3 Burst results for "William Stimpson"

"william stimpson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:59 min | 2 years ago

"william stimpson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You must run out and get or order online, William Stimpson, and the golden age of American natural history. It's published by northern Illinois university press. It is written by run. Vassil. V. A S. I L E and it contains this about the scientists. I love this. From a letter, the references to alcohol or typical of Stimpson's letters of the period, nearly all the club members drink. And Stimpson seems to have Sumed more than his share you give for a guy who didn't have a lot of newspaper clippings. You didn't have documentary film you. You really in thirty years you bring him to life to me. And you also bring Chicago to life. He had a coming back from the journey in his first sort of. Job. But his first prominent place was at the Smithsonian where he was instrumental in laying the foundation of that amazing wasn't. So he came back from that north Pacific expedition really starved for scientific companionship. Yeah, he actually compared life on board ship to like a being in prison because a lot of the shirt was a lot of the officers had no respect for what he was doing. They did not like him because he was so young. And so they gave him a hard time. So when he came back to Washington, that's where all the specimens were sent. And he rented a house in a basically started renting rooms to other naturalists because Sonian in Washington was a was a kind of a central point for bringing collections. And so he started renting rooms to people and formed, what was called the mega Therion club, where they did some drinking where it was basically a club where they get together and. Drink and eat after a long day's work. They would go out and chase women. They talk about going to all the different wait a minute. Scientists chase women. That's unbelievable to me. I'm joking and later on this club actually lived at the Smithsonian during the civil war. So the head of the Smithsonian also lived in the building, and he had three daughters. And Stimson was definitely chasing after a couple of them, we know this from his letters that he was writing to his friends. So it was it was almost like an animal house type it sounds like the neighbors complain about them, because they're drinking and singing and having a good time, so, yes, naturalists are not just this very stayed knew who knew who knew he, then he of you do such a nice job of. And again, we'll go back to the beginning where the reason run Vescio got to know. This guy is when he was the among the founding. Ding fathers of the Chicago academy of sciences where run worked for some years with our mutual friend, Joel Greenberg. That is now it's at the foot of Armitage in the park. It's now, the main offices of Lincoln park zoo, you do a wonderful job, Mr. vessel of in Chicago. I read a lot of books about Chicago. You also write in here. Known today for its world class museums in eighteen sixty seven call the head nothing remotely worthy of the term. When people heard the word museum, they probably thought of Colonel woods museum, which was I don't know. We describe it to me, like a p t Barnum, they did fiasco productions. They did comedy. He had some specimens had live animals would bring elephants. So that, that's what people thought of in Chicago as museum before the Chicago academy science. And when he began this, how was he able to do it was at force of wheel? I mean he's certainly was smart. Well, actually Sokoto. There were number of mid western academy of sciences, eighteen forties and fifties. There was this movement, where people are becoming interested in organizing together for science, and Chicago is the only one to provide enough funding for a fulltime scientists and that was because there were a small group of flannel office. Who put up the money for this academy of sciences. Where was it initially the building the quote unquote, fireproof building was at Wabash near van Buren, so right downtown. And it was a going concern. One of the, the and he was charged with filling the planet. He was in charge of displaying and filling and. What would would've been like to walk in there? Eighteen seventy eighteen seventy one early in eighteen seventy well the goal initially was to together up as many specimens as possible to try to get the people of Chicago interested in actual history support this organization, and real challenges with that because Kaga was very much focused on money, money, money. Oh later on. It's going to be called hustler town. Well, it's out as well. Things change. Sadly, and they're also so many immigrants in Chicago in eighteen seventy. So it was a challenge, trying to get people to, to comment support the museum they had missed it on skeletons. They had collections really from all over the world on display. And then, of course, Cobra eighteen seventy one there's a fire that not only destroys the building. But destroys virtually all of these specimens that he had put in the building. You do. It's tragic in your book. I find it you know it's supposed to cry at the end. Yes. Then they go back to where he was getting loaded his project, private club. You can balance the fun with the, there's something thing sad about it. Because you realize the, the, the thing that said is you realize, okay, wait a minute. This guy's only as late thirties. So maybe he will resurrect is going, another trip. Do all sorts of stuff, then he dies. Which sort of? Aces, the tragedy for me what he di- of data Turkey. Lows is the leading cause of death in the nineteenth century. And he died back on the east coast. So what happened was the fire. They had the entire Smithsonian collection of marine invertebrates were loaned to him, the Illinois state collection of museums were loan to the kademi, because they have this, quote unquote, fireproof building opened in January of eighteen sixty eight and so he was telling everyone, you know, you can loan things here and you can store things here, they'll be perfectly safe from fire gone. And he actually lost from a three fires and his life. There's a fire at the Smithsonian where he lost specimens was a fire at the original academy in eighteen sixty six where they lost about half the specimens, and they lost everything in the great yoga fire. He must've been immunity almost thinking was to Burke Yetlis, but you almost think he could have died of a broken heart, and that's what some of the contemporary counts talk about so not only where all those specimens there. But he had a series of unpublished manuscript that back in the days before the copy machines, literally three manuscripts that would have made him famous Amos and they were all. Completely incinerated. So not only the specimens that those manuscripts based on, but the manuscripts themselves run this, this is really a remarkable book. You know, you're, you're a teacher now of history us history and anthropology Lockport township high school. And I know it took thirty years and that may be why your wife thinks this guy looks like art Carney, and I think he looks she's probably been living with Brody seen this picture. You my wife, the book, is that equated to her. I saw that. If not for her, you know, helping take care of the kids. Yeah. So thank you, Jennifer. It's tough, Jennifer. It's tough to be the wife of an author a, but you can be very proud of your husband, the book, again, is William Stimpson, and the golden age of American natural history is a real Chicago book to believe me, Ron seal, the last name is V. A S. I L E. It is a pleasure to know you run, and I wanna thank Joel Greenberg, for hooking us up as they say, thank you for having me. And maybe I can cite a figure out some way to get a story about this guy this guy, just fascinates me. And also he was married. He had a kid had three children. The guy did it. He's, he's someone who people should know about. He really should. I agree. Thanks important. Figure in Chicago history to thank you. Save drive home. Will teach you to stop smoking after the news here, the sounds.

