7 Burst results for "William Volume"

"william volume" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"william volume" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"It because he had you know players that a team trusted in front of him and were you know set already on given all the work to you know what was the reason for it If we go off just what. You're what you're giving us here. That were saying it's because of how bad he was right. I just what. I don't know another way to explain. Got less volume than tyler ervin. Yeah that is weird Gwenda tyler get that work wonder I haven't actually looked too deep into tyler ervin but i wonder if it was when When he was when you know idea was out with the cova situation if that's when he you know had some carries as kinda crazy to say that he had as many carries. Tim note doesn't even sound believable It is expected points tyler and was just ahead of him and expected finds it. Looks like tyler. Ervin had one one good week in week nine where he was an rv to and like tyler. Ervin was less efficient than aj villanueva's so. I don't think it's really fair to say that. Tyler ervin outplayed him or anything like that yet but like why. Why couldn't he gets it more volume than this wised. If he would've even just gotten jamaal williams volume then his year one would be comparing to derrick henry. Instead of you know ronald jones. Yeah and just to create context for people. He rushed for two. He had forty six rushing attempts. Two hundred and forty two yards two touchdowns Only two receptions for twenty one yards and gandhi scored two touchdowns or socialize to right. may have four touchdowns in that game. Dan didn't really in the week. Sixteen game maybe. Maybe i'm sorry. I'm sorry no touchdowns just just to rush out. Okay so All right so two rushing touchdowns. So i mean that was a big game in that game. You know. a lot of people are going to use this especially people who want to be optimistic about eighty. Hey that's who. Aj dillas they're going to say. Hey i don't care about. You know the fact. When he wasn't getting workload the only time they gave him. Twenty plus carries or double digit carries he produced with it. And your argument to that is what josh by. Do you have an argument against that. I mean is there anything that you know that you could really say. Except you don't think he's going to get the workload in twenty twenty one either. I mean because a lot of people are going into this. Hey he's the starter in green bay next year and if he's a starter that automatically means work and is seen in his one opportunity with true working produced that make sense. Yes so my argument to that would be that like last year deal. Andry washington did really well. When he got volume for the raiders. In it just didn't mean anything now. They andre washington isn't a second round draft pick. But if we're going to say that Agia dillon has this inherent value. Because he's a second round draft pick that why didn't he get volume all year long. Just it just doesn't make sense to me though the one the one week of production like lots.

aj villanueva jamaal williams Ervin ronald jones two derrick henry Andry washington next year Dan second round Tyler ervin andre washington one week Two hundred Tim note twenty one yards last year two receptions Sixteen game tyler
"william volume" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"william volume" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Will you do that for the entire boat? Certainly would have And the monster. Be honest until still looking for An area too. Stores. Non teachers are OK, but it has to be on Eastern Shore. Okay, area. Okay, So if you have any area on the eastern shore for him his storage for For the storage of the equipment. Phaser like summer. Just a bill Candido going, OK, if you have an area or you have a rifle extractor. What number? Can they call Glenn? 443 to 44 to five to stay. Are you tomorrow on the rifle? It's model 47 a awards restaurant deal, Okay. All right, so that rifle extractor or if you have some property for Glenn Okay. 44328244 to 5. Thanks. Bye bye. For 10 92 6680. Jim and Perry Hall is looking to buy something. Good morning. J Morning. I'm looking for Hank Williams Sr volumes one in his greatest hits on record or cassette. Well, OK and also A lady called you but name of Lorraine and Chris. If listen, would they please give me a call? Chris No one was looking for a humidifier. No, No. They were looking for a phantom. A pool table. Okay, So my okay. All right. Not this week. Okay, if if you want to, But if you had these Hank William records, What are they again? Violent Williams. Volume one and volume to Hank Williams Sr Right. Right, either on or record either one, OK, what number? Can they call Jim or 10 6682347? For 10 6682347. Thank you. Thank you very much. Bye bye. Medicare. Daniel enrolling period..

