4 Burst results for "William Skelton"

"william skelton" Discussed on Permian Perspective Podcast

Permian Perspective Podcast

07:53 min | 4 months ago

"william skelton" Discussed on Permian Perspective Podcast

"Producing regions, the area in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico could nearly double crude oil production by the year twenty, twenty three, but who are the leaders behind this economic powerhouse and what is their story? This is Permian perspective I'm your host Krista a skinny. Today's show is sponsored by Baker Hughes. Who recently launched a new and reimagined Baker Hughes Brand as an energy technology company, they strive to make energy safer, cleaner and more efficient for people in the planet over one welcome to this week's episode of Permian Perspective. It's so nice to be spending this time with all of you I hope that you were doing well and enjoying. Back out there in this world. That's right. We've all been going through this together and I hope that you and your family situation has been okay and that you're healthy during this pandemic I'm sitting here today in my office in Midland Texas and joining me via Zen caster. That is the way with us. podcasters do things these days is then caster in I'm in Midland or visiting with William Skelton? WHO's in Midland Texas as well? He is the business development director for gyro. Data West Texas William. Thank you so much for being here. It's a pleasure to be here Chris to how you doing. I'm doing good navigating this new environment. We're in yes, the tastic. Meeting face to face, but instead it's to computer, but that's okay. We'll do what we have to do. Right to help out and flatten this curve. Right show jar with days. That's right well before we get started. I do WANNA. Thank everyone who has shared our podcast with friends and family and colleagues. We have listeners all over the world, and of course right here in the basin where William I are, and I appreciate each and every one of you special thanks. Thanks to those who've been kind enough to leave the five star review, I really appreciate your kind words and I look forward to reading those and sharing them on future episodes so once again. We are joined by William Skelton the Business Development director for gyro Data West. Texas William Tell us how you got in this oil and gas business, or we're all in West Texas. I think we all ended up in it. In one way shape performer another for me. In twenty eleven, it was really about seeking a different opportunity. And it was an opportunity for me to do something that I had not done before so. You know put in an application and spoke with the district manager at the time. That's really history right? There just got on and started going new thing for me. I'd I'd been another career for ten years and really had just. Just, wanted a change so here. I am is your West Texas boy right. Yes man wellborn in Houston raised here. I've been here all my life fantastic, and so with that. Tell us what it is. You love about West. Texas, you know it's really hard to put into words. Honestly, if you're not from here, the sunsets all of the sunset love relatively mild winters. I love the fact that it's not super humid. If you've been out of West, Texas, you know what I'm talking about us. So there's you know. It's always just been owned to me. So I can imagine not liking it honestly right, so you said you were in another business for ten years decided to make that switch into oil and gas. That's kind of how I was to. Until about five years ago, I felt like everybody else was in oil and gas, except my husband and I and then made that switch. What was it that made? You make that change well out. The obvious answer to that question would be money, but it'd be honest with you i. just wanted something that was less stressful. If not can be said about the oilfield really relish learning new things and so becoming survey specialist at. Was a really good move for me. I got to learn a whole. Whole other skillset, so I embrace that and it was a great move for me. That's awesome. Say you made the switch to Gyro data? How did how was that for you going into completely new field and tell us a little bit about what your company does. Well it was to say I was nervous. would be really an understatement honestly is done other things in the oilfield like giving testing and hydro static pipeline testing, so I'd had my stint in the oil field, and when I got out to a different rear I'm not going back well. You know you say that, but I got back into it because it was really just the right move for me financially and personally and for my professional growth. I felt like it was a good move so. What we do is gyroscopic serving. That's kind of the main thing with a lot of things fall under that we also do gyro while drilling, we do orientation works such as whip star. And also realtime gyros staring. And we can also do NS, collision, modeling and monitoring. There's just a huge huge number of things that we can do with. So you've been working for the company, I believe that eleven years now. No, it'll be ten years this coming March so just over nine years awesome so over nine years. What changes have you seen in technology and just the way that you do things at data? What have you seen over the past ten years that have really been beneficial to the industry will as you will know, safeties become very not to say that it wasn't important in the beginning, so I wouldn't want to say that I would just say safety safety has come a long way from just even twenty eleven to now. Safety is huge as you not. Ben So that along with the development of you know how technologies progressed. You know we've developed a new solid state GYRO. Is Far and away GonNa? Be Really huge for us. It's already proven to reduce the ellipse of uncertainty on most surveys by fifty six percent, so it's it's huge. The development of technology and safety culture obviously has been the big are the biggest changes I've seen over the over my time. So how has your company shifted now during this pandemic wear? Obviously, you and I both know things have slowed down quite a bit in West Texas. How has it changed over the past three months? It's really been a ride to say the least you know. Obviously, we had some layoffs. Just like US companies have there's been people out there making some really hard decision It's caused us to really look inward, honestly I I know this is gonNA sound really unusual to say, but it's made us all better. It's put us all closer. We have a more interactive team than we had before. If that's possible because we were really interactive before, but now we're even more in his changed the way we contact the. Engineers out there that are like good. Gosh. I'm so tired of answering emails. Because it's the only way we can know this one of the ways we can contact people doing that and as well as contacting A. By phone, so you know, I'm not the only salesperson out here on. No, that's not. That's going through that tough patch. Because in all honesty, it's really difficult to get people to engage this planet. Right and I think that's the biggest thing were so used to. We are a very social community I would say. In the in regular times pre cove it, I should say and we're just not able to socialize like we were before you know I. Mean you and I both know I've been here twenty two years and and you know how West Texas. Are We golf together? We Barbecue together we. Now. Know, networking events, and since all that is halted, you're right. It has.