Chicago William Stimpson Chicago academy of sciences Joel Greenberg academy of sciences northern Illinois university Washington Chicago academy science L E western academy of sciences north Pacific Lincoln park zoo mega Therion club Illinois Jennifer Lockport township high school Stimson word museum
"william stimpson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"william stimpson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Not me. Who says you? You say the in the beginning of the introduction. There are few nineteenth centuries hawala gist whose lies were as compelling colorful and eventual is that of William Stimpson, I would argue there few people, I've read about whose life is compelling colorful and eventful as William Stimpson. He's a person that really is not been written about, and the way that this came about, as I used to work at this kogo sciences, which is now the headquarters of only can park zoo. The office building of Lincoln park zoo. Correct Clark Armitage and I was in charge of the collections and then they also gave me charge of the archives. And I found a notebook of letters, written to William Stimson, immediately after the great you had you ever heard of him before. No, no. Just not until I started working at the kademi. Yeah. So I found this notebook of letters, written. Letters written to him that we're from every major American naturalist commiserating with him over his losses in the fire and back in those days, I started searching for information about this guy and turns out there really was very little in lead me on a thirty year track to yes, he spent thirty years writing this book. So you, you must buy this book, it is fascinating for, for many reasons we'll get into the Chicago sections of later, but he was you write in the book to you write that he was fortunate to live during what had been dubbed the second, great age of discovery forgive. My ignorance, I don't know what the first grade age of discovery was well for screeners discovery would have been just discovered the new world. Oh, you're all the voyages of exploration. And the second great. Area discovery was really more about discovering new species? So this is a time period, the nineteenth century where there were all sorts of exploring expeditions, going around the world trying to document all the animals and plants of the world. That was like a goal. He was in a way very lucky to have been born in Boston can live in Cambridge. But it near the sea and to be of. The son of rather well to do parents. I mean, this was a huge I'm not sure who got into the scientific field. Eighteen thirties or forties, but you had to have some kind of means. Did you not? Well, his father was actually initially opposed to Williams going into a career in the naturalist, because father was a stove manufacturer willing was the oldest son and he wanted them to take over the business and William was fascinated by the ocean and fascinated by all the animals there. And so his father, actually discouraged him from from doing this and he had to kind of go against his dad in order to pursue this career. Would at the time and I have to think at the time that parents literally would've thought that their children were nuts or something to did not seem like a logical career bad. It seemed like a hobby, and that's how many people viewed natural history back then was something you do in your spare time. But it was very few jobs available. What so he, he certainly studied and he fell under the. Mentor ship of another fascinating. Maybe your next book, I don't wanna take thirty years again. But this may be your next book, who is that guy? So Louis Agassi was probably the most charismatic was most well known, naturalist in America came over from Switzerland and. Subtle, their Cambridge at Harvard and Stimson studied under him. He never physically enrolled, at the university in Agassi took him out as a special student mentor them for a couple of years and really Stimson a really good foundation. And the basics of rain biology, I guess he, he must have recognized Stimpson a like like minded passion for something that was not a pageant, you. You've found why display now all the great naturalist hit Saint patient. They simply loved the natural world they love the animals, and they wanted to go out in nature and study and see them there you right here, too. I must tell you for, for a, you know, it's an academic book, it's it deals scientific. Issues of. But you write for many New England Ladd in the nineteenth century, the C served as a sort of recreation, and eventually livelihood fishing, all that stuff in the mid eighteen forties. One, young man began to he rowboat into the waters in and around the harbour over the next twenty years. William Stimpson would come to know would come to know the oceans inhabits in a way few ever would on. That's a strong wonderful statement. He traveled. I mean, necessarily before coming to Chicago, he traveled a lot. I mean he wanted to see more. So his biggest travel that really made a name from his naturalist was the US north Pacific exploring expedition. So this skill background. This is the second of expiration. The United States was sending out expeditions, along with other countries. And Stimson was named the chief zoologist at the age of twenty how because of his connection with Agassi. Wow. And so he actually had to get his father's must've also presented. Well, you must have been a sort of gentlemanly, kind of guess, could background Emily? And so this expedition was in part to map the north Pacific Ocean. Wailing industry was one of the largest industries in America, the time, and they did not have good charts of the oceans, lot of whaling ships, were lost. And so this was a three year government expedition. I like to think of it as the most important exploring expedition that no one has ever heard of written a book about this either. Why is this always intrigues me, how people and events, get buried by history stuff to why, why do you ser? Mayes this happened? Well. Being historian, you realize that there's an awful lot of really famous people in their day that story's just vanish and part of it with him is they never did publish a report of that north Pacific exploring expedition, Simpson was working on it got interrupted by the civil war, and then all of the papers and articles and specimens were later destroyed in the great fire when one thing he was not did not seem like a great big deal sell for motor. I'm going to read you folks, one paragraph from early on in the book, the chapter, the first American naturalist in Japan. You right here and tell me this isn't the stuff of some like Robert Stevenson thing. One incident marred Stimpson's relations with the natives and episode that he failed to mention in his journal, an inebriated native tried to give Stimpson a hug only to be revived in angry shove Simpson Stimpson to the ground, and the furious naturalist won the listed men accompanying him to shoot the man, that's pretty. But now if you didn't write about in his own journal, we're how did how did you the researcher find that? Where do you find that fascinating tidbit? So most of the officers on this expedition had to keep a journal that was part of what they were doing. And the commanding officer then at the end would take all those journals and right, three port. So going through the national archives spent a lot of time. This book is mainly assembled from primary sources that happened at the time letters newspapers, diaries. And so there's. There's a lot of documentation the national archives to help bring the story to light. Yeah. It's, that's what one of the things that distinguishes the book and why it took me greatly by surprise because of Joel Greenberg is recommendation. I was going to read the whole thing. But I devoured it. We gotta take a little commercial break. And we will continue on talking about this Williams Stimpson and the golden age of American natural history's very compelling. Looking guy. Round seals wife thinks art Carney on the cover shot. I think he looks like h h Holmes, or somebody's terrifies me Chicago's best, right? Hit up Facebook until she causes of where he liked to eat watch co two Sundays at ten on WGN TV your pick. Maybe Chicago's best and we will be back in a couple minutes. Sure it feels like the world's a hot mess. But I know who can get us out of this. I do love history understand. We understand every week, I talked to kids doing great things on kid of the week. Deal for people with goals. Celebrate these great stories early. What do you think you wanna do? Because you can help. Great kid. How about even a good kid in your life?.

