17 Burst results for "William Wrangham"

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:17 min | 4 months ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The way for more students to return to the classroom. The CDC said that students could safely sit three FT. Apart rather than six FT. If they're wearing masks, it recommended keeping students six FT apart. In common areas like the gym or the lunch room. And they say teachers should keep a six FT distance. William Brand him joins me now with more on all of this, So hello, William. This is a big announcement from the CDC. Changing the guidance from 6 to 3. Ft. Why did they say this is safe to do? You're absolutely right. Judy. This is big guidance and six ft has been the mantra. We have heard this entire pandemic. The CDC changed its guidance, they argue because of the emerging science about how people get infected, how kids get infected and how best to protect against those infections. The first piece of evidence that a lot of us look at is that schools in Europe have largely been reopened, and they have not become huge, hot spots for transmission. So that is one piece of evidence but a very specific key piece of evidence that the CDC director Rachel Enschede cited today was a study that came out of Massachusetts. This took Um, two different cohorts of people it had. I think it was a half a million students something like 100,000 staffers, and it divided them up so that some of the schools did three FT distance. Some of the schools did six ft difference and that there was no distinction in the two groups in infection rates. So it didn't matter whether the kids were six ft apart, or three ft apart, and it also didn't matter whether the virus was particularly rampant in that local community. The infection rates were not the same. So that was a key piece of evidence that they pointed to the important thing to remember. In all of that, in this Massachusetts study is that mask mandates were universal. So the CDC is saying. If you conglomerate T that grown ups and students wear masks, you can put them closer together. So we know maths are important. And now they've changed the distances we say from 6 to 3, But we also know there's more involved to keeping Children safe. That's right, reducing risk for infection, and there's no magic number six. FT is not Magic three. FT is not some magic number. Now it's about reducing the risk in his many ways, as you possibly can. One of the things that has really become important is ventilation, and that's clearing the air out where an infected person might be. Earlier today we spoke with Lindsay Marshy is a professor of environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, and she studies how viruses moved through the air. And here's what she had to say. If we moved to three FT. Ventilation and filtration become even more important at three ft. You're able to put more people in the classroom. There's a greater chance that there's someone who might be sick in there who is releasing virus into the air. And then it becomes incredibly important to remove that which you could do either through good ventilation, or if you if you can't it's hard to achieve that, then adding filtration by adding something like a portable air cleaner in the room. Just echo what she's saying there. If there's a person who is infected inside a room and breathing that virus out, this is an airborne virus that could be breathed in by others. This is why filtration is so key. Open a window open a door or in the case of schools build better ventilation systems. But that's a costly, expensive and not easy thing to do. But That's part of the challenge for schools going forward. And William, We know there are a number of groups watching all this very closely. School administrators, teachers and, of course parents. Everybody wants to get the school's open safely. How are they reacting to this news? You're absolutely right, Judy. This has been an enormous topic of conversation among school administrators and all the groups that you cited, and the reaction today was somewhat mixed. We did hear from some superintendents in places like Texas and in Florida, who believe this guidance they, like the CDC is evidence that their sighting and they hope that this is a further encouragement. Safely reopening schools. Others were a little bit more circumspect. Randi Weingarten, the head of the big teachers union in the United States, had a sort of wait and see approach. They want to look at the evidence a little more closely. Same thing with Becky Pringle, who's the head of the National Education Association. She said that this is going to be particularly hard to do this new distancing guidance for urban schools and for schools generally, who are still trying to come up with all of these covert protocols at once of masking cleaning staff training, ventilation, etcetera. They were also a little bit more circumspect about the evidence that has been sighted. And so they want further clarification from the CDC as to why you're really certain That this is a good idea. But in general, this is hope that this is a better piece of evidence and that schools and teachers and parents can all get what we all desperately want, which is to open schools again and get kids back in safely. So we will continue to wash to see what the school system to do across the country. William Wrangham, Thank you very much. You're welcome, Judy. In the day's other news, president Biden and Vice President Harris met privately with Asian American Community leaders in Atlanta. Six Asian American women and two others were shot and killed Tuesday at three massage businesses. Police have not named a motive, but the president vowed today to fight rising anti Asian violence. Whatever the motivation, we know this Too many Asian Americans have been walking Up and down the streets and worrying waking up each morning the past year, feeling their safety and the safety of their loved ones are at stake. Mr Biden also issued a statement urging Congress to pass a covert 19 hate crimes bill. Authorities around Atlanta publicly identified the remaining shooting victims. Today. In all, there were eight, including he on Grant, who was 51 Paul Michael's age 54. DeLana yawn 33 years old and shall Jet Thanh Age 49. The others were Dalio Fung, who was 44 soon shock him. 69 years old Soon Park age 74 young, you aged 63. Judge in Minneapolis refused today to delay or move the trial of a former police officer charged with George Floyd's death. Lawyers for Derrick Show. Vin argued that the city's $27 million settlement with Floyd's family could unfairly influence jury selection. We'll get an update later in the program. The Taliban is warning the US against ignoring a May 1st deadline for leaving Afghanistan as agreed to last year. The warning came a day after international talks in Moscow. Militants insisted the U. S abide by the agreement. After that, it will be a kind up violation of the agreement. So in that case If there is action, of course there'll be reaction. Taliban officials said they do support accelerating the peace talks and the Kabul government said the same Tanzania made history today swearing in its first female president, Samia salute who Hasan took the oath of office during a ceremony in duress along the East African nation's largest city. Assan succeeds John Magaw fully And out spoken Covad 19 denier officials say that he died on Wednesday of heart failure back in this country. The White House says that President Biden will nominate former Florida Senator Bill Nelson to head NASA. Veteran Democrat, grew up near Cape Canaveral and flew on a space shuttle in 1986. If confirmed by the Senate, he will be the space agency's 14th administrator. On Wall Street Bank stocks fell on news that the Federal Reserve is ending some of its cove it emergency measures. The Dow Jones industrial Average lost 234 points to close below 6 32,028. The NASDAQ Rose 99 points and the S and P 500 slipped too. And the White House says that President Biden is fine after stumbling as he boarded Air Force One this morning, he tripped twice, climbing the steps to the plane and fell to his knees. At one point, he appeared to rub his left knee before continuing. And aid says that high winds may have been a factor in the fall Still to come on.

