13 Burst results for "William Hardy"

"william hardy" Discussed on Ominous Origins

Ominous Origins

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"william hardy" Discussed on Ominous Origins

"Before we get into the investigation itself. Let's look at the people who were involved in said investigation. There were a few few people got involved in this thing and rightfully so i. If we have a miller county chief. Sheriff's deputy tillman byron johnson. Johnson was born on may twenty fourth. Nineteen eleven in stamps arkansas. He moved to her in the thirties and started working for the miller. County sheriff's department in nineteen thirty eight. He served in the military for two years during world. War two before returning home and working on the virgil starks. Murder case. He soon became one of the leading. Investigators in the case johnson. Do not believe that. The phantom committed these starks murder. He was a member of the first united methodist church of east sixth street at is quite a mouthful. He was the last surviving law. Man of the phantom slayings and was the quote unquote go-to man. For the case he had been contacted by many interested individuals including television crews from all over the world including china sweden australia. He kept many personal files of the which became the only case files available because many of the original files photographs and police knows eventually went missing from both police. Departments johnson firmly believed the identity. The phantom was that of the prime suspect. you'll swinney. We'll get to that in just a little bit. Johnson departed from the sheriff's office in nineteen fifty seven and became an insurance adjuster which he retired from in the nineteen seventies. He then became a private investigator. Johnson died on wednesday december tenth. Two thousand eight at local hospital at the age of ninety seven. He was survived by two sons. A daughter in law. One daughter son-in-law two grandsons and granddaughters in law one granddaughter and twelve great grandchildren. Demand lived a very full life. That is something. We cannot argue. Also working on the case. was arkansas. state police. Detective max andrew tackett. He was born on august thirteenth. Nineteen twelve in glenwood arkansas and moved to texarkana in nineteen forty one. He served on the police state force from nineteen forty one to nineteen forty eight having served as a trooper that special investigator during that period tack it was the texarkana police chief from nineteen forty eight until his retirement in nineteen sixty eight in nineteen fifty one. He became the president of the arkansas peace officers association. He was a world. War two combat vet who had served in belgium france and the netherlands as well as germany max also was a member of the beech street baptist church and the optimists club always been curious when optimus club really is is the people who dislike the sun's gonna shine tomorrow. It's gonna be a great day a doubted but let me keep my weird little fantasy there. Max was said to be colorful outspoken and even controversial figure in the police department. Max became the arresting officer of the lead suspect. You will swinney. That's name we're gonna hear quite a bit over the next couple episodes after realizing that on each night of the murders car was stolen and later abandoned tack it sadly unlike byron johnson died at a fairly young age at the age of fifty nine died in local hospital. Present at the case as well was bowie. County sheriff william hardy or bill presley. He was born on april twenty fifth eighteen. Ninety five in the red springs community of bowie county. He was a member of the men's bible class. The first united methodist church on fourth street and st lane avenue presley had served twenty years in elected office including terms as county commissioner county treasurer and sheriff. He was a veteran of world. War one and served overseas in france. With the american expeditionary forces he was a member of the chapel would methodist church american legion veterans of foreign wars. Andy thirty second degree mason and schreiner. He was a longtime friend of texas city. Chief of police jack n bernal's and he knew the stark family fairly. Well is the first lawmen on the scene of mary. Jean larry's attack and the first and second double murderers brazely died at the age of seventy seven in hospital. Another member of the task force or the investigation was texas chief of police jack. Neely runnells or jackson roles and he was born on september twenty sixth eighteen ninety seven. Ronald was a longtime friend of bowie county. Sheriff presley he impressively really. I officers called the scene of both the double murders. Bruno's was also the lead investigator of the bookers saxophone. After had been law enforcement officer for thirty years serving as chief of police or twenty of them. Having been re elected ten times he retired in nineteen fifty three and became a farmer he too died in local hospital but this time from a heart attack at the age of sixty nine last up and may be the most famous number of the investigation was texas ranger captain. Manual lone wolf can swallows youth born on july fourth eighteen ninety one in spain to parents who were naturalized american citizens you married in nineteen twenty enlisted in the texas rangers. That same year. He was in charge of controlling gambling. Bank robbery bootlegging narcotic trafficking prostitution rise in general lawlessness from the red river to the real 'grande and from el paso texas too so bein- during the nineteen twenties and thirties. He was made captain of the company. Be texas rangers in nineteen forty in nineteen forty six while hunting the phantom. He swore to stay texarkana until the killer was apprehended but three months after the last murder yup and left giddens. Walla's believed that the attack on hollis and lori was not committed by the phantom. He believed that someone else murdered virgil starks gins walla's retired from the rangers in nineteen fifty one and move to hollywood to become a technical consultant for radio television and the movies most notably the long running nineteen fifties radio and tv show. Tales of the texas ranger gins walla's mason and a presbyterian died of cancer on february thirteenth. Nineteen seventy seven at the age of eighty five during his time in texarkana jay..

virgil starks tillman byron johnson County sheriff's department arkansas united methodist church of eas Johnson swinney Detective max andrew tackett texarkana police miller county arkansas peace officers associ johnson beech street baptist church optimists club optimus club bowie county starks byron johnson william hardy bill presley
"william hardy" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"william hardy" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Emerge. Here's where it gets crazy all right. Now let's introduce you to the rainbow warrior. You saw the title of this episode. That's what this whole thing's about the rainbow warrior was a trawler class vessel a ship. Not not just about this is ship guys and it was built in the united kingdom in nineteen fifty five and it was called the sir william hardy. It is up to you whether the name whether you prefer the name rainbow warrior or sir william. Hardy this is a trawler is essentially a a motorboat that seaworthy so they wanted this because it can make long ocean voyages. It's not super impressive. You know it's not on the level of billionaires yachts or something. No one's living the high life on this it's a workbook for emission and when greenpeace uk got a hold of the vessel back in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. That's win. They renamed it. They spent about four months retrofitting. It may second nineteen seventy eight. They launched it and they decided to call it the rainbow warrior. It's named after a book written by one of the co founders of greenpeace. A guy named robert hunter wrote a book called warriors of the rainbow. The titular line of the book. If you're interested is the world is seeking dying. The people will rise up like warriors of the rainbow. I'm not one hundred percent. Sure what that means. But it's inspirational well like know warriors from all over the place you look like who look like everyone possibly could look on earth and we're all going to fight for everything cool man. That's something you could get behind. You know super chill a revolutionary kind of way but it's it should be noted that the ship was just rusted out looked nasty. You can see footage of it in There's a documentary that greenpeace put out. That's called the boat in the bomb. So you can really check out some retro footage of this ship as it was being changed over into the rainbow warrior. Stepper needed that four month. Glow up for sure. But let's let's just jump from one thousand nine hundred. Seventy eight. I think is when it was fully retrofitted eighty one after it had been out on a couple of different missions. They reignite this campaign that had kind of gone away since the early seventies this anti nuclear weapons testing campaign and when they did that they wanted the rainbow warrior not just to be fossil fuel powered vehicle. They wanted to be a little greener. Hey come on the names greenpeace right. So they they further retrofitted the thing they put sales on massive sales so now it's both a motorboat and a sailing vessel and that's that's form and function there and if you think about it that move makes sense because the most immediate criticism for an organization like greenpeace using both like this would be. Hey you guys know what those run on right so it's a valid. It's a valid criticism and our story. Really kicks off nineteen eighty-five the rainbow warrior. Set sail for auckland new zealand and they are on the way to a very specific infamous at all. In the world of environmentalism that's right the more aurora eight toll. The idea was to connect with this assembly of eight. Other vessels this flotilla an prevent the next firing of nuclear weapon And this area long. Been a popular destination for testing. You know tolls in remote is often are like the marshall islands episode. We just talked about where the risk of collateral damage as seen on paper as being you know low put. We know what happened with that story. it has long term consequences that are not often thought of upfront. But as long as the the math adds up. Then it'll all be okay but it often isn't so in one thousand nine sixty sixty. French had begun testing nuclear weapons in this area..