Hank Williams Eastern Shore Glenn Jim Hank William bill Candido Lorraine Perry Hall Chris Medicare Daniel
"william volume" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"william volume" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"The mock Latin ending is known from other facetious eighteenth. Century Slang formations such as stinky bus. but there is no obvious connection with Muck Lady Coventry came from Ireland. The likelihood is that Walpole misheard a genuine Irish word, perhaps and here. I'm going to do my best with an Irish word here Maureen Yuck. which is spelled M. A. O.. H. N. E. Ach Ireland get it together. Come on. The that's okay. I think it's. and it means sentimental. The I should say crystals. Article also mentions a bunch of other terms for drunkenness including my new favorite. Not Alone word, not a new coinage, a classic anglo-saxon word, which is same bell goal meaning want with drink feasting. It also sounds demonic in nature, which is perhaps fitting I went to the black. Sabbath, and I became same Belga About serendipity though actually got me on the subject of another invented word that I, really like that comes from the American philosopher Daniel it. It's his concept of a deep eighty I think we've talked about this on stuff to blow your mind before but I read about this idea in dense book called intuition pumps and other tools for thinking. Oh. Yeah I remember discussing. So a deputy is a special kind of equivocation, and of course, equivocation is a word or phrase that's used in two different ways to a misleading effect, so you might say like Why would you read all the arguments for and against dinner? Theory of consciousness isn't there enough arguing in the world. Know. People people say stuff like this all the time. It hinges on two different meanings of the word argument, one sense, an argument is just explaining why you think something's true in another sense, it means like angry your acrimonious. Okay, so that's an equivocation generally deeply is a specific kind of equivocation You'll probably recognize immediately from your life. It's a statement that can either be interpreted as true an utterly trivial or profound and. False. Okay Yeah but it, but it takes advantage of like the good halves of both of these versions, so an example would be if somebody says love is just a word. So, either you're talking about the word love, in which case the statement is true, but it is a banal truism and doesn't okay, so what yes, the word love is a word, or you're saying that the feeling of love is itself nothing more than a word in which case the statement is stupid and nobody would bother paying any attention to you. There was a I want to say Umberto Eco wrote something about or I can't wrote it or quoted it about some. Some some treatment on the on the rose. Saying the first person to make the statement was quite possibly a genius in the second person to make it was an idiot. Oh. Was He talking about nominalism, though with William volume in the name of the likely, so, but yeah, it was it was from I wanna say from the introduction or the the afterward to the name of the Rose, but it's been washed. I've read that well I mean I guess another thing that's true is like with any statement, even obviously stupid one with enough effort, you can find something that that might be true about it right away of interpreting it right or is the the actor. Reciting the line is skilled enough. It can seem a lot more profound than it is, and you can be like Oh man. Yeah, love is just a word I! Just heard Benedict, cumberbatch say. Hardcore, right? It's totally different. Brian Cox could say. Like. Oh, he's right, but if it's the actor who plays Badger on. Breaking bad different story entirely right. In fact, love is just a word is a great example, because you can make tons of deep unease with the ex's. Just a why formulation lots of them are like this one example that we thankfully here, a lot less of than. We used to like ten years ago. This was everywhere you looked. Evolution is just a theory over the sun, so it hinges on two different understandings of the words theory. Theory one interpretation of the sentence is true, but trivial. Another interpretation of the sentence where theory means something like unfounded speculation would up end all of modern biology if it were true, but is patently false. Yeah, yeah, it does that statement does tend to hinge on a misunderstanding of what theories are what role they play in our understanding of the world, other things are not quite as obvious as deeply, but feel vaguely deep dish one. One that I came across. His beauty is only skin deep like in one sense, this could be saying. Physical beauty is only physical, which is true, but not very profound, or it could be saying. Beauty has nothing to do with transcendent qualities, morality or character. In which case is that true like? Don't we often find things beautiful? Because they're morally good or thoughtful or meaningful? Depending on how you interpreted it, it could mean one of to destroy mathematically different ideas and the sense in. In which it is obviously true doesn't really mean anything. Yeah, I noticed in the real world decided. He is often shoot by you real fast. They tend to be the kind of thing that somebody doesn't just say and leave hanging. They say and then move on from there talking very quickly like they can sound good for half a second. If you don't stop to think about them, but I was also thinking about deeply is interesting because there's something about the way the word. Word sounds that was clearly part of the selection process for attaching this word to this concept like originally didn't it says that the word was coined by a daughter of a friend of his Her name is Miriam Wisenberg. And originally she had been at the dinner table sort of like lightly mocking her father for some kind of kind of overly ponderous thing he said and then didn't heard this word from her, and then reimagined it because of the sound of. Of the word fit so well with the concept that he wanted a word for and it brings to mind the concept of idiot phones, which we exploited on an episode of stuff to blow your mind, basically the idea that certain syllables and words sounds in our in our minds are naturally widely associated with with concepts such as physical textures like there are words that naturally sound slimy to us or have certain kind of moral connotations to us that are just. Totally apart from semantic meaning right? Yeah, you often see this in the like the names of fictitious characters. Part of this is. We've been on a Harry Potter. Kick at the House and so like a lot of the the names. The K. rolling uses the I. Feel like they they line up with..

