i'm out fucking party and you guys i watch. Tv on the internet to finish my book. I've written a chapter and a half. I finally got started on it over in a chapter and a half first drafts. Rolf potts said he would look it over. She's gotta finishes second half second half of the second chapter and send him through chapters for fucking feedback which is fucking. I have access to a fuck at top level travel writer. Who's gonna like. Give me some feedback. So yeah for sure. I do that. Hold me to it. produce make direct the terms. I don't care anymore. I just want to make a special i wanna have a credit has made by so i kinda did one for a friend. was like a it wasn't a real 'specially was but it was like an insurance special. Who shot in case in case His other stuff leaked Got out and then it's like it would just be lame. We had like an insurance special. We did learn nine days notice. It was a fucking hero of mine and It'll never come out because you know we look hindlip shooting the right way later but at least i got to do it. I had to fuck in Experience made it happy about another one this year. hopefully agents. Maybe ms pats maybe seventeen. There's a lot of people like. Hey i'll talk and make it a hold you to it. I'll hold you to like you got to work out. We can't just fuck in run this five times. You've got to work out on a level that we talk about and we're gonna make it look like the way you want it to look to put the money where it should be put. I'm gonna tell you every step of the way like why we're doing certain things and we're gonna make sure. The crowd is fucking amazing. That's always get a fucking paid crowd not get a great crowd in here. Get back to the streak of new country. It stop this year high. So i've got one so next year to nor new countries you know what maybe even three to make up for this year. Although i got five and twenty seventeen hundred thousand subscribers on youtube is a possible. Can you help me out. it's subscribe. Tell your friends. About yoga with ari. Subscribe if i can get to one hundred thousand. That's one goal. Three thousand people on patron if i got fifteen hundred people patriot. I've decided i'm doing this. I'm going to do a q. And a. on every episode which means like a week up. Say here's the fucking episode. Let you list your questions. what. I didn't get back to all this stuff. I didn't get back to all the stuff. I didn't say It questions you have like. Well what about this. Did you find this. And i'll fucking answer this failure fifty. I'm almost there. I'm a like a eleven hundred now. Thousand fifteen hundred. I'll do that every fucking week. Every episode me. In addition to the fucking solo podcasts and joint podcasts. I do too And if i get the five thousand. I really think i'll stop doing ads. I would love it five thousand subscribers and i can just stop doing that. And i got fucking t shirts on their tears like that and fucking stickers tears and whatever but just five thousand people or you know whatever that'll be the dream i i don't know friends some okay. Another one is reach out. I've been doing this to reach out to comics. That are in trouble. Which i have done the past Menaka to do I've been doing it for years. I have the most experience with trouble. from anybody in the fucking Happens that's all. I just call comics and if i were you i would do the same thing you know for fans just you see anybody that spin even if you're not you're not their favorite even if you don't really like them just placate man. None of those serves you right instead do like this this is a unreasonably harsh and and You don't have like. Hey i don't even like your stuff much but the you're not don't put that in just like. Hey this sucks. This isn't right what's happened to you You know and then a compliment. That's what i do. I'm like hey man you're always been a cool guy Underside and you should see. I mean it's happened five six years. I remember one and he was. I haven't talked to the guy in ten years and he was a. Hey thanks for reaching out. I just had his email address. This means shitload because every feels like have abandoned them so those two messages. Like i'm telling you. I got to where it's like. Hey i found that for yourself i. It just goes a long way. So i'm gonna continue to do that even the people that fuck in turn on me. It's okay it's alright doesn't mean i gotta do the same shit. I'll still be the guy. I want to be regardless of. If you're the guy that's turned against me all this stuff this connex they do this thing now where it's like. When someone's down the kickoff. I saw it. I with louis c. k. Where like. I never found him funny. And you're saying that now and not a year before all this fucking all the stories came out. You're saying now so you kicking him when he's down when he can't fight pack how cowardly it's crazy. I'm not going to be that guy even if they've wrong me. I'm not going to be that guy. I'm not going kick people when they're down kick when they're up. That's what i do. I kick them when they're up. I wonder if these guys like. Oh yeah i kind of fuck you over like whatever you can go part is publicly if you want but Ordered me if you want. But that's not why. I'm here like any apology. You don't feel like i'm sorry but you should. That's not an apology. Apologize ham sorry And if they go yeah. I should have done that. Thank you that means a lot to me. But then that's their apology can't fish for what whatever the last one like i said before. Remember the good of twenty twenty. There was so much fucking great shit. There was so much great shit last year. The the best summer i went scuba diving. I went skiing. I took surf lessons. Banged up my knee. You know in perspective in that back some of my friends. I have a friend who will never walk again. He hit his arm all bent backwards. Like a fucking like he was a fucking son of a vietnamese fishermen and one of those agent orange lakes. I'll never walk again. So you know broken bone here. There's something bad banged up. My neil of a wild taking surf lessons in december. Remember the good. There was so much fucking great shit. Drinking with with sal with holding a boombox crossing over the fucking williamsburg bridge rosa counter behind putting his hand over my show playing basketball. Big j all the whole legion of skanks election. So much fucking fun. Original stuff came out walks. Listen to the pink clouds. The park out doing fun podcasts. Going camp at there was just so much cool. Schick wanna see my sister's family a bunch of times hanging with my parents man was so cool having some wine with my pants just sitting on the porch drinking a glass of rosa which i would never drink and watching the fuck. They have this fenced in deck where you can see the sunset the trees and you sit there right a little bit or read and sit there with your parents. You know my fucking forties. It was it was great. It was great. You gotta make list of the fucking great shit. That happened this year and try your best even though works going to come by way harder. And life's gonna hit you hard to make time for those great fucking things. Make fucking cambodia so those are my resolutions for twenty twenty for twenty twenty one. We're now a fucking week into it. Fifty one weeks left