early seventies william hardy william robert hunter one hundred percent four month auckland one one thousand nine hundred about four months both earth one thousand nine hundred seve second greenpeace eighty one thousand new zealand co eight
"william hardy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"william hardy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Skip What's the first one? Mary, a Navy vet. An army mom wants to know what you and your wife did to celebrate your anniversary. She was praying you'd have a wonderful time. Mary. We spent one night at dust Dutchman s and house in Middlebury, Indiana, a favorite place of ours, Even though the wonderful restaurants were closed, we drove home and the next day was Thanksgiving, which was a delightful family event. Pete, A Navy vet was impressed by the way the eating place Don't remember. The name takes such good care of vets and first responders. Beat the restaurant change is called Mission BBQ. It's awesome. If there's one near you, you want to go there and eat. Now it's time for military history. What's first gift? 11. December, 17 77 General George Washington began marching 12,000 soldiers of his continental Army from White Marsh, the Valley Forge, Pennsylvania for the winner. As they began crossing the sky Kill river. They were surprised by British troops. The Brits came across them by chance as they forage for supplies outside Philadelphia. Upon spotting the British Washington retreated across the sky, Kill river and destroyed the bridge. After engaging the British for a short time across the river, Washington returned to White Marsh, delaying their march to Valley Forge for several days. Continental Army finally arrived at Valley Forge on December 19 to face a winter of starvation, disease and death. While they suffered the Prussian military adviser, Baron von Steuben drilled the miserable men in proper military discipline. Von Steuben joined the French born Marquis de Lafayette and Baron Johann Jakob as well. A status couscous go and Count Casimir Pulaski from Poland in the effort to turn the rag tag rebels into a well trained regiment. Come spring, Washington had a professional army with which to fight the British On 10. December 18 64 Union General, William Sherman completed his march to the sea, arriving in front of Savannah, Georgia. Since mid November, Sherman's army had swept from Atlanta across the state east towards Savannah, one of the last Confederate seaports still unoccupied by union forces. Along the way, Sherman destroyed farms and railroads, burn store houses and fed his army off the land. In his own words. Sherman intended to make Georgia Howl plan approved by President Lincoln and General Grant City of Savannah was fortified and defended by 10,000 Confederates under General William Hardy. The rebels flooded the rice fields around Savannah and Sherman was running low on supplies. So he director General Howard to the coast to locate friendly ships. Howard dispatched captain William Duncan to contact the Union fleet. Duncan located a union gunboats. I carried him to Hilton Head. South Carolina supply ships were sent to Savannah and Duncan continued to Washington to report to successful March to the sea for 10 days hard. He held out his Sherman prepared for an attack. Realizing the futility of losing, Hardy fled and slipped northward to fight another day. In a December 1941 as America's Pacific fleet lay in ruins at Pearl Harbor from the previous day's bombing, President Franklin Roosevelt requested and received a declaration of war against Japan. Leaning heavily on the arm of his son, James, a Marine captain. FDR walked haltingly into the House of Representatives at noon to request a declaration of war from the House and addressed the nation via radio. Quote yesterday, President proclaimed December 7th 1941 a date which will live in infamy. The United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan. No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people in their righteous might will win through to absolute victory. Roosevelt 10 minute speech, ending with an oath so help us God was greeted in the house by thunderous applause and stamping of feet. Within one hour. The president had his declaration of war. He signed it at 4:10 P.m., wearing a black armband to symbolize morning for those lost at Pearl Harbor. On 10. December 1941 World War 2 4000 Japanese troops landed on the Philippine islands. While Japanese aircraft sunk the British warships, Prince of Wales and Repulse Guam and American controlled territory was also seized. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill exclaimed. We have lost control of the sea. The attack on Pearl Harbor was only one step in a larger plan for dominated Pacific, which entailed knocking out first American, then British naval opposition. Japanese bombing raids on Guam, Midway Island and Wake Island followed the Pearl Harbor attack US airfields there were destroyed as we're in Clark and even airfields in the Philippines. Wiping out over half of the U. S aircraft in the area. Then on December 10th 2000, Japanese troops landed on the Philippine islands at Luzon in the north and another 2000 landed on the western coast. And in Guam, 700. Japanese special landing forces invaded and occupied the American controlled military outpost after only a 25 minute fight resulted in the capture of 500 American soldiers. And that's American history for today. Skip. It's time for the Armed America Report. What do you have this week? All of us here in front lines of freedom. What our listeners to get trained and get armed in that order. We fully support the right to keep and bear arms for all law abiding families, and we encourage you to find out about the laws governing use of deadly force in your state and follow them to the letter. And of course, don't forget to follow the rules of safety and common sense. Whatever you're carrying a firearm to protect the ones you love. What's the story this week curdle? While camping near Kneeland, Colorado, A man was forced to kill a £260 black bear a couple of days prior to.

William Sherman Savannah Continental Army Pearl Harbor America Washington Valley Forge President Franklin Roosevelt Guam William Hardy Baron von Steuben President White Marsh Japan William Duncan United States sky Kill river Mary Pete
"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Confederate General John, hood? React. Similarly. Yeah. James and John were old friends classmates at West Point along with another general in this Fight Union General John Scofield. Even, though they've chosen different sides in this war. John Hood Remembers James McPherson fondly. The Kentucky and writes. No soldier fell in the enemy's ranks whose loss caused me equal regret. Close quote. The. FIGHTING EAST OF ATLANTA RAGES ON COME TEMPORARILY PROMOTES General John Black, Jack Logan Field Command of the army of the Tennessee. The swarthy general who we met an episode fifty nine gets right into the fray. Under heavy enemy fire blackjack leads to brigades any counter attack, he yells out McPherson and revenge boys. And his attack successfully retake several pieces of artillery that had been lost earlier in the battle. To come to leave his headquarters at Howard House and gets into the middle of the actions. Well, General John Scofield watches almost in awe as comp quote leads the batteries in person to some high open ground in front of our line. Now, house placed them in position and directed their fire which from that advanced position infiltrated the parapets from which our troops had been driven in which the enemy then occupied. Close quote. With comes clear Directions Union artillery fire soon clears rebel troops out of those entrenchments. The fighting soon to be called the battle of Atlanta rages until dark false. Both sides take heavy losses, but the union lines hold. Confederates about eight, thousand, five, hundred, dead, and wounded while tecumseh has thirty, six, hundred casualties. William Hardy and his bruised infantry head back to the safety of Atlanta. For two weeks come tries to cut the major rail lines that bring food supplies ammunition into Atlanta. But fierce ever John isn't about to let that happen. He sends out forces to protect the lines at any cost and up until August ninth the confederate general succeeds then to come. So Sherman brings out the big guns. That Tuesday come put siege guns from Chattanooga in position to shell Atlanta into submission the bomb scare many locals into fleeing the city but others choose to stay. In fact so many Atlantans hold out against the Yankee bombardment give hope to beleaguered southerners throughout the say. The Atlanta in our newspaper ironically printing from Macon and not its home city writes quote Sherman will suffer the greatest defeat that any Yankee. General has suffered during the war. The Yankee forces will disappear before Atlanta before the end of August close quote. Camp keeps up the shelling to whittle down Atlanta's defenses. He tells us, staff let us destroy Atlanta and make it a desolation. With every bomb, his popularity dwindles in his infamy rises in southern minds. But the Union generals not here to make friends and he knows it hill later writing his memoirs. Quote War is war and not popularity seeking. Close quote. I think that's comes way of saying he plans to see this siege through no matter how long it takes. and His boss in Washington DC are on his side as the long days of shelling continued through August US Secretary of war Edwin Stanton rights to come to. Quote. Do not imagine we are impatient of your progress, take your time and do your work in your own way. This department is only anxious to afford you every assistance within its power. Close quote. Sakaba keep squeezing. Atlanta and by August thirtieth, the union troops have destroyed every rail line into the city except one. The make in Western. This line comes into the city from the south and its nearest depot is at Jonesboro twenty miles away. Before he attacks the make a western line to come to make some movie that confuses the hell out of. John Hood. The Red headed union general polls back moving his men and supplies north all the way to the Chattahoochee River. John Honestly thinks the federals retreating having run out of AMMO and food. Not Quite John I mean they are low on food, but to come came from Atlanta and he intends to get. ATLANTA. COMP orders almost his entire force to move south and break the rail line. Generals George Thomas John Scofield will attack near. ATLANTA. While the army of the Tennessee has farther south to capture and destroy the depot Jonesboro. Only. When all three union armies position south of Atlanta does John. Hood realize what's happening The panic confederate General Sends William. Hardy on an almost hopeless mission to stop the. Unions tax. At three thirty PM on August thirty. First, the rebels catch up with union troops, the men in Grey and butternut throw everything they have into the fight. One Florida officer describes the battle of Jonesboro as quote pure hell. Close. Quote. Union troops badly outnumbered confederates but they won't give up Atlanta's last lifeline easily. Won Federal Soldier says enemy troops quote King Within Twenty steps and I had just as good shots as ever I did at a rabbit. Close quote. After hours of battle, the confederates entrench having suffered well over two thousand casualties. But it's no use federal troops control the rails a few miles north of Jonesboro without any rail lines. John who has no way to get food or reinforcements he must abandon Atlanta and he knows it. On the night of September First William Hardy Keeps Union troops occupied at Jonesboro while hood marches the rest of his army out of Atlanta South to lovejoy station. John Force to abandon to munition trains and other valuable stores. The confederate general is pissed and says, this mistake is quote owing to the wanton neglect the chief quartermaster close quote. John sets fire to the supplies without any hope of being able to replace them, and if you see in the classic film Gone With the Wind, you probably remember that this is about the time that re Butler get Scarlett O'Hara Melanie Hamilton out of Atlanta. While the movie gets a few things wrong as the confederate army's leave Atlanta there's not nearly as much dramatic music or Clark Gable Saving Damsels in distress but there are that many explosions and fires. One confederate Colonel Reports The Red Glare in the northern sky and the Solan rumble of distant explosions told that hood was burning stores in abandoning Atlanta to Sherma. The Union. Army occupies Atlanta on September second. four-month campaign came at a cost of thirty, seven, Thousand Union and at least thirty thousand confederate casualties. TO COME TO MISSISSIPPI CHANCE TO SACK John Hood's army before they dig in lovejoy station. But he does control Atlanta last. The Union general in his usual to the point style telegraphs. Washington DC. Atlanta's ours and fairly won. This news, this union victory is more than just a point on the scoreboard for the Union. It has potential political implications. Just might be the shot in the arm. President Abraham Lincoln's dying election campaign desperately. History that doesn't suck created and hosted by. Greg Jackson. Researching and writing by Greg Jackson Yell Salazar Production by airship sound designed by Derek, terence theme music composed by Greg, Jacks arrangement, and additional composition by Lindsey Graham of air show for Bibliography of all time Mary Secondary sources consulted writing this episode visit HDD s podcast Dot Com. HDD disappointed by fans at HP on DOT, com forward slash history that doesn't suck. Yellen dire beyond grateful to. Providing funding. Help US keep going. And a special thanks to our patrons whose monthly gift puts producer stats. We'll call Jason Karston John Frugal Dougal Michael and Rachel. Bob. DRACEVIC feet down through Hill Andrew Fortunate Bryce in. Rap Firm Dax Jones John Leech Jeffrey. KNITS, and Brandon. Joining two weeks where I like to tell you a story..