William Wrangham Becky Pringle Dalio Fung Floyd Lindsay Marshy Hasan George Floyd National Education Association 234 points Congress Europe William Brand Rachel Enschede Tuesday Randi Weingarten John Magaw United States Samia Florida William
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 9 months ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have had a unique view of how things have been going in the state of Georgia, our miles. O'Brien continues to explore how the vote is being counted there. On the day after in Atlanta, Fulton County election workers were hard at work scanning and counting the last of the mail in ballots. They began the day with 45,000 left to go. They are among 200,000 untallied mail in ballots statewide. Secretary of State Brad Reference Burger is vowing to have the lion's share of it done by day's end. We're pushing really hard for that. If we can get that if we don't get it there, But we get the number so small that then there's no question of who, actually the winners. I think that would be helpful, really remove a lot of those questions that people might have George's election might garner the most improved award. Primary in June was a disaster. They rolled out a complex new voting system in the midst of the pandemic. It led to a meltdown and that was not the end of the trouble. In October, more than two dozen Fulton County election staffers contracted Cove it early voting was disrupted by Hurricane Zeta power outages and on election Eve. A moving company assigned to deliver voting machines backed out so early on Election day, Fulton County's election director Rick Baron came to work in the emergency operations Center, dreading a replay and at about 6 A.m.. He got word a pipe burst in the room where the mail in ballots are scanned. They were trying to assess whether any equipment was damaged, whether any ballots were damaged. They didn't find any damaged on any ballots, and I think they're going to be able to get the equipment running up and running. Now it led to a four hour delay. But once the in person voting began, their stars became uncrossed. Voters breeze through voting sites with barely a line in sight. Once we got past that whole opening about 30 to 40 minutes way, realized that all of our polls were open. I felt like the day was gonna go smooth way looked at June and we looked at everything that happened in June. The thing that I've said is that You can't be too timid to ask for help. As the focus turns to outstanding mail in votes here and elsewhere. Georgia has another bit of luck on its side. The state change the law to allow mail in ballot processing weeks in advance of November, 3rd. Unlike Wisconsin, Michigan get in Pennsylvania legally constrained toe wait until virtually the last minute. So now we are all on tenterhooks. Despite repeated warnings from election systems experts like Amber McReynolds of the National voted Home Institute. So in a census was a slow motion train wreck that you saw coming. Yeah, I mean, we we flagged this. We flagged this policy issue, And frankly, it's the fact that these three state legislative bodies refused to respond to the needs of election officials because it was election officials of all sides all party stripes that we're asking for this very technical change that would feed up the election results process. Election security experts say This is a particularly dangerous time. Potential adversaries can now home their attacks on the Tegra T of the voting system. University of Michigan Computer science professor Alex Halderman says this underscores the need for states to audit their results. We now have a target painted on the back of certain particular states that are going to be close and Miss Tripp in those states could take the form off, attacking the integrity off the paper ballots could take the form of attacking the computers that are going to be used to count them. What we need to do is wait for states to perform the necessary checks any post election audits and recounts and make sure that those checks are done accurately enough that we can all have confidence in the results. In the meantime, Professor Hartman will be watching closely to see if any hackers attempt to get in the middle of this process and cause mischief. So far, the federal agency which is assigned to track all of this, since there's no evidence of any threats, domestic or foreign to the process that have affected any votes. Meanwhile, behind me live pictures here at the State Farm Arena in Atlanta as Fulton County election workers get through A pile of about 38,000 ballots and counting. They say they will be counting here tonight until they finish statewide. They're promising. It will all be done by tomorrow. But in other places the weight could take longer. They may take more time that we have patients, Judy So, Brian in Atlanta, where you been now for several days, and this is the kind of reporting that is so important at a moment like this miles. Thank you very much

Wisconsin Joe Biden Trump President Trump Wisconsin Elections Commission Donald Trump Zac Schultz PBS fraud William Wrangham Michigan Atlanta AP Reporter O'Brien Barack Obama Georgia
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:35 min | 9 months ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This vote. Stop this count and whether or not I talked with a few of the Trump volunteers who are outside and asked them. What about these is that that point there were rumors that that the count had been finalized and the Biden had won Michigan. None of the Trump supporters believed it. They said that they don't trust the media. They think that there's real shit penury going on behind me right now. Eso William. Is there any evidence of that? I mean, what are people who are watching this process closely saying about the counting about whether they've had problems? What? What do you What do you what? What? What are you hearing? There is no documented evidence of any kind of fraud going on. I mean, there are ballots that get rejected Because voters make mistakes That's totally common. The process is somewhat slow because mail in ballots take a little bit longer to open toe unfold to scan. To confirm the signatures again. Those are totally normal procedures, and it was simply state elections rules that didn't allow them to start counting those ballots until Yesterday morning, so there is no evidence of fraud. But there is still an incredible deal of distrust. The Trump campaign tried to file a lawsuit today saying that they don't have proper access to this kind of counting that they want more volunteers in here. As far as I can tell that both the Biden and Trump campaign have dozens and dozens of people standing at all these tables watching the process unfold so This vote is nearly done. If it has been called the Trump campaign has less and less opportunity to really challenge what's going on. But I hear you saying both campaigns have had eyes on and still have eyes on this process as those votes are being counted. All right, William Wrangham reporting for us tonight from Detroit. Thank you, William. So another state, Wisconsin was one of the keys to President Trump's winning the White House in 2016. But as we reported the AP has called a victory for Joe Biden this year to give us a sense of all that's happening there. I'm joined by Zac Schultz. Reporter with PBS, Wisconsin as actual Thank you very much for joining us again. Tell us the status of counting and whether their complaints I mean, what are you? What's your impression overall of the ballot counting process there? We're done counting ballots in Wisconsin. It wrapped up earlier this morning. It took through the night for quite a few of the larger cities to count all the absentee ballots similar to what we're seeing from around the country. There was an abnormally large number of absentee ballots in Wisconsin and just took a lot longer to count. The last few batches of votes came from a small township in western Wisconsin, where the clerk went home Sick yesterday wasn't able to deliver the final count. But those were 300 ballots. We're talking about a 20,000 vote margin at this point. And that is where it stands until we get to the canvas, which happens later where they might find a few heirs, But it never really changes anything beyond a few 100 votes. So what are you hearing from the Biden and the Trump campaign's In Wisconsin or even from Washington, where around the country in reaction toe to the call in Wisconsin. Well, the Trump campaign put out a statement saying that they found irregularities. There's no evidence of that here on the ground in Wisconsin, none that we've heard from the clerks or from the Wisconsin Elections Commission or either either of the parties in Wisconsin. But they did say that they would request a recount in Wisconsin. If the margins within 1% which in this case, it is The second place runner up, Ken request a recount. That would be a couple of weeks away from actually going through it that process that we're not at that point yet, But that is something that the Trump campaign has threatened. It wasn't we knew that Wisconsin was going to be close, Zac Schultz and again This is a state that President Trump won narrowly in 2016. Is. Is there general acceptance of the results that Joe Biden has wanted? Or people saying this was just impossible? What? What? What's the reaction? No, absolutely Both sides seem to be understanding that this is a really a result. In this case, a number of the Republican officials that I followed from around the state have tweeted out their acceptance of this result, and there's not any we've been through this so many times of Wisconsin every presidential election unless it's involving Barack Obama is a close one. Al Gore 5000 votes John Kerry 11,000 votes Donald Trump 22,000 votes in 2016. This time 20,000 votes. We're used to these close elections, and both sides have come to understand that we do transparent, clean, fair elections in Wisconsin. Well, that has to be reassuring. Not only the people in Wisconsin but the people across the country. As we get close, Tio closer and closer to declaring a winner in this election's actual ZZ with PBS, Wisconsin Thank you so much. Now we have had a unique view of how things have been going in the state of Georgia, our miles. O'Brien continues to explore how the vote is being counted there. On the day after in Atlanta, Fulton County election workers were hard at work scanning and counting the last of the mail in ballots. They began the day with 45,000 left to go. They are among 200,000 untallied mail in ballots statewide. Secretary of State Brad Reference Burger is vowing to have the lion's share of it done by day's end. We're pushing really hard for that..

