9 Burst results for "William Sharpe"

"william sharpe" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:25 min | Last month

"william sharpe" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It's down 46 points at 39 48. The Dow Jones Industrial Average down 1% or 331 points at 33,629, and the NASDAQ down 1.4% or a 152 points at 11,018, ten year treasury up 7 30 seconds. You have 3.45% that yield on the two year 4.22%. Nymex screwed oils down four tenths percent or 31 cents at $76, 97 cents a barrel. Comic school down one and a half percent or $27 50 cents at 1791 ounce. The Euro one 7 O 5 against the dollar the end is at one 36.47, and Bitcoin is down 1.6% at about $17,500. Tom and Paul. Thanks so much. Greatly appreciate that Karen this morning. Paul sweetie and Tom keen after a Central Bank a thon. We're going to try to be Central Bank free here, which Dennis gartman will like. He joins us now. Dennis gartman is he's not retired. That's not like the right phrase, Paul, because he's the next stage. The next stage of life career, that kind of stuff. I used to get the golf courses nearby. And you know, he's like doing university of Akron endowment and the rest of it is seen on stage and screen worldwide. And we're only talking to him because Ed Morris over at Citigroup basically who's been dead on oil, Ed Morris, doctor Morris is just killed it on oil drifting down to the 70 80 level. In Dennis carbon basically his outlook for 2023 stole from you. He said everything else is in turmoil by the boat, load the boat, and gold. Are you long of gold Dennis? I am on a gold. I am short of equities at this point, have been for several weeks now and actually really quite comfortable, given the fact that looking at the futures right now that we've got gold down 1.4% and the S&P futures down to 1.4%. I would have expected on a day like this to be down a little bit, but I'm actually holding steady and the trade seems really quite comfortable to me. So yes, I am long of gold. I'm short of equities and equal dollar amounts and feeling relatively comfortable with that. Why will gold move from the lower left to the upper right? I still think that we have inflationary problems that are incumbent in the economy, especially because of wages, I think that's the place that the people have to pay more attention to. Wages are going to continuously be stronger than anybody had anticipated. The one caveat, the one bearish circumstance prevailing for gold is obviously the fact that the fed and other monetary authorities are earning bearishly at this point earning hockey at this point. And that would on balance give you a reason to be bearish of the gold market. We'll see what happens. Today is, I think, an important day, if gold would gain upon the equities markets today, I'll probably come in and add to my trade at the end of the day. We'll see what happens. But the one bearish caveat is of course the hawkish nature of the monetary authorities around the world. Given the fed's actions yesterday, given the Bank of England's actions earlier this morning, given the ECB's actions coming up, that's the one caveat. Dennis, as you think about 2023, how concerned are you about a recession in the U.S.? Do you have a good call as to yeah, no deep, shallow? How do you think about that? Yes, and shallow. I think that's what's going to end up happening. I think it will be relatively, it will be consequential, but not terribly consequential. It will be something akin to what we saw back in the early 70s, early 80s. It will not be anything like what we saw in 2007, 8 and 9. That's just not going to happen. Time shall tell, but I think we're going to be we were in recession by definition in the first two quarters of the year. We'll see when the NBER actually sits down and decides to calendar as when the economy did enter a recession, but I think it ended in an early in the part of the early in 2022. And I think we're quite out of it quietly at this point, we'll go back into it in 2023. Dennis, you know, the stocks in general, let's look at the S&P 500, have rallied off of the bottom of several months ago. Was that kind of a head fake from your perspective, or is that something we can start buying into? No, I don't think you want to buy into it. To me, I've been right for 11 months. I've been wrong for the last two months. And let's be abundantly clear about that. When you're wrong, you should admit that you're wrong. And I curtailed my bearishness modestly at this point. But one of my favorite indices and I hate to bring up a competitor, but CNN has a great CNN here in greed index, which one it gets over 60. It's a composite of about 7 different indicators. I think all of which are very important. When it gets over 60 and turns down, that's usually indicative of a market that is a greedy overbought and it turned down to turn down from 60 about a week and a half ago. So I'm bearish because of that. I like that indicator. It's a very good one. It's worked well over the course of the past 5 years. So given the fact that we've had a good rally, I think anybody who's long should use Australia into which to reduce one's exposure. I want you to talk Dennis gartman with the decades you and I have played together. Jonathan Pringle over at UBS today I thought was great on this and this goes back to the laureate Paul romer. We're in this moment and we've had three, I believe we have three once in a lifetime event. In the last 14 years. The fact is Dennis, we had a 12 year free lunch of Dire Straits money, money for nothing. And all of a sudden, money costs something again, William Sharpe's ratio clicks in with a risk free rate. I'm saying next year

Dennis gartman Ed Morris Paul sweetie Tom keen Central Bank Dennis carbon Dennis Nymex
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