William Stimpson William Stimson Chicago Louis Agassi Williams Stimpson north Pacific Ocean Lincoln park Cambridge America officer Clark Armitage US New England Boston William Japan Williams art Carney Harvard Switzerland
"william stimpson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"william stimpson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Onto man. Get the traffic Chicago app, approved by the mortgage experts of team hockberg just search. T. R. A. F F. I X Chicago, your forecast from the WGN Chicago weather center, a slight chance for showers in the overnight hours, breezy with low around fifty nine Monday back to school and work of slight chance for showers again before ten in the morning, then should become sunny and breezy with a high near seventy three Tuesday sunny with a high near seventy seven temperatures right now sixty four at O'Hare and river for sixty seven. Midway, sixty along the lakefront Lake Michigan water temperature at sixty five wins out of the north at five. I'm Roger badesch, WGN newsroom. Ready to join the conversation whenever a story changes on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN. That again is Bob mammoth from his great, great CD, London house, flus with portico and Larry gray. Bob. And his trio will be performing Saturday night at piano. Forte thirteen thirty five south Michigan. You can go to Pinot forte Chicago dot com or Bob Mamat dot com. Or you can just show up there show up there. Six thirty concert starts at seven it is my real pleasure this book so got me off guard. Our mutual friend run seals, the author of the book William Stimpson in the golden age of American natural history. Our mutual friend, Joel Greenberg, again, put together JOL Rene fascinating book about passenger pigeons. That was another book that also caught me off guard run. Welcome to the show. This guy is one of the most you right? Well, it's not me. Who says you? You say the in the beginning of the introduction. There are few nineteenth centuries hawala gist whose lies were as compelling colorful.

Chicago WGN Roger badesch Lake Michigan Bob mammoth Joel Greenberg Bob William Stimpson Bob Mamat Michigan T. R. A. F Larry gray London house Rene