Wisconsin Joe Biden Trump President Trump Wisconsin Elections Commission Donald Trump Zac Schultz PBS fraud William Wrangham Michigan Atlanta AP Reporter O'Brien Barack Obama Georgia
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

16:11 min | 2 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To build resilience house against wind. How again the houses, I guess flooding. We also have rules way to stay in a way to stay. We have maybe the ads in the city mapping as we have. This information definitely can stay. I know that your city is just beginning to dig out from this crisis and your facing challenges from displaced people to an outbreak of cholera. What is betas most pressing need right now. The you know, when you have this kind of disasters flooding raining weaned damaging sewed NO today who have different type of rubbish. And if you keep ravage what to get people read regular proper water. So what we need as quick as possible is what rigging water food to avoid us. I guess bed. New three shifts. And well Senate Dacian, but after that, we need to be cleared that will ski to come and Melitah would take place. So we need to prevent as as well against. Is your city getting the support it needs from the international community. I hope. Yes, we had to do support which is. But the question keeps on going. What does to happen if they go? We're talking about rebuilding debater. We need the resources to the Bill to see and to support those families who lost everything mayor Davis Sango. Thank you so much for talking with us and best of luck with the cleanup and recovery. Thank you think is. If things go the way, the democratic chairman of the House Ways and means committee wants he will get President Trump's tax returns for the past six years, and he will get them by tomorrow. That is the deadline congressman Richard Neal set in a letter to the IRS both Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and IRS Commissioner Charles red tag were testifying today on Capitol Hill and the returns became topic. A as NPR's Peter Overby reports the notion and writing went up to Capitol Hill to testify about next year's budget for treasury, and the IRS the question started immediately democrat might quickly chair of an appropriation subcommittee that oversees treasury s Mnuchin who was making the decision about complying with congressman Neal's letter minutiae treasury lawyers were working on it and other lawyers to our legal department has had conversations prior to receiving the letter with the White House general counsel. This is an issue. Because the law that Neal's using was crafted to keep the requests between congress and the IRS Mnuchin said he was out of the loop. I want to be very clear and not be misleading. I acknowledged that. There were conversations. I am not briefed on the full extent. Those conversations almost all of the president's in the past fifty years have made their tax returns public voluntarily. Trump has not and questioned about his tax returns of piled up since he took office quickly went to the history books. Richard Nixon Gerald Ford Nelson Rockefeller all had congressional hearings relating to their tax returns. That was this morning in the afternoon. Mnuchin told the House Financial Services committee, his lawyers hadn't asked the White House for any permission. We consulted which I believe was appropriate of our legal department. Well, I think the fact that there was any communication with the White House about this is deeply troubling. And certainly violates the spirit of the law. If not the letter of the law. That was New York Democrat, Carolyn Maloney, who said Moore digging was needed Mnuchin had this exchange with Nanteuil services chair, Maxine Waters, not afraid of being fired at all very good. Having said that I wanna be clear I've said we will follow the law. Please you're not afraid of being fired. Meanwhile, the appropriations subcommittee that question Mnuchin was moving on to IRAs. Commissioner Charles Rettig when Trump's tax returns came up. He tightened visibly and turned away. Several questions is inappropriate Georgia. Congressman Tom graves. The ranking Republican on the panel decried the democrat approach the just seems like we have chairman in potentially a party that is attempting to weaponize the IRS for political gain. But the history of this law is also relevant. Congress passed it in nineteen twenty four to get it the teapot dome bribery, scandal and conflict of interest problems in the Harding administration. Peter Overby NPR news, Washington. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Up and down the eastern seaboard spring storms. Typically mean serious Rosen, and that's getting worse with rising seas on Cape Cod. Haley Fager of member station. W C A I reports some beachfront homeowners are shelling out thousands for temporary fix Laura wing is showing me video of what happens at her house during a bad storm. That may breaking one of them. She lives in a beachfront home in sandwich, Massachusetts when they break. They hit the beach. How fixed wing inherited the house from her parents forty years ago? But the beaches changed a lot since then the dunes went much further out on the beach. So over all this time. It's just a road it away to what it is. Now, the water is fifty feet from her home at high tide. It's typical to have houses right on the shore on Cape Cod and storms can cause. A lot of damage the erosion isn't going to stop and wing has a costly decision to make whether to invest thirty thousand dollars in five or roles the most resilient method for slowing Rosen that Massachusetts homeowners are allowed to use. They can cost up to two thousand dollars per square foot. It's a big commitment to do them. They're huge rolls. They're made from coconut fibre and buried in sandy slopes in front of homes to absorb wave energy and hold sand in place. They end up looking like dunes what wing decides to do with her. Property could affect a Rosen on nearby public beaches. Dave Konta is the director of natural resources for sandwich. And we're on a different beach in town where public and private land meets if you walk down along here. The with the fiber roll begins. There is where the private property begins on that end. If you want to take a look the beach next to the roles is pretty washed out. It's lost a lot of sand. That's because anytime you constructed dune like when you install five rolls. There's going to be more Rozhin where the dune ends and the beach begins sand naturally moves from beach to beach, but when people install fiber roles the roles prevent sand from drifting to see how interconnected they are. There are other options for slowing Rosen. One method uses barriers to break up the wave action before it hits the coastline, but it hasn't been approved by Massachusetts. Environmental regulators dicanio says all of the fixes are temporary. While the. The nation's going to do a mother nature does because every other town on Cape cod's, dealing with it. Every town on the coastline of Massachusetts is dealing with it every community along the eastern seaboard and the Gulf Coast and west coast United States, dealing with it mostly being used by private home owners right now because the high cost can be a barrier for small coastal towns. Massachusetts officials recommend five rolls because they have a lower impact on natural habitats than other methods for slowing Rosen. But because they're biodegradable you have to reinstall the roles every five years. Seth Wilkinson is installing one of these systems at a private home in the town of Orleans. He says he's had some hard conversations with homeowners. And they're saying I don't think I can afford to live here anymore. Being repairing this banker stabilizing. This Bank is will cost more than the value. My home Laura wing says she isn't going to install fiber rolls for now. And she'll probably have to sell her house. Eventually I can't cover that kind of expense by renting the house. So that that just comes out of my savings and retired wing says she's taking things one year at a time. And she hopes she doesn't lose her house in a storm before she decides to sell for NPR news. I'm Haley figure in sandwich, Massachusetts. This is all things considered from NPR news. People from Haiti who were granted temporary protected status are not being deported. Not yet. But President Trump still wants to send more than fifty thousand Haitians home going back to Haiti I don't know how life will be. Next time on the world, we traveled to Haiti nine years after the earthquake and ask Haitians how they feel about welcoming thousands of people from America. It's on the world. Here the world Wednesday afternoon beginning at two followed at three pm by the PBS news hour, William Wrangham, we came to an article because this area is losing ice three times faster than what anyone previously thought what that means for coastal communities all over the world that's on the next PBS NewsHour. Building transportation infrastructure in this country is expensive is it to cost property rights, unionized labor, excessive regulation. Really interesting how you can come up with a counter example for almost every explanation on car. Hellas simple subway so Doug on expensive next time on marketplace. Marketplaces on the air Wednesday afternoon at four and again Wednesday evening at six thirty. I'm Greg Dalton tonight on climate one. We talk with three psychologists about how to cope with climate anxiety. I'm starting to notice in my practice that sometimes people come in with ambient, anxiety ther- just more distressed, even if they haven't always connected the dots about why the psychology of climate change tonight at eight on climate one from the Commonwealth club. Here is the final segment of all things considered now and k key weedy public radio. News information and features from the BBC World Service a head at the top of the hour. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. The new novel trust exercise opens with teenagers attending an elite performing arts high school in the nineteen eighties. There the theater kids form heartfelt friendships and relationships, and then they sabotage them all while they're semi tarantula drama teacher inspires and manipulate them. Midway through the book leaps forward in time. And in perspective, one of the students Karen is now in adult rethinking her whole past trust exercise is Susan choice fifth novel. She wanted to explore what happens when you look back on decisions you made as an adolescent asked her what she's trying to get at with how the teenage mind works when we're teenagers wildly. Improvising. We're just sort of grabbing standards of judgment were grabbing values out of the air and hoping that they fit, and we are really really I. Think prone to make mistakes. I know I did I hate speaking for all teams survey like as a teen myself. I made loads and loads of late real mistakes about the values that I held the things that I thought were important versus dumb the people that I thought were admirable versus silly. You know, I I really was basing my judgments on on pretty limited experience. But it was so important to make those judgments, you know, remember like that was that's what it was all about. That's what growing up as I felt each of his judgments with such conviction. Don't you tell me? I am wrong. This is what I believe obscene, and we're supposed to I mean again like that's what we're supposed to do. Yeah. Because that's what growing up is right. Growing up like forming our own judgments, but it's funny bit as a teen. It was very important to understand about music. And I remember being confronted with David Bowie and like puzzle. You couldn't quite reserve. In your head. Yeah. Exactly. I remember David Bowie being this amazing conundrum where I was like is this the kind of thing lots of people like this a secret that I've discovered I think I like it. I think that's okay. I think I'm boasted. I think I'm brave enough to, you know, choose this as one of the things that I like so that was that was what we were constantly trying to do with again with like a very small toolbox. Which is why it was. So fascinating this device you use you you switch narrators in the middle of this story in my doing. So you really confront the fallibility of memory how truth does change as people age and look back and realize how they reconstructed history. How people can remember very different things about the same events. And Karen that talking about have to say, I couldn't decide who to be angry at the end because I couldn't decide what was. The truth. Then is that what you intended for me to feel indecisive about what actually happened Karen is a student who hasn't experienced that. I think could be recognized by some people who have struggled to know how to feel about a relationship they were involved in in the past when they were young Karen is really torn between to put it. Most simply. Blaming the adult in the room at the time and blaming herself because she felt so much like another adult in the room at that time. But now that she's really an adult. It's impossible for her not to understand that she was a child, right? This man was someone who was maybe two decades older than her at least. Yeah. And a person who was in a in a position of trust to allude to the title on. So, but what what Karen is really struggling with that. I really struggle with is that she had an experience of agency of choosing when she was going through it as hunger when she was going through this young person. What do you do that? When once you grow up. What do you do with that answer? That was something that I didn't want to give the reader a Pat answer because I don't think there is one. You made me think about here, we are in the metoo age were watching powerful men fall one by one and you're seeming. To suggest that we should still be wary of where the truth lies and where was their agency. And where was they're not there's this point in your book or thinking about other women coming forward with accusations of misbehavior later in life and she's making quote in her bowels. She scorns them these young women who made a bad judgment. And now want to blame someone else. The thing that's really complicated about this..