Atlanta John Hood George Thomas John Scofield John Scofield Army Jonesboro William Hardy James McPherson Union John Force Directions Union confederate army Red headed union Sherman Washington Tennessee Kentucky John Black Thousand Union lovejoy station
"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Joe, Johnston pulls back again. By July eighth, he's well entrenched on the North Bank. So the Chattahoochee, the last river between the Union army in Atlanta. At tecumseh could attack the confederate position head on. or He could cross the chattahoochee south of rebel. Lines. Threaten. Their. Rear. Becomes done both of those things and he wants to try something new. You. Know Surprise Joe in his gray. Gladman. Enter General John Scofield. John Takes his small army on a recon mission north of the confederate position and finds a barely guarded ferry where his entire force could easily cross the chattahoochee. Even better for the Union army's Joe. Johnston's got his cavalry miles to the southwest covering the place where he thinks union troops might cross the river. Let's do this job. At three thirty P. M. John's men's splash across the chattahoochee and take the southern's totally by surprise. By Sundown, the Union, Army of the Ohio has built two pontoon bridges taking the high ground entrenched and is ready to defend their position. Town that's good work, John Its top it all off John reports that this move is done quote without the loss of a man. Close quote. This slinky maneuver forces Joe Johnston to retreat again. He takes his manned Peach Tree Creek a small stream runs east to west only five miles north of Atlanta proper. And that's the last move that the balding confederate general will make not because he finally stops you trine of course, but because he gets fired. Here's how that goes down. CSI President Jefferson Davis is sick and tired of watching. Joe. Give up ground in Georgia. So July Sixteenth Jeff Asks Joe to explain his overall plan to save Atlanta from the Yankees. The general. Answers. As the enemy has doubled number, we must beyond the defensive I plan of operation must therefore depend upon that the enemy. Is mainly to watch for opportunity to fight advantage. That's Joe. Your boss wants a plan of action. You WanNa stay on the defensive. Jeff Davis thinks this plans sucks. Joe Johnston has to go. So on July Seventeenth Jeff Sachs experienced but underperforming Joe Johnston via telegram. I express no confidence that you can defeat or repel the enemy. You are hereby relieved from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, which you will immediately turn over to General John Hood. How much that's almost says badged girlfriend breaking up with you via taxed. But WHY IS JEFF choosing to promote relatively inexperienced General John Hood. Well, as it so happens, John has been writing to Jeff and see Assay War Secretary James Seddon for weeks now. The confident blue eyed commander has been talking up his own qualifications while not. So subtly hinting that other confederate generals like next in line William Hardy referred Joe Johnston's defensive plans. The same day John Gets promoted war Secretary James said, and sends a message to him saying quote you are charged with great trust. You will I know test to the utmost your capacities to discharge it. Be No less wary than bold. Exactly a message that exudes confidence but aggressive eager for fight John, has command now. Let's see how he does. On July Twentieth Union troops start moving toward the confederate army and its newly promoted leader John. In General George Thomas in his army marched across Peachtree creek in a direct assault on confederate lines. But John's rebelled troops are ready for the attack. What they aren't ready for is Union General John. SCOFIELD's advanced from the east. Not Good. John Scrambles data's grey clad soldiers in position for this two pronged federal salt at four pm John is finally ready to launch an attack to stop the Yankees but this delay gave union commanders a chance to prepare instead of marching into confederate lines they dig in on the highly defensible southbank of Peachtree Creek and wait for the rebels to attack them. The confederate assault devolves into a bloody mess in the sweltering afternoon, heat and humidity. John's lack of overall field command experience begins to show one Alabama soldier recalls. The most perfect order and system and movements of the army under Johnston suddenly changed into utter confusion. Cavalry were hurrying in one direction artillery flying in another infantry double quickening another. And everywhere confusion. In only a few hours of fighting John Loses around forty, seven, hundred men while inflicting only one thousand, seven, hundred, ten casualties on the Union forces. The defeated confederate general retreats behind intimidating defenses that ring Atlanta. But there's no way aggressive John is just going to sit and wait for come to Sherman to attack him. This guy got schooled by the likes of Bobby Lee and Stonewall Jackson. He's not going to cower before the enemy. Now. On the night of July Twenty First, John Orders William, hardy in two infantry divisions on a night march to attack. General James McPherson's Army of the Tennessee. This army stationed east of Atlanta and is threatening to not only shell the city but also break the making rail line. John can't have that. So we want man to get around the union rear and launch a surprise attack at dawn. Year that doesn't work. The march starts late the men are exhausted. The still night air is hot as hell and confused Calorie leaves the infantry right into the reinforced union front instead of sneaking around the back. Nice Despite this mess at noon on July twenty. Second William Orders, his southern boys to attack. The uncoordinated assault by exhausted rebel soldiers meet stiff, federal. Resistance General James McPherson keeps a close eye on the battle to ensure as men can hold their ground. Within an hour James Learns that there's a half mile gap between his Fifteenth Sixteenth Cores and that the confederates could easily exploited. He's got to close it. James. In a staff, mount their horses a start writing the dense woods toward the battle. came. So anxious, he rides ahead of his men. The young general soon, see soldiers through the trees. He also sees their gray uniforms. The confederates have already infiltrated the gaps in his lines. James can't hide. The confederates have heard his horse. Halt. One of them yells others take aim with their rifles. James Turns horse around the before can ride safety confederates fire. Thirty five year old up and coming James Drops off his horse dead before he hits the ground. When comp hears about James, death he shocked. He later reports Suddenness of this terrible calamity would have overwhelmed me with grief. But the living demanded my whole thoughts..

Joe Johnston P. M. John Army Union army Atlanta James confederate army John Scofield assault James McPherson John Hood John Orders William Jeff John Loses Yankees Jeff Davis Peachtree creek Secretary North Bank Jeff Sachs
"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