West Texas Texas Midland Texas William Skelton business development director Permian Midland Baker Hughes Brand Baker Hughes William I US Krista golf Chris New Mexico district manager Houston Ben
"william skelton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"william skelton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Amazing health centers that can care for patients with pancreatic cancer. If you're in other places in this country, some physicians may rarely see a case of pancreatic cancer. It's much more deadly. When you're in places where we're physicians don't appreciate that. There's the pancreatic cancer is an option. So we're we're fortunate in that respect, but there's still needs to be more awareness told us about your fundraising efforts this year. So this year, I didn't look this morning. But we were I think in the top five team. Some we always work to be one of the top three teams of New York's cities purple stride event, we spend a lot of time was laughing about the flamingos are flock of purple flamingos flies from yards yard in our local community in north call. Well, we are amazed to have just friends and family and colleagues jump in. And support us every year. I always wondered what would happen, you know, three four five years down the road. And you know, we'll we'll go into New York this year. With about sixty people on our team. So that always makes me feel good that we we have people that are representing we use this day as as really a remembrance for David. It's it's a positive day. We're making a difference. We come back. He was a huge barbecue connoisseur. We have a big barbecue in the backyard and all of his friends and family are here in his family comes up from Arkansas. So this is a really big day for for our family. And it's a way that we know really giving back and making huge difference. And the funding is part of that goal is twenty thousand dollars for this particular purpose event, we are well past halfway, and we'll be we'll be close by the time. We get to Saturday, and in hopefully, we'll be standing up on the with lots of our other teams in you know, it's sort of a friendly rivalry with the other teams because they've been there. Also, we know the struggles that they've had and in in. It's just it's. Just fun to sort of push one another to see if we can raise more money for a cause that we all really really believe it could we're gonna talk more about this concept of purple strident purple stride in New York City as we continue. We're talking with John Skelton and Skelton and William Skelton this portion of our program sports edge with Rick will follows are eight o'clock update on the fan. Hey, New York, Sean Lowe here wanna reward yourself for surviving. Another winter do what the lows do escape.

