17 Burst results for "William Styron"

"william styron" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:20 min | 10 months ago

"william styron" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Somewhere in there you again nor the homos County up in the up in the north End Snohomish County putting this up in the snow Ho All right, eh? So there's a When the price of something goes up to people buy more of it or less of it silly. Oh, certainly you buy more of it because it's more worthwhile. That's why Yeah, there's my business minor from the University of Notre Dame for you. All right, you get over the church there. It's the exact opposite. Yeah. You jacked the price up on something. You people stay away from it so well more people because they're rude. They're losing money, not as many people are going through the tolls. Go go under the tunnels. They're they're not many people going through. So what's the plan from the State of Washington? Yeah, They're really kind of been in a fix. I think like a lot of people are you know through this this pandemic who are trying to figure out how to pay off their bills, or, you know, to do what they need to do every month and right now the state for example, on the 5 20 Bridge. $909 million of that that was used for construction of the floating bridge portion is supposed to be paid back by tools and up Until this year, everything was tracking great that you know people were using it. The tolling was fine. We were done What toll increases as of about four years ago, and everything was good. But when the Pandemic happened. People stopped going everywhere. The 5 20 bridge. People traveling on that bridge went down by more than 80% in the early stages of the stay at home order, it's still down more than 50%. And so what you have is with those people not using that told facility the money that they had expected to get from the toll revenue. That would pay back those blondes they don't have. So they're trying to figure out they being the state the Legislature what they're going to do to try to, you know, make up the shortfall. Do they raise the tolls? That's the simplest thing to do. You know, years, right? You just jacked the price. But that's a sensitive issue. Just like you started with John. If you raise it too much. No one uses it And then you got even less people using it, And then you got even less money. So it's not gonna be that simple. I mean, they're drawing down reserves. They're looking for ways they can Fix this, but one of the things they might look at. In addition to raising the tolls is no potentially raising the gas tax again and and try to earmark some of that for there to pay back the bonds that they're, you know, financially responsible for So I've got a question. I mean, this is a It's a classic dilemma, because, yeah, you don't have enough money. And so then you hit people harder. They're already avoiding it. If you could take I 90 instead of 5 $20 to pay the tolls because of the traffic isn't strong And if you're going to do that, anyway, But I have a question about the bonds. Cannot week examines is okay. That's like a given. We have to pay back the bonds. But can't we appeal to whoever the you know, we owe the bonds to to say, Listen, we need a little you know, time because we've been hit with his economic crisis like everybody else. Why is it that the bonds have to be paid back on a regular scheduled whether we're in the midst of World War three or, you know Armageddon. And that's one thing that they are doing to it. Additions. Okay. Rating rating funds. They're looking at refinancing what they could do to toe with their creditors to make that happen. Certainly that that that's obviously number one. Okay. Okay, that That was an underlying assumption on my part that I didn't specify. But, yeah, that's number one. They're going to try to refinance. They're gonna work with their people that they're going to draw down. We're looking for money and then at the end if they can't if they have to raising tolls, raising gas taxes, raising other revenue somehow to try to make up the shortcomings. Certainly refinancing is at the top of the list. They have an obligation to pay back the bonds at a timely manner. Edit it interest rate that's understood that the holder of the bonds expect so in the case of haven't idea why did they do this? Why is the governor let people go back to work? Well again, That's above my pay grade. But that was certainly but the thing that would solve it well, that would help it on. Oh, hell, But what? We don't know what we've been talking about this one for months is The public's behavior. What is the long term work from home situation? Our business is going to have fallen in love with this, and that may be getting out of their lease is of those high rises in downtown Seattle in Bellevue. There's custom, however much square foot to rent. And I mean and so is Are We ever going to see the congestion Come back. My my gut says yes, because I mean, they've invested a lot, but they've also invested a lot as you guys were talking about earlier in the week, the home work started. They put in a lot of money to people who work from home. There's cast that out. So yes. So that's the big question that nobody really knows is, you know, in a year's time, six months time is everybody could go back to Driving to work every day and riding the bus and riding the train. Or is it gonna be some sort of hybrid model, and that's the problem when they're trying to fit that into their their algebraic equation, and, you know exports. Why, you know that kind of thing. They don't have the values they don't know, And that's that's making it very difficult to forecast, but certainly getting people back to work. People right Using those facilities would certainly help. But, you know, right now, I'm not sure how many people could afford to use the tools that are out there who have to be working and driving around. A lot of them are small business owners. A lot of them are, you know, contractors the miracle Lower end. Maybe. Yeah, they're out. They need to do it. So it's It's very difficult. It's a very interesting conundrum. And the Department of Transportation is not the only agency dealing with this. I mean, it sounds City metro, every city, every county. I mean, where they're all facing. These kinds of Sophie's choice is that at some point, someone's gonna have to make decisions on Chris, Is there any wait, Wait. So well done, Tom. You're gonna let that movie reference to go by just like that. Sophie's choice, Tom. Well, first off, it was a William Styron novel. So we got to give him credit for we give a movie credit. But still And of course, I read the book and didn't see the movie. Did you really course not. I resolved. It's gonna be impressed for the first time in my life. Chris Sullivan. Bad TV shows better than a good book. Come on, look. Yeah, So the premise of Sophie's choices she has to decide one child over the other, You know, in a concentration camp setting, it's like an impossible decision. So for those who haven't read the book like Chris, we're seeing the movie like John. That's the reference, but at least I understand it. You show the movie and the reason I mentioned that is because when I walked out of the movie, my father, I told the story My father turned around, looked at me. We got into the bright light of the lobby. He looked me in the eye, and he said a They got you, didn't they? They made you cry didn't help a child die, You wimp. They got you with the of the shed. Violence. Looks like Oh, my God! Monster! This guy anyway, moving on. So nobody said that Good day E s. So my question is because I haven't heard. Is there any like partisan divide on how this should be handled? In other words on the Republicans suggesting one thing about the tolls? The Democrats another or is this one such a crisis that it over? You know, sort of overrides any kind of partisan differences that that remains to be seen that that's the hand is that's in Hannah's kitchen. When it comes to the Legislature. The expertise.