19:07 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"All together in English was his creation. It's fine if he'd put inspired by real mythology if that's not too contradictory. It would have been, it would have been helpful and there's been centuries of debate since about how much of our was fabricated by McPherson and how much of it predates McPherson and that it makes it harder sometimes to get to gallic originals beneath the kind of English, super imposition. That's still true today, and there are still people who don't know that Aussie is largely of fabrication. And this is so much of Scottish literature. At the same time, there is and has always been a continuing garlic literature, which is rarely had as much attention as the interpretations of Gaelic literature as made by people who didn't have garlic by English speakers. It's reminding me of that kid that made up all that language Wikipedia recently. That's a very good contemporary version of the same dynamic, I think. Yeah. In August 2020, it was revealed that some 23,000 articles about a third of the articles on Scots Wikipedia had been cobbled together in a mixture of English gobbledygook and English rendered into Scots through translation software. The perpetrator was an American teenager who didn't speak any Scots. But since it's actually a really good example, because that American could wanted to be doing good, like really wanted to be strengthening the Scots language, creating more resources in the Scots language and didn't know enough to understand the damage that he was doing and the way that the work that he was doing was creating a false corpus for the language. That's clear to see because we're alive at the same time as those events unfurled. But yeah, when you're looking back to 1700s with James McPherson, Claudia, so much Claudia, in that cloud, and that messed, we have this name, feel that. Because the first known appearance in writing of the word Fiona is actually in the English person of James McPherson's tales of ossian that he published in the 1760s. There is one usage of the word Fiona actually with the two little dots over the awe, the diacritical mark, so we know it's supposed to be pronounced Fiona. It's a really passing reference. It's just used once and in fact, in the gallic version of ASEAN, which we now think McPherson back translated from the English, it's not used at all. Oh. How does he do the line instead? Because the line that I've seen is let the size of Fiona rise on the dark heaths of her lovely ardenne. That's the line. So there's a different name in that place, the name is, which is EI, BH. IR, which is another name I can't figure out where McPherson got that from. It's possible that he invented both names out of whole cloth. The versions of a there that I've seen are masculine versions. So it's a little bit obscure where that comes from. And is Fiona weather? Here or some kind of divine force or experience supposed to be human in this line. In the first edition of our scene that I can find, there's a footnote to Fiona, which translates it as a fair maid. Now whether that affair made is referring to a person called Fiona or whether Fiona is a kind of epithet for a fair made or whatever McPherson intended is a little bit hard to find. Right. But as far as I can tell at first and puts together the words, just fabricates the word. He's got practice. Exactly. Fabricates the whole epic so and I can't find a written example of Fiona in that usage before McPherson. It looks like there's some derivation from a garlic word for white. And there that something like that may be going on confusingly in the garlic version of a there's another use of that sequence of letters. But in the context, it's very clear that that's supposed to be pronounced fina and the English that gets translated as fina braco and in the galaxy it's just as fina FIO NA without the accent. So that's in there in fluorescence creation as well. And then also confusingly, McPherson uses the same sequence of letters to refer to what we know called the Fiona, the sort of wondering warrior bands. And Scott skellig. It's pronounced fania, generally you'd find it in English as Vienna now, but in some of the notes on some of the additions of parts of our scene, McPherson writes that as FiO2 as well. So it's possible that either of those are getting muddled up in what McPherson is doing is a little bit obscure. There's also, I find one set of that sequence of letters in an older garlic text with reference to a male figure actually as an alternative name for the Saxon Alfred Alfred in a couple of older Irish texts, actually, is referred to as flan fianna FIO and a son of asa king of Saxon land. But all of these are very different usages and different spellings and don't have the accent that tells us that this is supposed to be pronounced Fiona. The Welsh name Theon double FIO N is a modern one when given to girls. It means foxglove, but the male name fion is old, more than a thousand years old in Welsh and Breton. Yeah, yeah, so that is a male name. A lot of my research here was adapt to a researcher called Sharon crosser, who did some of the earlier work on the origins of the name Fiona. And I am not an expert in garlic by any means. I'm just a garlic learner. My pronunciation, so my knowledge are quite weak. And of the mind, but Sharon crosser does understand the medieval origins of these names and words a lot better than me and has done quite a fine piece of etymology arguing that to form a female name from thee on earth. Just by adding an a to it, that's not something that happens. That's not how a gallic feminine is formed. And we can't find any examples of anyone actually doing that to fend to make Fiona. So this is the other complication that comes in there. There is an old gallic name, witches, Fiona girl, and that is the garlic name, the English equivalent of which there's a tradition of gallic names having English equivalents. That would usually be given in English as flora, which is the old name. So usually when somebody uses Fiona Karl, in the garlic context, they would use flora in an English context. William sharp claimed occasionally that Fiona was an abbreviation of vinegar. I can't find any evidence of anyone doing that before if you want a McLeod. And again, according to Sharon crosser, it's just not how you would form a diminutive from Philadelphia doesn't make sense in a linguistic context. And we already had flora to do that work. In case this isn't complicated enough, flora and Fiona go may be used as equivalents, but they have different meanings. Flora is from the Latin for flower, whereas Fiona Gil means white shoulders, being the Scottish form of the Irish name, vanilla, which is centuries old and female assigned and means white shouldered. This might have been an expression for someone having fair hair. In Irish mythology, was turned into a swan for 900 years. I guess swans have white shoulders. If they actually have shoulders, the swans have shoulders? A question for another time. There's also the old Irish male named Fiona, which also means pale or fair, there are several saints called it or variants of it from the 5th, 6th, 7th centuries, and there's the name Finn, which has various different origins that all ended up as the modern Finn, but one origin is the aforementioned film. There's also an early gallic name fina, acute accent NE. That meant vine. So etymologically unrelated to Fiona, which means white if you believe all the baby name lists. This is probably the same thing going on where people are taking this word for white, where offend and feon come from and assuming that's what the meaning of Fiona is. And that's possibly why McPherson uses it and that's possibly why we get a fair made as a translation of Fiona fair and white being kind of connected there. Sharp gives it as the same meaning that to make fluorescent as he says it's a fair made. So in some letters, who says Fiona means a fair made, it's an ancient Scottish name. I've heard it. There's a minister's daughter just the next island over, who has the name of Fiona. This is something he says every so often. So sometimes he says it means a fair made at other times he says it's a diminutive of vinegar. And in fact, he does write a letter to Fiona in which he addresses her as Fiona gallic Clarke, which is a gallic version of Fiona McLeod. So he does sometimes call her. A letter from Fiona MacLeod says it may interest you to know that the name which seems to