Daniel it Muck Lady Coventry H. N. E. Ach Ireland Walpole Ireland Umberto Eco Maureen Yuck. Miriam Wisenberg Harry Potter Brian Cox M. A. O William Benedict cumberbatch
"william volume" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"william volume" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"They offer real service for classy people who want to be confident in what they are buying. I call it the state farm difference. I don't know what they call it. I don't even know who runs the company. Maybe I should run the company. I would keep the jingle like a good neighbor state farm there but I would change the tune like a good neighbor state farm as there. That was better right all right. We're back okay. Now we've been looking at ways that words arising language without being intentionally invented when they rise through the process that's more akin to biological evolution. But what about when we WANNA Frankenstein? Some words just like make him in the lab so sort of going back to the business scenario. You've got a new product. The Need to get out there or your rebranding another one you need you gotta call it something I know somebody who would have been great at branding. And that's the English writer. Horace Walpole. Who lived from seventeen seventeen to seventeen ninety seven and the term that he coined that everybody knows he actually coined quite a few but most of them are forgotten. The one that everybody knows is serendipity And this comes from a letter. That walpole was writing to a friend named Horace Mann different from the American education reform. Pretty sure I think this horseman was a British diplomat But the letter was dated January. Twenty eighth a seventeen fifty four. And despite the magical delight of Serendipity as a concept I have to say the occasion by which he ends up describing it is incredibly dull Basically Walpole says that. He accidentally discovered a historical link between two families while he was studying their coats of arms and a reference book earthshaking right. Yeah But he's writing about this process and he says quote. This discovery indeed is almost of that kind. Which I call serendipity very expressive word which as I have nothing better to tell you I shall endeavor explain to you you will understand better by the derivation than the definition. I once read a silly fairytale. Called the three princes of Serendipity as their highness's traveled they were always making discoveries by accidents and suggest city of things which they were. Not Inquest of for instance. One of them discovered that a mule blind of the right. I had traveled the same road lately because the grass was eaten only on the left side where it was worse than on the right now. Do you understand. Serendipity one of the most remarkable instances of this accidental suggests for you must observe that no discovery of a thing. You're looking for comes under. This description was of my Lord Shaftesbury. Who happening to dine at Lord. Chancellor Clarendon 's found out the marriage of the Duke of York and Mrs Hide by the respect with which her mother treated her at table. God riveting right dinner how he treated her a man. It's it's hard to believe the the term really took off at all reading this but it's a great term right because it really does describe something. The idea of a happy accident the the occurrence or development of events by a thing that was in a way that's beneficial but it was not intended by the agent. Yeah like when you run into an old friend at a subway subway ride and you and you think this is exactly like a one eyed donkey grass at one side of the road. I think something at least in the way I use the word. It's especially serendipitous if it's a situation in which you know in the course of trying to do one thing especially if that thing is foolish or misguided you actually accomplish something different and good a true yes. It's like the foolishness of the original air end. That makes something especially serendipitous but according to a post excerpted from this letter in the Paris review the adjective form of the word. Serendipitous was not recorded until nineteen forty three. So that's a pretty big span of time and I wonder do intentionally invented words take longer on average to find. All of their derived. Parts of speech seems like they have to have a certain amount of sticking power to just like the language is a living thing you know so if you create a word and it doesn't take off you know if someone's out they're not making it happen like pushing it into the into the lexicon How does it ever gain a foothold? Well I think about the fact that when a word feels organic. You're more likely to assume that is derived parts of speech already exists right. The you're not making them up when you say them whereas when a word is something that you're aware of as like an intentional recent coinage you might be more likely to think Oh serendipitous. That's not a word. This is also probably the struggling point for Zaa by SWAT why? I think that I could be wrong. I don't think a lot of people are using saw as an abbreviation for pizza. Just because it's it sounds fake. It doesn't seem helpful okay So walpole also provides early written evidence for some other terms though not necessarily always of his intentional coinage. When I was reading about the I thought was great is from an article in the new republic by David. Crystal that's all about terms for drunkenness. In English a lot of these are forgotten okay and this term comes from Walpole. The term is monkey bus. Meaning drunkenly sentimental which is a good thing to have a word for right like you know I love you man. No I love you. Man Mucky bus Sounds a little bit like sucky bus too. So it has this kind of like demonic quality to it as well of the of the will being overpowered. Would you believe that this word comes from a dinner party? So it's an anecdote that Walpole shares in a letter to George Montagu on April twentieth. Seventeen fifty six Walpole says so. He's at a dinner party. He's having supper he over. Here's somebody named Lady Coventry saying that? If she drank anymore she would become mucky bus and then somebody named Lady Mary Coke Asks What that means in. Coventry says that it was Irish for sentimental crystal writes quote the mock Latin ending is known from other facetious th century slang