to live to our fullest guys. That's been fear skeptic so recording first episode four twelve twenty my my twenty twenty year in review. I do this every year next year. You can have some fucking countries to tell you about. And i'll tell you more about ecuador on the john he Probably call it revolution. Probably ecuador i don't know In a couple of weeks You guys they started much. I appreciate. Don't forget hit subscribing to bring this up into five different sections i got. There's no where six. There's no i i can't put a fucking six. Maybe i'll put up a six hour version of it and then i'll fucking break it up into smaller. Thanks also coming this year. Well yeah sure come into sierra. It's all the all. Podcasts are audio only put up on youtube. I don't know what else doing yoga. I forgot to say doing yoga. I'll march or april and was it now. I guess it was all april. He i guess is all of april. The april challenge was hard. Do light yoga czar guys. That's the episode. Thank you very much. You guys are the best Thanks for keeping me in business. While my entire industry you should see people go like how you coming to to this country for success. Mrs and i'm like yeah. I know like how am i. Mitch hose Kobe is is a veneto bihar. Total for nita this back. It's it's been ravaged live performance. It's fucking minor. It ain't like it was been up since falcon last week of october. Hammered won't be till like march or april. That i go up again. That's a long time for ray. After three months the beginning of the year to are you going to roll with the punches plays gentlemen. I'm sure say for fear saying so long. Goodbye thanks guys thanks Last is dry. Just talk juice violence dr with.

omega philli jon benet Rolf potts hindlip Tony ecuador yossi Menaka aviva holloway dante patrick louis c ari orange lakes new york williamsburg bridge rosa youtube Schick skiing
BONUS: Shira Haas and Anna Winger Take Us Behind the Scenes of Unorthodox

Little Gold Men

44:55 min | 1 year ago

BONUS: Shira Haas and Anna Winger Take Us Behind the Scenes of Unorthodox

"Today's episode of Vanity Fair's little gold. Goldman is part of a special series called Little Gold women sponsored by net flicks. Hello and welcome to little gold women. A special two part series made in collaboration with net flicks. I'm which way Ferguson and I'm Ange, for Goodell. This is the second episode in this series, which we got some of the most fascinating female characters on Netflix original series. Last week, we discussed Ozark and this week will be getting into unorthodox a four part limited series created by an winger and Alexa Kurlansky that was nominated for eight emmys this year. And you had the chance to talk to Anna winger as well as share has who stars in the series as s t a woman who escaped her conservative Hasidic Community East Williamsburg for a new life in Berlin. Unorthodox became a surprise hit when it debuted on Netflix in March and I think a lot thanks to the character of SSD while many viewers may not have experienced with her religion I. Think a lot of women can still see themselves S. And leaving one community in seeking out another on your own is kind of a universal experience regardless of gender. And just F- I, there will be spoilers for the series. So. Unorthodox Star your haas as t a nineteen year old Jewish woman who is in an unhappy marriage arranged marriage in an ultra orthodox community in Williamsburg. As noted, she decides to run away to Berlin to find her estranged mother and from there she discovers a a whole new world whole new life that she was always taught to fear. And process her husband Jaki played by Rav follows her to Berlin to find her and bring her back by order of their rabbi. What I is interesting about this story. So this is obviously based on a true story, but I really recommend watching the a documentary alongside it's about twenty minutes long, but it gets into how s story in Brooklyn is based on a true story, but everything in Berlin is. Up and I thought it was really interesting that the world she falls into is music and how that kind of plays into representing freedom and flexibility a little. What did you think of Berlin storyline versus? Her Life in Brooklyn of upon finding out that the Berlin storyline was created specifically just for the show and it wasn't the same as Deborah's I. Think it actually speaks to the universality of this whole miniseries where obviously this is a culture you and I don't really know much about not part of this culture. But I think anyone can understand trying to find yourself in a new world, which is what a Berlin scenes do and contrasting that with the Brooklyn scenes. It really helps to make this a series where you can relate to this despite being from a world away I think. The thing that really makes this mini series work as well as it does, it makes it as accessible as is despite coming from a completely different perspective, right? I think a lot of people can also relate to the idea I mean I. Think it's important to note that she is nineteen. She's so young and that's usually the age where I think. A lot of us can get the opportunity to go to college or start careers or taking these big steps in our lives and she's doing that but she's also kind of learning how to become a person and in do do things that she wasn't really given the opportunity to she wasn't really given opportunities to speak her mind to use her voice is. A very powerful theme that. Finally comes through in the finale and I really like how it was all kind of woven together. They didn't really like hit over the head too much. So when she sings in that final episode, it's very powerful in you really understand how much it needs to her. Yeah, it's it's a story about finding your voice without having to say every scene is about finding your voice. So so when she literally finds her voice, it actually has impact and meaning, and it's because she is she is so small and that's very evident when you're watching St navigate the world especially, the larger the world gets to the contrast and just watching St. you know it's not even necessarily that she's a timid character in her Brooklyn World. It's just that she is living this life that she was raised to live. She is doing everything essentially right and she keeps being told how she's doing it wrong. There's something wrong with her and you just progressively just see how she gangs appearances how she learned that. You know there's nothing wrong with her. She finds kinship with people very quickly. Characters. Who by the way we we should discuss her friend group because I think it's a it's a very diverse dynamic friend group without shouting hey, look how diverse we are. Right. And it's also interesting. We can talk about the Robert Character because I feel like he's less for character that memorial concept in general. Yeah it's a bed of a he has a little bit more to him but it kind of reminded me of the Manic Pixie dream. Girl trope of this kind of like person of the opposite sex that gets to like represent freedom in and you kind of becoming a new person. It's it's nice to see her have a relationship with a man romantic are not wear. He's kind of letting her be her own person and I think that's what Yankee. kind of has to