puzzle so many people is, though it does exist as the name Fiona not only in ossian, but at the present day, though rarely, the gallic diminutive of Fiona, Fiona, however, are not Fiona goal, is my name. Note that the letter says the name seems to puzzle. This, I think, does indicate that the name Fiona was not common at the time, if it had indeed existed at all, before Fiona MacLeod, because contemporaries of Fiona mccloud William sharp really struggled with it. They couldn't pronounce it. They couldn't spell it. They just don't seem to know how to pronounce it, which is very strange, considering how it seems to be one of the most intuitive names to pronounce. There's no silent letters. Exactly. Not a single one. Even the vowels. Don't come with the ambiguity that a lot of words do. Now they don't, they absolutely short. Yeah. It definitely doesn't seem as intuitive to people in the 1890s as it is later on. There might have been young girls in the highlands who had been cold Fiona and they just never been reported on a fences. So it might be that Fiona was being used as a nickname for a longer name. For an extremely long time and had just never been a Christian name. But this was just not a name that was in use. Why do you think people want this name to be old? Like old old. Because for some people, late 19th century is old, but old old. Yeah, I think people want it to be old for exactly the same reason that William sharp created Fiona clothes. They want a connection to Celtic authenticity. I think that's what William shark was reaching for. William Sharpe is best I can tell plucked the name out of ASEAN. But whether that was consciously or not, William shark did edit an addition of a CN and he edited an edition of IC and where there is about accent over the O of Fiona. So I think when he was looking for an authentic Celtic garlic name, he reached for Fiona because it's mentioned in a CNN because he didn't really want to believe that ASEAN itself was a bit of a fabrication. It's fabrication all the way down, but scottishness is made up all the way down. That whenever you go searching for kind of authenticity and our ideas of scottishness, you find someone telling a story that's a little bit shaky. And it also means to me that there is transness at a really pivotal moment in Scottish literature and that some of the binaries that have now become almost a cliche in Scottish literary analysis. Catholic Protestant highland lowland, English garlic, male female as well, these cliches of what gex called the caledonian anticipated in a wonderfully overblown term. I really embodied in this one creation of wealthy on of William sharp and Fiona McLeod. Caledonian anti syzygy noun, the presence of dueling polarities within one entity considered to be characteristic of the Scottish temperament. There's a last story about I think is really worth telling. It kind of sums up the whole story to me. So they're on holiday in the highlands and they're out walking and they spy a boat, a little rowing boat that's on a la. And they squint at the boat and they squint at the name of the bull and they think it can't be. Can it can it? And they get closer and closer and they look at it and they realize that yes, indeed, there's a little rowing boat on this little loch is named Fiona. And they go closer and they realize that there's a man in the boat. And William shark, not giving the game away at all, says, oh, that's a very pretty name on your boat there. Where did you get that name from? Is it a real name and the man says, yes, it's a real name. It's an old highland name and says, oh, do you know anyone who has that name then and the man in the book says, oh yeah, there's some, there's a daughter of a minister over the way that's called Fiona and sharp says, oh, so it'll be after her then that the boat's named and the man in the book says, oh no, no, it's not named not named after her. Oh, so sharp. Is it named after your mother or your grandmother and the man says, oh, no, no, no. It's named after this great writer lady from iona. And apparently this man read a story of Fiona mccloud's in the urban times or been being a tone in the west highlands and decided to name the boat after. Wow. So in the search for authenticity in the search for the real use of the name Fiona, William Sharpe can come back to edge themselves. What a fan encounter. It's beautiful, isn't it? And I just love that in the way that you can see in the questions that sharp is so desperate. So desperate to find some authentication of this name Fiona and can only encounter Fiona McLeod, but then maybe for you on a cloud is authenticity enough for the name. Yeah, I mean, all names had to start somewhere. They were all made. Yeah. This episode is sponsored by wondrium, the huge online library of video and audio courses, and tutorials, lectures, documentaries, and much more. There is so much stuff in this library. There's a ton of linguistics, psychology, art, business, food, astronomy, home maintenance, even how to treat a pet that has been poisoned. And then if you want to wreak vengeance upon the person who poisoned your pet, I'm sure you'll find some creative ideas in some of the medieval history courses, or instead you could take the high road and calm yourself down with a painting course or learning to quilt large quilts. I know how ungainly a large quilt can be to quilt, so I'm glad to have this expert guidance on how to do it. No more lumpy large quilts for me. Right now, one dream is offering illusionist listeners 50% off your first three months of wondrium. That is half off when you sign up for your first quarterly plan. What if a fantastic deal? Sign up today through my special URL to get this offer, go to wondrium dot com slash illusionist that. Dot com slash allusionist. Wandering dot com slash allusionist. Following the first Fiona episode, Beth says in the illusion verse Discord. When I Googled Fiona mccloud, I discovered that Google just pulls up William sharp's information in a way that feels less sensitive to the complexities of their identity than this podcast was. It's interesting to me how these choices are made. If you Google George Eliot or Marianne Evans, the heading that comes up is George Eliot. Very interesting, care to comment Google anyway, this kind of thoughtful chat is one of these several things that make the illusion verse Discord such an inviting and charming place to spend time online and you can be there with your fellow excellent pod fans and receive additional perks as well. If you support this independent podcast at the illusionist dot org slash donate. Your randomly selected word from the dictionary today is. Hyperbaton, noun, rhetoric, an inversion of the normal order of words, especially for emphasis, as in this I must see. Originally 16th century violet in from Greek hyperbaton, overstepping. Try using in an email today. In this episode you heard from Harry josey Giles, who is a performer and writer, her verse novel deep wheel Arcadia, recently won the Arthur C. Clarke award for science fiction book of the year. You also heard from mole hit in Callaway, scholar of queer book history, who's written their PhD thesis about Fiona mccloud and William Sharpe. Thanks to Julie denine and Shannon crosser, whose article concerning the name Fiona, I'll link to at the illusionist dot org slash Fiona too. Martin Norwich provided editorial advice, as well as the original music. Here his compositions via pal bird music dot com and as pale bird on band camp. Our ad partner is multitude to sponsor an episode of the illusionist in 2023, contact them at multitude dot production slash ads. There will be one more episode this year, bonus 2022, I love the annual bonus episodes. There are selection boxes of intriguing etymological tidbits and interesting chat because throughout the year I've been squirreling away cool stuff that the interviewees have said that there wasn't room for in their episodes or it was on a different topic and in the bonus episode, you get to hear all of it. They're always a treat. In the meantime, find me at illusionist show on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter, and find every episode of the podcast and audio and transcript form, and the full dictionary entries for the randomly selected words and links to the guests plus more information about the episode topics. And event listings might be upcoming Toronto, live performance of your name here, all at these shows forever home the illusionist dot org.