formations such as stinky bus But there is no obvious connection with Muck Lady. Coventry came from Ireland. The likelihood is that Walpole misheard a genuine Irish word. Perhaps and here. I'm going to do my best with an Irish word here. Maureen Yuck with spelled M. A. O. H. N. E. Ach Ireland get it together. Come on the that's fine Yuck And it means sentimental I should say crystals article also mentions a bunch of other terms for drunkenness including my new favorite Not Alone word. Not a new coinage a classic Anglo Saxon word which is same bell goal meaning want with drink feasting it also sounds demonic in nature which is perhaps fitting I went to the Black Sabbath and I became. Same Belga about serendipity though actually got me On the subject of another invented word that I really like that comes from the American philosopher Daniel in it and it's his concept of a deep eighty. I think we've talked about this on stuff to blow your mind before But I read about this idea in dense book called intuition pumps and other tools for thinking. Oh Yeah I remember discussing. So a deputy is a special kind of equivocation and of course equivocation is A word or phrase that's used in two different ways to a misleading effect. So you might say like Why would you read all the arguments for and against Dennis Theory of consciousness? Isn't there enough arguing in the world? You know people people say stuff like this all the time it hinges on two different meanings of the word argument one sense. An argument is just explaining why you think something's true in another sense it means like angry your acrimonious okay. So that's an equivocation. Generally deeply is a specific. Kind of equivocation. you'll probably recognize immediately from your life. It's a statement that can either be interpreted as true an utterly trivial or profound and false. Okay Yeah But it but it takes advantage of like the good halves of both of these versions so an example would be if somebody says. Love is just a word so either. You're talking about the word love. In which case the statement is true but it is a banal truism and doesn't okay so what yes. The word love is a word. Or you're saying that the feeling of love is itself nothing more than a word in which case the statement is stupid and nobody would bother paying any attention to you. There was a I want to say. Umberto Eco wrote something about Or I can't reveal rooted or quoted it About some some some treatment on the on the rose saying the first person to make the statement was quite possibly a genius in the second person to make. It was an idiot. Oh is he talking about nominalism though with William volume in the name of the likely so but yeah it was it was from. I WANNA say from the introduction or the the afterward to the name of the rose. But it's been washed. I've read that. Well I mean I guess another thing that's true is like with any statement even obviously stupid one with enough effort. You can find something that that might be true about it right away of interpreting it right or is the the actor reciting. The line is skilled enough. It can seem a lot more profound than it is and you can be like. Oh Man Yeah. Love is just a word. I just heard Benedict cumberbatch. Say Hardcore. Right it's totally different. Brian Cox could say like Oh. He's right but if it's the actor who plays Badger on breaking bad different story entirely right in fact love is just a word is a great example. Because you can make tons of deep unease with the ex's just a why formulation lots of them are like this one example that we thankfully here a lot less of than we used to like ten years ago. This was everywhere you looked. Evolution is just a theory over the sun so it hinges on two different understandings of the words theory. One interpretation of the sentence is true but trivial. Another interpretation of the sentence. Where theory means something like unfounded. Speculation would up end all of modern biology if it were true but is patently false. Yeah yeah it it does. That statement does tend to hinge on a misunderstanding of what theories are what role they play in our understanding of the world. Other things are not quite as obvious as deeply but field vaguely deep dish. One one that I came across his beauty is only skin deep. Like in one sense. This could be saying. Physical beauty is only physical which is true but not very profound or it could be saying. Beauty has nothing to do with transcendent qualities like morality or character. In which case is that true like? Don't we often find things beautiful? Because they're morally good or thoughtful or meaningful depending on how you interpreted it. It could mean one of to destroy mathematically different ideas and the sense in which it is. Obviously true doesn't really mean anything. Yeah I noticed in the real world. Deputy is often shoot by you real fast. They tend to be the kind of thing that somebody doesn't just say and leave hanging. They say and then move on from there talking very quickly like they can sound good for half a second if you don't stop to think about them but I was also thinking about deeply is interesting because there's something about the way the word sounds. That was clearly part of the selection process for attaching this word to this concept like Originally didn't it says that the word was coined by a daughter of a friend of his Her name is Miriam Wisenberg. And originally she had been at the dinner table. Sort of like Lightly mocking her father for some kind of kind of overly ponderous thing. He said And then I heard this word from her and then reimagined it because of the sound of the word fit so well with the concept that he wanted a word for And it brings to mind the concept of idiot phones which we exploited on an episode of stuff to blow your mind. Basically the idea that certain syllables and words sounds in our in. Our minds are naturally widely associated with with concepts such as physical textures. Like there are words. That naturally sound slimy to us or have certain kind of moral connotations to us. That are just totally apart from semantic. Meaning RIGHT YEAH. You often see this in the like the names of fictitious characters. Part of this is. We've been on a Harry Potter kick at the House and so like a lot of the the names the K. rolling uses the. I feel like they. They line up with.