discover by the end of the show and the actors kind of acknowledged get he's stuck in this one way. Of Thinking Healing knows this one truth by Berlin represents not only a diversity of people but a diversity of thought any type of community where all these people are coming together from different backgrounds The metaphor of the orchestra is kind of perfect because it's all these different sounds coming together to make you know one kind of beautiful piece of music and I think you see some music to back in Brooklyn in her orthodox community but it's only the men singing and it is it's kind a little more uniform I again, you also save that with the costumes as well. I think they're. Crossing design team deserves a shoutout because you really see that the Palette of back in Brooklyn is very dark and blue and it's very colorful when she gets Berlin. Yeah. It's of course very muted in Brooklyn, which again speaks to the the finding your voice because early on we you know we see the flashback where sti telling Yankee when I meet the how she's different and it's something that yerkes. In that conversation seems to be accepting of we quickly learned that's not the case. There's that moment where you know they're talking about music and she's trying to bond with him and he talks about you know how he performs times and then he he's asking her about music and she's like Oh do I perform? He's like, of course, not like the the idea that she would perform music is just preposterous because of the you know the culture of the world in which they live in. So it's got moment where she thinks she's Having this connection with Yongki and immediately shut down. I feel like junkies an interesting character just because. I wouldn't Sitcom the villain announced its its moisture. Obviously pretty obvious but I did go back and forth between just being very frustrated with him and feeling for him. Because he he got he only does know this one way and he is so ingrained in this world and he is so ingrained in what he has been taught by his family about man's place in a woman's place and he is fighting this culture shock and he does want to try as he's in Berlin discovering but. Ultimately. Let's say that S D did decide to get back with him at the end. I. Don't think that he would change. Like he make much in for a little bit, but he would return because of what society expects from them. Anyway, and you know that's something that s is aware of right. I agree something I. Appreciate it about this show is that the men aren't one note it's not straightforward like it would be very easy to just make Yankee like a restrictive kind of husband that doesn't understand her at all and I think they make it clear that he was also raised this way in. He's also just doing what his family has kind of raised. Him To do his whole life and moisten. It was like an interesting contrast because I think he's villainous in ways but he's also what I got from him was that he's very jealous of SSD he's jealous of the fact that she is leaving and she is stronger than him in ways that she doesn't return, and now he seems like a man who feels very trapped. By his choices in by his guilt for leaving an for returning. We see him gambling on his own in going out to bars like he's definitely a lot looser than Yankee. It's interesting to see kind of the perspective from the men I. Read that there are Orthodox. Jewish people who think this is the best representation Dave scenes so far I think it's probably impossible to get everything a hundred percent right? There's only so much you can do and get in a few hours of TV, but I think what's good about this show is it can also provide opportunities for people to research more. In learn more about these people and to get firsthand experiences. There's definitely a lot of I've seen some writings from people who kind of are pointing out what they got right and what they got wrong and it's good for people who don't know anything about that world to kind of learn about those other perspectives I interesting that you note that marshes jealous of St because I was kind of taken aback by how. He is such a complete mess everyone in the community knows this but he's essentially going to if if he brings SD back he's going to be absolved of all of us and even though it's not as though he's changed he talks about you know wanting his wife and kids back a gambling addiction and he does not change and I do like the touch at the end where he wins big because I was like just a really bad gambler because. He's a gamble gamble just really bad at it can explain everything but the fact is he is you know he does have skilled by a certain point when you're gambling that much it doesn't really matter if you have skill because. The House always wins but yeah, it's it's one of those things where. St Is Not GonNa get any leniency. If she comes back, she will always be the woman who ran away with her child even if she came back. Whereas the, you know the rabbi's talking about how will pay all your debts will bring you back with your family that he he destroyed. It's like the way he can just because he is a man in this world, the way that they'll forgive this kind of betrayal of their community but they won't forgive St just for trying to be be a real person essentially. I think all the characters in the community are kind of beholden to the elders in their community, and that can go for any religion or any kind of tight knit group where guilt is a very powerful tool. I wasn't raised with a lot of Jewish people in my neighborhood but I I grew up Roman Catholic I. was an altar server for a very long time and it was just kind of what you did. You know when you make choices to leave it's kind of described as selfish or you can be made to think that it's a selfish choice when really you're just making a personal choice that has nothing to do with the others around you. I personally haven't experienced that but my mother is Nigerian immigrant who was raised Catholic Catholic school all of her life and then early twenties she moved to America. You know she's still after all years gets grief from certain family members for leaving. Her home for setting off on her own with no one else in her. In, her twenties, not even as you know a nineteen year old girl who's been forced to get married you know, right right and and yeah, this particular experience, four women you know like again, a lot of people can kind of relate to what it's like to leave one group. But I think women also have this extra baggage in kind of feel maybe more beholden to continue family lines are to kind of pass these traditions on. what did you like the most about? Sheera. Haas's performance because for me what I thought was really interesting was that she doesn't speak a lot. So when she does is extremely powerful and I thought her face was just so expressive in. So is extremely powerful that went she's holding it. So tight, the show is a when she really does start to fight back or clenched teeth when she's arguing with her husband or when she smiles it really break through to the screen. It was really beautiful to watch. Gee, I would have. To agree with that, because there is such an amount of restraint especially in the flashbacks street, she has to have in her