Fiona McPherson William sharp Sharon crosser James McPherson William shark Fiona McLeod Fiona mccloud ardenne Claudia Scott skellig William Sharpe Alfred Alfred Fiona Karl Fiona Gil Fiona gallic Clarke ASEAN Wikipedia Breton gex
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

04:48 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"Doesn't want anything to be particularly. Questioning if the colonial project let's put it that way. So Welsh literature shouldn't sound too Welsh Scottish literature shouldn't sound too Scottish. It should sound just Scottish enough I'll just Welsh enough to be exotic. But it shouldn't be problematic for the London market. So William sharp's literary career as William sharp often kind of underplayed his scottishness and sometimes you'll come across some of his writing that seems anti Scottish. But I think you kind of have to interpret that in the light of this is a person who is constantly having to write for whatever opportunity will come up. And so there is a little bit of self denial in that that I think Fiona's incredible scottishness has ideal scottishness intended to counteract that in some ways. So William is both not Scottish enough and two Scottish. Yeah, not Scottish enough for himself or for his own artistic desires, but two Scottish for London. So Fiona is this gateway into a kind of scottishness that William sharp has been personally and professionally denied. Elizabeth edited these books with Celtic poetry and stuff, but did the two of them spend that much time in the highlands? No. No, they did not. They went there on holiday. They both mention Williams time in the highlands when he was a child. And they both mention the influence of a gallic nurse or a galaxy fisherman that galaxy fishermen that Williams spent time with and this is usually mentioned to kind of ground the authenticity of the Fiona mccloud project. They were constantly striving for that authenticity, but I think it's rather more dubious than they would like us to believe. It's interesting, isn't it that all these things that Fiona had that were perceived disadvantages like more scottishness, femaleness, worked great for her professionally? Absolutely. Absolutely. I do think it is interesting and I do think it is perhaps a sign that Fiona's works were so good that they kind of overcame these disadvantages or you might also interpret it that they forced some of these exotic ideas about celticism and exotic ideas about Celtic femininity, cultism is very much associated with femininity. There's all of these stereotypes of airy psychic Celtic femininity and you might say that MacLeod's work is playing into all of those tropes and it absolutely is. So something that is going on here and that I think ties into this highland lowland garlic English binary is that male female gets written into that binary as well and so femininity in the mind usually of lord and writers becomes associated with gallic culture with the highlands with the natural and this definitely exists that William sharp's mind as a binary as well. And so Fiona mccloud almost becomes this kind of natural expression of William Sharpe's emotionality and courted into a Gaelic writer, his emotionality, which is maybe suspect as a man becomes authentic as a Celtic woman. That's kind of what's happening there, I think. With hindsight, I would want to problematize all of these binaries and would say that the way that garlic culture is identified with the feminine and identified with the natural is a colonial binary and is part of the system of thinking that continually erodes gallic culture which is going to take a quick break to pay the bills. This episode is sponsored by brilliant dot org, fun, short interactive lessons in stem subjects, like computer science, algebra, calculus, and my favorite logic. You know those logic puzzles where it's like, there are four chairs. Bob is sitting next to George, melchior refuses to sit next to either bob or George, which chair is Susan sitting in. I love those always have, can't get enough of them. So I was merrily breezing through brilliant's lessons in logic, you know, nights who can't lie, knaves who can't tell the truth, that kind of thing. And then suddenly I was being introduced to how it would be rendered in formal logic and understanding it. Apparently I speak at algebra now, which is an amazing outcome of me playing around

William sharp Fiona Fiona mccloud London Williams William Sharpe Elizabeth William MacLeod melchior George Bob Susan bob
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

06:25 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"On the illusionist. Everyone thinks it's an old Scottish name, but it's not an old Scottish name. Given how common the name Fiona is now. You wouldn't have thought it just doesn't appear in like 1893 or whatever. The first public figure who had the name Fiona is the Scottish writer, Fiona McLeod. Fiona McLeod was talked about as this prophet test of the Celtic revival. William Sharpe was a late Victorian writer, was not really the most popular writer in the world. After William sharp's death, everybody else found out that he wrote as mccloud. That's mole heaton Calloway who's written a PhD thesis about William sharp and Fiona mccloud or will Fiona as they were sometimes called and writer and performer Harry josey Giles. I asked Josie what the response had been in the literary world when, upon William chop's death in 1905, he was revealed to have been Fiona MacLeod. Some people just take this as a kind of beautiful expression of an artistic ideal. A lot of people continue to speak a few on a card's work in high terms and continue to talk about it as work with a great deal of value. There was a mix of, oh, we knew it because it had been speculated that Fiona mccloud and William sharp were the same person or some sort of personal link between them. So there was a certain degree of, oh yes. We could have figured that out on our own. And a mix of, for some people, a sense of betrayal. Or a sense of, I can't believe I was taken in by that. But in all in all, it is mostly respectful. William sharp's wife, Elizabeth sharp, published her affectionate biography of William and Fiona in 1910 and released volumes of selected writings of Fiona mccloud and William Sharpe. But over time the public attitude towards them and their work did become more negative. From the early to mid 1910s publication of sharpen macros works had been dropping off. But it's only really in the 30s that it starts to become controversial. After Elizabeth sharp died in the 1930s, this is when we start seeing rejection of William sharp and Fiona mccloud. So it's very much sort of a we can only be disrespectful once Elizabeth sharp is no longer there to make us feel ashamed of ourselves. As the years pass, there is a more and more criticism. And I think particularly of what is more manufactured or what we might now see appropriated in Fiona mccloud's work that you start to see questioning of the authenticity of the work. And this is as ideas of authenticity are starting to gain more attraction in literature and art. And I think less the gender material actually, I think less the trans aspect of what's going on and more the questioning of the authenticity of the Caltech material itself starts to undermine Fiona McClure's reputation. And even though people wrote about her at the time, as one of Scotland's most important writers, she passes remarkably quickly out of the literary canon to the point where most people have never heard of Fiona McLeod. Fiona goes from being one of the absolute figureheads of the Celtic renaissance to being almost completely forgotten about. And yet, there are echoes. There are echoes of Fiona McLeod and William Sharpe, and the name Fiona is just one of them that it is now an ordinary name. And I don't think that anyone should come away from this conversation, not wanting to use the name of your own. I think this is a beautiful and rich history. It might not be quite the history that you imagined, but I think it's a beautiful history. I can't get them out of my head because they seem to me to teach us so much about scottishness and Scottish literature. To recap, William Sharpe was a Protestant lowlander, also writing as Catholic highlander, Fiona McLeod. There is something uncomfortable about that. And I think we should find that a bit uncomfortable. This was happening before language around cultural appropriation was used and this kind of writing across cultural lines was not so uncommon at the time. But there is something uncomfortable about it and particularly there's something uncomfortable I think about someone from a large day lower than background who was not affluent galax speaker. Trying to be this profit test of the Celtic revival and trying to write authentically as a Gale and trying to take on that role. Something we talked about in Fiona part one is that by writing as Fiona McLeod, William Sharpe was able to publish without being sullied by his reputation as an uncelebrated hack writer of pot boilers and whatever else he could pay the bills with. And more heat and Callaway sees further reasons for William and Fiona to have been kept distinct. One thing I speculate in my thesis is that this was a way to distance Fiona mccloud. From William sharp, not only professionally. But also personally to make these distinctions so that Fiona mccloud was not too much like the woman that William sharp would have been had he been assigned female. To give personal emotional distance. But there is also a sense that William sharp in his writings in his letters, for example. Never seems to consider himself fully Scottish. He is Scottish, but he's lowland's Protestant rather than highlands Catholic, and it's quite clear in his writing that he considers highlands Catholicism to be like the highest form of scottishness, the purest form of scottishness. And so it could potentially be an attempt to allow himself access to scottishness that he doesn't necessarily have in his daily life and also in his daily publishing. He's very much beholden to the London market. The London market at that period