Sophie Chris Sullivan Legislature Snohomish County University of Notre Dame Washington homos County Tom William Styron John Hannah Seattle Department of Transportation Bellevue
"william styron" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Time Capsule

Sci-Fi Talk Time Capsule

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"william styron" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Time Capsule

"Bruins name was attached. All who've films and I said no, no, no man. This is epic is an epic Tale of Resurrection Got All this action. It's got a lot of humor. It's got a lot of social satire in it, but underneath it all a great, great, great, great tale, powerful tale of non ephemeral nature of the soul. They could take anything away. You know they can crucify issued off my hands. Somebody forget that image. But they cannot take the soul. No, no amount of science or violence can take away the soul. Absolutely, that was great. I mean I. Know You had to do if you work with a mime and you've got the movements down mechanical. Teams. And not only that you had to work within the framework of Robbo teen suit I. Mean it was just I, mean it was? A challenging part for you, but you really made that work really well very challenging. Teen Gifted Guy. The guy applied to make up all you know Phil. Tippett to this stop motion. What a gift is oh. Yeah, he's Great. He's great. He's been one of my guests. He's a great guy. What did you do? Is You doing CGI I now? Company's doing CGI and he's actually doing some directing as well so. A lot of. Stop, motion the grandees of stop motion animation are over. They are gone. Unfortunately, they really are gone. It's a shame. This guy's actually kind of got a little bit more for me to the front of the class. As far as my favorite characters, you played chuck Taggart and Odyssey Five. Yeah, and I'll tell you why that was. Because I think Manny Coto said during the commentary of the other the pond, the pilot. It was just like you just. Hooked into this guy and it was just like a fusion of the actor and the character, and it just became something really special, and there was just there was nobody that could tell you who chuck Taggart was like right from the jump. He knew this guy was. I really love doing that show. And directed three of the whole thing. was about that. You go back in time. You know you're conscious. Goes back in time and do a body that even have it at five years previously. So while you're trying to save the world, you are also hey, why don't I fix my life? I know what's going to happen, and then there's soon as you start. Don't pebbles into the lake. You know the ripple start going different direction, wondering amazing, sophisticated far-out show that was at a ball. Yeah, that was great and actually. I think it was one of the episodes directed. Where after your wife dies on the show and you take your car and you go out and you pick up a young girl. And I one of my favorite episodes and I pick her up Donna. Yes, yes, yeah, yeah, pick up! My wife is a young girl exactly exactly. Right during the middle of it when when you guys are having some dialogue in the car and you're talking. you start to see exactly what it is. It's like this is chuck kind of dealing with his loss of his wife, and remember the good things about her and what he loved about her initially, so I mean it's amazing. You could see that in this sci fi kinda show, but it was great. That was one of my favorites, and it was really it was really cool. I was just a great series and a great cast, and it was just a nice mix, and I was really I just watched them all on DVD and. I was just come out of DVD. Out. On DVD so it's definitely worth having it for people who haven't seen it. It's just the only special feature unfortunately is just both of you doing the commentary. For the pilot episode. Manny Coto but. That was great, and a lot of these loss was enterprises gain really because he did a great job moving over to produce that and you act you play the kind of character on enterprise, which is, it's still. Very very topical, even today you know the kind of person that securest. That diversity is not something that he can deal with you. Know and I thought that was an important voice to show that there are people like that, and not only in that world, but in this one very much so. Not Unlike the point of view of the guy and I played in twenty four. 'cause you know those guys get their point of view about how the world should go, and they may look to the masses like madman those a collection of. Folks out there on planet e, and some of them are in power. Who believe that that's the way to go? You know you got to like. Cut The from the chef and. Only the pearls you know are allowed to move on and. Boy! It's like Adolf Hitler's the only one of those guys you know there's like. Plenty of them I had a great time doing that. I did that is really no Mars to Leonard Nimoy. While to get on Star Trek I'm not really tell you big sci-fi Guy Yeah. I watch. There's a couple of SCIFI, movies. That I adored the day. They're still alive Oh. Yeah, it's classic. Yeah, there's a few others. But I don't I. Don't read a lot of sci-fi. You know I I read Philip Dick. A fan of him. But I'm not. Housing off never had Clark never remember. Read those guys. You know I I sort of admired. So find myself. Always talked about in the size you're on, you know I feel at a loss for words sometimes because. Sifi folks like Manny Coto. Are you know they quote the entire play of, are you? Are you know? It's. I feel I feel really like in basilica around the Great Sci. Fi. Find. Well you've played memorable characters, and and really the thing that you do. Is You bring a humanism to them? And that's really the can do, but that's really. That's what makes a memorable. Tell anybody, but a lot of time. sci-fi is really about the human condition, but people don't talk about that. You know it really is yes. Surrounded by a lot of sometimes pretty light bulbs and things, but essentially when you strip it all down, that's it's really trying to understand ourselves. Yeah I mean look, do androids dream electric shape is really confessions of NAT. Turner Yeah Yeah. William Styron's. Five people I mean you do? You do the Math I. Mean Five robots escape from some colony, outer space or coming back to try to find. It created them why 'cause they WANNA live. Yeah, but what are they really for freedom? They're really looking to be free. Nat Turner escapes with five slaves of the plantation. I think South Carolina is starts cutting a swath of. Murder toward the north, and you know the eighteen thirties. Nobody understood what this eighty four days. Why would he want to leave? You know never thinking. This guy wanted freedom, human condition and SCI FI as prevalent everywhere. Open the book anything over the Moon. You're gonNA find some sort of powerful correlation to or modern parallel. Antiquated parallel to human freedom. Has Great to relive that you know you get lucky with some people and I really was. This is Tony Tomato take care, and we'll see you all next time on Scifi. Kevin J Anderson and you're listening to sci-fi fi talk how you can manage your account online. Stay safe out there during congestion customers using more than fifty gigs per month may notice reduce speeds prioritization video typically at four ADP capable device required..

Manny Coto Nat Turner chuck Taggart SCI FI Bruins South Carolina Adolf Hitler Leonard Nimoy Kevin J Anderson Tippett Philip Dick William Styron Phil Murder Tony Tomato Donna Moon Clark
"william styron" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