Massachusetts Rosen Karen IRS Steven Mnuchin Cape Cod NPR Trump Laura wing president Peter Overby congressman Haley Fager chairman congressman Neal congress White House
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Increasingly dependent on imports as water becomes a rare commodity here. The price of food will increase in the place known as the cradle of civilization life. Here will become more precarious for the PBS news hour, I'm Jane Ferguson in Nasiriyah, Iraq. Today. The US department of agriculture announced new rules that will restrict who can qualify to receive federal food assistance known as the snap program or food stamps as William Wrangham reports. The move comes after similar explicit restrictions were blocked from the farm Bill that President Trump signed today. That's right. Judy Republicans and President Trump wanted restrictions to the food stamp program to be included in the eight hundred sixty seven billion dollar foreign Bill, but Democrats balked in. So those specific restrictions were left out. But the USDA that's the agency that oversees the food stamp program announced today that it is effectively expanding work requirements, and allowing fewer exemptions for hundreds of thousands of Americans who received this federal help buying their groceries. Republicans have long sought these kinds of changes arguing that too many able bodied Americans are getting help that they don't really need. Democrats argue these requirements are. Harsh and will hurt unemployed and underemployed Americans Jeffrey Stein has been covering all this for the Washington Post joins me now. Thank you. Thanks for having. So tell us a little bit more the US put out these rules today. What specific changes are they making? So I think what's really important to understand is that the vast majority of the forty million Americans who received food stamps are working and there's ways around what basically states are allowed to do its grant exemptions for these work requirements for people with snap benefits, if they live in an area with very high unemployment that way, people can still get the benefits they need to be able to eat even if they can't work because there's no jobs and job opportunities in their in their areas. What administration with the Trump administration said today was we're going to restrict and pare back the ability of states to grant waivers, which will have the effect of cutting off potentially seven hundred fifty five thousand people from the program in the argument that they're making is is that the. Rules right now are too lenient in the sense that you're saying if the vast majority of people who receive food stamps are working what what are the requirements actually change. So right now the way the food stamp waiver works is if your area your county has an unemployment rate more than twenty percent of the national average, then you can get the waiver. This would change that to set it up seven percents. Your county would have to have an unemployment rate of above seven percent to receive the exemption, and there are proximity nine hundred counties across the country that fall into that designation. So this could affect a lot of people who are relying its benefits so of those seven hundred and fifty thousand people do we know kind of who those people are they older the young are they like another. It's it's mostly white people. It's mostly poor people on the average income of this group is about four thousand dollars a year, which is four thousand dollars really not a lot of money. But there are throughout the throughout the country thirty six separate states. And territories. How these waivers so that's basically half the country or enough the country. So it's a it's a wide swath of the poor in America. The Republicans have long argued this isn't just a fight that's happening in the Trump administration. They have long argued that people need to work, and if they work then they can receive these benefits this has been a long ideological fight that the Republicans and the Democrats have been fighting for a long time. I understand that the Republicans wanted even more severe restrictions in the farm Bill itself. That's correct. What they wanted to do was to restrict the ability of people with children from six to twelve and elderly people. Well, not exactly unbelievable between the ages of forty nine and fifty nine to be able to receive food stamp benefits. Those changes were rejected because congressional Republicans needed votes in the Senate to pass their farm Bill. So the Trump administration is just gonna do this unilaterally, bypassing congress entirely. So the rules have been put forward I understand there's a ninety day window. Now, I understand I've already seen in my emails and on Twitter that the Democrats and other groups that support. The food stamp program are really fighting this. Is there anything that? They can do right now to change this. There's gonna be a legal challenge. It's not exactly critic who's gonna file that my guess is it's going to be governors and democratic states that say this impedes our ability to effectively administer the program. But we haven't heard that yet. Right now, it really seems like the Trump administration is gonna be able to do this. Without anyone stopping them. Maybe that will change and we'll see Jeffrey Stein of the Washington Post. Thank you very much for being here. Thanks for having me. And now for something completely different a comedy duo with a growing reputation and an economic critique of America on matters of inequality poverty and race are economics. Correspondent Paul salmon caught up with the Lucas brothers. It's part of our weekly series making sense. A comic. Take on a scary. I'd be it exaggerated stat is in black. Dishonor to turn thirty four. Getting close. Keith and Kenny Lucas, aka the Lucas brothers an identical twin comedy team unafraid to tackle tough subjects. We're gonna have to get a little serious serious. From violence to economic inequality in town that we're from.