William sharp Fiona mccloud Fiona McLeod William Sharpe Fiona Elizabeth sharp heaton Calloway Harry josey Giles William chop Fiona MacLeod Fiona McClure mccloud Josie William Scotland galax Gale Callaway London
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

08:19 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"Their handwriting. I think it's partly that I think they wanted a feminine hand for one of a better word or what would be perceived as a feminine hand. I think it was also that thing on a McLaren and William Sharpe would write to the same people. And so they needed the handwriting to look different to preserve the secret. And it's just extremely interesting to look at this process of identity creation. Fiona is acting in the world as a woman, and acting in the world very aggressively. She's making her own publishing deals, she's making her own pictures for stories to magazines, she's making connections with people, often people that William sharp didn't always know. I couldn't necessarily make connections with as William sharp. But mccloud is making all of these connections as a person in her own right. There was a very small group of people who are in on the secrets. Usually the people who are closest to William and Elizabeth Sharpe. Some people kind of wrecked it out and found their way into the secret and some people were let in on it. One example is Richard dalian. Who read MacLeod's first novel and thought to himself, I know this writes, I know who wrote this. And he commented to a magazine that he thought that it was William sharp. And not Fiona mccloud as was written on the spine. And William sharp very hastily telegram. I think his exact words were for God's sake, shut your mouth. But everybody else found out after William sharp's death. He had handwritten note cards. To the people he was closest to, to tell them in person after his death. That he wrote as mccloud. Everybody else found out through the newspaper. Now as for William sharp's wife, Elizabeth, what was her relationship to or with Fiona MacLeod? As far as we can tell, Elizabeth's was an extremely supportive, so Elizabeth sharp was William sharp's cousin. They didn't know each other as children particularly well, but they had been very close to her mother late teens. The impression that you get from Elizabeth shops biography of William sharp. Is that Elizabeth is extremely protective of both William and of Fiona. And it's very open to the. Peculiarities that are going on. Elizabeth Sharpe, the wife, publishes a memoir of William sharp and Fiona mccloud. This huge biography of their writing life and the first half, the first book is entitled William Sharpe and the second book is entitled for you on a McLeod. The whole of it has a frontispiece with a portrait of William Sharpe, signed Fiona McLeod. So it's this book and two halves. The biography, it's partially I think a sort of rehabilitation. It's in the wake of a literary scandal. It's an attempt to make the story make a bit more sense to the audience and also I think to dismiss what was some of the more scurrilous ideas that were going around at the time. The biography is filled with Williams own descriptions of his life as Fiona and Fiona's own descriptions of how Fiona thought about herself and also descriptions of how Elizabeth thought of both of them. And it's not easy to make sense of and contemporary terms, but the clearest way I can put it is that as William sharpen Fiona McLeod thought of it, they saw themselves as two aspects of the same person. They had very different writing careers, and they wrote about quite different things. And they saw themselves as friends and collaborators who sort of happened to inhabit the same body. And there's a number of different ways that we can kind of read that now. In fact, Reddit at the time, some people wondered if there was some kind of what we would now call transgender impulse going on. Some sexological peculiarity. And the science of sexology was really emerging at the time. Some people both now and at the time read this as what we call now a plural identity or what sometimes gets pathologized as dissociative identity disorder. And that too is an emerging science at the time and people wrote about William and Fiona as potentially some example of the dual personality. And people also spoke about it as a kind of spiritual possession that William sharp was kind of possessed by the spirit of the land, this gallic highland spirit Fiona McLeod to write these books. And that's particularly how William butler yeats would often talk about this. But I think it's I think it's worth hearing some of William's own words on this. So here's one letter that William sharp wrote about Fiona mccloud. He said, this wrapped sense of oneness with nature. This cosmic ecstasy and deletion, this wayfaring across the extreme verges of the common world, all this is so wrought up with the romance of life that I could not bring myself to expression by my outer self insistent and tyrannical as that need is. My truest self, the self who is below all other selves and my most intimate life and joys and sufferings, thoughts, emotions, and dreams must find expression. Yet I can not save in this hidden way. Wow. It's pretty beautiful stuff. It's like standing in a high wind. It is, it is, and that's how they both write a lot of the time. I really romantic view of themselves and of the world. They wrote letters to each other, William and Fiona on their mutual birthday. They would write letters to each other. And their final letter to each other in 1905. This is William writing to Fiona, which I think again helps to understand how he saw Fiona. All that is best in this past year is due to you, mock out its jealous, my loyal friend that is and garlic. And I hope and believe that seeds have been sown which will be reborn in flower and fruit. And maybe green grass in waste places and may even grow to forests. I have not always your serene faith and austere eyes, dear. But I come too much in and through my weakness as through your strength, but will be one and the same even then shall we not be on a deer. Together, we shall be good sewers, Fiona, and lettuce work contentedly at that. I wish you joy and sorrow peace and unrest and leisure sun and wind and rain all earth and sea and sky in this coming year. And inwardly dwell with me so that less and less I may fall short of your need as well as your ideal. And may our mystics prayer be true for us both who are one. Peace and unrest. Peace and unrest. And that's William writing so romantically. Fiona's reply to William is somewhat harsher and mostly scolds him for being lazy. Which is quite an interesting pairing. Just very upsetting when you're alter ego is mean to you. Absolutely. But I think he used for your nerd to push himself along sometimes. So in these letters, there's very much the sense of two in one, and at the same time, there's a lot in Williams letters and in Elizabeth sharp's memoir where he say things like sometimes I imagine that I am half a woman and a description of him going about London, Elizabeth Sharpe says there is scarcely a day that went by where he did not try to imagine