16:03 min | 2 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My next guest is Mary Creggan who is now a lecturer in English at Barnard, and she's no stranger to New York City having earned her PHD from Columbia University. Her writings appeared in the chronicle of higher education. In the financial times when Mary Creagh in was twenty seven years old she and her husband, Jake, experienced, something horrible. Less than twenty four hours after giving birth to their daughter named Anna the newborn died. Jake's arms as a result of a heart defect. Well, both parents were devastated by the loss of their child. Mary found herself increasingly unable to cope after an unsuccessful suicide attempt meant as a cry for help Mary was hospitalized for depression. And it was there on hospital bathroom that Mary made the most serious attempt on her own life inflicting herself with a near fatal injury that has left her with a noticeable scar. Thanks to a combined effort a therapy. Antidepressants electric consult convulsive therapy Mary was discharged from hospital to resume life outside over the years. Mary's bleak moods would resurface periodically. She realized that the depression was something that she could manage it would never truly disappear. Mary's memoir about these events is called scar a personal history of depression and recovery, and it provides a personal and a historical look into major depression. It's treatment methods and the ways people have learned overcome and. Survive Mary will be speaking here in the city of culture on March twenty eighth but Mary in is in studio now, so nice to see you. Thank you for having me. Thank you so much for coming on. I really your book is such an interesting mix of a personal story. And then I can I see the professor and the writer in you because you want to teach us about the history of mental illness and depression in various ways that is treated. So I want to break this interview up into two parts your personal story. And then we'll talk about some of the research that you've done as well. So in this book early on you write quote, I wanted to turn to the past and face it. Squarely. Before you turn to the past and faced it squarely. What had you been doing? I had been not wanting people to know this about me. I mean, it was a very. Important when I got out of the hospital that I just the trouble was I think that my new identity as a person who had been hospitalized for a psychiatric problem was was so disturbing and this change in my life had been so disturbing the change in myself that I just needed to try and get my life back in order. I needed to move forward. And only the people who really knew me, well where people that I could talk to about this. So as time went on I began graduate school at Columbia. I began teaching it was obviously, not something. I wanted my students to know about on my professors to know about or anyone who might hire me. It's really not something you feel you want people to know because they may see you differently or they may not really trust you or whatever it is. So finally some things happened. There is a debate about anti-depressants not working about them being placebos. A couple of members of the younger generation of my family received diagnoses of depression. And I felt like it was time. I wanted to write this book for a long time. And Finally, I just thought I am old enough. Now that I don't feel that anyone can really hurt me when I reveal this about myself, and it's important to me to finally do this as you were going through and reliving these memories and trying to recreate a narrative in your own story. What kind of did you Delaney ground rules for yourself to protect yourself because I can imagine it might have been triggering. It was it was it was. Let's see I had tried in the past to write this starting as early as the year that I went to hear William Styron speak at the ninety second street, y which was one thousand nine hundred four. At a conference on American writers and suicide and when I heard him read the end of his book, darkness visible. I was incredibly moved of course, recognizing exactly this experience. And I knew that I wanted to write about my experiences. Well, of course, then ran into that problem. Like, I don't want people to know this about me. So I had tried and put those efforts aside because I couldn't face the exposure. So this time returning to it. I got in touch with my ex husband who had been there through it. With me. I also got my hospital record, which I was shocked to receive in the mail one day thinking that there's no way that they're going to have this thing. And so when I started looking through that I could see it all again happening, and it was amazing because I hadn't even known some of the stuff that was going on because I was not in a very, I don't know healthy state of mind, and I wasn't reading what the doctors and nurses were writing down in my record, which now from this much later perspective. I'm seeing kind of from an outside perspective. And that was fascinating. So there's this kind of inside outside thing that happened when I was working on the book I'm looking at it from a distance. I'm looking at myself from a distance, but also to try and do the writing and try and make the reader feel the experience of being in this condition. You have to be in it somehow so having hospital record and having my notebook from the time that I was in the hospital helped me to re enter it. But then doing this kind of starring perspective on it helped me to stay outside. Of it and helped me to put myself into this community of sufferers over time who had have all gone through this. So it's a very personal story. But it's also the story of an illness. And it's and it's kind of his its history and attempts to provide relief. My guest is Mary Creagh in the name of her book is the scar a personal history of depression and recovery, Mary as you looked at your own personal notes. Your notebooks? You said you had at the time. And then you look at the doctor's notes. What had you been experiencing at that time? What did you see in your personal notes? That is either was an unreliable narrative, or perhaps, maybe it was a more reliable narrative than with the doctors were writing fi- understand your question. My own my own perspective. And as I learned about the illness called melancholia, my diagnosis when I entered the hospital was major depressive episode with melancholy, and what I learned when I started to read about this illness was that the word Mellon Kolia. This is a specifiers of what is now called major depressive disorder, and there are different types, and this type is incredibly serious and deadly people become profoundly suicidal. And this was what happened to me? I mean, I really do fit the symptoms of this. So that my delusional condition was that my life was over. There was no hope and I had no sense of the future. So I can see that. When I look at what I was thinking in the record what the doctors are saying to me, I look at people. My husband, for instance, at the time bringing in books from the library because we didn't have the internet. Talking about look this is what this person in this book who has melancholy is saying about herself. I am a bad person. I do not deserve to live. You are saying that to this is not who you are. This is an illness that speaking through so doing this work has been really fascinating. Because the power of this illness is overwhelming. And it's really difficult once people get to a certain depth in it. For doctors and loved ones to reach them with rational thinking, they need to be protected from the suicidal impulse because it has to be addressed with medication or with or now with ketamine perhaps. Before the mind can begin to listen to those rational and hopeful. Imports. What did you read in your medical records? That surprised you. Let's see. I read this amazing combination of. A trial and error process. For instance, when I entered the hospital having cut my wrists. They already taking medication for the last couple of weeks and the decision was to continue with medication. And the constant question. Are you feeling suicidal? Which of course, I would always answer. No. But I do think that I was suicidal because there's this. Diurnal change in mood and melancholia the nights are really difficult. You cannot sleep and you wake up in the morning, and you're extremely in a terrible state. And I think that in the mornings, I was very suicidal. I had to face another day in this condition. I didn't know how I was going to get through it. And of course, the morning that I made that attempt in the hospital. It was in the first part of the day. So it's very surprising and interesting to look at the record and see the response of others and see my own state of mind, which is so clear. It's it's really fascinating to look at a historical document in which you are an actor. And you have no recollection of it. It's fascinating. And then there was all of this effort to help me. But I think they didn't see how suicidal I was and how what an emergency. This was. So the decision to keep me on medication. Wasn't a steak and that then I had to start electroconvulsive therapy which eventually worked. So there's all kinds of really interesting stuff in the record, including. The response of other patients smile response to being with other patients, which I found incredibly comforting and interesting to see what other people were going through to understand myself in this new condition of being a psychiatric patient, not something I ever expected it. It's just really interesting. I try to put some of that on the page for people. My guess is Mary creek in the name of her memoir is the scar personal history of depression and recovery. Very clear you start the book you go into a steep decline. After the death of your daughter, Anna from hypoplastic left heart syndrome, her heart just wasn't developed enough to sustain life to sustain pumping blood through her body. I think something I found fascinating in the book was your your description of how we as a culture are not equipped to handle the death of a very newborn and how to handle it with. Parents and the family how did that lack of structure that lack of understanding what impact do you think it had on your mental health? You know, it was I think that right now. Women would certainly get more support than I got. Although we've just seen. There's a piece in the New York Times today about postpartum depression, because there's a new drug out to treat it and the people who wrote that op, Ed. Are basically arguing that. Despite how far we've come women do not get enough support in the period after which they have given birth even when they have healthy children. There are often very isolated alone. They've had to leave their jobs once the excitement is over after the first week. That's it. There's no sleep. There's no help. It's crazy. Yeah. So that is still continuing in my case, we had just moved out of the city to a house in the suburbs. Where I knew no on. And when my husband went back to work. I was trying to figure out how to get a new job. So that I could feel more hopeful about my life. But there wasn't any follow up. I had been discharged from maternity ward to go to another hospital or my daughter had been taken and where she died, and I was discharged in a hurry. And there wasn't really any follow up. Then I think at the time a postpartum what's the word screening would happen with the babies pediatric visit. If there's new baby you don't have the follow up visits that looks at the mother and says, how's the mother doing? Does. Remember, my pediatric. How's mom? How are you? Yes. Yes. Yeah. Are you sleeping who? None of that. Was that was it? I was discharged from the hospital. I went to another hospital where my baby died and was I was released into the world and into this whole new reality, which was. Beyond surreal, so cold, very cold. Very. Yeah. And so it was just trying to kind of then grapple with my sense of meaninglessness, the despair at meaninglessness, but what I didn't understand which is very clear when I look back is that I very quickly entered the state of of illness of psychiatric illness that I did not recognize and neither did anyone else around me because we haven't seen it before. And it was it was normal that I would be in a terrible state. So it was it went onto long before getting help. And that was how things became so very dangerous. You described it as being possessed? Yes. Why did you choose that word? Well by the time, I was in the hospital. I had to press psychosis, which is a very serious bad bad bad, very low point into press. Vilnis that you can become psychotic and in which you're negative thinking and your sense of self accusation. Your sense of yourself as a bad person. Are almost like there are voices in your head telling you that you are a bad person. So that's what I mean by being possessed that the state of melancholy ah, which has been sort of echoed in many many patients throughout hundreds of years was operative in me. I mean, I wasn't really speaking as myself necessarily. But I was speaking with the voice of this illness. It's interesting when you talk about your your self reflection, your self identity the second suicide attempt which is a bit graphic. So it's difficult to read and it has as I was reading it. I was struck by your sense that after you you took a piece of glass, and you you read it across your throat. Because it hadn't worked you felt like a failure. Yes. That's exactly what I'm talking about. I was a coward and a failure..