pancreatic cancer New York John Skelton New York City David Sean Lowe William Skelton Arkansas Rick twenty thousand dollars three four five years
"william skelton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"william skelton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Morning on the fan. Good morning, everybody. This is Bob Solter. We're in a discussion talking about this topic of pancreatic cancer and talking about the work of the pancreatic cancer action worked purple stride. New York City is next Saturday, April thirteenth that prospect park in Brooklyn in studio with this Chen Skelton William Skelton and joining us by phone on a skeleton they're talking with us on our program about this topic. And Janet interrupt you before we went to our update and messages. Wanted you'd be able to talk more you're talking about. Your husband, David. And when he was diagnosed back in August in twenty thirteen I guess it was right. And I just think it's most important that when you have symptoms that seem concerning even if they seem that they could potentially be very common that you should get them checked out his symptoms were very vague back pain fatigue. He'd lost some weight and in. He didn't didn't take it as seriously as I wish we would have. And and when we finally honestly got to see a physician than it happened very quickly. He was diagnosed from the time we saw the first doctor. In fact, I actually tell the story we went to see an internist who called back when day later and said, everything looks great your vitamin d is just a little bit low. We're both healthcare professionals. We knew enough to know that there was clearly more to the story. And had good friends who got us into see someone very quickly. And from that point on it went went very quickly. He was diagnosed we had a Whipple. And he, you know. Literally was within six days of of of having that really serious symptom to being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and undergoing Whipple surgeries your fight him. Indeed is low. Yeah. Wow. So again, it's not it's not what most physicians think of I advocate for yourself. I think that's the message that I would really tell people is if you feel like there's something wrong really advocate for yourself. It's it's hard sometimes especially in this healthcare system. It's it's difficult to navigate, but you really have to advocate for yourself and ensure that you're getting complete I'm complete testing to make sure that everything's okay. The earlier you detect pancreatic cancer the better your odds survival. It's really as simple as that. These support of Panchem for your family. What's been like for you? They're just amazing people. I think it's probably simple as that. Both. We know personally people from the national office all the way here to the New York office. We also do a great deal of work in New Jersey. What it gives you a community of people who've who've dealt with exactly the same issue and everybody's head to manage differently. It's different people within their family. But these are people who understand what this is like and everybody has a passion for making sure that other people don't have to experience the same thing. And we didn't really know this family until after we lost, David. And you know, we were just sort of in the thick of it when he was first tight nosed, but we have been working with them now for almost seven years. So from the moment he was diagnosed until now, and we've been an active part of the New York City purple stride, walk every year on this'll be our seventh year. And if it's a celebration of the fact that we're making progress with this disease, we really are. Okay. That leads perfectly into thought that I have in this kind of something that we touched upon in. The first hour with guests where with stent. Progress? The future. And hope I guess are things that all come together. Some people might look at the survival rate. And be skeptical. I guess my question to you is in talking about pancreatic cancer, which obviously all three of you do. I'm sure people have raised questions along those lines where they are skeptical. How do you? I guess get across that message of hope when looking to the future. I think that's a terrific question. And I'll tell you the way that I look at it. When David was diagnosed the survival rate was five percent survival rate. Now is nine percent makes a huge difference for anybody who sits within that four percent. Those are families that didn't lose their loved ones pancreatic cancer. The other thing that tells me were making a huge difference is that when we first started at purple stride, the survivors are there, and there might be in the beginning there were one or two and they often were not there the following year. And now we go to purple stride events, both in New Jersey and New York, and we have a whole stage full of people who survived this disease. So I feel like that there is there is an opportunity for hope every single day. We have opportunities for treatments to get better. And. And. The only way that we