Horace Walpole Lady Coventry writer Lady Mary Coke Lord Shaftesbury Benedict cumberbatch Horace Mann Miriam Wisenberg Chancellor Clarendon Umberto Eco Paris George Montagu Muck Lady Dennis Theory David Maureen Yuck Harry Potter Daniel Ireland Mrs Hide
"william volume" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

The Best of Stuff

12:43 min | 2 years ago

"william volume" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

"Right. We're back okay. Now we've been looking at ways that words arising language without being intentionally invented when they rise through the process that's more akin to biological evolution. But what about when we WANNA Frankenstein? Some words just like make him in the lab So sort of going back to the business scenario. You've got a new product. The you need to get out there or your rebranding another winning. You gotta call it something Well I know somebody who would have been great at branding. And that's the English writer. Horace Walpole who lived from seventeen seventeen to seventeen ninety seven And the term that he coined that everybody knows he actually coined quite a few but most of them are forgotten. The one that everybody knows is serendipity And this comes from a letter that Walpole was writing to a friend named Horace Mann from the American education reformer. I'm pretty sure I think this Horace Mann was a British diplomat but the letter was dated January. Twenty eighth a seventeen fifty four. And despite the magical delight of Serendipity as a concept I have to say the occasion by which he ends up describing it is incredibly dull Basically Walpole says that. He accidentally discovered a historic link between two families while he was studying their coats of arms and a reference book earthshaking right. Yeah But he's writing about this process and he says quote. This discovery indeed is almost of that kind. Which I call serendipity a very expressive word which as I have nothing better to tell you I shall endeavor explain to you you will understand it better by the derivation than the definition. I once read a silly fairytale. Called the three princes of serendipity as their highnesses traveled they were always making discoveries by since Jesse of things which they were. Not Inquest of for instance. One of them discovered that a mule blind of the right. I had traveled the same road lately because the grass was eaten only on the left side where it was worse than on the right now. Do you understand serendipity markle instances of this accidental suggests ity for you must observe that no discovery of thing you're looking for comes under this description was of my Lord Shaftesbury who happening to dine at Lord. Chancellor Clarendon found out the marriage of the Duke of York and Mrs Hide by the respect with which her mother treated her at table. God Riveting Right Dinner. How he treated her. Oh Man. It's it's hard to believe the the term took off at all reading this but it's a great term right because it really does describe something. The idea of a happy accident the the occurrence or development of events by a thing that was in a way that's beneficial but it was not intended by the agent. Yeah like when you run into an old friend at a subway on a subway ride and and you think this is exactly like a one eyed donkey asset one side of the road. I think something at least in the way I use the word. It's especially serendipitous if it's a situation in which you know in the course of trying to do one thing especially if that thing is foolish or misguided you actually accomplish something different and good a true yes. It's like the foolishness of the original air end. That makes something especially serendipitous but according to post excerpted from this letter in the Paris review the adjective form of the word. Serendipitous was not recorded until nineteen forty three. So that's a pretty big span of time and I wonder do intentionally invented words take longer on average to find all of their derived parts of speech. I don't know I mean. Seems like they have to have a certain amount of sticking power to just like the language is living thing you know so if you create a word and it doesn't take off you know if someone's out they're not making it happen like pushing it into the into the lexicon how does it ever gain a foothold. Well I think about the fact that when a word feels organic. You're more likely to assume that it's derived to different. Parts of speech already exists right. You're not making them up when you say them whereas when a word is something that you're aware of as like an intentional recent coinage you might be more likely to think. Oh serendipitous that's not a word. This is also probably the struggling point for Zaa by why. I think that I could be wrong but I don't think a lot of people are using as an abbreviation for pizza. Just because it's it's it sounds fake. It doesn't seem helpful okay So walpole also provides early written evidence for some other terms though not necessarily always of his intentional coinage. When I was reading about the thought was great is from an article in the new republic by David Crystal. That's all about terms for drunkenness. In English a lot of these are forgotten okay In this term comes from Walpole the term is monkey bus meaning drunkenly sentimental which is a good thing to have a word for right like you know. I love you man. No I love you man. Marcus sounds a little bit like sucky bus too. So it has this kind of like demonic quality to it as well of the of the will being overpowered. Would you believe that this word comes from a dinner party? So it's an anecdote that Walpole shares in a letter to George Montagu on April twentieth seventeen fifty-six Walpole says so he's at a dinner party he's having supper he over hears somebody named Lady Coventry saying that if she drank anymore she would become mucky bus and then somebody named lady. Mary coke asks what that means in. Coventry says that it was Irish for sentimental crystal writes quote the mock. Latin ending is known from other facetious th century slang formations such as stinky us But there is no obvious connection