Mary depression Mary Creagh Anna Mary Creggan Mary creek Jake Columbia University New York City Barnard William Styron major depressive episode professor New York Times lecturer Columbia ketamine Mellon Kolia writer
"william styron" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Unspooled

"Michael Jackson releases the thriller album Tylenol capsules are laced with potassium cyanide. They kill seven people in Chicago. Disney opens up Epcot in Florida. The recession starts in the United States and Argentina invaded the Falkland islands all while the Whaling Commission decides that wailing fishing should. And now it's also the year. That's Sophie made a choice. That's right to your Sophie's choice. I just want to say that collection of year facts was such low high low. Really took me on a ride. I know I'm trying to get better each week. It's very nice. It's got Meryl Streep as Sophie is house-key. It's got Kevin Kline as Nathan landow, Peter mcnicoll Stingl Rita. Karen? As yet Zimmerman and good Maria Hummer as Rudolf Hess, every lift person was the longest serving commandant of Auschwitz. No, what is this movie about? Well, you've did not know last week with Sophie's choice was no here's the thing. I knew that Associes choice was a hard choice. And I thought going into this film. It was going to be a straight up holocaust drama. Like, I thought I did know that she had to choose one of her kids. Oh, you didn't know that? I was like hoping it'd be like the biggest surprise for you that you would think it was a love drama because so few choice looks like a love triangle movie, where her choices like, oh, do I stay with Kevin Kline who's like magnetic and wild and coming or do I stay with this like wishy washy little rider? Boy, it doesn't seem that interesting. Well, first of all he's got a lot of good things going for him. He's a great writer. But no, I did know that I didn't know the context of it. And when I first started watching it, I was like, oh, this isn't a World War Two movie. Am I confused and it really took me on a journey? So selfish choice is about a young boy in lewiston, New York. He wants to be a writer. He moves into the boarding house. And there's a couple of stairs Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline, and they're in this passionate impetuous romantic relationship that they're always either like doing it on a hammock or having screaming fights in the stairway. And he storming out and saying I'll never come back together and Peter mcnicoll, the young southern kid Stingl is just fascinated with this couple and the more he gets to know them the more Meryl Streep Sophie opens up about how she got two living in America, nineteen forty seven the really difficult steps that took her from Poland to Auschwitz to their including this choice. And I would argue this movie it feels like in many respects, you're watching a play. It's so small it's so kind of contained in its emotionality that you could see. This easily on stage. I believe I could see that the structure would work really well on stage, you can picture Sophie in kind of the mock bedroom, and then the lights darken, and suddenly is, you know, back in Poland in the gas that could totally work. I mean, it's I mean, I hope it does. Because I sunk a lot of money into it aiming. I hope that people wanna go see it. Are you going to be self faith? Yes. He's had a bad choice. I think it was an upper. I think I have a bell. It wasn't opera actually. And the whole thing the entire film is based on a book, which is alternately based little bit on a real life story. I mean, not totally really I don't think so choice is part of it being real. But the writer this guy William Styron, he went to this kind of house in Brooklyn lived there made friends of this couple upstairs. And this woman was a survivor and he connected with her on a level. And I don't think that the Kevin Kline. Character was as intense as we see in the film, and obviously they didn't fall in love. But this is kind of the impetus for him to write this novel. Wow. So you're saying it's out of my graphical ish because I what am I parts on this movie is when 8-o stinger sits down with Sophie, he's telling her that he's writing a book in this scene heavens..

Meryl Streep Sophie Kevin Kline writer Meryl Streep Peter mcnicoll Disney Michael Jackson Auschwitz Poland Chicago Peter mcnicoll Stingl Rita Falkland islands Whaling Commission Florida United States Associes William Styron Karen New York
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