community and then there the restraints when she just getting to a honestly doesn't know what she's doing in. It's just a progressive no softening and lightening yet that just relief and you know the stress could've falling off her that moment in the lake where she's just floating. She's taken off her wig for the first time and she just gets to be that's the such a powerful moment. So early on. In contrast of that with her bathing before her wedding. Yeah. You know what I mean I. Liked how Water Water represents a type of purity for her in the Orthodox community. And that's what it represents for the community and I. Think it's kind of interesting that they end the first episode in Berlin and another element of Berlin that I really appreciated. You know it's especially shocking that she goes there and her family brings that up a lot. But it's interesting how Berlin kind of wears it's trauma on its leave as they said it, they're very open and I think. It's kind of well known that in Germany. They make it very clear that they teach children schools about the Holocaust about World War Two, and they confront the past so that the past does not repeat itself and trauma is definitely a thread that runs throughout her family back in Brooklyn and it's important that they learn about it as well. But she kind of confronted in different ways in both communities. And they're obviously teaching in a different ways of to because in her community. It's come out of fear and out of obligation you know as she says. They have all these babies because they're trying to replace the six million loss in the Holocaust. So that is the reason why there's such importance on having children or having so many children but that's such a burden to put on anyone honestly and especially a nineteen year old or seventeen year old girl when you know when they first get together so. What is your think about her relationship with the other girls and Berlin? I love her friendship with dossier. Ya'll is one of those characters were again. That's not like is this development it's like she's one of these cares just always so honest, but it actually works well in a way where at first it might seem like is there something? Is She just trying to undercut s? But. There's that moment you know when she's performing for them in the kitchen you playing piano for them and it starts off well, and then it's like, oh, she's really not at the level she should be to survey. Tori. And you can get on all of their faces. Besides Mike occupants boyfriend just because he's not I, don't think he's probably the conservatory. So just like this is nice. No one's going to say anything. Was the one who the band aid off. She's literally not trying to be mean and they continue on as friends. She gave her the reality checks needed to instead of coddling her, which is probably the best thing that could have happened to her coming into the because it's a huge culture shock, right? It's for the best that they weren't as all GonNa Coddle her throughout this they treat her like they treat each other basically. Yeah it's absolutely brutal to be that explicitly. Honest. Maybe she didn't have to say like so harshly in front, of everyone. But. Eventually that is what does lead her to change her mind in singing's Dad. Yeah. I also just really like that. St. Despite her upbringing is not judgmental with all the new experiences, she just witnesses from her new friends. Because, you know you have a gay couple you have a L L who's from Israel which? Contrast that with moisture show when the hotel manager thinks that they're from Israel and his reaction just like them you know. Something that was also I thought was interesting about moisture Yankee is both of them wearing their baseball hats to kind of cover up, and we kind of had a moment with them. It kind of parallels, the power of transformation between both of them and for St because you really watch SD kind of come into her own when she puts on genes for the first time, like maybe leaves like one button open just a little bit and for the men for Yankee him putting a hat on and hiding his hair and eventually cutting it by the end of the episode et really mean something to kind of hide that from the outside world. Lou, militias truly the villain for not letting Yankee where Yankee hat like yeah let's just. Bench really me. I WanNa talk about Yankee cutting his hair real quick because as. As I said, I went back and forth on him. But I kind of feel like that moment is like a desperate act of emotional manipulation in a way. Yeah. It's one of those things where again you wanNA believe he can change but I just he's like algae Walmart thing she'll she'll have to come and this'll be it. So I I don't feel as he sobbing why doesn't I don't feel for him at that moment just because it's like it's too late she said, no, she's not coming back. Yeah definitely a bold move for him to do and one that I think would seem maybe romantic if those two had had a stronger connection, but it is inactive ration- and it's a bold move for him I think again she she shaves off her head and that's really powerful scene towards the start of the season. So it really means something to kind of cut it all off into, take that part of himself away for her but you're right. It's it's he's making this sacrifice much too late and he's not listening to hurry is not really seeing the truth of the situation. So. Now, let's let's listen to the conversation. You had with one of the show runners and a winger as well as star share? House? Well first things. First congratulations to both of you for your Emmy nominee. Box Yeah Do, you guys want to talk a little bit about how you found out. You were nominated Sheera I. Know You filmed your reaction with a meat that was a fun time. I mean it was not expecting to be a nominated, but it is my neighbor you live really nearby and he's a friend of mine and he's such a unique moment that even a possibility to be nominated. So we just decided to meet each other and to film it just for fun and then it hasn't. But needs the special moment. So we decided Sheri's with the world. And we were very, very excited both of us. I think the really touching moment about that reaction is. Unbelievable I and you guys have a moment where like wait wait? No No. No and then they say Unorthodox and you guys lose your minds. Wind up like forever the on before believable I. Two minutes. So I was like, Oh, my God, it's on North No. It's unbelievable. And I was really happy because I love unbelievable. But you know I hope for our show and then it happened like one option unbelievable and we dream and hugged, and I fell out of my bed everything happened you know. You don't nuts I mean first of all it was just incredible. The show was nominated in sheer was nominated Mugabe's other nominations we were all like wait what I mean. By so I was like crying than elected I tried to call each other on the phone wasn't working, and then I tried to Shira than I was like you have to call Shira like seventy. All I can go like. Nobody knew which end was up it was really crazy. And obviously when you're creating a work both as like decrease writer and as an actor, obviously you're creating the work to create the work but was there ever. An idea in your