with Muck Lady. Coventry came from Ireland. The likelihood is that Walpole misheard genuine Irish word. Perhaps and here. I'm going to do my best with an Irish word here. Maureen Yuck which is spelled. M. A. O. T. H. E. A. C. H. Ireland. Get it together. Come on the this okay. I think it's Wean. Yuck and it means sentimental crystals article also mentions a bunch of other terms for drunkenness including my new favorite Alone word not a new coinage. A classic anglo-saxon word which is Sime Belghoul meaning wanted with drink feasting. This one also sounds demonic in nature which is perhaps fitting I went to the Black Sabbath and I became same Belga. L- about serendipity though actually got me On the subject of another invented word that I really like that comes from the American philosopher. Daniel in it and it's his concept of a deep deeply. I think we've talked about this on stuff to blow your mind But I read about this idea. Independence book called intuition pumps and other tools for thinking. Oh Yeah I remember US discussing that. So a deep. Pity is a special kind of equivocation. And of course equivocation is a word or phrase that's used in two different ways to a misleading effect. So you might say like Why would you read all the arguments for and against in its theory of consciousness? Isn't there enough arguing in the world? You know people people say stuff like this all the time it hinges on two different meanings of the word argument in one sense. An argument is just explaining why you think something's true in another sense it means like angry your acrimonious okay. So so that's an equivocation. Generally a DP is a specific kind of equivocation that you'll probably recognize immediately from your life. It's a statement that can either be interpreted as true an utterly trivial or profound and Asli. False okay yeah but it but it takes advantage of the good halves of both of these versions so an example would be if somebody says. Love is just a word so either. You're talking about the word love. In which case the statement is true but it is a banal truism doesn't okay so what yes word. Love is a word or you're saying that the feeling of love is itself nothing more than a word in which case the statement is stupid and nobody would bother paying any attention to you. There was a I want to say. Umberto Eco. Wrote something about Or I can't remember if he wrote it or quoted it about some some some treatment on the on the rose saying the first person to make this statement was quite possibly genius in the second person to make. It was an idiot. Oh was he talking about nominalism though with William volume in the name of the raw likely so but yeah it was it was from. I WanNa say it was from the introduction or the The afterward to the name of the rose but it's been west. I've read that. Well I mean I guess another thing that's true is like with any statement even and obviously stupid one with enough effort. You can find something that that might be about it right away of interpreting it right or if the the actor reciting the line is skilled enough can seem a lot more profound than it is and you can be like. Oh Man Yeah. Love is just to word. I just heard Benedict cumberbatch. Say it hardcore right. It's totally different. Brian Cox could say oh. He's right but if it's the actor replace Badger on breaking bad different story entirely right. In fact love is just a word is a great example. Because you can make tons of deep unease with the ex's just a y formulation. Lots of them are like this one example that we thankfully here a lot less of than we used to like ten years ago. This was everywhere. You looked evolution is just a theory over the sun so it hinges on two different understandings of the word theory. One interpretation of the sentence is true but trivial and other interpretation of the sentence. Where theory means something like unfounded. Speculation would up end all of modern biology if it were true but is patently false. Yeah yeah it does. That statement does tend to hinge on a misunderstanding of what theories are and what role they play in our understanding of the world. Other things are not quite as obvious as deputy but feel vaguely DP ish. One that I was one that came across. His beauty is only skin deep. Like in one sense. This could be saying. Physical beauty is only physical which is true but not very profound or it could be saying. Beauty has nothing to do with transcendent qualities like morality or character. In which case is that true like? Don't we often find things beautiful? Because they're morally good or thoughtful or meaningful. Yeah depending on how you interpreted it it. It could mean one of to destroy mathematically different ideas and the sense in which it is. Obviously true doesn't really mean anything. Yeah I noticed in the real world. Deputy is often shoot by you real fast. They tend to be the kind of thing that somebody doesn't just say and leave hanging. They say and then move on from there talking very quickly like they can sound good for half a second if you don't stop to think about them but I was also thinking about deep is interesting because there's something about the way the words sounds. That was clearly part of the selection process for a touch ing. This word to this concept like Originally didn't it says that the word was coined by daughter of a friend of his Her name is Miriam Wisenberg and originally she had been at the dinner table. Sort of like Lightly mocking her father for some kind of kind of overly ponderous thing. He said And then I heard this word from her and then reimagined it because of the the sound of the word. Fisa well with concept that he wanted a word for And it brings to mind the concept of idiot phones which we exploited on an episode of Steph to blow your mind basically the idea that Certain syllables and words sounds in our in. Our minds are naturally widely associated with with concepts such as physical textures. Like there are words. That naturally sound slimy to us or have certain kind of moral connotations to us That are just like sounds totally apart. From semantic meaning right..