Trump administration President Trump USDA Jeffrey Stein Washington Post Judy Republicans America Nasiriyah President Iraq Jane Ferguson US William Wrangham Twitter Kenny Lucas Senate
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stay with us. Coming up on the news hour, we continue our fall film series with a look at the heist movie widows and David Brooks and Ruth, Marcus, analyzed the weeks, political news. But I Facebook has been in the headlines more than usual lately as William Wrangham explains. There are new revelations about how the social media giant has dealt with the discovery of a massive long-term disinformation campaign by Russian operatives masquerading on his website. Earlier this week. The New York Times published a long investigation into how Facebook I discovered the Russian campaign what it did about it. And how it then employed some pretty tough tactics to push back on its critics for the record the NewsHour works with Facebook on some video projects. The New York Times story was called delay deny and deflect. How Facebook's leaders fought through crisis and one of the reporters on that story sheriff wrinkle joins me now from Los Angeles sheera up, thank you very much for being here. I wonder if you could start by telling us at first when when when Facebook I discovered this Russian activity on Facebook and just for the record. We're not talking about people in St Petersburg, posting pictures of their babies we're talking about something a little bit more malign what did Facebook. Discover what were the Russians doing? So this is back in spring of twenty sixteen. It's the year of the presidential elections and someone on Facebook security team starts to see people that he knows are known veteran actors looking. Around a counselor connected to the presidential campaign flash forward, a few months later, and they start to see those same types of accounts. These are known Russian accounts trying to share content from hacked Democratic Party emails with reporters, and they start to get a sense that that's very summer that there's a bigger sort of campaign underway. There's a bigger sort of influence operation likely underway. And when Facebook becomes aware of this? What we're how did executives react? So there's levels of awareness. I mean at that point in that summer, the security team that had found information had taken it up the chain to to their people and Sheryl Sandberg. Does it at the top of that chain, though, it's unclear at this point how much she was told about just after the elections. Mark Zuckerberg gets in front of a stage of people and says, it's a crazy idea that Facebook played a role in influence influencing people ahead of the elections. And at that point the same people on the security team that have been doing this research reached that would realize that whatever's happening at the company, it's not making its way up to soccer Berg, and so. Then a little bit after that we had the huge Cambridge Analytica scandal where it was revealed that Facebook had allowed this one data mining firm access to a huge amount of users data, and then again, this is in the midst of the Russia investigation, the president calling it a witch hunt. Critics start really piling on Facebook for all of this. What were the critics saying see you've got to remember? This was a rough year for Facebook, even before Cambridge Analytica they were getting hit again. And again, and again by reports that the Russians had done a lot of their platform during the presidential elections, and they just weren't finding it then the New York Times publishes the story, which essentially makes the argument that there was a huge breach of privacy at Facebook that they had allowed this political firm to come in to gather all this data and then to keep the data. And so Facebook was facing calls from critics. It was facing calls from from politicians that needed to be regulated. And they go on the offensive. They hire an external PR team actually hired a number of external PR team, but one of them specifically was called definers, and they essentially try and change the narrow. About their company in what was it? What was the narrative that was going on at the time? And how did they try to change it? There was a sense that there was actually a campaign. I should say called delete Facebook. Private people were calling on one another to get rid of Facebook saying it couldn't be trusted anymore. They were advertisers that we're talking about pulling out, and there were politicians that were calling for them to be regulated and the offensive here was was interesting. I mean, we we say it in the headline of our stories, but it was basically to deflect criticism Facebook came out. They would say we're sorry. We won't do this. Again. We're investigating what happened. And then at the same time that they were kind of on this apology tour for what had happened. They hired a PR firm to try and get people to write about something else to talk about something else in one of the critics. I know George Soros, the the billionaire financier had been very critical of Facebook. And apparently they were also spreading what we're not completely inaccurate. But we're not really in good faith stories about Soros him, potentially funding. Some of this criticism. Awesome. And source was in fact, funding, some of those groups so there was a grain of truth there, what they were trying to do was to deflect attention from the company and to say, hey, the real story. Here is source funding anti Facebook limits. The real story here isn't us. It's companies like apple and Google, and you should be asking them what they're doing about privacy and security so time and time again, we see a pure company on their behalf trying to deflect attention. Facebook said today in a call as they have said in times prior. We understand that this is the problem. We're trying to address it. We're trying to put an end to this malign use of our platform. Does your reporting indicate that they are actually doing things differently? Now, I've covered Facebook a little while. And when I read the transcript of that call I had a little giggle to myself because I think they use that exact same wording after Cambridge Analytica. And I'm pretty sure they use that exact same morning after the first congressional hearings in which they admitted that Russia had bought advertisements on their platform. They've said again and again. That they're sorry that they're investigating what happened. But nothing in that company has changed. The leadership is still the leadership the people making the calls are still making the calls. And so I think a lot of us are wondering even with all the new, you know, the the new programs have implemented security personnel. They've hired how much can really change when the same executives are running or searing this ship. All right, Shira Frankel of the New York Times. Thank you so much. Thank you. Now an acclaimed director.