09:24 min | 1 year ago

"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Six, hundred, sixty, five casualties. It takes another thirty six hours of skirmishing in heavy rain for comp to ascertain just what he's up against. Imagine five miles abreast works earthen works in a batty man by season confederate soldiers cutting through dense woods, ravines, ridges, and small creeks. And the red bearded union general can't find a weak spot along the entire line. Come figures best option is to get in between Joe Johnston and the Atlanta rail lines to the east. To do that he'll need to flank the northeast end of confederate lines at Pickett's mill. Union troops track over the disorienting terrain incessant thunderstorms trying to find the confederate flank there's supposed to attack one officer quips. No person can appreciate the difficulty of moving over this ground unless he can see it. When they finally reach their target, the confusion doesn't let up. At four thirty, five, PM Union General George Thomas Zeman launched their attack, their grey clad enemies fightback. According to one union officer, the southerners quote not only opened a murderous fire from their frontline works, but also terrible crossfire from both links. Close quote. George Thomas Has Yankee. Troops get slaughtered suffering sixteen hundred casualties. A survivor of the battle Pickett's mill will later write a memoir called the crime at Pickett's mill. The next morning. Joe Johnston. Gets word that union troops moving east out of the area. Joe Figures he has a chance to hit com while he's on the road and in an uncharacteristically offensive move joe takes it. He orders John Hood to attack or may twenty eighth, but the assault is a total disaster. The Yankees. Are Not on the road, but doug into well hidden earthworks in ready to fight. In a reversal of the battles tickets mill John's men bashed themselves against union lines to no avail. The confederates lose between one thousand and one, thousand, five, hundred men. Who? No Wonder Union troops call these three engagements combined the battle of the hell hole. The only union benefit from these four days of brutal fighting is that Federal Cavalry took the confederates former position Altoona pass while the rebels were distracted Dallas. With Blue Clad cavalry in the mountains, come marches men back to supply line seven miles south altoona to regroup. Meanwhile, Joe Pulls his men to a slave built stronghold at Pine Mountain. These two positions are only a couple miles apart in not more than twenty miles from Atlanta. After the disasters near, Dallas starts raining the first week of June doesn't let up for seventeen days. Comprises a letter to his boss and best friend Ulysses complaining that the rain comes down quote as though it has no intention ever to stop. Close quote. But the fallout union armies of the Cumberland, the Ohio and Tennessee are grateful for a reason to hunker down and rest for a minute. On, June fourteenth two days after receiving news of his son's birth. Would you heard about in the opening to comes as hard at work finding a way to break or flanked the confederate position? He reports quote. Johnston has sixty thousand infantry fifteen thousand cavalry in a good deal militia. He must have a terrific battle. and He wants to choose and fortify his ground. Close, quote. Union generals go on a scouting mission to find a weak spot in the nearby rebel position. Competence companions can see gray clad men walking along the ridge of Pine Mountain but the are too far away to see who these soldiers might be. It's a pretty bold move to stroll around and the open like that within range of federal artillery comp remarks. House awesome be are. The red headed general or suspend fire the forces enemy troops to take cover. COMP has no way of knowing that he just ordered his men to fire on confederate generals, Joe Johnston, William, Hardy, and Leonidas Polk and their staff. These guys are out on a recon mission of their own. From Pie Mountains, Ridge it can get a full view, the union positions without the dense Georgia forest blocking their line of sight. Then federal artillery opens up on. Joe And William Take Cover but LEO moves too slow leak Catholic Bishops turn general stands and open while his aides yell at him down. They watch in horror as a three inch ball lows through Nieto's chest hits a tree behind him and explodes. Leo's lifeless body drops to the ground. Once. The shelling ends Joe Crawls over to his dead comrade. weepy. I would rather anything then this. Joe Issues a statement. That afternoon informs men the loss of yet another confederate general it reads. Comrades you called them on your first captain, your oldest companion arms tenant. General Leonidas Polk. In, this distinguished leader, we have lost the most courteous gentlemen the most gallon of soldiers. Leo Soldiers and family mourn his loss. But history will be less kind to the Bishop General Historian Stephen Woodworth surmises quote. pokes incompetence had consistently hamstrung confederate operations west of the Appalachians his special relationship with the president made him untouchable. Close quote. Now doesn't know that he may have been better off with Leo alive rather than dead. He simply reports the chief of staff. Henry. How. Can Washington DC? We killed bishop bulk yesterday and have made good progress today. If by that, you mean watching the rebels retreat and other few miles to kennesaw mountain then yes general Sherman you have made. Good progress. Yeah once the balding confederate general scouted out the union position. He realized he would have a hard time defending Pine Ridge. So on June eighteenth. Minded Joe Orders Southern boys to pack up and move to a stronger position your kennesaw mountain two miles closer to Atlanta. No problem couple just do it. He's been doing this whole campaign skirt Joe's left Lincoln threatened his rear. Hey It worked Dalton and at Rusalka it could work again. Come plans to travel south around Kennesaw Mountain and then east to the confederate supply. Depot Maryetta. Maybe guys can hit a waterpark in Marietta get some relief from the Georgia summer heat. Just, Kidding Marietta hasn't bloomed into the bustling Atlanta suburb that you and I will know the twenty first century. Anyway on June twenty second comp orders John Scofield, and fighting Joe Hooker to March south of Kennesaw mountain as the advance guard. But the confederate top brass have finally figured out comes Mo here third time's the charm and Joe Johnson since his aggressive battle-scarred General John Hood with an entire division to block the union flanking move. About fifteen thousand blue coats clash with fourteen thousand grey-clad men near copes far John Scofield and Joe Hooker successfully repulse John Hood's attack with three hundred union and over one thousand confederate casualties. This small skirmishes important for really only one reason. It prevents the federals from following through on their plan flanking move. Looks. Like comp will have to hit kennesaw mountain head on. At Eight PM on June twenty, seven, the union general puts. His battle. Plan. Into action. Come orders his men to hit the confederate works in three places. Honestly. This is almost hopeless situation for the boys in. Blue. The well protected rebels sit behind breast works in parapets, which runs south from kennesaw mountain down to cope's farm. Almost all the way to Chattahoochee River tributary called all these creek. Still, if trump wants to get to Marietta and into Atlanta is men will have to get through Joe, Johnston southern troops on how. The booming of over two hundred pieces of artillery starts the battle and union soldiers advance on the confederate lines. James, McPherson orders his men from the army of the Tennessee to advance on the northern section of the rebel works while George Thomas's men of the army of the Cumberland hit the center. The Blue Clad soldiers fight well, but confederate bullets repulsed almost every attack. One brave color bear from the fifty second Ohio actually reaches the rebel line climbs an earthen parapet. While he raves his regimental flag encouraging his comrades to join the fight southern officer jumps on parapet. The two men fight hand to hand one trying to keep the flag-waving the other trying to throw it to the ground. The Ohio and kills his southern foe but as he waves his flag in triumph. Confederate takes him and the flag down. This is as far as any union soldier get today..

Joe Johnston joe kennesaw mountain Atlanta officer Union General George Thomas Ze Pickett Pine Mountain John Hood Confederate Yankees Leonidas Polk Joe Figures Leo George Thomas Joe Orders Marietta Dallas Joe Johnson Tennessee
"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"william hardy" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Arm and lost his right leg at Chicago but he didn't lose his fight. At. Five PM come orders an attack on John's position. Even though fighting Joe's men outnumber John's three to one, the blue coats can't dislodge the confederates from their lines. For three hours fighting. Joe's men launch dozens of uncoordinated confused attacks and according to one soldier quote. Nearly, everyone swearing top of his voice. Close quote. As night falls and severe thunderstorms roll in all fighting Joe has to show for the battle at New Hope Church is one thousand, six, hundred, sixty, five casualties. It takes another thirty six hours of skirmishing in heavy rain for comp to ascertain just what he's up against. Imagine five miles abreast works earthen works in a batty man by season confederate soldiers cutting through dense woods, ravines, ridges, and small creeks. And the red bearded union general can't find a weak spot along the entire line. Come figures best option is to get in between Joe Johnston and the Atlanta rail lines to the east. To do that he'll need to flank the northeast end of confederate lines at Pickett's mill. Union troops track over the disorienting terrain incessant thunderstorms trying to find the confederate flank there's supposed to attack one officer quips. No person can appreciate the difficulty of moving over this ground unless he can see it. When they finally reach their target, the confusion doesn't let up. At four thirty, five, PM Union General George Thomas Zeman launched their attack, their grey clad enemies fightback. According to one union officer, the southerners quote not only opened a murderous fire from their frontline works, but also terrible crossfire from both links. Close quote. George Thomas Has Yankee. Troops get slaughtered suffering sixteen hundred casualties. A survivor of the battle Pickett's mill will later write a memoir called the crime at Pickett's mill. The next morning. Joe Johnston. Gets word that union troops moving east out of the area. Joe Figures he has a chance to hit com while he's on the road and in an uncharacteristically offensive move joe takes it. He orders John Hood to attack or may twenty eighth, but the assault is a total disaster. The Yankees. Are Not on the road, but doug into well hidden earthworks in ready to fight. In a reversal of the battles tickets mill John's men bashed themselves against union lines to no avail. The confederates lose between one thousand and one, thousand, five, hundred men. Who? No Wonder Union troops call these three engagements combined the battle of the hell hole. The only union benefit from these four days of brutal fighting is that Federal Cavalry took the confederates former position Altoona pass while the rebels were distracted Dallas. With Blue Clad cavalry in the mountains, come marches men back to supply line seven miles south altoona to regroup. Meanwhile, Joe Pulls his men to a slave built stronghold at Pine Mountain. These two positions are only a couple miles apart in not more than twenty miles from Atlanta. After the disasters near, Dallas starts raining the first week of June doesn't let up for seventeen days. Comprises a letter to his boss and best friend Ulysses complaining that the rain comes down quote as though it has no intention ever to stop. Close quote. But the fallout union armies of the Cumberland, the Ohio and Tennessee are grateful for a reason to hunker down and rest for a minute. On, June fourteenth two days after receiving news of his son's birth. Would you heard about in the opening to comes as hard at work finding a way to break or flanked the confederate position? He reports quote. Johnston has sixty thousand infantry fifteen thousand cavalry in a good deal militia. He must have a terrific battle. and He wants to choose and fortify his ground. Close, quote. Union generals go on a scouting mission to find a weak spot in the nearby rebel position. Competence companions can see gray clad men walking along the ridge of Pine Mountain but the are too far away to see who these soldiers might be. It's a pretty bold move to stroll around and the open like that within range of federal artillery comp remarks. House awesome be are. The red headed general or suspend fire the forces enemy troops to take cover. COMP has no way of knowing that he just ordered his men to fire on confederate generals, Joe Johnston, William, Hardy, and Leonidas Polk and their staff. These guys are out on a recon mission of their own. From Pie Mountains, Ridge it can get a full view, the union positions without the dense Georgia forest blocking their line of sight. Then federal artillery opens up on. Joe And William Take Cover but LEO moves too slow leak Catholic Bishops turn general stands and open while his aides yell at him down. They watch in horror as a three inch ball lows through Nieto's chest hits a tree behind him and explodes. Leo's lifeless body drops to the ground. Once. The shelling ends Joe Crawls over to his dead comrade. weepy. I would rather anything then this. Joe Issues a statement. That afternoon informs men the loss of yet another confederate general it reads. Comrades you called them on your first captain, your oldest companion arms tenant. General Leonidas Polk. In, this distinguished leader, we have lost the most courteous gentlemen the most gallon of soldiers. Leo Soldiers and family mourn his loss. But history will be less kind to the Bishop General Historian Stephen Woodworth surmises quote. pokes incompetence had consistently hamstrung confederate operations west of the Appalachians his special relationship with the president made him untouchable. Close quote. Now doesn't know that he may have been better off with Leo alive rather than dead. He simply reports the chief of staff. Henry. How. Can Washington DC? We killed bishop bulk yesterday and have made good progress today. If by that, you mean watching the rebels retreat and other few miles to kennesaw mountain then yes general Sherman you have made. Good progress. Yeah once the balding confederate general scouted out the union position. He realized he would have a hard time defending Pine Ridge. So on June eighteenth. Minded Joe Orders Southern boys to pack up and move to a stronger position your kennesaw mountain two miles closer to Atlanta. No problem couple just do it. He's been doing this whole campaign skirt Joe's left Lincoln threatened his rear. Hey It worked Dalton and at Rusalka it could work again. Come plans to travel south around Kennesaw Mountain and then east to the confederate supply. Depot Maryetta. Maybe guys can hit a waterpark in Marietta get some relief from the Georgia summer heat. Just, Kidding Marietta hasn't bloomed into the bustling Atlanta suburb that you and I will know the twenty first century. Anyway on June twenty second comp orders John Scofield, and fighting Joe Hooker to March south of Kennesaw mountain as the advance guard. But the confederate top brass have finally figured out comes Mo here third time's the charm and Joe Johnson since his aggressive battle-scarred General John Hood with an entire division to block the union flanking move. About fifteen thousand blue coats clash with fourteen thousand grey-clad men near copes far John Scofield and Joe Hooker successfully repulse John Hood's attack with three hundred union and over one thousand confederate casualties. This small skirmishes important for really only one reason. It prevents the federals from following through on their plan flanking move..