persist in this is to continue to push. I can remember the days when breast cancer was considered an automatic death sentence. It's not anymore because there was funding. And there was advocacy and people jumped on board and said, we need to do something different. And is William mentioned earlier it comes down to fund it. It comes down to being able to do the research that's necessary to find potential cures for this disease. David, and I are both pharmacists, and I'll be quite honest. It's one of the very few things I research things for a living where I went to do research, and there were just such few options for patients, that's not the case anymore. They're not as good as we would like them to be a don't create the the level of a lifespan that we're looking for. But it's certainly better. So there's nothing that we're going to do. But wait hope moving forward is research, primarily taking place in this country. What research there is? I think a lot of the research being done in this country and to be Frank a lot of it is being funded by the pancreatic cancer action network. And I I think one of the major positive things that they're doing is changing the way that research is done in this country and for much of the clinical research, we do for drugs or diseases or or devices you have to have double blind clinical trials, they have to go for a long time. The problem with pancreatic cancer is that our patients don't live that long. And we can't be limiting them as to the the experimental treatments that they try and so pancreatic cancer action network has a program called precision promise, where they're focused on really turning on its head the way that research has been done. So that these patients have options and have the ability to participate in clinical trials, and that is what is jump starting. The the ability to move this disease forward is that that we're able to actually get patients into these trials who have active disease, which is not often the case in other diseases. When you're talking about this idea of fundraising. And awareness-raising which part of what purple stripes all about? What's the approach that your family is taken put this question out to any of the three of you Hannah, you can feel free to jump into? Hi. So I do a lot of fundraising when I worked at Avon thirty nine. And so for that we would put flamingos on people's. It came kind of a fun thing do communities they would have put them on their lawn and pay to put them on other people's onto now we've recently brought that into pancake we have purple Mingo. Everyone's having agree town. We really ask our friends at because their show so supportive of us, which is so amazing. Nice. And I think they understand how important is that? If we don't fund as we're not gonna make a difference. And that's really one of the main parts of it is understanding and getting everyone involved is gonna and pancreatic cancer. What's fundraising been like for you? William. Sorry. It's been okay. I was I've been studying ways to fundraise. I duct tape myself to a wall. I like school. You did what duct tape myself to a wall. Duct taped yourself to a wall. Yeah. We had a bake sale at my school, and they could pay five dollars something to buy piece of tape. They shot it to me on a chair and at the end of the lunch pulled the chair out. And see if I would say on the wall. Did you? Yes. Interesting approach. Okay. And then I'm assuming somebody let you off the wall. Okay. That's that's the important to. I mentioned the very beginning. Introducing. Folks in this hour of the program that I think hundred and fifty thousand dollars that has been raised by your family for pancreatic cancer action network. That's gotta make you feel good. It makes us feel amazing. I think every time we do this every year that were involved that I work really hard. I went to think David really proud of what we're doing. And he would really he's proud that is children are focused on this disease and working to make a difference that other children don't have to go through this process, some incredibly proud, and I know that every single dollar. We raise goes to make an actual difference for people. And that makes all the difference for us is that the pancreatic cancer action network is putting programs and services in place that help people who are currently affected in ways that no one else in this country is doing, you know, just on a very interesting point too. Because one of the big things with fundraising as you. Well know is. The whole idea people want to know where their money's going. Okay. And unfortunately, there are a lot of situations where people will give money to what they think is very good 'cause organization and comes to find out that an awful lot of money went for administration and very little money. Went fr actual programs and services. That's not the case is what you're saying. That is absolutely not the case of the pancreatic cancer action network. I think they're actually over ninety percent of their funding goes to support the programs and their programs are second.