Facebook The New York Times George Soros Russia David Brooks Sheryl Sandberg Cambridge Analytica NewsHour William Wrangham St Petersburg Mark Zuckerberg soccer Democratic Party Los Angeles Shira Frankel Marcus
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On Capitol Hill Democrats echoed for its request for an FBI investigation. Do you have the tire force of the presidency and all of the supporters of judge cavenaugh in the Senate arrayed, a one side and on the other side, you have Dr Ford who doesn't even have the benefit of an FBI FBI investigation as we all have called for Republicans. Have downplayed the need for further investigation in today's Email, Dr Ford's lawyer reiterated that Ford's quote, strong preference continues to be a full investigation prior to her testimony for the PBS news hour, I'm on Nevada's. And with that we turn to our own Lisa Desjardins for more on the fallout from Capitol Hill and William Wrangham on what more if anything could be gleaned from an FBI investigation. Hello to both of you. So William can the FBI investor. Gate this. Absolutely. There's nothing precluding the FBI from looking into this provided and this is the big provided that the White House requested that's the barrier here. The White House needs to say reopen this background investigation into Cavanaugh. And then once they do that I talked to a retired senior official in the FBI today. And he said if that request comes in there is nothing off limits. The FBI can look into any of these allegations as they see fit and Lisa what is it exactly that Democrats want to get from the FBI investigation. Well, they're actually asking something new of the FBI in just in the past few minutes. Senator Patrick layhee who is on the committee. Sent this Email saying he wants the FBI to investigate crimes against doctor Blasi for he says that includes hacking of her Email as well as death threats against her. So there's an investigation into things happening with her that the Democrats are requesting after the background investigation that we've been talking about all week and William was talking about Democrats in particular would like the FBI to interview Mark judge. He's the other. Person that professor Ford says was there, and they think he needs to be under oath and accountable for what he says, that's the one other name. We have of who she says was at that party at that home that night William how long does it take do we know to conduct this kind of an investigation as with any investigation. It depends on the complexity of the investigation a lot of Democrats in the last few days. I've been pointing out that Anita Hill's investigations back in the early nineties against Clarence Thomas were also investigated by the FBI, and that took just two days to do many people have said that that was somewhat cursory investigation. But there's really no determining it really depends. How deep the Democrats. I mean, how deep the FBI wants to go into this and Lisa what are Republicans saying? How do they see this latest turn while we're waiting to see what they come out with publicly? But right now, they are not yet backing down about the Monday hearing, however, privately I think the we're hearing from some key Republican offices. They feel that they will need to accommodate Dr Ford if she's saying she can meet. Next week. They don't think it's good for Republicans to focus on Monday hearing without her now at the same time. We're also seeing that on the campaign trail pressure is mounting protesters throughout the capitalism no reported, but we're also seeing some Republicans like a man who used to be Republican. Now, the independent governor of Alaska has come out and said that he opposes the cavenaugh nomination. That's important, of course. Because Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski is a swing vote he or she determines vote. But if the man running for reelection as governor of that state is now a formal no on Cavanaugh is something she's thinking about that sounds like they're beginning to feel some political blowback William Republicans, though are saying even if the FBI goes investigate this. They can't make a judgement. Call. So what value is it? This is true. This is what the FBI's protocol is for all these cases, not just in this case that they gather the evidence in simply put it forward. And then it's to whoever receives that report in this case, it would be the White House to determine what to do with it. And what to make of the? Assessments. In fact, I talked with seaboard in gray who was in the Bush White House back during the Nita hill allegations. And he said made this very same argument that the F B I can't really render a judgment. So what would we learned that we don't already know supporters of Dr Ford, including Jenin, Apollo tunnel voice spoke with today said there are so many other threads to this. They could interview Mark judge. Lisa mentioned, they could interview the other students who might have been at that party. They could interview the therapist that Dr Ford allegedly told this to so they argue that this this timeline set forward by the GOP is completely artificial. And that there's no reason why it couldn't take days perhaps weeks to reopen. This and really get to the facts. Meantime, Lisa, we wait. The Republicans are in control of stay tuned. Lisa Desjardins, William Bryan Adams. Thank you both. We will hear from the congresswoman with whom Blasi Ford. I raised her accusation. And from a woman who clerked for judge cavenaugh that will be right after the news summary in the day's other news, the death toll from hurricane Florence rose to forty one as the long slow recovery were continued in the Carolinas. Floodwaters closed part of interstate ninety five in South Carolina parts of ninety five and I forty are also closed in North Carolina heavy flooding still covered parts of Lumberton today after eleven breach the governor toured a railroad bridge with no floodgate that left the water through. This.

FBI Lisa Desjardins professor Ford Ford William Mark judge Senator Lisa Murkowski William Republicans Cavanaugh William Wrangham Senate White House Anita Hill Senator Patrick layhee William Bryan Adams Alaska doctor Blasi Florence
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Trump campaign is suing former staffer Omarosa manigault Newman for allegedly violating a. Nondisclosure agreement she signed when she joined the campaign in two thousand sixteen William. Wrangham explains this comes amid reports that the Trump administration has also tried to get White House staff to sign, similar agreements These nondisclosure agreements are increasingly common in the corporate world but far. Less so in government the Trump campaign alleges that manigault Newman is violating the agreement. With her recent? Accusations that the president? Is a. Racist and is suffering a. Mental decline Markazi is an attorney who specializes in national security and these kinds of contracts welcome back to the show thank you for people who are not familiar. With what these days are generally speaking what are they what are they for chores zone NDA is a nondisclosure, agreement it's a confidentiality agreement that is entered into by one or. More part obvious to a more parties to set, terms as to what can be discussed going, forward and it may have a set term in life or it could be as actually this document. Says in perpetuity that Moroshima is if she signed it and apparently she did that she is not allowed to disparage Trump his family his businesses during the service of the campaign and then The kicker is and at all times thereafter so. That was a contract she made when she was a quote unquote private citizen there have been other reports including, from Omarosa herself she told this to Judy Woodruff last night that. The Trump administration government employees are asking fellow government, employees staffers at the White House to sign, similar agreements Is that, common that was not common at least. In the context that we have. Seen it a arisen within this. Administration this administration has. Brought its corporate. Mentality into public service and they don't always mix very well at all now many of us who have worked either, in government or work with government when I, represent intelligence officers and military I. Often have access to classified information I sign a secrecy nondisclosure agreement it pertains only to classified information I can say anything. Otherwise it's classified and when I represent people. All the time who write books of their time in the time, in, the air. Force they submit their books for pre publication review. And it's cold for classified information only the courts have made it very clear over the last four decades that there is no legitimate interest in the gut Government in prohibiting unclassified information from, being disseminated so what the Trump administration did and bringing its corporate mentality they've tried in some cases apparently. Succeeded, in getting people to sign nondisclosure agreements well the courts of government employee. Government employees the courts have also said, that those first amendment rights that government. Employees possess post employment in particular. Cannot be contractually given away you. Can't sign your rights. Away absolutely so. We're gonna have or Amer Hosa will have a very complicated situation that I don't think has ever arisen before because, with this administration everything seems novel that she, has signed a nondisclosure agreement that. Pertains to the private entity of the campaign vehicle even the transition team still private not public that she may be responsible For what relates. To that information as well as the apprentice information where she. Supposedly signed an NDA too, but then when she gets to her government service. From, January of twenty seventeen to when she. Was terminated in December of two thousand seventeen a bubble may be surrounding that when she worked for the government that she can. Disseminate and discuss anything that happened. During. Her time in the White House the arbiters I'm sure have never dealt with this particular situation before but I think. The courts at least, from way I would interpret it that that area of time has to be shielded from the NDA that existed. During her time in the campaign, Mark thank you very much thank you.