05:41 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"Imagine this is your worst nightmare crime soon. Our roof. No, it's not my worst nightmare. It's my fourth worst. Not wait. Fifth, fourth, fourth, or fifth. I didn't bring a list. We wanted to demonstrate the disorder accurately, but you know, we also wanted to take dramatic license and comedic license, but we wanted to be respectful of it because it's a serious disorder OCD and it's just in extreme cases is very disruptive and devastating to people's lives. So loop who also produced the show believes he and his writers did find the right balance, and they showed that an emotional disability, a sort of madness as Styron would say, could go hand in hand with genius after all monks. Obsessive nece usually helped him catch the murderer as the guy was Mr. science, Derek, Philby. He asked about a suicide note. I never mentioned the note. Maybe he just into usually a suicide. Note. As a matter of fact, there isn't also cheats on his wife wedding ring, Wayne wining ring. Yes, I know. But he takes it off a lot when he opened his wallet, I noticed a small indentation in the leather where he keeps in a little indentation. It's a gift and the curse, even out of character. She'll lube thinks a lot about the yin and Yang of madness and creativity, how the torment of a mental illness can be a precursor to profound empathy and insight. William Styron's, former Dr Alice Flaherty once diagnosed with manic depression herself. Things about that too. Here she is in the podcast, there were periods when I was agitated in manichean where like wonder and and terror would come back and forth. So often in the same, you know, one minute period that they seem inseparable. So anything that got rid of the terror was going to get rid of the wonder as well. There's that issue that there's a possibility that these kinds of problems or these kinds of dilemmas, spark. Creativity, and maybe this is not true in Styron's case, but some people don't want to lose that part of them that that of which there is a piece of madness or a problem that they're trying to resolve. It's that you know the sand and the oyster that you know turns into something beautiful. And while that sand need not be full blown clinical depression, which in Styron's case stifled, his creative output needs some obstacle to be to push against and some something to be unresolved. And that's what makes for great comedy admit what makes for great drama. And yet it may be the problem is that you you, you delve too deeply into that, and then there's that point of diminishing returns, which apparently he hit. The vast metaphor which most faithfully represents this fathomless ordeal in the final passage of darkness visible Styron borrows from Dante's epic poem in the middle of the journey of our life. I found myself in dark wood for I had lost the right path. For those who have dwelt in depressions, dark wood and known. It's inexplicable agony. Their return from the abyss is not unlike the ascent of the poet trudging upward and upward out of hell's black depths and at last emerging into what he saw as the shining world. The book ends with the same quote, rose Styron chose for her husband's gravestone on Martha's Vineyard a Queen. Do Schimmel a review dare list. And so we came forth and once again, beheld the stars. Love that God what a beautiful Paraguay. At this point, I packed up my gear and put my shoes back on since shillue had a flight to catch. Thank you so much for, but before I left, I decided to admit my fan girl status, and I will say my children are very impressed that I'm meeting you because I told him that during a family health crisis a few years ago, my husband kids and I would been John episodes of monk for distraction and for solace. She'll loop said I'm not the only person to tell him that, yes, mental illness or madness can cause great pain, but it's not something to look away from human flaws in gender, a certain empathy and others and emotional mirror that works in dramatic novels in depression, memoirs, even TV comedies. Sometimes it's a gift, sometimes a curse and sometimes a comfort. I'm Karen Brown. Thank you for listening. And if you haven't yet heard the great God of depression, just look back in your showcase feed and you'll find it waiting for you. Radio. Thanks for listening and thanks to add Cirque for providing their ads, serving platform to radio Tokyo.

William Styron Wayne Dr Alice Flaherty Derek rose Styron OCD shillue Cirque Karen Brown Philby Paraguay manichean Schimmel Mr. science Tokyo Martha Queen John one minute
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"Our podcast. After all on the day we met, he'd just been shooting his TV series until two AM and that night he was flying to LA for another job. But when rose Styron asks her friends for a favor, they can't say, no, she's the most social, I think person on the island. She's incredibly generous and she's a valued treasured for him because of shillue schedule. He wasn't available for voice over work on the main podcast series, but he was happy to talk with me about William Styron. We settled on a combination of readings and an interview as it happens. She'll loop had been meaning to catch up on Styron's work. When I had no more tears to shed. I lowered myself to the sand and slept like the novel Sophie's choice made into an off. Skar winning movie with Meryl Streep. It turned Styron into a household name back in the nineteen eighties. When I woke, it was nearly morning. I heard children chattering nearby. I stirred blessing my resurrection. I asked shillue to read some of the most poignant sections from that devastating novel, which is about a holocaust survivor named Sophie. It's written from the point of view of her friend and aspiring writer someday I will write about so Fay's life and death and thereby help demonstrate how absolute evil is never extinguished from the world. Auschwitz itself remains inexplicable. The most profound statement yet made about Auschwitz was not a statement at all, but a response, the query at Auschwitz, tell me where was God and the answer. Where was man. After this section, we both needed a moment. Really do. I want to read everywhere this guy road now my God. But the main thing I wanted to talk to Chalupa bout with mental illness, the Greek God of depression revolves around Styron's groundbreaking, memoir darkness, visible. It was one of the first accounts by public figure on what it really feels like viscerally to fall into clinical depression. Never let it be doubted that depression in extreme form is madness the madness results from an abandoned by chemical process with all of this upheaval in the brain tissues the alternate drenching indep revision, it is no wonder that the mind begins to feel aggrieved stricken and the muddied thought processes registered. The distress of an Oregon in convulsion. The madness of depression is generally speaking, the antecedents of violence. It is a storm indeed, but a storm of Merck..

William Styron rose Styron depression Sophie Auschwitz Meryl Streep Fay LA Merck Oregon writer
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"I'm here for for Tony. I'm a little early. So maybe I'm just going to sit here for five minutes, so I'm not. Okay, thanks. I just arrived at a gorgeous apartment lobby on the Upper West side where I'm about to record one of my favorite actors. His doorman helps me find the elevator. Follow less. Okay. Thank you. I'm pretty nervous as I make my way up to his floor. My name is Karen Brown, and in my day job as a reporter, I often cover fairly serious topics in health and mental health. But I also love good entertainment, and this actor bridges a number of my interests. He portrayed one of the few openly mentally ill characters in a TV comedy anymore. That's it. Is there any more soap in San Francisco. Scrubbing her hand for nine hours. I'm surprised you have any skin left coming out. Tony shalhoub won three EMMY awards for playing a phobic. Obsessive compulsive detective on the show monk and he's agreed to meet me. Hi, karen. Not at all. I couldn't help, but smile when the first thing he asks me to do is take off my shoes, something his character would probably do to though to be fair, the real shillue had a sense of humor about it and went along when I made a nervous joke sitting dog food, the near apartment that seems reasonable. Recently, I co produced the Greek God of depression. A series published right here on showcase across five episodes narrator and writer. Pagan Kennedy tells the story of famous author William Styron and his brilliant Dr Alice flared as they navigate his final depressive episode. So you may wonder how I ended up in the apartment of Tony shillue who, by the way, also won a Tony award on Broadway and is up for yet another EMMY for his latest TV series. The marvelous MRs Mazel well, let me explain. Since William Styron died more than a decade ago, we needed other people to help us evoke his life and work. That's why his wife rose Styron invited pagan and me to meet her on Martha's Vineyard at the compound where she and her family spent some of their happiest moments. It's also where despite the bucolic surroundings, her husband experienced some of his greatest torment. I have suffered more and more from a general feeling of worthlessness as the malady had progressed. If you hurt the podcast, you know that even during their darkest periods, the Styron's led an incredibly glamorous life eighty nine year old rose a poet and human rights activist still does as the snapshots of famous friends on her fridge can attest. So that's Caroline Kennedy, George Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Carly, Simon, and we wanted to highlight William Styron's most powerful writing so rose offer to reach. Out to some of her actor friends to read his work allowed. One of them was Jack gilpin who became the podcasts main stand in for Styron in Paris on chilly evening late in October of nineteen. Eighty five. I I became fully aware. Other actor rose suggested was Tony shalhoub struggle, which it engaged me for several months might have a fatal outcome. She is an amazing woman. This is blue sitting on his couch in New York explaining why he graciously offered to volunteer his time on.