Horace Walpole Lady Coventry Horace Mann writer David Crystal Mary coke Muck Lady Lord Shaftesbury Maureen Yuck US Benedict cumberbatch Jesse Chancellor Clarendon Fisa Zaa Paris Miriam Wisenberg Sime Belghoul Marcus M. A. O. T. H. E. A. C. H. Ire
Explaining Occam's Razor

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:43 min | 2 years ago

Explaining Occam's Razor

"Today we're going to discuss a problem solving principle that many of you probably heard of and we've we've definitely referenced on the show before and that is autumn's razor that's right. It's it's one of the classics one of the hits of like the skeptical toolkit and I think it's a really one to get into because it's something that is widely known but in different ways and often To whatever extent it actually does have value. It often gets deployed in ways that do not actually make use of its value right like like an actual razor blade. It may be misused from time to time. Yes now. What one specific place that. I know we've talked about it before. Is that is in the context of Carl? Sagan's recommendations for the the tools of skeptical thinking he these out and one of them is autumn's razor. He writes all comes razor this convenient rule of thumb urges us when faced with two hypotheses that explain the data equally well to choose the simpler. Okay now why did we end up talking about this today? We we were in the studio the other day Discussing upcoming episodes. And you said that. Seth had mentioned this our producer Seth Yeah. I was in here and set a nickel Johnson was working on. A crossword puzzle was at the New York. Times he tells us it was the New York Times And he he asked me how to spell. Autumn is in razor and I took a guess at it and I can't I can't remember. I was correct. I was probably wrong but also probably hit one of the multiple acceptable spell things for razor But anyway we started talking about it and I was like. Oh Yeah we we could do that as an episode and so here we are. I'm very glad we picked this because I think one of my personal favorite genres of of critical thinking is is being skeptical about the tools of skepticism. You know is sometimes people who identify skeptics can ca- can I get a little cocky. You know they get a little too sure of themselves about what the reasoning tools they use and it's worth putting those tools to the test. Giving them a closer look. Yeah absolutely now I have to say I definitely remember. The first time I encountered the concept of outcomes raise or at least the first time I encountered it and it on some level stuck with me and that was when viewed the Nineteen ninety-seven film adaptation of Carl Sagan's novel contact the movie. I can't watch without crying. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah well. Why does it make you cry? Oh God there's no point especially the first part where you know it. Zooms out from the earth and you're hearing the radio signals go back in time and then and then it shows the young. L. E. Airway experimenting with the Ham Radio and her dad's helping her and get so emotional. Yeah Yeah it's it's been a very long I. I haven't seen it since initially came out and in fact the main thing I remember from it is seen in which jodie foster's character. Eleanor Airway has having this conversation with Matthew mcconaughey as character. Who How old was Matthew mcconaughey at this point? I don't even know how old he is. Now is this ageless demon but anyway. Here's this character He's scared Palmer. Joss in the scene in question foster's character brings up autumn's razor in a discussion on the nature of God she. She says well which is ultimately the simpler hypothesis that an all powerful God exists or the human beings made got up in order to feel better about things and then this ultimately comes back around is kind of flipped on her later on film regarding her characters encounter with an extraterrestrial intelligence right. Is it more likely that she really had the experience? She thinks she had with With all these aliens or that. She like hallucinated. Something that would give her emotional closure. Yeah and so. Yeah I think I was in high school at the time so it was. It was interesting concept especially in the context of of atheism verses of faith in a creator deity inserted to suddenly have this tool from the chest. Skeptical thinking just thrown up on the table and you and seemingly used by both sides. Well Yeah I think this is funny. This is a great example because it highlights some of the most common features of all comes razor as it is actually used to like. It's often invoked in a kind of fuzzy way without an objective measure Just kind of invoked to back up your intuitions about the probability of something right but another thing is that this example shows how. It's not always easy to find a way to compare the simplicity of two different propositions like is the existence of God a simple hypothesis or a complicated one that I think that really depends on kind of how you feel about it like like what kind of objective measure can you come up with to evaluate that question right. It's GonNa depend so much on your like your background your culture what you grew up with. And you know how you how you've come to view the possibility of Of God's existence. Is it just kind of the bedrock of your your worldview or is it this thing from the outside that you are contemplating and also how do you view it at like the coherence of the idea? Do you view it as something. That's like That's full of all these little kind of ad hoc accommodations or something that is a holistic coherent Sort of like fact about nature. Yeah you know I it's I I think this is a perfect example. That shows like win. People used the idea volumes razor in a way that is not helpful and doesn't really doesn't really get you any closer to figuring out what's true now if you're if you're still questioning what the concept really means. Don't worry we will get to some. I think some very understandable examples of how it can be a used properly and used improperly. But let's go ahead and just start about the concept itself the the word autumn You know where this comes from. We'll get to the origins of autumn's razor so Oxfam's razor is also known as the principle of parsimony and parsimony means a tendency towards cheapness or frugality. So I like that. It's like the principle of parsimony is like you. You want to be cheap with your with your logic right yeah. I don't need more than two steps of logic between me and the solution. Don't give me one with four or five. And it was named after the Medieval English philosopher William of autumn. Of course William of Arkham So he he lived in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries from twelve eighty five to either thirteen seven or thirteen forty nine. I've seen different death dates given forum. I've seen different birthdates as well. Eighty seven twelve. Eighty eight looking at That's interesting so he was a prolific scholar. Franciscan friar we'll get more into his ideas in a minute. I you know one thing I've always wondered is where the heck is awesome. I've never heard of that. Well yeah because the word sound has kind of like a remoteness to it. It sounds alien in some ways. Autumn is very much a real place. It is a rural village. In Surrey England. You can look it up online. You can find that the website for the church in Oxfam for example and this area has been occupied since ancient times. It's about a day's ride south west of London and it was the birthplace of the individual who'd come to be known as William Volume now beyond that beyond the fact that he was born here. We don't know a lot about William's life We don't know what his social or family background was or if his native language was French or Middle English. As Paul Vincent Spadea explains in the Cambridge companion to Arkham he was likely given over to the Franciscan order as a young boy. Before the age of fourteen and here Latin would have quickly become his language of not only writing but also just conversation Grey Friars Convent in. London was likely his home convent but later he traveled he visited Avalon he visited Italy and he lived the last two decades of his life in Germany. Now philosophically William was a Nominal List and spayed writes that the two main themes of this for William were the rejection of universals and ontological reduction in these two teams are are not necessarily interconnected like you can you. Could you could believe in one but not the other and vice versa but basically like let's get into what these mate so the first rejection of universals is perhaps best considered and this is very brief and broad Certainly you can find so much written in instead on this topic but basically think of it as a rejection of the tonic idea of the realm of forms. So that idea that all chairs that we might make design and carve a symbol are an attempt to create the perfect chair which doesn't reside in our world but only resides within this realm of forms. So all chairs that we create our like an aspiration for the ideal chair another way. I've thought about it at least as I understood it was. The nominalism is kind of the idea that there is no such thing as a chair. There's only this chair and that chair in this chair over here. There is no chair right like this. This is the kind of the situation gets too. When you you get into the genre classifications of say albums artists or movies. You care a great deal about and someone tries to limit it to a classification and say oh well that's classic rock where that's alternative rock near like. No no no no no. Don't don't try and fit there is there. Is these categories. Do not apply. There is there is only you know whatever. Your band of choice happens to be. There is only tool. There is only primis or whatever right there yeah there. There is only things not category right. Now let's move onto the second theme here. Ontological reduction this is as Britannica defines it quote the metaphysical doctrine that entities of a certain kind are in reality collections or combinations of entities of simpler or more basic kind. I think your classic example here is molecules atoms. Yeah so another example. Here's while our aristotle defined ten categories of objects that might be apprehended by a human mind. These would have been translations vary on on how you wanted to find these but substance quantity quality relative place time attitude condition action and affection. William cut these down to two substance and quality. He's really getting in there. That's the razor. That's what a razor Dutt. Cia slices away. It cuts off the fat and gets down to the meat. Spayed writes quote. Although these two strands of thinking are independent. They are nevertheless often viewed as joint effects of a more fundamental. Concern the principle of parsimony known as Oxfam's razor okay. So we're getting to the razor. Yeah so William. Devoted a lot of energy to arguing against What spade calls the bloated onto logical in inventories of his contemporaries and became well known to his peers for this as such either towards the end of his life or shortly after his death a kind of greatest hits album came out on his thoughts and ideas titled On the Principles of Theology? Now it wasn't actually by William of Arkham but it featured his doctrine as well as verbatim quotes there is no ascribed author either so later generations would often just attribute it to him as well as the notion of outcomes razor however the specific phrase was apparently never actually used by him. He never said autumn in the house. I'M GONNA get the razor out and started carving on some some some some some ideas