gut Government Trump administration governmen White House Omarosa manigault Newman manigault Newman Wrangham Judy Woodruff Amer Hosa Omarosa president attorney Moroshima Mark four decades
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Rachel Martin Europe is suffering from a massive heat wave this. Summer which is. Making many people miserable but it's. Good for some tropical Andean flamingos at a refuge in the UK it was so hot the birds were reminded. Of their natural habitat and they. Laid eggs for the first time in fifteen years unfortunately, the expert fertilized so they didn't hatch but, wildlife officials replaced those eggs with viable ones from Thailand flamingos to raise their own it's morning edition it's five thirty one on. KiKi Joe McConnell returns with, some traffic news with a couple. Of new problems reported in the last few minutes. Oakland nine eighty, westbound before. Eight eighty. There's a report of a crash in, the middle lane possibly, the right lane and heading into Milpitas Fremont on six eighty. Southbound before Jacqueline a report of a collision with a motorcyclist down and might be blocking, the middle lane second from the left them we just reported there in Fairfield. It was a car I seen about an hour go west eighty west Texas The fires out the traffic is open again there's just a little pocket. The heavy traffic otherwise eighties, flying along Joe McConnell for all. Right Joe thank you. The latest traffic brought to. You by video only on Coming up on morning edition on this Friday Rachel. Martin will be speaking with NPR's Ruth Sherlock about another terrible turn in the war in Yemen with, images of bloody children after an airstrike Thursday that killed dozens that story also coming up later in the hour we have California's stories on the. California report all on k. q. e. D. And later this afternoon I'm William Wrangham on the next NewsHour beyond Charlottesville reflections on how. That violent rally has changed the community and the country over the past year that's Friday on the PBS NewsHour you'll hear. The story and other news of the, day is it develops starting at three. This, afternoon you can listen to, the PBS news hour on your way home here on k. q., public. Radio at. Three pm today and then at four o'clock this afternoon There are changes coming to the rules for public housing people on government assistance are going to have to pay more. But how are they going to pay Car is necessary but if you have to choose. Between the house and park my house I'm KAI Ryssdal the poor the, rules and the price of. Public housing next, time on marketplace that's, today at four then it's, the California report magazine at four thirty bay area morning clouds some of the dense fog then some clearing sunny and breezy today low sixties along the coast mid nineties inland, are the bay area highs..

Joe McConnell Rachel Martin Europe California California report Milpitas Fremont KAI Ryssdal Texas Thailand PBS Oakland Jacqueline UK NPR William Wrangham Ruth Sherlock Fairfield Yemen Charlottesville fifteen years
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We've become almost inured to the site thousands of refugees afloat on the, Mediterranean trying to cross into Europe in recent. Years a growing number of Nigerians have joined this. Migration in, fact Nigeria is now one of the most dangerous places for young people who often fall into the hands of human. Traffickers William Wrangham recently traveled to Benin City in Nigeria to see what's driving so many young people to set off on this desperate. Journey This is Evelyn near She has. Such a nice smile The story of modern day human trafficking often begins in neighborhoods like this in rural Nigeria places, where, young, people like Joyal God bones daughter Evelyn dream of a better life for their families and give up everything to try. And find it a year ago Evelyn was a happy and Embiid student finishing, her last year of high school but then she disappeared without warning these past. Before her brother Stanley's phone rang Lebron Who is this season? Work Evelyn had joined thousands of other Nigerians who traversed the Sahara desert to reach Libya where they crowd into boats to, cross the Mediterranean into Europe but like, nearly a million other migrants Evelyn got stuck in Libya. Apparently held captive by those she paid to take her across Joyal born demanded that, the captors return her daughter. The, will must remain comeback listen we'll go. Give seven hundred fifty thousand I don't have the come on Oh God Boone couldn't come up. With the roughly two thousand dollars they haven't heard from Evelyn since Julia is one of the top countries in Africa as far as the number of, people who try to leave here to go find a different life up in Europe and Eddo state which is where we are right now accounts for. The, vast majority of Nigerians leaving the country almost half the people. Who depart come from right here Julia makes a lot of money from oil corruption poverty and high unemployment have sent young people looking for opportunities elsewhere for years The money those. Migrants send back, helps their families build houses and buy cars propping up.

Evelyn dream Nigeria Europe Evelyn Mediterranean Joyal Libya William Wrangham Benin City Sahara desert Julia Lebron Who Boone Stanley Eddo Africa two thousand dollars
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now we continue our series on the aids epidemic returning again to russia last night we looked at how injection drug use initially drove the epidemic there where it's estimated that one million people are hiv positive tonight correspondent william wrangham and producer jason kane return to look at the other factors behind the continued growth of this epidemic and how the russian government is responding this series was produced in partnership with the pulitzer center hoffa love cov is one of the top news anchors in russia a celebrity of sorts here one night three years ago he became the news revealing to the country that he had hiv you focused i went to the infection yet a thick file crossed with the red marker h i v positive this was news because lot cough is one of the only well known figures in all of russia who has gone public about his hiv status loop says he wanted russians to know that each iv was not a death sentence something that much of the world learn decades ago you look at me you don't see the exhaustive and you don't see a spots on my on my cheeks you couldn't distinguish that i'm hiv positive if i don't tell about public health officials say it's hard to believe that such a wealthy educated nation still treats hiv aids with so much stigma and denial it's because there are still soviet what does it mean to be soviet very soviet means to be very shy shy problems keep everything with himself if you cry do it place critics say these attitudes are partly why russia is one of the few places on earth or hiv spread continues to increase at a rate of ten percent every year higher than in the hardest hit countries in sub saharan africa over the last decade the science has shown that there are certain things you can do that will definitely slow the spread of hiv you give clean needles to injection drug users you aggressively test and treat people with hiv so that they don't spread the virus to others and you target these interventions have people who are at risk these things have been shown to work and yet oftentimes those tools are.

russian government russia cough hiv william wrangham producer jason kane pulitzer center ten percent three years
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Finally tonight as stark new report shows the opioid crisis seems to be deepening across the country the centers for disease control released data showing overdoses are increasing at an alarming rate in fact emergency room visits for suspected overdoses rose by an average of thirty percent in a year william wrangham is back with more on this report william what did the cdc said just as you describe the headline out of this report is that the opioid crisis is still awful and that is getting worse and remember we lose on average about one hundred and fifteen people die every single day in america because of a drug overdose with the cdc did in this report is they went to emergency rooms and they looked at how many of the people that come to your hospitals are coming because of these overdoses and as you mentioned thirty percent of the overdoses they've seen a thirty percent increase in overdoses in between 2016 and 2017 in certain places has been particularly bad the midwest was really hard hit pennsylvania illinois overdoses were up fifty percent or more delaware up by one hundred and five percent wisconsin up by a hundred and nine percent so these are really really startled lee high increases in the number of people who are coming in this terrible circumstances some states dizzy moderate decreases in the number of overdoses but not nearly as dramatic as the rises so disturbing in these numbers are recent as you said right up to two thousand seventeen so why is this happening what do they think the cdc didn't really get into that uh i think the argument is that it's the same part of this crisis that we've seen all along people are addicted to these drugs they're taking more and more of them one of the obvious factors driving overdoses is the rise of what's called fence and all these additives that are added to heroin and other opioids on the streets that makes them much more potent and makes them much more likely to cause people to become it to have an overdose additionally we've also been using more and more of this drug called nor can which if you do overdose it's a drug the you can shoot into your arm or should into your leg and it revives you from that overdose so in some way we are saving more people who are overdosing and.