William sharp William Sharpe Fiona Fiona mccloud Fiona McLeod Elizabeth Sharpe Elizabeth William mccloud Richard dalian Elizabeth sharp Fiona MacLeod McLaren MacLeod McLeod William butler Reddit Williams London
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

08:05 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"This news, it really took the literary world by storm. It was republished across the literary press, there were defenses of William sharp and Fiona mccloud. There were more defenses than criticism. There was a little bit of criticism and a little bit of a certain kind of prudish wondering about what William shark was up to kind of taking on this Gaelic Catholic female persona and William Sharpe was a lowlander and a Protestant and a man and people didn't really understand what was going on with that. And that kind of debate raged for years after the death of William sharp. People trying to make sense of what was going on. Yeah, 'cause you hear a lot of 19th century female authors taking on male pseudonyms. That was quite common, but the reverse was a lot less common. Yeah, because no one would publish you. Right? There is one that I know Graham Allen. Published one book under a female name. Was already a brother at the time, continued to write under his own name. But released one book as a woman as part of this sort of literary navigation of the concept of the new woman. But that's the only one that I know of from the time. Who had a female pseudonym? They're not very common at all. And it's interesting that in an not particularly hospitable time for female authors, Fiona does so much better than William. Yeah, a lot of people have said that Fiona card was a marketing ploy because Fiona's work was so much more popular and so much more artistically interesting than sharps. I would question the degree to which people say, oh, this is a marketing ploy. Because there are so few women writing in the Celtic renaissance, which is usually associated with figures like Yates, for example, the BB-8. A lot of people thought that she was potentially actually a pseudonym of William butler Yates, who wrote who was a major figure in the Irish Celtic revival, and was in correspondence with Fiona McLeod a lot. And they were often spoken about in the same breath kind of yeats as the Irish side and Fiona McLeod as the Scottish side. Fiona was a lot more professionally successful and it sounds personally popular than William. Did he mind? I'd be really upset. I think there is a certain degree to which he didn't really mind. Primarily because a lot of the work that William sharp was doing, he was really unhappy with. So you see quite a lot in saying, I want to write something better and more interesting and more putting edge, but he can't because he has to make money. He's not like somebody like, I don't know, Swinburne. Who has enough monetary backing to do whatever he wants? Sharp is having to support himself on his writing. He doesn't have any of the money to fall back on. So he writes these pot boilers and these not very good pieces of work because he has to get them out very quickly. Because otherwise he's not going to eat. And that's for quite a large period of sharp life. So I think their Fiona mccloud named allowed shop to make these artistic choices. He'd made some money by this point, and now he has the flexibility to say, okay, I'm going to write these artistically. More viable works, but he doesn't want them to be tarnished with his own bad reputation as a hack writer. So that is kind of one theory why it's published directly under a Fiona macro is that it's an attempt to get away from his own reputation. So I don't think there's necessarily the dynamic of sharp wishing he'd had that three under his own name because there is a degree to which the Fiona MacLeod name is more reflective of the kind of person and the kind of work that William wanted to write wanted to create about the being more personally liked. William sharp is very much one of those people who doesn't really seem to notice when he's disliked. There's quite a lot of quite interesting letters where he's just being extremely friendly and extremely open with people and extremely vivacious with people. And them just not reacting with the same energy in him just going on regardless. But then Fiona in her lattice doesn't show the same kind of friendliness, it is kind of like Fiona is a relief from having to try to be liked all the time. So interesting isn't it because usually women have been socialized to be likeable and more ingratiating. Absolutely. And there is a degree to which in some lattice Fiona can be like that. But in a completely different way from sharp. Hers is much more business like, whereas William is always being like, please like me, please tell me I'm good enough. People can smell it. They can smell the need. Whereas Fiona is much more self confident. And I think that's one of the one of the most interesting parts about when you read the letters next to each other, they do read like different people. And fear in a does read like a much more comfortable person in herself. And a much more confident person in herself. And a lot more attuned to other people rather than just sort of railroading through with this attempt to be liked. It might be knowing, for example, that female writers are treated much less seriously. So it's perhaps a sense that she has to force people to take her seriously by being a very business minded, practical person. And not have these bubbly approaches to people. For fear that they might use a modern word consider her to be a bit of an airhead. Because bless him, William sharp does sometimes come across as a bit of an airhead. Fiona mccloud also carried on correspondence with other people, particularly women and particularly women writers. And did develop sort of literary friendships and associations in that kind of way. William butler yeats tells a story of essentially of meeting Fiona. So he said that he would set with William Sharpe and a Fiona mood would come upon William and then Yates would speak with Fiona McLeod and then when the Fiona moved left, William sharp would come back and would have no memory of what went before. Elizabeth sharp disputes that and says no, no, he never didn't remember, but there were certainly these moods of Fiona that came upon him. Fiona does have a lot of friendships with a lot of people primarily women and is an entire person or is presented as an entire person in her own right. This is one of those places where we kind of have to think if this was just a marketing ploy or if this was just a pseudonym for sharp, why go to all of the trouble of forming these social relationships as Fiona, sending all of these letters as Fiona, in Fiona's handwriting, which was generally the handwriting of sharp sister Mary. William sharp would write a draft and that would go to Mary. She would handwrite it, and that would then be sent to whoever Fiona was corresponding with. And I wonder whether because now you don't see people's handwriting that often but back then there were probably a lot more kind of alert to how you would characterize people from

William sharp Fiona Fiona mccloud Fiona McLeod William Sharpe William shark Graham Allen William William butler Yates Fiona macro Yates Swinburne Sharp Elizabeth sharp William butler Mary
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