mind, the work that you were doing is going to be as critically acclaimed as it has been. I don't think you can think about that when you're making it, it's all about the work when you're in it and we know in this case, it was such a tight community of people making it. Also, you know we were all very involved with each other but. I was unable to think about it beyond like a making of it while we're in there was. In Post production which obviously. was fewer people but were I remember watching it and thinking just that it moved me so much. It's really hard to think about the audience beyond the set of constellation of collaborators 'cause you can't plan that. I think that would be very difficult. Yeah. No I agree I mean we'll also committed to these projects then we were also busy and just doing it and doing. The, best we can with it I while doing it was in I wasn't even thinking that it will be out there was just I wanted to do justice would be strolling I I really believe in this project and I wanted to believe that glue pathological people's hearts but I was not expecting that in this amount. Love and acceptance. It was really beyond what we all expected. And can you talk more about the reception You know after it came out this past spring and you know that love and acceptance because I I think it's very universal story even if you don't come from this community and I think that allowed the reception has been about that universality. That's not even when I read it that I mean I was very curious to read it because like you said, he's about a specific community. So I was really curious about it. Then why reading as I was like I, really felt like I can see myself with the s even though I'm icon because different circumstances in different ways I skill could really relate to that and I remember hoping that when People Watch this show, we'll watch show hopefully will feel the same and have been big dive and I remember it was the first time I realized That it's it's happening is when it really came out with any, I wasn't lockdown. I'll say Israel. Fool up down. We were not able to leave our homes at all and I went out to my balcony. And I think I send you a video of that and. And I saw so many television open you Tel Aviv from different. Buildings that people are watching Unorthodox I think five. At the same time and was as well something is happening and then of course. Went by and we got so many comments and reactions from people. Happened what I felt from disagree. Unbelievably happen to other people who watch that. For All of us it was this incredible thing that it really crossed borders of culture faith in you know we engender. Newman. Writing to us and say you know St Story is my story like people come in kinds of communities and it was really very inclusive. In that way you know and we I remember the realizing that this was happening my first of all. If you've never made a chauffeur Netflix, there's I just incredible shock that one hundred ninety countries just received the same material. That's already when you start getting you know notes from people in Kenya and Saudi Arabia and Japan and then you're like they're all watching the show and that was very you know I knew my mom was going to watch it. You know what I mean back. My friends you know, but it was still. Wild, when it started catching on in places that have nothing to do with the Jewish community. Nothing, to have Satmar community nothing to do with Jews in general, you know it wasn't. That wasn't what it was about for. Many audiences it was. It was really about this woman's journey also Yankees Journey people identified with really strongly, and in these two young people who are really struggling to find themselves in a space that is just not esthetician is just not they can't make it work I think a lot of people felt identified with that in a way that was you know the we all identified with it and I just wanted to say that one of the magic things. About the book is just at about Deborah Feldman in general she has an incredible empathy she she deeply relates to other people and she connects in a way that's very special and I think that you know while we changed many things about the show. It's we activated the story differently Onscreen as the book, which is obviously a memoir and very internal but we tried to stay true to the spirit of the book, which is very empathetic and Berry emotionally. Away you know. So that was one of our. Goals in the making of it. And you bring up a memoir of the same name on Orthodox and just talk to me about adapting a memoir a person's real story to create this show that will process and especially the process of changing certain elements of the Berlin aspects specifically obviously of her life story. Well head number adapted anything before then make a make another show but everything is made up and so. So I I in I mean first of all, it was debra who suggested that we do listen to me. Were friends. So at first I thought like I, I don't even know how to do that but then she was very encouraging and she was like listen. Just take the creative freedom that you need. Because I thought it has to be really different and I was. Working with Alexa and the one thing we did that really helped, which is we changed all the names. And wanted did change the names. It sort of became something new became something different and we gave ourselves the creative freedom kind of break it apart and put it back together because I think that you know in the best case, the adapted version of something becomes its own art piece, its own work of art in some way and its own animal and. Lexin I had to find I created the show with Alexa Caroline Ski who's a filmmaker and Also comes to this as an artist I think we needed to find this place where we can make it our own, and once we sort of set ourselves free from the original than we could kind of make our own thing but stay true to what we loved about the original. I think that was always the goal and we. Just, a key choice we made was to focus from the book we focused on the arranged marriage and the kind of dissolution of this marriage and everything from the moment she leaves home we made up and we activated her husband's character because he's not you don't see things from his perspective in the book. And then we made up everything in Berlin because you know Deborah is a young woman. She's a quite well known person in Germany and was important to us. This yesterday of bio-pic this be that the present day of this of this young woman's life be different from Deborah's we weren't GonNa try and follow Deborah around town that. She needs to have the freedom to live her life too. So we need to sectional added that also is where it was fun to make things up. And Shira while obviously an Alexa made a lot of things up for the story. How did you approach playing essentially a real life person St Spinning off from Deborah Yeah it was a big tallies I mean I. Played a cartoon that he's basically spied by real person every story but not a real person. So I mean I remember when I heard the based on the book inspired by the Buca read the books I think like maybe like five times. And No. markered by a lot of stuff and super laws a bit as much as I could and at the same time