joe Joe Johnston Joe kennesaw mountain Atlanta John John Hood Pickett Union General George Thomas Ze Joe Figures Pine Mountain Joe Johnson Leonidas Polk Joe Hooker Yankees officer Joe Orders Leo John Scofield Dallas
"william hardy" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"william hardy" Discussed on KGO 810

"Is fierce patriot tangled lies to come to sharp. A man I only knew before as, as the civil war, general, the man who led the March to the sea that broke the confederacy this eighteen sixty five possibly is the man, who was the second to go grant at the siege of Vicksburg that was critical to turning the war in eighteen sixty three. But this is the full picture of who Sherman was before grant. And he worked together in war-fighting, which was ugly and the horror of the civil wars ahead of us. But before that sherman's married, and he goes off to California. Again, this time he gets there because there's this, pulling the Ewing, family. They want him to leave the military to resign his commission to work to work for the family property. Is that the tension he feels Bob? Yeah. They want him to get out of the military. It, it, it isn't considered an. And he is in a situation where he, he really is. He feels is very careerist been has been deeply compromised by missing. They Mexican war. So he he's not that hopeful of his military career, and he's not he's, he's used to it. But he, he doesn't realize how much enjoys it until he ultimately leave for a while. But at any rate, there's all this pull to try to turn him into a banker and Sherman wasn't a great banker. He was a careful banker. But probably if you believe the adage, that all money is made at the margins then Sherman was not a good guy. He he was about calculated risk. They send him seven Cisco, and he comes up against what you'd have to say is a wild scene of rascals and bankruptcies. And all of a sudden people making promises they can't keep at this point. I think yeah, bra Braxton bragg's brevity Colonel Hal expen- promoted, and, and Sherman was still a first Lieutenant, I don't think it was a captain yet. So he takes a six month leave. And he heads off to San Francisco. He was it was a man of rectitude. He believed in law and order yet a permanent sense of discipline, and San Francisco looks to overwhelmed him did it did it Dr into despair letters to Ellen say that, that I'm defeated. He's getting there. His worst days, are actually in Leavenworth, Kansas. But things don't go well for him on, and it's in a second time in California. He does when he gets there, there is almost immediately or run on the banks, and he performs pretty well because he's again, fairly careful he had enough capital that he could cover most of his loans. And he did though have a week nece in that he extended some credit to some military, some of his friends from West Point Braxton Bragg, Don car rag among William hardy, George Thomas all major for the war. And he had to make good on those investments out of his own pocket, how much he actually lost is hard to nobody. It was time to make money too. And after that he established himself meet in a very nice neighborhood and started pretty much living large. And of course, one of the things about Ellen besides, you're very religious nature was her dedication to shopping. So she was always a costly bride. And the Ohio Princess never changed her whole. No, no. But in the meantime, Howick was interesting, he, too left a service, what happened was towards the end of the his his time in California. How became because they were working on the California constitution. He became an expert on land ownership and soon set himself up as a lawyer in San Francisco. And under the unlikely name of peachy buildings and Howick. And they were the, the in terms of title. They were the goal the gold standard, and he made a fortune, in California will become commander general and chief of the army. That's why we keep mentioning him. And they will do all the way through the civil war. It's a treat to think of Haluk wandering around San Francisco being a being a wealthy man. Always thought of him is that the character you described the punchy guy who looks who's got a wondering eye and, and his grumpy at the war department. I'd never thought of him in, in any other fashion. No, he was. He made himself. I mean he was a remarkable guy that, that one scene, when they're calling it around on their way to California, California on the sailboat and heloc is has tied himself to a in a storm. He's tied himself to a to the wall, so he can write and study. That's how come the boat to California. Now we come to a part where Sherman has vision of the transcontinental railroad. And you say it's in his letters to Ellen does he also right to the war department. This time his brother now is an up and coming politician. He's in the house of representatives, John Sharman, who will be gone, extremely prominent. Yes. And John so impressed by this that he has published in Washington. And yet again, Sherman gets this bit of notoriety, and people really read this take it seriously. He's very well form. I mean, this is the guy that was shipwrecked Weiss on, on his way to California. Ellen was even shipwrecked at one point there. They had a deep deep personal desire for a transcontinental railroad. I think, and keep that in mind because Sherman will be a principal in creating the conditions for the transcontinental railroad after the war, we're moving towards the war. It's like the, the thunder you can hear off stage. You know, it's coming, but we're building the conditions for it because Sherman has experiences all over the country has been in Florida certainly been up and down the Mississippi comes from Ohio. He likes Saint Louis lot. We've mentioned Fort Leavenworth. He's spent time in. San Francisco and in the south of Las Californias. Well, the missions and also dealing with the gold rush Sutter's mill but now we take him into one. I'd say one of the strangest episodes, contrary to everything you assumed at the time, even bringing into question, his loyalty, right before the civil war. He's run out of good ideas about serving in the army, and he's offered a job to lead a seminary in Baton Rouge to turn it into a military, academy. And the people who hire our Braxton Bragg and a man name Beauregard, who's Beauregard who are brag what do they want him to do? Well, basically PG ball regard becomes one of the best generals in the confederacy and Braxton Bragg is nowhere near as good. But he, he was very important general in the confederacy. And you know the question that, you know is like the dog that didn't bark. The question that Sherman never ask. Why do these people want to establish a military academy down here in eighteen six? He was strangely blonde. To the whole issue of slavery and secession. He just didn't wanna hear it because basically could lead to the break-up denied states. He just he wanted to just saw pedal it. I think he, he, he described, you know, we have to treat the south like a dog without a tail or something like that. Just pretend we just don't see slavery, you know. And so he kidded himself that this secession crisis wasn't building. And of course, it hit it, shattered, his, his brother. John Sherman wrote him about this. You, you make a note. The John Sherman endorsed Hinton helper, who is the author of the impending crisis in the south, that's one of the books that everybody talks about at the time we know wars coming. Well, Sherman was embarrassed by that. And actually John actually took back his, his. His endorsement of that book and it, it actually cost him being elected speaker of the house of representatives got because he endorsed because John, John endorsed, the book put it put Sherman kind of on the hot seat to and Sherman. Again, you know, he just was confronted by bunch of these politicians in Louisiana and basically said, you know, I, I have no problem with slavery. You know, and my brother is my brother and he just they convinced them that it wasn't a problem with him, which it wasn't until they decided to secede Lincoln, Israel elected in the fall of sixty he's going to be take the office in the March of sixty one remember this before they changed that term to January and in that interim the confederacy starts to form it self, I South Carolina than the other states follow. So it's impossible for. Sherm to ignore this. His brother invites him to Washington and my note here says that's when he met Lincoln for the first time. Yeah, that was the first time he, of course, did resign from the military academy, and there was actually they thought he was very effective. Leader would have been glad to have him. Stay probably glad to have him as a confederate general, but he he had an interview with the governor that was funny. So, you know, governor is good to see, you know, the next time I see, I may have to hang you, and he sort of could say that in a laughing way, but, but anyway, so he sort of was cooling, his heels, not sure what to do. And John thought, well, you know, this is the time to bring him to Washington. And so he gets a, a meeting with of president ABRAHAM LINCOLN and Lincoln as he meets Blinken several times over. The next couple of years, Lincoln have a vivid memory of does Lincoln talk about him or is he just one of the one of the young men, who well he's is in his forties. But one of the young men who bounces by me, and I'm always looking for talent. He, he seems to remember Sherman, like can't cite a quote that said, you know, and Lincoln's looked our and said, who is that guy? Boy, we need guys like that. But on first meeting it was early in Lincoln's presidency. And the white wherever the office was that Lincoln was meeting in. I don't think it was the Oval Office, then it was just filled with people, and he came over and John introduced him, and he sat down for a moment, and he said, well, how are they getting along down there in the south? He said, this is my brother just up from Louisiana, and he said, well, how do they get along and Sherman said, they're getting along fine? They're preparing for war. Four. And at this point, no shots had been Fard and Lincoln said, well, I think would get along with this, and he got up and left and Sherman stormed out of it. A White House and was standing on the on the pavement, you'd be rating. John saying, you know, you got an assist hell the message. This guy doesn't even know there's going to be a war. Let's go to war. The book is fierce patriot tangled lies William tecumseh Sherman, Robert L O'Connell is the author next. I bull run. I'm John bachelor. America is offering absolutely free. A unique study bible called.