cdc america drug overdose pennsylvania wisconsin william wrangham illinois lee heroin thirty percent fifty percent five percent nine percent
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"However there is something in our hearts will name i give him funded never atlantic forget yukon for forgive it's difficult to forgive it's not these across iraq the violence of recent years has pitted neighbor against neighbor bitterness and mistrust have pulled diverse communities apart from one another and in turn pulled the country apart for the disease the memory of this genocide will last for many generations to come and forgiveness may take generations to for the pbs newshour i'm jane ferguson in singer iraq and as we heard this is a critical wake for congress as republican leaders sprint toward a final vote on their tax plan and avert a looming government shutdown meanwhile they're conservative drumbeat to discredit the special counsel's russia probe is growing even louder and to william wrangham thanks duty to help us wade through this thicket we're joined by our politics monday team tim rookies of npr in any walter of the cook political report welcome you both and thank you so tim let's start let's talk about the tax bill looks like the president is on the cusp of his first major legislative victory is this all but over pretty much as an vice president mike pence is announced that he is definitely staying in town he's delaying a trip to israel that was supposed to take place later this week until january just so that he can be in town just in case to make that deciding tiebreaking vote but every by every account this is on a glide path at this point to passage and if it does pass this is not just a tax bill this is president trump actually accomplishing aim surprisingly large number of things well well everyone was focused on the russia investigation in the tweets i mean this bill not only is a one point five trillion dollar taxcut but it is it is also a repeal of the individual mandate under the affordable care act which is the least popular part of the affordable care act it opened the drilling in the arctic national wildlife refuge and then if you add some of the other things that the president has has done like rolling back regulations.

iraq yukon atlantic trump congress pbs disease special counsel russia israel arctic national wildlife refug npr vice president mike pence
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pbs newshour i'm reser sale in baghdad tomorrow's essayah continues our series with a report on the controversial irani in back militias in iraq that were instrumental in the fight against isis now is the trump administration is considering whether to put tariffs on solar panels made outside the us the rapidly plummeting price of solar panels has led to a boom in rooftop installations and jobs the solar industry now employs almost three times as many people as the coal industry this growth is also raising questions about how utility companies should respond william wrangham is back with this report from vermont it's part of our occasional series of reports payroll and promise the challenge of climate change it's also our weekly look at the leading edge of science and technology good girl injury the commune in her son colder run a dog kennelling grueling business just outside waterbury from on are you ready during the recent windstorm that knocked power out for hundreds of thousands of people in the northeast the lights and blow dryers stayed on at their business power walls are over here that's because mcmahon had just installed these two brand new tesla batteries connected to the solar panels on her roof all your neighbors were out of power for you weren't now way it worked mcmahon installed the panel's five years ago in the summer with its ample son they generate more electricity than she can use so the.

baghdad irani iraq solar panels solar industry coal industry vermont climate change waterbury mcmahon Pbs william wrangham tesla five years
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stay with us coming up on the news our what proposed cuts to food stamps could mean for trump voters how tesla's new cheaper electric car could shape the industry's future and devil's bargain a new book about white house strategist steve bannon but first president trump continues to repeat the unsubstantiated claim that millions of illegal votes were cast in the 2016 election the commission he set up to look into this has sparked its own controversy william wrangham reports every time voter fraud occurs at cancels out the a vote of a lawful citizens and undermines democracy the first meeting of the commission on election integrity convened with the presidential defence of its mission throughout the campaign and even after people would come up to me and express their concerns about voter inconsistencies and irregularities which they saw in some cases having to do with very large numbers of people in certain states were so far those allegations remain unproven but the commission is pressing ahead last month sent letters to every state asking for voter information including names birthdays in partial social security numbers seventeen states governed by republicans and democrats as well as the district of columbia refused to comply many others said the provide only limited information that is already publicly available today the president criticised those states who have refused to go along one has to wonder what they're worried about and i asked the vice president i ask the commission what are they worried about there's something there always is just after the election were hillary clinton won the popular vote by two point eight million votes mr trump tweeted again with no evidence whatsoever that the vote count was skewed quote i won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally the commission cochair kansas secretary of state chris cobac whose republican says the country deserves a hard dispassionate look at the issue for a long time there's been lingering doubt among many americans about the integrity and fairness of elections it's not a new issue at all if you look at the polling data goes back decades the panelist cheered by vice president pence and in addition to khobar akg members include current and former secretaries of state from indiana new hampshire maine endo higher among others but critics.

hillary clinton indiana chris cobac secretary of state kansas social security white house electric car mr trump food stamps vice president columbia voter fraud william wrangham the commission president steve bannon tesla
"william wrangham" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"But first president trump continues to repeat the unsubstantiated claim that millions of illegal votes were cast in the 2016 election the commission he set up to look into this has sparked its own controversy william wrangham reports every time voter fraud occurs at cancels out the vote of a lawful citizen and undermines democracy the first meeting of the commission on election integrity convened with the presidential defence of its mission throughout the campaign and even after people would come up to me and express their concerns about voter inconsistencies and irregularities which they saw in some cases having to do with very large numbers of people in certain states thoughtful were so far those allegations remain unproven but the commission is pressing ahead last month it sent letters to every state asking for voter information including names birthdays and partial social security numbers seventeen states governed by republicans and democrats as well as the district of columbia refused to comply many others said they'll provide only limited information that's already publiclyavailable today the president criticised those states who have refused to go along one has to wonder what they're worried about and i asked the vice president i ask the commission what are they worried about there's something there always is just after the election were hillary clinton won the popular vote by two point eight million votes mr trump tweeted again with no evidence whatsoever that the vote count was skewed quote i won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally the commission cochair kansas secretary of state chris cobac who's a republican says the country deserves a hard dispassionate look at the issue for a long time there's been lingering doubt among many americans about the integrity and fairness of elections it's not a new issue at all.

the commission william wrangham voter fraud columbia president vice president hillary clinton mr trump social security kansas secretary of state chris cobac
"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 4 years ago

"william wrangham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Policy filippo guerande who was the united nations top official leading the response to the refugee crisis is in washington this week for meetings at the white house and the pentagon william wrangham sat down with him earlier this evening commissioner filipo grandi welcome thank you you're here in washington dc obviously this week to meet with some members of the trump administration of curious what what message are you here to convey to them a message that i have already conveyed in previous visits us leadership in humanitarian matters and specifically in matters concerning responses to refugee crisis is very important continues to be very important and the response i get these is quite good what is that response would what do you hear back from them when i think we all swatch to basra haley the us the united nations visit recently uh refugee program same turkey and jordan were talking about syrian refugees the biggest refugee crisis in the world and our message was very clear and very strong united states generosity and the united states support for refugees continues to be a strong and and constant than i greatly appreciate this this message on her part i i know investor healy has said that on several occasions but we've also seen president trump try to pass through and executor in order that in effect says we're are not taking any refugees in the us and the president has conflated refugees with the fear of terrorism saying we can't know who these people are is this something that you bring up with administration officials to talk with them about those concerns that they've shared a great deal in fact i don't think there was ever any statements saying that no more refugees with come to the united states there were decisions to increase the fact think of those selected to come here and to limit certain nationalities all these says as you know is now being this cost in the judicial sphere so we have to wait for that discussion which is a an american a us discussion to finish our message is ressettlement programmes this is what we're talking about a very important tool to protect the most vulnerable refugees and vetting he's already quite strong for those refugees that entered that program of course this is a sovereign decision.

filippo guerande united nations white house william wrangham washington dc jordan united states healy president official pentagon commissioner filipo grandi basra