07:37 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"Owners. She was hugely popular in her own time, she published multiple novels, books of poetry, a couple of plays, a huge amount of work and about 12 years. The Aberdeen free press at the time in a review said of Fiona MacLeod that we know of no other author since sir Walter Scott that has been so eminently successful as miss Fiona MacLeod. Wow. I first novel is called Fatah, which is a form of the gallic word for Paradise. It was published in 1894 and was subtitled a romance of the aisles, which gives you a kind of impression of it. She was writing into what's called the Caltech revival, which was this period across the Celtic countries of trying to revive a language that many people saw was fading. And to revive a culture that many people thought was feeding. The Celtic revival in Ireland is probably the best known. It's a bit less developed in Scotland. But Fiona McLeod from this first novel was talked about as this prophetess of the Celtic revival. I'm a car produces all of these books about Scottish life and Scottish heritage. Thomas hardy is quite a close analog. So it's that kind of quite miserable tales of Scottish peasantry. She was a huge popular and critical success. She was also criticized for people who thought that this kind of Celtic romanticism was backward looking or overly emotional. But for people who are kind of interested in the Celtic revival, she was at a Beacon of hope really for a skies, Celtic revival and she was a galaxy speaker. She was from the island of iona, which has a small island in the west of Scotland. And she came from a so she said from an old gallic tradition and a tradition of Gaelic storytelling and meth making and a lot of her work was a way of kind of retelling a bunch of ideas about garlic life. So she kept writing for about 12 years. And there was a lot of speculation about who exactly she was and what the details of her life were because she never appeared in public. So like an Eleanor ferrante type. Very much like that very much like ferrante and people were a light for anti constantly speculating about who she might have been. So there was a lot of speculation, a lot of uncertainty, a lot of rumors in the press. Her intermediary often was her cousin, who was a writer called William sharp, a Scottish writer who was also publishing at the time and was well known as an editor and reviewer. And a minor novelist in his own right. William sharp was a late Victorian writer, who was not really the most popular writer in the world. Which is quite a what you might call a hack writer, so wrote a lot of pop buyers, a lot of quite cheap novels, and by cheap I mean kind of sensationalist. Inexpensive stories that were published in boys magazines, that kind of story. But also published quite cheap biographies and anthologies of poetry and just sort of eked out a career in London that was not particularly fantastic career economically speaking. And William Sharpe was often involved in getting book deals for Fiona McLeod. And Fiona got a lot more popular than sharp had ever been. Had a lot more weight as an artist than sharp ever did. And then suddenly, McLeod stops publishing in 1905. And then at the end of 1905, a bunch of friends of Fiona mccloud get this letter from Elizabeth sharp, who was William sharp's wife. And William sharp had just died at the end of 1905. Quite young, he was only, I think, 50 when he died, but he'd been quite ill for a lot of his life. And there mutual Friends received this letter posted by Elizabeth sharp. And it reads this will reach you after my death. You will think I have wholly deceived you about Fiona McLeod. But in an intimate sense, this is not so though and inevitably in certain details I have misled you. Only it is a mystery. I can not explain, perhaps you will intuitively understand or may come to understand. The rest is silence. Farewell, William Sharpe. And then as a PostScript, because this was this letter is so typical of William sharp, he often wrote in this very flowery, very elusive way. And I think he wrote this letter and then realized he hadn't been entirely clear. He clear as an egg. So clear. And he adds this PostScript, which is, it is only right, however, to add that I and only I was the author in the literal and literary sense of all written under the name of Fiona McLeod. Gasp reveal. Big third act twist. It's a huge. Hold on to your hats. We're just going to take a quick break to pay the bills. This episode is sponsored by mint mobile, the bargainer cell phone plans because Americans, you're unlucky in that most of your data plans seem unreasonably expensive, but you're very lucky that mint mobile is available in your country, with plans that start from a mere $15 why the unlimited plan is only $30 a month and if it's a family plan you need, you can start one from just two lines. And mint lets you order and activate from home with E sim. So you don't even have to find a paper clip and unravel it so you can stick the end into your phone to pop the sim card out and then you drop it on the floor and you have to Scrabble around making fit then you have to stab yourself with a bed paper clip and I need for any of that. Thanks E sim that's all pretty great, isn't it? Even more great is that for a limited time, you can buy any three month mint mobile plan and get three more months for free by going to mint mobile dot com slash illusionist. That's mint mobile dot com slash allusionist. Cut your wall is built of 15 bucks a month at mint mobile dot com slash allegiance. The illusionist is sponsored by bombas makers of socks, undies and t-shirts that are super comfortable and cozy upgrades to your everyday basics and available in a range of colors and fabrics and patterns. All of them thoughtfully designed, so for instance, if you are irritated by seams in your usual clothes, bombast is looking out for you, they minimize seams and they never put any tags in either, so I can go around without worrying the label in the back of my T-shirt is sticking up because there isn't one. And as always with bombast, when you buy any of their products, they donate items of new and durable clothing to people in need. To date, bombas has donated 75 million items through

William sharp Fiona McLeod Fiona MacLeod Elizabeth sharp William Sharpe Eleanor ferrante sir Walter Scott Scotland Thomas hardy Fatah Fiona mccloud Aberdeen ferrante iona west of Ireland McLeod Fiona
"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

07:12 min | 2 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on The Allusionist