pancreatic cancer David New York City New Jersey William Skelton New York Bob Solter Janet Brooklyn Panchem Chen Skelton Frank Hannah fifty thousand dollars ninety percent five dollars five percent four percent
"william skelton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"william skelton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Talking about this topic of pancreatic cancer. Interesting discussion in first hour of our program. Second hour, we're joined by a couple of guests in studio guest is going to join us by phone and they're all from the same family. Now that doesn't happen often on this program, especially on Sunday mornings. We welcome in studio to us to WFAN, Jan Skelton and William Skelton they are both here in studio. The skeleton family has raised over one hundred fifty thousand dollars for the pancreatic cancer action network. Since August of twenty thirteen and we're gonna talk about their loss and also about their efforts in supporting pancreatic cancer in this hour of our program. First of all, Jan and William welcome to our program. Thank you for having us. Thank you. Nice. Dave you join us on our program today. And I'll just mention to the folks we're listening to us that purple stride, New York City takes place next Saturday thirteenth, April at prospect park in Brooklyn. We had very good discussion in our one of our program today talking about this topic of pancreatic cancer. And Jan your daughter Hannah spinach in just a little bit on a program as well. One of the things that I like to do at the start of discussions like this. Is to provide a little bit of background for folks. We're listening to our discussion today. Pancreatic cancer. Your husband. Your soulmate David succumbed to pancreatic cancer. I understand in August of twenty thirteen. How much did you did your family know about this disease? Before he was diagnosed what a great question. I would have to honestly say we knew nothing I had a friend from where I grew up whose father hid had died of pancreatic cancer. But other than that, we absolutely knew no one who'd been impacted. And so we didn't have a lot of resources. We didn't exactly know where to go. And honestly that was our first exposure. So the pancreatic cancer action network, which is patient advocacy group that supported both our family as we were walking to the study and my husband. No, so many different areas where we can go in our discussion. And by the way, also we should welcome into the discussion Hannah Skelton Hannah, first of all welcome to our program here at the and good morning to you. Morning hannah. You are saying you're a junior at west Essex high school. Member of the national Honor Society field hockey team. Also participate in the annual school musical, and you've a speaker for the pancreatic cancer action network pan and also for the Avon walk for breast cancer. Yeah. First of all sounds like you keep busy. And Secondly, what's it been like for you? Speaking on behalf of and product cancer action network. It's been a really great honor. I feel. Really glad that I'm able to share my story in order to help other people because when I first entered this. You like mind there was nobody who under surpri going through. That felt like I'm sure there was aware. But I really wanna be able to be somebody that other people who are just starting on this horrible horrible journey can look up to and I would really like to be somebody that is another child would it be going through this? I would wanna be they could talk to. And when I was talking a lot for Avon thirty nine. I think it really helped me because I didn't have a personal connection that hit so close to home. I think having experienced from that really helped carry over into the cancer action network, and I'm just really honored to be part of their movement and their ultimate goal to anticancer. In. Talking about how it is that the pancreatic cancer action network as I guess helped you and your family. What would you say comes to mind this away in been supportive? I guess. Family. I know so many people in that in the community, which is horrible that everyone is always gonna be supporting I've met families. That are just I if I were to need anything they would be there. There's so many connections of people that you really have this network in great kids and action network, and that's not something that a lot of other organizations have and I think that's really important because that which that's apart that there's nothing else like it in the world. All right. I guess in. The course of this discussion will touch upon talking little bit also about David, but I don't want to ignore William who's very patiently sitting here in studio. William as I understand. You're an eighth grader at west Essex middle school. You play lacrosse recently qualified for the national history bee Chicago that sounds exciting. Looking forward to that. And one of the things that move closer to as I noted in Reno about your background preparing for today, you've actually on a personal level advocated to members of congress about funding for pancreatic cancer. Yes. Against her has thing in July that you go to the congress building, and you advocate for your state. Senators and congressmen, wait a minute. Hang on for just I can't believe you said that so matter of factly. You're going to the capitol in Washington DC. What was that like? Kind of nerve wracking. It was nice. Reassured me, I was able to talk and explain why we need funding to our senators. What did you say? I I told him. I said my story. Basically, I read out my story to all I explained why I gave him reasons to believe we can beat this disease and why we need funding disease. And the most important aspect of the whole time that you were there. What was the reaction? They increase funding. That said it all. Wow. Very interesting. That you would have that kind of courage. And also be able to do that. And convince people did they have questions for you. I really. They turned listened. And in terms of pancreatic cancer action network. How has it helped you? It's given me something to work for I. I had no idea how I was gonna get this. Or what I could do guy. Cancer action network helped us to find something to contribute to. Very interesting. What do you wanna do? Very interesting speaker. I want to be a journalist or FRA tougher. Very interested to see how your future develops there. You've got a very interesting. Future ahead of you. This whole idea of. Advocating. You know, your children are very well-spoken. Their passion. Is it? Reflective not only of your passion. But of what your husband was bringing to the table. Oh, absolutely. I think that for all of us when David was first diagnosed the first thing, you do with such a horrible central outcome as you think what in the world, can I do what what can I do? And for us. The first thing we did is we started doing. Events or fundraising or what can we do? And that's how I got involved with purple stride. Are I walk was very soon after David was diagnosed, and it gave us sort of something not just us our media family, but us our friends our colleagues are professional acquaintances to get involved in feel like that we were actually doing something that could potentially make a difference. And and so that's why purpose ride has sort of been such a passion for us. But David was passionate in all of the work that he was involved in. He was a pharmacist by training. He was tremendous mentor of students in he worked in Gdynia for awhile. And he always he would be the first to tell you to to really go for what you believed end into never believe that you can't make a difference. And he he was a part of instilling that in our children, excuse me. Rivera small from very very small. And don't be sorry. Not at all. The whole ideas for you to be able to to talk and to express yourself here as it is in his diagnosis. With the the disease. We hear very often that this is a difficult disease to diagnose what kind of symptoms was he exhibiting? This is really this is really one of the places. Our passion really lies. I think pancreatic cancer symptoms are so vague nondescript and common, you know, we had celebrated David's fiftieth birthday we'd had a huge party at our house. We just finished redoing our deck and he woke up couple a week later was kind of phenom back hurts. I don't feel very well. And we were joking and saying, oh, you know, you hit fifty and everything goes goes, south and. And unfortunately, you know, the back pain increased, and and unfortunately, also many. I hate to be stereotypical, but many men don't see doctors regularly and don't have he didn't even have an internist at the time. And so we had to sort of push him to go and see someone about something that was so nondescript is is really serious back pain hit holdings thought, I want you to be able to give. The complete answer on this. But we gotta take a pause here. We got a sports update coming in a couple of minutes to interesting discussion on our program on.

pancreatic cancer David William Skelton Hannah Skelton Hannah Cancer Jan Skelton prospect park Hannah spinach New York City WFAN west Essex high school Brooklyn congress Dave national Honor Society hockey Washington DC FRA west Essex middle school