William Styron rose Styron Karen Brown Tony shalhoub Tony EMMY Tony shillue Caroline Kennedy Tony award MRs Mazel Jack gilpin San Francisco Martha's Vineyard reporter writer New York Hillary Clinton George Clinton Dr Alice
"william styron" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

The West Wing Weekly

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

"New exciting show a miniseries from radio topa. It's called the great God of depression. Here's what it's about in nineteen ninety eight. A brain scientist named Alice Flaherty developed a rare form of madness. She felt so compelled to write that she scrolled sentences across the walls of her house and on her own skin. And Alice's quest to understand her own bizarre behavior letter to William Styron who's one of the most celebrated authors of the twentieth century. He documented his own suicidal depression in a memoir that transformed modern psychiatry. He seemed like a remote genius until one day. He showed up in his office, begging for help the series features interviews throughout with Styron's wife, rose and daughter. Alexandra his biographer, Jim west, and the writer, Andrew Solomon, and all five episodes are available now. So you can listen to the whole story from front to back. Think of it as summer reading or like a novella in podcast form. Here's a little excerpt from one of the. Episodes. Here. I was ten years ago, sort of height of my so-called career. I was, you know, success. I'd made money of at critical acclaim still with all of that. I felt like an absolute loathsome, complete worthless object who hadn't done anything in whose entire trajectory of my life had had gone up and then was plunged down into absolute zero pit. Find out more about the great God of depression and all of the previous showcase series to radio Topi dot FM, slash showcase. Radio. Ex-. Thanks to ads ERC for providing their ads, serving platform to radio hope..

William Styron Alice Flaherty Andrew Solomon Jim west scientist writer rose ten years one day
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

05:36 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"I'm pagan Kennedy and this is the great God of depression. We'll continue with Alice's story soon, but for now, let's turn to William Styron. How did he become the most famously depressed man in America. To truly understand why Styron had such a huge influence. We're jumping back to the beginning of his story back before he realized he had a problem, a depression and its manifestations were something totally alien to me that Styron on NPR's fresh air a never once before. This thing happened to me as far as I can tell ever had a serious depressive episode. He's talking about the period in the early nineteen eighties when his novel Sophie's choice had just been adapted into a movie. It was nineteen forty seven, two years after the war. When I began my journey to what it was, the story of a holocaust survivor struggling with her trauma. We arrived at the movie theater in a limousine, and I'd gotten this red very grown-up, looking outfit at Bloomingdale's. His daughter Alexandra was a teenager when the MU. He came out, she remembers the premier in New York being in the dark of the movie theater and watching this extraordinary devastating, beautiful, romantic horrifying. Epic, be nine, a polling bidding Cauca ball. He's been kinda Meryl Streep, even won an Oscar for playing. Sophie. The winner is lava. This Merrill ski. I'd like to thank William styling for creating this beautiful character. The film made him a household name. So William Styron existed in a super glamorous fairytale the Hollywood version of a writer's life. Won't be all right, hoping we'll be great. He and his wife masterminded these understated yet amazing dinner gatherings ornamented with Pulitzer prize winners. Well, there will be Arthur Miller and his wife ain't none. Cleve, gray and his wife all seen the Plessey gray, a filmmaker camped out at the Styron's house for a few days during the early nineteen eighties, you're hearing out, takes from these recordings at Arthur's daughter, Becky. I think that's the whole story. Am I right. It'll be a good party. And the ham will be the centerpiece. I would like to have a dollar for every ham I've cooked. I could in Dallas small foundation Styron seemed to be perfectly happy at that moment. But in a few years he'd be locked in a psych ward already. Some kind of shadow was passing over his mind. I've always been fascinated by graveyards in maybe that's why he led the filmmakers to the burial ground near his house. I think people born in the south are while the film rolled. He kneeled down peering at the tombstones I was hunting for the angel of death. That's a motif on so many of these gravestones. Remember there was an angel of death around here somewhere. I'm gonna find him if if if it kills me. Now when I listened to this tape, it sounds as if Styron knows what's coming. Yeah, here's a, here's a angel of death. These are the wings and here's the face of the angel success seemed to have spooked him. I think so fees choice, probably as much as it confirmed for my father, his talent and his right to be at the top of the sort of literary tower. I think it also is frightening. His daughter Alexandra Styron. Any great artist has his struggle with the idea of what do I do? Next Styron was trying to finish his ambitious war novel, but he kept hitting dead ends and the image of that to me of these sort of creatures which were perverted versions of his muse turning their little hunched backs on him and walking away, just broke him in a way. Soon. His writer's block turned into everything block years later in a radio documentary Styron would describe how depression crept up on him over the period of of several weeks. It got worse and worse began to feel agitated. And I think subconsciously I might have recognized that the onset of this illness was there. His wife rose tried to distract him. She was a human rights activist and poet, but now she dropped everything to take care of her husband. She dragged him to black tie parties, full of celebrities, hoping to cheer him up quite hilarious..

Alexandra Styron depression Sophie writer Meryl Streep America Bloomingdale Pulitzer prize Kennedy Alice Arthur Miller William NPR Plessey gray rose Oscar Alexandra Dallas New York Cleve
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"Just a quick note before we start this series discusses mental illness and some other sensitive topics that might not be appropriate for all audiences. Chapter three, the stolen brain. Yes. My question was also about darkness visible, which I read in one, great, horrified. Exhale, inhale. Do you worry about becoming depressed? Again, I think anyone who suffered massive clinical depression is to some extent worried. This is author William Styron speaking in nineteen ninety seven to an audience in New York, seven years before he'd published the best selling memoir darkness visible about how he had defeated depression. One of the things that I think destroys people rapidly when they suffer clinical depression. The fact is the first time it's ever happened to them and is so cataclysmic -ly ghastly that that they're taken on a wears if it were to happen to me again, at least I would know what I'm facing, and that would be advantage or an thank you. It had been ten years since he checked out of the mental hospital. He'd been fine ever since. Well, he felt that he had lived through his terrible time in depression. His wife rose Styron, and that he'd come out the other side and he really sought that was permanent. But in the spring of two thousand rose saw some strange behavior in her husband. He's just kept apologizing for everything. He thought he had done wrong in his life. And then for no apparent reason, Bill Styron's, booming voice change to a whisper. He said to me, I think I'm going to crash again. He spent entire days in bed. I think as soon as he sort of heard footsteps of despair, he freaked out his daughter Alexandra Styron. He really when he spiraled again in two thousand and all sort of came on very quickly. His son, Tom remembers being summoned to their home in Connecticut. So this was in his bedroom. When I remember having this conversation when he was the ginning to to panic, this wasn't supposed to have. Happen. Readers still thought of him as the icon of recovery, the man who beat depression. There were endless phone calls. They'd Allred darkness visible. And I remember once he cut a phone call from a policeman and he said, I'm here with a guy who is out on ledge, wanting to jump off and commit suicide. Is there any way that you could talk to him. But now Bill Styron was paralyzed with regret and shame. He felt that he had let all his readers and all the people you can talk to on the phone courage, and he felt like a frog which was ridiculous, but he did and in the summer of two thousand Styron's stumbled over to his desk, he hadn't been able to write for months. But now he labored to set down his last words, a final message to his readers. Near that summer veneer ending. All that's Styron's friend and biographer, Jim west. During that summer, Jim received a terrifying letter. Jim in having a very bad time hope to make it through. But in case I do something to myself trust, you will make the enclosed letter public as ever Bill..