John Sherman California John Braxton bragg San Francisco ABRAHAM LINCOLN Ellen William tecumseh Sherman Bob Sherman John bachelor Vicksburg Louisiana Ohio Braxton Bragg Ewing war-fighting Leavenworth Lincoln
"william hardy" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"william hardy" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"This is the John Batchelor show. Babacar Robert L, o'connell's new book is fierce patriot tangled lies, the William tecumseh Sherman. A man I only knew before as, as the civil war, general, the man who led the March to the sea that broke the confederacy this is eighteen sixty five possibly is the man, who was the second to go grant, at the siege of Vicksburg that was critical to turning the war in eighteen sixty three but this is the full picture of who Sherman was before grant. And he worked together in warfighting, which was ugly and the horror of the civil wars ahead of us. But before that sherman's married, and he goes off to California. Again, this time he gets there because there's this, pulling the Ewing, family. They want him to leave the military to resign his commission to work sent to work for the family property, is that the tension feels Bob. Yeah. They want him to get out of the military it, it isn't considered an. And he is in a situation where he, he really is. He feels is very careerist been has been deeply compromised by missing the Mexican war. So he he's not that whole pool of his military career. Any not he he's used to it. But he, he doesn't realize how much he enjoys it until he ultimately leave for a while. But at any rate, there's all this pull to try to turn him into a banker and Sherman wasn't a great banker. He was a careful banker. But probably if you believe the adage, that all money is made at the margins then Sherman was not a good guy. He he was about calculated risk. They sent him. Seven Cisco, and he comes up against what you'd have to say is a wild scene of rascals and bankruptcies. And all of a sudden people making promises they can't keep at this point. I think yeah. Bra Braxton bragg's, brevity, Colonel Haluk, spin, promoted, and, and Sherman was still a first Lieutenant, I don't think it was a captain yet. So he takes a six month leave. And he heads off to San Francisco. He was a it was a man of rectitude. He believed in law and order, he had a permanent sense of discipline and San Francisco looks to overwhelmed him did it did it drive into despair letters to Ellen say that, that I'm defeated. He's getting there. His worst days, are actually in Leavenworth, Kansas. But things don't go. Well for him on in the second time in California. He does when he gets there, there is almost immediately or run on the banks, and he performs pretty well, because again, fairly careful he had enough capital that he could cover most of his loans. And he did though have a weakness in that he extended some credit to some military, some of his friends from West Point Braxton Bragg, Don. Among them. William hardy, George Thomas all major for the war. He, he had to make good on those investments out of his own pocket, how much he actually lost is hard to nobody. It was time to make money too. And after that he established himself me in a very nice neighborhood and started pretty much living large. And of course, one of the things about Ellen besides, you're very religious nature was her dedication to shopping. So she was always a costly broad. And the Ohio prince has never changed her whole. No, no. But in the meantime, Howick was interesting he to, to service what happened was towards the end of the his his time in California. How became because they were working on the California constitution came an expert on land. Land ownership and soon set himself up as a lawyer in San Francisco and under the unlikely name of peachy billings and Haluk. And they were the, the in terms of title. They were the goal the goal standard, and he made a fortune, in California Alec will become command general, and chief of the army. That's why we keep mentioning and they will do all the way through the civil war. It's a treat to think of Haluk wandering around seven Cisco being a being a wealthy man. Always thought of is that the character you described the paunchy guy who looks who's got a wondering I and, and his grumpy at the war department. I'd never thought of him in, in any other fashion. No, he was. He made himself. I mean he was a remarkable guy that, that one scene, when they're calling it around on their way to California, California on the sailboat and how is has tied himself to a in a storm. He's tied himself to a to the wall, so he can write and study. That's how on the boat to California. Now. We come to a part where Sherman has a vision of the transcontinental railroad. And you say it's in his letters to Ellen does he also right to the war department by this time his brother now is an up and coming politician. He's in the house of representatives, John Sherman who will be extremely prominent. Yes. And John so impressed by this that he has published in Washington. And yet again, Sherman gets his bit of notoriety. And people really read this take it serious. Aslis very well form. I mean, this is the guy that was shipwrecked twice on his way to California. Ellen was even shipwrecked. At one point, you know, there they had a deep deep personal desire for a transcontinental railroad, I think, and keep that in mind because Sherman will be a principal in creating the conditions for the transcontinental railroad after the war, we're moving towards the war. It's like the, the thunder you can hear off stage. You know, it's coming, but we're building the conditions for it because Sherman has experienced all over the country has been in Florida certainly been up and down the Mississippi comes from Ohio. He likes Saint Louis a lot. We've mentioned Fort Leavenworth. He's spent time in San Francisco. And in the south of Los Californias. Well, the missions and also dealing with the gold rush Sutter's mill but now we take him into one. I'd say one of the strangest episodes, contrary to everything you assumed at the time even bringing into question his loyalty, right before the civil. War. He's run out of good ideas about serving in the army, and he's offered a job to lead a seminary in Baton Rouge to turn it into a military, academy. And the people who hire are Braxton Bragg and a man name Beauregard, who's Beauregard who brag what do they want him to do? Well, basically PG T-ball regard becomes one of the best generals in the confederacy, and Braxton Bragg, it's nowhere near as good. But he, he was very important general in the confederacy. And, you know, the question that, you know, like the dog that didn't bark the question that Sherman, never ask. Why do these people want to establish a military academy down here, eighteen six he was strangely blonde to the whole issue of slavery and secession? He just didn't wanna hear it because basically could lead to the break up the United States. He just he wanted to just soft pedal. It. I think he, he, he described, you know, we have to treat the south like a dog without a tail or something like that. Just pretend we just don't see slavery, you know. And so he kidded himself that this secession crisis wasn't building. And of course, it hit it, shattered, his, his brother. John Sherman wrote him about this. You, you make a note. The John Sherman endorsed Hinton helper, who is the author of the impending crisis in the south, that's one of the books that everybody talks about at the time we know wars coming. Well, Sherman was embarrassed by that. And actually John actually took back, his, his his endorsement of that book it, it, it actually cost him being elected speaker of the house of representatives Bhagat becau because he endorsed because John endorsed, the book put it put Sherman kind of. On the hot seat to and Sherman again, you know, he just was confronted by bunch of these politicians in Louisiana and basically said, you know, I, I have no problem with celebrity, you know, and my brother is my brother and he just they convinced them that it wasn't a problem with him, which it wasn't until they decided to secede Lincoln, Israel elected in the fall of sixty he's going to be take the office in the March of sixty one remember this is before they changed that term to January and in that interim the confederacy starts to form itself. I South Carolina than the other states follow. So it's impossible for Sherman to ignore this. His brother invites him to Washington and my note here says that's when he met Lincoln for the first time. Yeah, that was the first time he, of course, did resign from the military academy. And there was actually they thought he was very effective. Leader would have been glad I'm stay probably glad to have him as a confederate general. But he he had an interview with the governor that was funny. So while governor is good to see, you know, the next time I see, I may have to hang you, and he sort of could say that in a laughing way. But, but anyway, so he sort of was cooling, his heels, not sure what to do. And John fought. Well, you know, this is the time to bring him to Washington. And so he gets a meeting with of president ABRAHAM LINCOLN and Lincoln as he meets Lincoln several times over the next couple of years, Lincoln have a vivid memory of does Lincoln talk about a more as just one of the one of the young men who willies is in its forties. But one of the young men who bounces by me, and I'm always looking for talent. He he. Seems to remember Sherman, like can't cite a quote that said, you know, and Lincoln's looked our out and said, who is that guy? Boy, we need guys like that. But on first meeting it was early in Lincoln's presidency. And the white wherever the office was that Lincoln was meeting in, I don't think was the Oval Office, then it was just filled with people, and he came over and John introduced him and sat down for moment, and he said, well, how are they getting along down there in the south? He said this, my brother just up from Louisiana how they get along and Sherman said, they're getting along fine preparing for war. And at this point, no shots had been fired and Lincoln said, well, I think we will get along with this, and he got up and left, and sir. Stormed out of a White House and was standing on the on the pavement be rating. John saying, you know, you gotta hell the message. This guy doesn't even know there's going to be a war. Let's go to war. The book is fierce patriot tangled lies William to come to Sherman, Robert L O'Connell is the author next first bull run. I'm John bachelor. America is offering absolutely free..