William Volume Seth Yeah Oxfam Carl Sagan Arkham Razor Dutt Jodie Foster Matthew Mcconaughey New York Times Eleanor Airway New York London Producer Grey Friars Convent CIA Johnson Paul Vincent Spadea Palmer Joss
"william volume" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"william volume" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Two thousand sixteen. Okay. Wait, wait. Wait. How am I haven't tasted that? Well, it's just been released. I am. So sorry. Yeah. It in a concrete him for. And then I aged on the lease for like fifteen months, and then I bottle it. I hold it in bottle promised the year before these are very austere dry style truckin recycling that I I think go really well. I can't wait those winds that I think is actually more expressive and and more. Food friendly than even Chardonnay, and I've made a lot of Chardonnay my career. So recently is is my new passion. So until I could get Mike to sites I grafted in planted sites in two thousand fourteen is leaving Williams volume. And I knew I wouldn't have grapes till two thousand seventeen two thousand eighteen I wanted to at least get my hands wet a little bit from refilling side bought about a ten and a half from the Yakima valley on the eastern side of mount rainier in Washington. Yes. And it's just beautiful. I I'm really excited about this wine and Bob we need to take a quick break. But please don't go anywhere. Bob Cabral rockstar winemaker continues to fill our glasses right after this. Chef Jamie Gwen here. So the.

Bob Cabral Jamie Gwen Yakima valley Mike Williams Washington fifteen months