like animation before it was really important for us. Not to try to be deborah taste like a deborah. So for example, I did not meet their brought us. I. Think the first time I've made it was after we started filming was with NFC went. For brunch together. I was very excited to meet her but up until this point I did not make it was really important for me to take a lot as much as I can from her story for during their amazing book. But also to create something of my own of our onto make betsy, you know it's not just a different name. It's really like a cargo of her own. So yeah it's a big responsibility I. Mean I always felt the need to do justice with the story and the fact that is inspired by a real person and you know a lot of stories that are inspired bio based on real stories. Either Dead. People very old people in Deborah is not so far for my age I mean we're frenzied like years older than me. So I really am I mean I yeah, I felt a lot responsibility to do justice with her story and after she watched issue really let texted me that you watch this and I was so nervous I wrote her and and then she calls me and she was very emotional and very happy. So I was very relieved. Absolutely. Yeah. That's definitely a good sign. But while you did, you know create your own character and approaches. was there anything specifically from the book that you? You noted that this is something I have to bring to this character? Yes. Whether he could, for example, the relationship with bobby because also a bit different from the book but you I mean you could really set from Deborah's book has special connection to our body. Bobby her grandmother I'm sorry. To her grandmother and that it's really like you know the person that she's most close. Jew. So it's something that I really took and with very meaningful for me and also also Augustine's I remember the first meeting with the on her example in the book industry I mean there are a lot of similarities even. Even in the lines themselves, I remember meeting with Deborah we'll film the scene and we talked about it and she was like Oh my God, how did you say this line? How did you say? I'm different from the other girls and I was like I told her I was doing for realized. Beyond him is. He was like Oh my God. This is exactly how I said that. So I mean I took as much as like you, and of course, also the ask. Her feelings, and her dreams. I think to be belonged. You know what that always felt from reading the book even when she was in Williamsburg Book you can feel from the book that she was trying so hard to skip in the four even dreamed about leaving or anything like that. It was always about. Being perfect being. In somewhere this is something that's really motivated Deborah and I think that is something that's also was espy's goal. So yeah. An- Anna. Obviously, you cast all Jewish actors for an Orthodox. Could you discuss I guess decision to do that but also the process of doing that because you hear so much about how hard it is to cast certain types of people but you made it seem pretty easy with Unorthodox. Are really followed the debate around. This now, this is ten gentle but to us, it was really important because we're working in Germany where there's been a lot of films and TV projects that speak to Jewish history because obviously German history Jewish history intersect. So, there's a lot of projects made around the Holocaust that don't involve any Jews it all right where all the actors are German and everybody on both sides of the camera is German. As Jews living in Germany. This is something that the election I already had talked about quite a bit I just something. You notice. You know you think it strange of other people tell store raise that feel. Like our stories you know but the, but there's also simpler thing which is just that the language you know if you my grandparents bookish, I don't speak it. It's IT'S A. It is the language of Ashkenazi Jews. You know we have this history and it was not easy to find people who could speak at more than speak who could not perform an an inhabit the language. Right so there's a few people. There's a few young people on Earth you speak Yiddish as a native language in all of them are people who grew up Satmar and left. You know like Jack will, Bush, who plays moisten. And Replace the rabbi but and some of the other characters, a smaller characters were played by except mar actress as well. But you know when it came to casting the whole cast, it felt really important us that people have some connection to the language some kind of shorthand understanding of the culture in it's also I mean the spectrum. Jewish. Experiences really broad I'm one end endeavors. Childhood is the other, but we do have a I mean the thing that was really striking for me doing research was just how much we have in common I haven't really expected to feel like that to the extent that I that I do and. You know they might not see it right. But I I really felt like I felt much more connected than I expected to. So it was important choice that we made that resulted in a really healthy conversation around Jewishness and culture and diaspora culture onset. I mean we had people from all over the world of Jews have been sort of flung around the world and that's our history and so we have people from Romania Israel Paris London obviously New York California all shooting in. Berlin which in effect is a central. Europe. where the origin of Ashkenazi Culture so it was pretty interesting experience. And I, you know obviously, it shows through in the final product and in the documentary that comes along with the just showing the process and the pine the scenes and this community you all created with this project and Shira neither English nor Native languages. Speak them both heavily in the series. What was the experience like learning the series? Yeah. been both also specific Daleks for they English and also, of course, lending me which I did not know before at all I mean my grandparents used to talk with my parents later but I never heard that. One understood that I'm GONNA learn it. That was very excited of that I able to do that also for them you know why and also for me I, I'm a bit of a Nerd I love. About new cultures I love learning new languages, an accent despite of while of acting. So much of this research that. I'm grateful for doing So yeah, like Ns mention before we had rose on the. Rabbi was also are religious confessor and our need teacher. He basically saved my life I spent a basin him hours I recorded him and I because my during the lines he gave me no, I was rising everything down also in English and Hebrew and listen to that while like washing my dishes. You, know I read I want to play with this and we'll go up with these because. It was not only about learning my life. It was really about understanding really every reward that I'm saying and to be able to go on sadden on Exton, then not to even think about what I'm saying but to be just like asking that it's her language. She's with and I'll be able to change it at a Beijing and like advertise different wards. Knows from my rearend like that. So that was one of the biggest turnage is probably was actually fun all to do that, and it really helped meals to dial into the car. I