William tecumseh Sherman California John bachelor Braxton bragg Ellen ABRAHAM LINCOLN San Francisco Colonel Haluk military academy Cisco Bob Robert L O'Connell Vicksburg Louisiana Ewing Ohio Leavenworth White House Lincoln
"william hardy" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"william hardy" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Peres Barrio Gipson, these guys were all there last year. And so you try to figure out what the different in the different is the Minnesota Twins in the off season change their manager Rocco belt belly. But the biggest change that they made is something that had not been done before in baseball. They hired a pitching coach rate out of college west Johnson, who was at Arkansas, Mississippi State, Dallas Baptist all good baseball schools. He is they're pitching coach and he's a guy that heat in the new technology. He's a file mechanic guy a philosophy expert, and I think huge jump for an organization because for whatever reason unlike football and basketball, and even hockey hiring a college coach, whether it's a head coaching college or pitching coach hitting coach. You just don't do that. People never embraced the college coaches that is changing now because the colleges, especially the big name colleges that the big money college is that the some of the Pac twelve schools. They got to that technology that the drive line stop the, the, you know, the rap Soto cameras the high speed cameras the high tech stuff, even the stuff that. Talked about that, that he tinkering around the college has got their first and felt that that higher in my opinion has been the biggest change in the twin because that rotation it's essentially the same guys is last year and their lights out right now. Talking to rich waltz right now. And a rich I mean you said you're listening to the mic quality thing or the mic quality interview earlier. And talking about Byron Buxton, who for a long time, was one of the top prospects of top prospect in baseball, only twenty five years old. He's kind of that old school speed, not tons of power, but does he doubles? He's a gap the gap that he can still you basis if he stays healthy. This guy has the makings of being a superstar type center fielder. Yeah. And look, I think that's a great illustration that there's value in that still. We, we, we grow in the game focused on home runs and power and guys then they've got it. Obviously, I mean, we're fifteen TJ krone following up a career year that he had to nose healthy. They all this with Nelson Cruz on, on the DL as well. But there's still value in a guy that speedy centerfielder and go gap. The gap guy didn't get on the guy that can feel basis. There's value in that in the game. The teams that have a mix of that the Red Sox the Astros of it still feel basis that still value speed and stuff like that. There's that's fun too. So it's nice to see a guy like that emerge. And and to me the twins. Remind me a lot of the Astros in in what they do. Well, you guys talk about the home runs and how many they hit fifty two home runs in may. But they've got the, the flip side of that. You know, part of hitting home runs in baseball comes with the cost of a lot of strikeout. The Astros don't do that. They hit home runs and they don't strike out in the. Don't do that, either. They have the most homers in major league baseball in the third pew strikeout baseball very good. Wow, very good rituals with us. Here's the one caution flag. I, I don't mean to use that fun Memorial Day with the Indy five hundred but the twins play in a division that, that thought on the bottom and, and outside of the division. They played the Orioles. The orioles. They've got four wins against the Tigers. They're doing what you need to do. They're feeding the teams they should beat which for a young team that. Building cO lifting and blossoming perfect scenario when they get to the harder part of their schedule. Go, I love the story. I love the story rituals with us. What was your first year in Miami? Two thousand five with my first year that World Series team was still intact. It was a fun bunch Dontrelle. Willis, Josh Beckett. AJ burnett. That was the rotation Miguel Cabrera was blossoming Mike Lowell and, and. Penny. Yeah. A penny. Penny had left by five, but that was a really good team that fell just short of the postseason and they, they blew it up completely, and the next year was the, the youngest team in baseball. But both anonymous even baseball with a payroll of back then was like twenty million. They became Davey Kane into this is what when you rebuild traits they became the first team in baseball history to be twenty games under. And then get over the five hundred Mark later in the season. That was a team with Hanley Ramirez and Dan Uggla Josh willing ham Johnson, Cody raw, there was that was a really good team eventually in that year. They showed it at the at the second end of the season. What a great story. I love your background than all this stuff and seeing Seattle built up. And of course the Marlins and, and all the stuff that you do now in MLB quickly though, we got a few minutes left. Yeah. I had a good conversation with Kyle Haines the giants farm director. Yeah. I did. I look I live in Seattle. So I wanted to go see Dr line baseball for myself and spend a whole day. They're in. You know that they're the, the leaders in this. That post article focused on on what they've done. And they've really like I said, not only in the college is the in the professional game in every organization now is diving technology. I wanted to find out what the giant did with that in there. The giants are in it with two feet. As someone looking for the outside of the giants. And then last year I got a chance to do some games in a little bit on the inside the giants have always been a team that has been a little more advanced than people know simply because they're not a full organization. They don't go around talking about their secret sauce. And what they did even though you know, the last off, it was more into analysts. I think people realize. With the ship. Now there's a little more light shined on it. The giants organization has all that stuff that, that, that high speed cameras track man for spin rates and launch angles and all of that. And it was a good discussion about velocity and pitching and all of that, the focus on velocity is is, is big. But I think you heard a little bit of it in the Milan-San discussion. The technology is just as important with bio mechanic, and the mechanics of a pitcher now it just takes out the guesswork now you can design pitches, and work with pitchers on, on everything. And there's no guesswork, it's no, hey, tinker with that. Here's the proof. When you drop your, your move. You're rich just a little bit this or change your grip. You're getting a much bigger spin rate in the one thing that he said that really stood out with me. It's the last thing I'll leave you with is all of the hasn't reduced. What teams are looking for it hasn't reduced what with a really good scouts able to identify to take the guesswork because he talked about spin rate. And that's another thing that big in the game. And he said, you know, we can identify been right, much better. But it's always been valued in the game. And it's a good example to guide that had been right? That we're able to get guys out in the. Zone. And I was well before breath photo and track man, and all of that, though. Some of the oldest new that, that kind of the mic, but it was fun to hear what the giant, especially in the minor league have got in, in terms of technology and instruction and all that we're just a matter of time. It's just a matter of time. Great report, rich really, really enjoyed it. If you got time next weekend, we have the draft on June third. It'd be a lot of fun to chat with you over the weekend. Maybe look at the first top picks or whatever especially in light of what you just said. Whether you go college high school pitcher outfielder shortstop, so we'll keep in touch with you have a great day, and I appreciate you being on. All right. Get them runs. William hardy. Get some don't give up runs. That's it. That's the deal that they can now. But my goodness, just get out of the first inning gets them out smarter. All right. Have a good app that thanks rich. Thank you. That was a pleasure pleasure with rich waltz. I'm trying to get him on next week. It's funny to look back on the Marlins have always been sort of an awkward or strange franchise. The three team was good. The five TV's mentioned some good names. Dan, glen. Well, let's Cody raw gonna if he was there before three ask him how that team came together the authority. Yeah. Sort of like the twins. But I think we've, we've done a good job on the twin cites been a lot of fun. We'll take a break back here at the public house. We're going to do are drawing for Hawaiian airlines alleys going to give us a minor league report, as well. And we will look at the scoreboard all that coming up right.

baseball giants Astros Marlins Seattle Minnesota Twins Peres Barrio Gipson Cody raw Byron Buxton Dan Uggla ham Johnson Pac twelve schools Orioles Penny Nelson Cruz TJ krone Dallas Baptist AJ burnett Rocco
"william hardy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:19 min | 3 years ago

"william hardy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Oh, I got to tell you. I started the new year on the right note. I went to go to bed. Let's like January third was a Thursday, and it was ten thirty. And and kind of like the Pavlov's dog. I wanted to see if I could find one last something before I went to bed, and I found a little article on newspapers dot com, and then I thought okay. Well, I'll I'll go find it again in the morning now that I know it's there wasn't anything of great significance. But I figured I'd I'd capture it, and I would save it because I love newspaper stories for family history. And then as I was logging off I got a glimpse of what the paper was this was found on what what? Well, wait a minute. What it was the Bergen record of northern New Jersey. Now, this is my father's hometown newspaper. And I've been looking for that paper to be digitized for years. And so I went back to it. And I started searching it and by two. Fifteen in the morning. The next morning. I had found sixty four articles concerning my dad and his brother, and my grandparents and great aunts and uncles. And finally, my body just says shut down. No, more names, go to bed at which point. My wife was very upset with me because it was it was really late and the next day. I found fifty more articles. So is absolutely incredible. And that's why I figured we gotta talk to Brenda Johnson today. She is a project manager with legacy tree Genealogists and Brenda. You just did a blog on this whole subject, and it's fantastic. It's one of my passions. You think about all the stories that are in the digitized newspapers now, and it keeps growing, and you know, when you think about it. There is a difference between genealogy and family history family history, incorporates genealogy, which is basically putting your tree together and making sure that it's all accurate and documenting it, but family history incorporate so much more of the photographs and the audio recordings and the home movies and the stories and so many of them come from newspapers. And sometimes it's a little hard to coax those stories out of those sites. And I thought we talk a little about that today about when you're not finding articles, you know, should be there. So with the newspapers you're used to going and looking for a bitch worries and most of that's been indexed by individuals looking for those of injuries and reading it and typing it in. But if you go to the newspaper sites that are out there, most of the indexing. That's done. There is by character recognition. Been typing it in for example. I had an article on my great, great aunt who passed away in Australia. And when you look at what the text errors our next to what it actually says in article, I would say seventy five percent of the words are not start. Right. So you have to just keep trying different words when you do the search to be able to pull out some of these stories, especially the older newspapers. Yeah. That's really true. I've found a few tricks that have really worked for me. And I bet you've done some of these two first of all I've tried to narrow it to a certain timeframe certain year to year, and then I'll put in for instance, in quotes, just a street address. And maybe the name of the town right on the outside of that. Because hopefully, if they were living at that address, it will pull up stories about them where the name itself might be too common and bring up too many, or maybe the name is not registering, and it's bringing up to few or not bringing up some that it. Should bring up. So I put in the street address in the town, sometimes I'll put in just a last name, an occupation or an interest or something that might make the news or I'll put in misspelled versions of the name commonly misspelled, of course, with Fisher, you'll often have a C in it as opposed to not the C, which is, of course, the way God intended it. So so anyway, that's how I search, and it brings out a lot more things. But it takes a lot more time. And also you'll put in for instance, the first name in the middle name initials instead of the full name. So my dad William hardy Fischer would be w h Fisher and put it in that way. There's so many ways you can put in a name and get a result. They were actually setting the tight back then so they wanted to take and make it as succinct as possible to try to, you know, just have the initials not full names for the women. It was always MRs. So and so I would say one of the main things that you want to consider when you're looking. For things. Also, the outer is a great idea. But you might also want to take him look for events that have happened in your family. So a death is a good example. We had a client where there was a fire in the history. So they knew that their relatives had passed away from this fire. What they didn't know and was found an article was this woman actually died a hero. And they cheat stood between her children in this fire to protect them when paraffin wax exploded. So it had more details. The details they had on what happened? What what truly happened at what time period was this. And where it was early nineteen hundreds in the US. Yeah. You know, these fire stories are incredible and often these things will just bring tears to your eyes as you read them as if it just happened yesterday, and you consider what people endured, and that's the beauty of the newspapers. You know, we talk so much about DNA now and properly. So however newspapers to me is what really puts flesh on the bones as we figure out who are people are found so many stories in this recent hall of over one hundred and ten articles. I found the reference to my dad's marriage to my half sister's mom back in nineteen thirty five even a birth announcement in my half sister the following year, which is really exciting to me. My best case came from my own great-grandmother house away from suicide back in nineteen twelve and newspaper article actually had her suicide note. So while nobody in the family through the years talked about it ever and everybody's gone by the time. It comes to me. I had in her words what was going on. And so. The world actually how about that is really interesting. Yeah. Well, and I've found stuff over in Great Britain. I've mentioned recently about an eighteen eighteen article where a church parish. There was looking for my third great grandfather because he had abandoned his family of five and they were looking for him, and they were offering a reward because at that point the church was now taking care of them. And it was obviously his responsibility, but he pretty much disappeared. We never saw him again. But it was fascinating to see that. And understand why saw his wife remarrying sometime later, but never found his death record, and it truly shows that he disappeared. Yeah. That you couldn't find a death record. And she was a widow like they actually know. She just move someplace else, you can understand a lot of the records. You see? Well, you know, there's so many sites, and I don't know how many people consider that. It's really a good thing to subscribe to many of them as much as anything.