Alexandra Styron depression William Styron rose Styron Jim west Allred New York Tom Connecticut seven years ten years
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"Just a quick note before we start this series discusses mental illness and some other sensitive topics that might not be appropriate for all audiences. Chapter two, the angel of death. It was nine hundred ninety nine Dr Alice flirty a brain scientist rummaged through the supply closet in the hospital where she worked and. And. There wasn't a shortage of IV fluids though either is now, so it would be like bringing home a plastic comb or something. This was only months after a devastating, miscarriage, and Alice was pregnant again by had a whole lot of nausea and vomiting, and I would I'd rate myself and that's why the IV bags. Because in the middle of the night, I was just so dizzy and dehydrated. But she had a bigger problem than dizziness. Alice had just been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She cycled between mania and depression. Mostly mania had a sense that I was this helium balloon that had gotten way too high, and that was just maybe one little thread holding me to the earth. The thoughts piled up in our mind. They demanded to be put on paper. She felt compelled to write five or ten even twenty hours a day. She would creep out of bed. Careful not to wake up her husband and Hooker self up to a fluid drip, then she'd type furiously. I was sitting at my computer and the bag. I had hung the bag on like the bookcase because it had to be above may and it was a little bit precarious and I was trying to get the avian and something slipped, and, oh, man, blood just started spurting out of the needle. All of them keyboard. How was was driven to right because she was chasing a big question. What is the connection between madness and creativity. One day she pulled a book offer shelf. I recall thinking that even if this were one of those warmly Senate and passionate evenings for which Paris is celebrated. I would respond like zombie. I had become she saw clues everywhere in its pages. The weather of depression is unmarked related. It's light Brown out. That's actor Jack gilpin reading from darkness visible. The author of this memoir William Styron told the story of his breakdown. He used himself as a case study to understand the depressed mind in Styron. Alice found a new and interesting way of going mad. He had observed himself like a scientist and help to change the way millions of people, including top psychiatrists thought about depression. He was like the great God of depression. He wrote the book that was really the. Only book that I knew of that I could look to for someone who had gone through it in a way that made sense to me. At this point in our story, William Styron. It's just an idea in Alice's head, but ideas can be magical wormholes that connect us to strangers and within a few years, Alice's life will become intertwined with Styron's and she will try to save him..

Dr Alice William Styron scientist depression Jack gilpin bipolar disorder nausea Senate Hooker Paris twenty hours One day
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"He couldn't right because he was depressed and then not writing made him more depressed. Now at that time, I was kind of struggling with writing too much with this hyper graph yet which I was thinking of as a neurological thing, and it suddenly hit me that what he had was the opposite of what I had. At the same time that Alice had a revelation under the bridge, William Styron would have been sitting on a dock near his summer house in Martha's Vineyard. His bare feet on the warm would darkness visible had been out for nine years and gone into its twenty fifth printing by now, his mental illness was just a bad memory. He was the famous -vivor pulled out of it. And if I perjure myself this this pack of the and. But within a year, he will descend into another suicidal depression. And in four years, William Styron will show up in Alice flared his office. He will beg her for help. He will become convinced she is the only doctor who can save him and she will try to be that Dr. This is the great God of depression. Production of showcase from PR Xs radio Topi. It's a five part series produced by Karen Brown and myself taken Kennedy with support from New England, public radio, music, and sound design is by Ian costs. Julie Shapiro is our executive producer, excerpts from William Styron's were were read by actor, Jack gilpin fine links photos and more information about this episode at radio topa dot FM, slash showcase. Coming up in chapter two, Alice gets pregnant again, and all of a sudden brain was going miles an hour, and I thought, oh, and William Styron rights book about depression, that changes lives including his remember the enormous relief. I felt when I wrote the last words and said, I have said everything that I think human being can say about the horror of clinical depression. Radio. Ex. Thanks for listening and thanks to add Cirque for providing their ad serving platform to radio topa.

William Styron Alice depression Martha's Vineyard Jack gilpin Cirque Karen Brown Julie Shapiro executive producer New England Kennedy twenty fifth four years nine years
"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"I sort of wonky Qiwei read everything that I could both scientific and also memoirs, and I loved reading depression memoirs in the nineteen nineties. When Alice was in medical school, memoir called darkness visible had been required reading for many young doctors. It was written. By a famous novelist named William Styron every doctor in the hospital new Styron as a man of stature, but not because he had Pulitzer prize and not because he wrote the screenplay for Sophie's choice. It was because he was the great God of depression. He'd written this book that taught even medical students about depression, not to mention all the patients who had read it. Never let it be doubted that depression in its extreme form is madness. Styron eloquently described his own suicidal depression and even more important. He assured readers that they could recover as he had been established with reasonable certainty that such madness is chemically induced among the neurotransmitters of the brain. When he published darkness visible, it became the book about mental illness. The one everyone read, I got depressed and everyone said to me, you have to read the Bill Steiner, look, you have to read the bills, tire move. If you read the Bill Styron book, let me give you a copy of the Bill. Writer, Andrew, Solomon is a historian of mental illness that was the only book out at that point. And there was almost no one I knew who wasn't egging me on to read it, whether they had read it themselves or not. It was the great dawning of an era in which we could talk about those things. Fan WFAN new law. She throughout the nineteen ninety Styron appeared on TV and radio discussing his mental illness, still his many awards and his best selling books did not prevent a sudden descent into depressions. Back in this is Diane ream on NPR. How would you assess your current state of mind or I'm in very good shape. If if if I may be so bold as to say that. At that moment. Styron believed he had conquered depression, and yet he struggled with a lingering and ominous symptom for decades. He'd been working on a war novel that he thought would be his masterpiece and he couldn't finish it. Attempted to gird his loins many times and move back into the rhythm of composition and to push that narrative forward. But he simply couldn't do it. Jim west wrote a biography of Styron and was also the authors longtime friend field himself short-circuited and frustrated as if his imagination had deserted him. The question is whether his depression caused him to be unable to write or whether his inability to write brought on depression, it's impossible really to know how those two operated with each other hell they fit each other. And as our studied her copy of darkness visible, she became fascinated with that same question Styron had described depression as a disease of creativity. The words would come out of his mouth and just fall on the floor, like and sort of gasping fish out of water and never reached the other person. And that's why he couldn't right because the words would just die. But Alice, of course, had the opposite problem by the way. It was very sad. She rigged up a waterproof pad on the handlebars of her bike and carried a waterproof pen so that even when she was pedaling to work in the rain, she could keep on writing and then in October nineteen ninety nine. I was biking back from a psychiatry appointment in Brookline over to Charlestown where my lab was. I was just passing a little playground by the Charlestown bridge, and I had been thinking about, why am I? Why? Why is the world the way it is? Is there a God? And then I had this revelation that maybe whatever was making me hyper graphic was also the same thing that would switch off when I couldn't right. And maybe I should think about this. I should write a book about it. She began frantically scrawling this idea on her notepad cars with by overhead trucks, rattled on the bridge, the world was all sound and fury, but she was taming it with her pen because she had just cracked the code. Alice scribbled the name Williams sti- rent. He was the key to it all it was so painfully obvious that a lot of what he was writing about was writer's block..