mean, it has to be said like she's insane talent. Sorry. Securing it. She's all I did it because it was really fun and get, but most people do it at all you know. So that was. It was an amazing unbelievable process to work with her I am just curious you've created to complete whole world's with this series you know both the New York part of it where you guys filmed and then Berlin you filmed and just how was that experience? It's kind of a culture shock in itself when you're you're filming this right because you're going from this very conservative world that you're filming and to the big large bustling world of Berlin, yeah, I personally I had to scrape I really separate it. I had scraped of Wilford in a different script Berlin completed these. It was also important for me because when you see these show, you see suddenly a flashback and back to Berlin checking back to brilliant but I wanted to have like a coin logical order for me as an extra because that's what I need to think of. So he was important for me to do that and luckily for me and I say thank you for Anna. Anna for that, we started actually the shooting. In Berlin. But we started with the Williamsburg stay with the past scene, which really helps because I mean of course, it wasn't completely chronological not at all, but it helps to begin with that because we started with the dish we started with the family with scoop as we say here, these with all of our actors of from Williamsburg, and then after finishing, it could be moved to Berlin to the outside as well as all the musicians and besides being very been very helpful logical even from isn't and that's A like cargo emotional journey suddenly working with all the you know the Williamsburg cost and talking Yiddish all day in. Beverley boom which into new cost that I barely know talking only English. No. Not at all I felt like was like, what where am I what is going on and suddenly I was not with without my colleague or out of the hat I was with my shaved bus guts hair that we also have for me that he was suddenly different and wasn't recorded for me to realize chronological during sem going through. And Yeah. What about you? You had to wrangle everyone for both of these worlds on me and and everybody also working with the media just emphasize it as a whole group of us who've made the show and it was very a collaborative and we really had one vision for it which was great and you know from the beginning with Maria. One of our discussions was Maria, the Director Maria Astrada. We this idea that it should really be heightened in that. You're seeing the world through St's experience of it. Right so you know in Williamsburg gets darker and it when you get to Berlin, you know it's in brighter colors. It's rounder architecture it's. Sort of discovering the world for the first time and Alexis from Berlin. She was very particular about the architecture. She had a really strong sense of which buildings and that was really fun to discuss sort of cotton candy landscape notes bright yellow houses and break greenhouses and stuff. So we wanted to be like she's discovering herself in the world and you're kind of in this expression, a stick landscape. But it was also like something that was really important to me and to Alexa about showing Berlin Berlin. As you know this place that attracts people from all over the world an unlikely group of people come together here, which is very much my experience of the city and it is. The. Music. Academy. In the show is modeled on a real. Academy. It's called Baraban say eat academy where. Jews and Arabs played classical music together, and it's this kind of utopia projects that could only exist here. So it just seemed really. Good setting for this kind of project. Yet you know what's interesting in Germany since you're interested in sort of the reaction to this show is that Around the world I think many people thought like I now I want to go to Berlin Mike. This is so interesting and then a lot of Germans from other parts of the country commented you know like that's not my Berlin are that's not the Berlin that I know and I thought that was interesting. 'cause you know obviously I'm a foreigner here and I have such a wide range of friends from all over the place that I've met I've lived here for eighteen years. So I have a really wide range of of friends really international but it was interesting that the German reaction I mean they love the show but they they're one comment was like I've never been to that Berlin so then Thought. That was interesting. You know like what come on over To this side. So excellent. Well, thank you so much for speaking with Me Shera and Anna. This was has been great. Thank you very much. For having us. Thank you so much for listening to little gold women sponsored by net flicks, you can find me on twitter at nine the Farda and on the blank check podcast, and you can find me at La Berg's on twitter and at Ronda Rousey Dot Com as well as my vampire diaries rewatch podcast the Empire diaries this episode was edited and produced by Brett Fuchs. The special episode of Little Gold Women is brought to you by Netflix presenting Unorthodox now nominated for Eighteen Emmy awards including outstanding limited series lead actress Shira Haas Directing Maria Schroeder, and writing, and a winger. Time called it riveting and the New York Times said sure Haas is a

Berlin Shira Haas Deborah Feldman Brooklyn Netflix Anna winger Alexa Emmy Germany Williamsburg Germany Israel Berlin Berlin Orthodox community Goldman Alexa Kurlansky Ferguson Jaki Ozark
President Heads

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

11:24 min | 3 months ago

President Heads

"You've just spent the day in colonial williamsburg and you've been soaking up the various sites of early american history horsedrawn carriages old buildings guys in those triangle shaped hats. And so no one would blame you if you'd had your fill of american history for the day but before you had home there's one last thing you might wanna see you heard from someone who heard from someone that if you turn down the right little back road you'll find. Fueled full of statues hawking twenty foot tall busts of almost every american president george washington to george w bush slowly crumbling into dust. And this is. Alice obscure a celebration of the world's strange incredible and wondrous places. Today we're going to croaker virginia to visit the iconic ill-fated presidents heads. We'll talk to the artists who sculpt them and learn why they have been forsaken in a field. That after this if you're wondering who has both the patience and the skills to sculpt giant busts of every president. I'd like you to meet david aspects. Okay i was in world war two. Remember that one so all the papers. David's originally from texas but he served in the army air corps during world war two and that brought them to france he always been artistic kid who doodling in the margins of notebooks. But it'd be embarrassed in seeing it all as a young man said man. This is where. I want to be. So i finish service and then took my gi bill to do two years embarrassed. David addicts was primarily a painter. But over time he started to work in sculpture as well and in nineteen ninety-four four. He got his