"Fiona is a name. I think now that still has slightly romantic, slightly historical, Scottish feel. And I think everyone thinks it's an old Scottish name, but it's not an old Scottish name. I'm Harry Josephine childs, a joystick for short. I am a writer and performer from orkney in Scotland from the northern IELTS. My most recent book is a very novel. It's called deep wheel Arcadia. It's a science fiction versus novel and it's just one that Arthur C. Clarke award. Welcome back to the show. Why? Did you want to return? Well, I want to talk to you about the origins, the very surprising origins of the first name Fiona, which when I started coming across this story, I couldn't quite believe it, but I've dug and dug and done more and more research. And I'm pretty sure it's quite true. And I think a lot of people assume that it's a really old garlic name from the highlands of Scotland. And it kind of is, but it also really isn't. Kind of is but isn't intriguing. Yeah. How does that work? Well, the first public figure. I'm confident saying this the first public figure who had the name Fiona is the Scottish writer, Fiona McLeod. So Fiona McLeod was writing at the very end of the 19th century, beginning of the 20th century, writing for about 12 years. Now the caveat here is if you go into Scottish census records, you will find a dozen Fiona's who appear before Fiona mccloud. And that's in the digital census records. But I've gone to the original handwritten version of that doesn't feel as and what you find is that certainly in most of the cases, if not all the cases, something that is not Fiona has been mistranscribed as Fiona in a couple of them, there's just a sort of ink blot and you can't really tell what the name is. Sorry your middle name's block now. In a couple of them, it's definitely flora, which is an old Scottish name. That is a very common old Scottish name. In a couple of them, it might be iona or it might be Laura or lorna, and there's one. And a licking. I think. None of these handwritten names look like Fiona to me. But if it is for you or not, there's no record of that Fiona in the birth records. So it's all a bit of a mystery, but I think what's happening is that because people now think that Fiona is a very old Scottish name when they come across an ambiguous entry in the census when they're digitizing that, whether it's a computer trying to work out the name or a human trying to work out the name. They superimpose the word Fiona, which they assume is old unto the older record. Harvard back to the Scottish centers or birth records go. We are only going back into the 19th century, so into the early or mid 19th century. I'm trying to be like a circumspect, as I can be about this. I could be wrong about any of this, and if you go to ancestry dot com, you will certainly find loads of Fiona's from around the world, whether it's a name of a different derivation, but I've been to a few of them. I haven't systematically gone through them and often you find exactly the same mistranscription thing happening. Please inform us if you do have any slam dunk evidence of Fiona's from before the late 19th century. There is also one bolt called Fiona. Which if you're into historical racing boats was actually quite a famous boat, which was made in the mid 19th century before Fiona mccloud was rating and that was a sort of mid up sequence of sounds and in this case it was a derivation of the original books builder, the first person who was having the boat built had a name that then got slightly changed to be Fiona. Its original builder was H la full of Liverpool and E, who had a trading ship called lafonia and then had a book build called Fiona. I don't know why he switched the vials, but apparently the files got switched. Just innovating. Then the boat was taken over by a mister Emmanuel butcher, and this is the kicker the boat was so successful that butcher had several other Fiona's built after it, and also gave the name to his daughter. As a middle name. So before Fiona McLeod, there is an Emily honora Fiona butcher. And I might be wrong that he named the daughter after the boat, but the boat did come before the doctor. So it does seem like he really liked the name. Certainly seems like he really liked that boat. Emily and Nora Fiona butcher's baptism was registered in 1868 and nearly three decades before the first person to have the first name Fiona definitely Fiona and not a mistranscription Fiona MacLeod. Callaway and that I'm a scholar of book history and gender identity queer queer book history, essentially, so I work in the ways that queer people have made books made texts. Most studies have concentrated on the writers Fiona mccloud and William Sharpe. When Fiona mccloud's novels became popular in the mid 1890s, so did the name Fiona. Given how common the name of yona is now, you wouldn't have thought it just doesn't appear in like 1893 or whatever. And it's this massive boom of this name. It starts from nothing and kind of through the 1890s and the 1900s, you can count in a census how many people have this name. According to Scotland's people, which gathers the birth records and makes them available, there are no registered Fiona's born before Fiona mccloud. In total, there are four Fiona's born after Fiona McLeod and before 1900, and then in the next decade, the first decade of the 20th century, there are 19 Fiona's in Scotland, then the second decade there are 24, then in the third decade, there are a 115, and then in the fourth decade, there are 643 and after that I stopped counting, so that I'm just starts exploding in popularity, which might be one reason why it seems so old is because it became so ubiquitous so quickly. That it doesn't seem even likely that it just started in the middle of nowhere in 1890. But it did. And I think it was because Fiona mccloud was so popular. Naming trends often reflect the popularity of artists or their fictional characters, like how there were no baby meridas registered in Britain until after Disney's 2012 film brave starring princess Merida, or the name Wendy becoming popular after JM barrie invented the name for the character in Peter Pan. But who was Fiona MacLeod, the author that launched a thousand Fiona's and then morphe

Fiona Fiona McLeod Fiona mccloud Harry Josephine childs Scotland Scottish centers Arthur C. Clarke orkney Arcadia Emmanuel butcher iona lorna Emily honora Fiona butcher Nora Fiona butcher Fiona MacLeod Laura William Sharpe Harvard yona butcher
"william sharpe" Discussed on Gambling With an Edge

Gambling With an Edge

03:57 min | 6 months ago

"william sharpe" Discussed on Gambling With an Edge

"All inclusive gambling site with more reliable information on all of the games and with a spectacular section on blackjack and all of the appendices that contain a wealth of information and that of course is wizard of Vegas and was about dot com. Dot com. I agree. And that is a spectacular site. Well, thank you very much coming from you that means a lot to me. Another one of your contributions to blackjack has been to assess the value of any given blackjack game, according to a metric known as score, which is an acronym for standardized comparison of risk and expectation. Can you tell us more about how the score is calculated and which games tend to be more or less profitable than might be gleaned from the expected value only? Well, the principle of score was interesting because some people know that I have a background in investment banking and options trading and finance and I worked for an investment bank for some 13 years. One of the principles of investing when you're looking to see what kind of a return you can get from an investment is that the return shouldn't really be everything. And that you should also consider the risk that you take in order to achieve that return. And the Nobel Prize in economics was given to William Sharpe who actually conceived of the idea of actually forming a ratio of putting the expectation in the numerator of a fraction. So you want that to be as big as possible. But also putting the standard deviation or the variance in the denominator of the fraction and you'd like that to be as small as possible because a fraction's value gets larger if the denominator gets smaller. So we formed this idea of the shop ratio and it occurred to me one day that that's really the best way to evaluate the goodness, if you will of the attractiveness or the profitability of a blackjack game. What you really need to do is consider not only the return that you can get from the game, but also the risk or the standard deviation that you take when you play that particular game. And it's only when putting them on that equal footing that you can rank games appropriately. So I set out to do that and you have to make certain assumptions so that you're comparing apples to apples, and so I arbitrarily decided that we'll use a $10,000 bankroll and will bet optimally and will assume certain rules and we'll put so many people at the table and will play high low and will spread from one to 6 or one to 8 or whatever the case may be. And I started to rank all the games.

William Sharpe Vegas Nobel Prize