William Styron depression Bill Styron Styron Alice Writer Charlestown bridge Solomon Diane ream Bill Steiner Pulitzer prize Sophie NPR WFAN Jim west Brookline Andrew Williams
"william styron" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"In put it all down it's it's interesting because when you're either riding in a ridge opd on both of britain original screenplays and i've written um adaptations and i know that that brooke widow has really only made films based on adaptations because he said that he could sit down and read a book in four or five hours and realize if the story held up whereas if you're writing and original you don't quite know omitted takes a great deal of time so it's it's really depends on either foam adapting something like a william styron novel which can be very dense or this nonfiction peace uh that has a great deal of research outside of the book that i'm using or for a piece about eighteen ninety tune in of influenced by music and photographs and and other films and all the sort of things that that kind of get thrown into the stewards jeff bridges would say we'll so when you're when you're doing that what can the draft did you end up with for hostels after four or five weeks of doing this how long was your first draft probably about up i i i 10 as i said earlier i tend to over right uh in in some time how to do it for my read or for other people's read knowing that i'm ultimately going to pare down removing dialogue uh taking out scenes that i probably won't need that are unnecessary um but sometimes the drafts can be quite long a hundred and three hundred thirty five pages and you realize you know there's not that bad well no but it but you know that they just can't beat that long so what was your production drafted oh probably about a hundred and seventeen hundred nineteen okay and the film is i think to out work with credits two of seven i think um.

britain brooke widow jeff bridges william styron five hours five weeks
"william styron" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Well you didn't i was always an observer at the feast you know i i i don't know dilatot come on you are at the fees dim more dinner parties in cocktail parties and drinks in you name it in this out than i was totally at the fifth i was totally at the feast but i always kept might bdi going very often when i went out amazing things happen light one night i went to a fundraiser for uh to raise money for suicide survive as an william styron the writer got up and started talking about his depression and i went over and i asked him to write a peaceful vanity fair and he did he say you agree and he wrote this amazing piece that we called darkness visible about his chronic depression which caused the most enormous a reaction under hugely helpful to people who had suffered and he went on to write a bestselling book about it so very often going out was the way i got material it takes toll about three hundred pages into this thing until you talk about um being a woman in new york publishing in the 1980s um what joyful wait so when i think that's right the theme will actually that's not so i mean this a theme the theme throughout really is of a young woman sort of noah's learning how to be a boss you know i'm a lot of what the book is about his learning how to run things learning how to be a boss learning how to uh you know persuade people to do things and i think another theme ready is getting the management to kind of take me seriously for my strategies because i did many things for vanity fair like tony in how making a success and for instance launching a british edition one of these things were ready business strategy which never was quite understood as as that you know them the management tended to say oh kind of the equivalent of don't worry a pretty had about the business side and and just focus on the editorial side but actually and a good edita has to be a part of all of that on i did do all of that advan antifair and sometimes felt that eu noone had to kind of fight to get hurt a award here actually about women and something you said earlier you know this idea of.

william styron writer noah tony new york
"william styron" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Few movies are as good as that william styron novel and veronica voss a fast spencer for the film set in the 1950s about a former german film star very good film and that closes out our top five films of 1982 we would love to hear your picks or any other comments about the show you can email us feedback at film spotting dot net that's also where you can find twelve years of reviews interviews and top fives that on the show archives while you're at film spotting dot net go ahead and vote in the current film spotting poll were asking what is dare near enough skis best film the requiem for dream in black swan directors new one mother comes out in a couple of weeks i was an fedik as good i'll give you that also if you haven't already please do check out the film spotting family podcasts the next picture show an film spotting s view you'll find them in apple podcasts or wherever you find your other point out in wide release this weekend a rerelease on its 40th anniversary movie michael jess might think you need to go in c he mentioned it more times the show than 'bladerunner which we reviewed in some detail close encounters of the third kind also a sacred cow discussion here on the show i believe was lincoln what year was lincoln 2012 was it 2012 that long ago clearly so while i think it was twenty while they're just seems so weird to me but on that show we also discuss closer counters of the third kind and we will link to that in our show notes if you want to hear that conversation out in limited release speech rats this is getting some good buzz a film from emerging director elisa hitmen it came out of sundance our friend scott tobias from the next picture show gave it a positive review over at npr dot com tulip fever he 17th century set romance with one of my faith alicia candor and dane dawn it was completed in 2014 longdelayed delayed pushed back.

michael jess lincoln sundance scott tobias william styron veronica voss apple director twelve years
"william styron" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"william styron" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Are there any books you recommend here at it have been some great books on depression that it is been wells' i've read them buddy i remember william styron's book darkness visibles a very short window onto this experience of of you have having a major depressive episode and andrew solomon wrote a book the noonday demon which was i remember being great is there anything you um recommend people of those in fact or two of my favorites in that regard on the kabul that wiz leading some of the websites put up by the places the likes of national institute of mental health and stuff is trying to instead yet from a scientific from biological perspective to get people to recognize this is a disease this biology this is not a problem with willpower but robert i'm i'm mindful of our time now at it's i'm going to give you a final question of big picture question that i'm going of asked have anyone yet the seems to be in your house if you could come back in a thousand years assuming our descendants survive what do you think you'd see will we be recognizably human how much are we going to take the reins of genetic engineering and anything else you know integrating ourselves with machines what will we become men and what is reasonable to hope for here uh i suspect we will be technologically unrecognizable to our present cells much is our presence also technologically unrecognizable recognizable there were past cells my god you take a human from twenty thousand years ago and you look at the fact that people who have like sufficiently bad i cite that they would get eaten by a predator two seconds are around just fine because of the technology of eyeglass i liked benefit from that and that our teeth don't fall out and oh my god we can go get our hit replace a hits that's like even stuff that will you wouldn't see until like somebody's twenty thousand year old carcass would rod with ya we're technologically transform dow and were still recognizably hunan.

william styron major depressive episode kabul dow andrew solomon national institute of mental h hunan twenty thousand years twenty thousand year thousand years two seconds