biggest commission to sculpt a sixty seven foot. Tall statue. Of sam houston. The city's namesake and former governor and president of texas in one of the things that david loved about sculpting sam houston was working on the head and specifically the is head is about twelve feet tall and i get looking in his eyes and i love the way it's gone looks right at you. It was a big job so in the middle of it. David decided to take a little break. Go on a road trip. Take a quick vacation to visit friends in canada and driving. Back home decided mount rushmore. Everybody knows what it is. But i've never seen it but man i was well by that in the sixty feet tall but disappointed that you couldn't get closer to them. Look in their eyes. The is to david. The is were what helped him make the sculpture more than just a piece of stone. And so as you looked up at the president's carved into mount rushmore. He got an idea. Wouldn't it be great to do the president. Not just the four of those but all of them were forty three hundred that and not that big sixty feet but the about twenty. So that's what they the idea of building a whole set of the president's heads at about twenty feet tall but you know from mid chest up. He had his work. Cut out for him technically. He would cut out the work himself. But you know what i mean. The the analogy is if you took a green pepper slice it slice it and must by every slice by ten and put it back together. You'd have the exact shape times ten. That's how you get a model from one to ten p. He starts with a smaller model. Then slices and multiplies the dimensions of the slice. Of course it wasn't that simple. Subtle adjustments were required. These aren't cookie cutter presidents and there are actually some distinctions between the busts that you might not notice if david didn't point them out to you eight of them that are larger. During this research phase divvy came across a survey of historians that ask who were the great presidents who the average ones. And who are the true failures. He used that as his guide for sizing the statues here eight great and two that were phased those were grant. Us rant and guy in the twenty. At right after woodrow. Wilson can't think of his name right now but warren g harding now. All the rest of them were average. So i made the average ones all the same size that those eight i made about a foot taller instead of ten times like eleven times so they sort of stand out more. Generally speaking david says the presidents were all easy enough to sculpt all of them except gerald ford whose lack of strong distinctive facial features prove challenging but for every president david found. He did have a particular blindspot. History did not record what the back of anybody's head looks. So i remember. I used to go to movies and sit back and look at the back of everybody's head. It's like a man about that age that and kind of figure out what it looks like so there was one presidential head. Those particularly easy to sculpt lincoln is a piece of cake you know. I mean there were so many good photographs of lincoln. He had photographs taken practically every day. In a lot of life that beer the speeches are so this thing is. You can't do lincoln. give it up. You know after blazing through heaps of styrofoam and rubber after sitting in movie theaters and studying the backs of men's heads and after sculpting and slicing and enlarging over and over david addicts had bus of every president. Staring back at him. All within his humble texas studio marriages had to figure out what to do with them. Originally david wanted to move the bus to washington dc where they could be displayed among the other major monuments to american history and it made sense but it was too hard and too expensive to find space within the city so he looked farther to williamsburg virginia where he found a partner in local entrepreneur. Everette hayley newman who put around ten million dollars into the creation of the heads. New home the new home was an open. Air museum called president's park and from two thousand four to two thousand ten visitors could walk along a winding path and stop in front of every president to look deep into their well. Sculpted is but the park never really became a hit with tourists and when the us economy plunged into recession in two thousand eight. The whole operation had to shut down a contractor howard. Hankins assisted in. The construction of the park was hired to come in and destroy all of these huge presidential busts. Maybe i'm projecting just picture the big sad eyes of warren g harding into the distance waiting to be reduced into a pile of rubble but hankins couldn't bring himself to do it instead. He decided to keep the statues and store them on his family. Farm in kroger but moving forty two sculptures that way as much as twenty thousand pounds. A piece is no small feat if david addicts had known they were being spared. He might have offered some advice. I had no idea they were going to be moved. Told him how to move them. Which is at the top of each of had is a disc. It's about six inches. it's easy to get off. You go inside the statue and wrap non stress around this structure. It's at the top of his hands and then lift him with class. We took forty three of the virginia and didn't lose no damage whatsoever. But this guy didn't know about that so he busted the whole and the back of everybody's head and lifted them was a forklift from the back of their head. The spa at the back of the head that david had worked so hard to get right. Well that destroy them all and they started cracking and falling apart and he put a farm thirty miles out of tourists. Come by and look at them. It's a very sad affair. But he's showing what a bunch of dead presents look so there. They are crumbling. Cracking chipping away. It's definitely sad for david who poured his time in them but they're also strangely symbolic a truthful metaphor for the passage of time a metaphor that reveals the time comes for us all president or not luckily though for david and all the visitors there's one crucial feature still survives on all the president's that reflection of the light. What makes them all alive. And that's what's beautiful about open and they all speak about chewed. You wanna see these giant crumbling presidents heads and honestly who wouldn't. It's important to note that the form is private property. it's not open to visitors and trust. Passers may be prosecuted. However there's a local photographer who offers tours and organiz photo shoots of the heads. So more info can be found on the house obscure listing. I want to thank david addicts and howard for taking the time to talk to us for this story. This podcast is a co production of cure and witness docs. This episode was reported by matthew tab. Production team includes doug bollinger. Chris nocco camille stanley. Sarah wyman john doerr in peter cloudy. Our theme and end credit. Music is by sam tindall. This episode was mixed by loose fleming undoing thurs wishing you all the wonder in the world attack. Descend witness stocks from stitcher.

david sam houston mount rushmore warren g harding David williamsburg texas george w bush lincoln army air corps virginia george washington Everette hayley newman Alice gerald ford