Brenda Johnson Pavlov Bergen New Jersey Great Britain Australia project manager William hardy Fischer Fisher US seventy five percent
"william hardy" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"william hardy" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"To go to bed. Let's like January third was a Thursday, and it was ten thirty. And and kind of like the Pavlov's dog. I wanted to see if I could find one last something before I went to bed, and I found a little article on newspapers dot com, and then I thought okay. Well, I'll I'll go find it again in the morning now that I know it's there wasn't anything of great significance. But I figured I'd I'd capture it, and I would save it because I love newspaper stories for family history. And then as I was logging off I got a glimpse of what the paper was this was found on what what? Well, wait a minute. What it was the Bergen record of northern New Jersey. Now, this is my father's hometown newspaper. And I've been looking for that paper to be digitized for years. And so I went back to it. And I started searching it and by two fifteen in the morning. The next morning. I had found sixty four articles concerning my dad and his brother, and my grandparents and great aunts and uncles and and finally my body just says shut down. No, more names, go to bed at which point. My wife was very upset with me because it was it was really late and the next day. I found fifty more articles. So is absolutely incredible. And that's why I figured we gotta talk to Brenda Johnson today. She is a project manager with legacy tree Genealogists and Brenda. You just did a blog on this whole subject, and it's fantastic. It's one of my passions. You think about all the stories that are in the digitized newspapers now, and it keeps growing, and you know, when you think about it. There is a difference between genealogy and family history family history incorporates genealogy, which is basically, you know, putting your tree together and making sure that it's all accurate and documenting it, but family history incorporates so much more the photographs and the audio. Recordings and the home movies and the stories and so many of them come from newspapers. And sometimes it's a little hard to coax those stories out of those sites. And I thought we talk a little about that today about when you're not finding articles, you know, should be there. So with the newspapers you're used to going and looking for bitch worries and most of that's been indexed by individuals looking for those bitch worries and reading it and typing it in. But if you go to the newspaper sites that are out there, most of the indexing that's done. There is by character recognition. Typing it in for example. I had an article on my great, great aunt who passed away in Australia. And when you look at what the text airs our next to what it actually says in the article, I would say seventy five percent of the words are not start. Right. So you have to just keep trying different words when you do the search to be able to pull out some of these stories, especially the older newspapers. Yeah. That's really true. I've found a few tricks that have really worked for me. And I bet you've done some of these two first of all I've tried to narrow it to a certain timeframe certain year to year, and then I'll put in for instance, in quotes, just a street address. And maybe the name of the town right on the outside of that. Because hopefully, if they were living at that address, it will pull up stories about them where the name itself might be too common and bring up too many. Or maybe the name is not registering, and it's bringing up too few or not bringing up some that it. Should bring up. So I put in the street address in the town, sometimes I'll put in just a last name, and an occupation or an interest or something that might make the news or I'll put in misspelled versions of the name commonly misspelled, of course, with Fisher, you'll often have see in it as opposed to not the C, which is, of course, the way God intended it. So so anyway, that's how I search, and it brings out a lot more things. But it takes a lot more time. And also you'll put in for instance, the the first name in the middle name initials instead of the full name. So my dad William hardy Fischer would be w h Fisher and put it in that way. There's so many ways you can put in a name and get a result. They were actually setting the tight back then so they wanted to take and make it as succinct as possible to try to, you know, just have the initial not full names for the women. It was always MRs. So and so I would say one of the main things that you want to consider when you're looking. For things. Also, the outer is a great idea. But you might also want to take him look for events that have happened in your family. So a death is a good example. We had a client where there was a fire in the history. So they knew that their relatives had passed away from this fire. What they didn't know and was found an article was this woman actually died a hero. And they cheat stood between her children in this fire to protect them when paraffin wax exploded. So it had more details. The details they had on what happened? What really happened? What time period was this? And where it was early nineteen hundreds in the US. Yeah. You know, these fire stories incredible and often these things will just bring tears to your eyes as you read them as if it just happened yesterday, and you consider what people endured, and and that's the beauty of the newspapers. You know, we talk so much about DNA now and properly. So however newspapers to me is what really puts flesh on the bones as we figure out who are people are. And I found so many stories back in this recent hall of over one hundred and ten articles. I found the reference to my dad's marriage to my half sister's mom back in nineteen thirty five even a birth announcement of my half sister the following year, which is really exciting to me. My best case came from my own great-grandmother who house away from suicide back in nineteen twelve and newspaper article actually had her suicide note. So while nobody in the family through the years talked about it ever and everybody's gone by the time. It comes to me. I had in her words what was going on. And so that just means the world to actually how about that is really interesting. Yeah. Well, and I've found stuff over in Great Britain. I've mentioned recently about an eighteen eighteen article where a church parish. There was looking for my third great grandfather because he had abandoned his family of five and they were looking for him, and they were offering a reward because at that point the church was now taking care of them. And it was obviously his responsibility, but he pretty much disappeared. We never saw him again. But it was fascinating to see that. And understand why I saw his wife remarrying sometime later, but never found his death record, and it truly shows that he appeared. Yeah. And it's just that you couldn't find a death record. And she was a widow like they actually know. He just move someplace else. Yeah. You can understand a lot of the records. You see? Well, you know, there's so many sites, and I don't know how many people consider that. It's really a good thing to subscribe to many of them as much as anything else.

Brenda Johnson Bergen New Jersey Pavlov Great Britain Australia project manager William hardy Fischer Fisher US seventy five percent
"william hardy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:18 min | 3 years ago

"william hardy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"I gotta tell you. I started the new year on the right note. I went to go to bed. Let's like January third was a Thursday, and it was ten thirty. And and kind of like the Pavlov's dog. I wanted to see if I could find one last something before I went to bed, and I found a little article on newspapers dot com, and then I thought okay. Well, I'll I'll go find it again in the morning now that I know it's there wasn't anything of great significance. But I figured I'd I'd capture it, and I would save it because I love newspaper stories for family history. And then as I was logging off I got a glimpse of what the paper was this was found on wh-what. Wait a minute. What it was the Bergen record of northern New Jersey. Now, this is my father's hometown newspaper. And I've been looking for that paper to be digitized for years. And so I went back to it. And I started searching it and by two fifteen in the morning. The next morning I had found. Sixty four articles concerning my dad, and his brother, and my grandparents and great aunts and uncles and finally my body just says shutdown. No, more names, go to bed at which point. My wife was very upset with me because it was it was really late and the next day. I found fifty more articles. So is absolutely incredible. And that's why I figured we gotta talk to Brenda Johnson today. She is a project manager with legacy tree Genealogists and Brenda. You just did a blog on this whole subject, and it's fantastic. It's one of my passions. You think about all the stories that are in the digitized newspapers now, and it keeps growing, and you know, when you think about it. There is a difference between genealogy and family history family history, incorporates genealogy, which is basically putting your tree together and making sure that it's all accurate and documenting it, but family history incorporates so much more the photographs and the audio recordings and the home movies and the stories and so many of them come from newspapers. And sometimes it's a little hard to coax those stories out of those sites. And I thought we talk a little about that today about when you're not finding articles, you know, should be there. So with the newspapers viewer used to going and looking for a bitch worries. And most of that's been indexed by individuals looking for those victories in reading it and typing it it is. But if you go to the newspaper sites that are out there, most of the indexing. This Dan there is by character recognition. Typing it in for example. I had an article on my great, great aunt who passed away in Australia. And when you look at what the text airs our next to what it actually says in the article, I would say seventy five percent of the words are not start. Right. So you have to just keep trying different words when you do the search to be able to pull out some of these stories, especially the older newspapers. Yeah. That's really true. I've found a few tricks that have really worked for me. And I bet you've done some of these two first of all I've tried to narrow it to a certain timeframe certain year to year, and then I'll put in for instance, in quotes, just a street address. And maybe the name of the town right on the outside of that. Because hopefully, if they were living at that address, it will pull up stories about them where the name itself might be too common and bring up too many, or maybe the name is not registering, and it's bringing up to few or not bringing up some that it. Should bring up. So I put in the street address in the town, sometimes I'll put in just a last name, an occupation or an interest or something that might make the news or put in misspelled versions of the name commonly misspelled, of course, with Fisher, you'll often have a C in it as opposed to not the C, which is, of course, the way God intended it. So so anyway, that's how I search, and it brings out a lot more things. But it takes a lot more time. And also you'll put in for instance, the the first name in the middle name initials instead of the full name. So my dad William hardy Fischer would be w h Fisher and put it in that way. There's so many ways you can put in a name and get a result. They were actually setting the type back then so they wanted to take and make it as succinct as possible to try to, you know, just have the initials not full names for the women. It was always MRs. So and so I would say one of the main things that you want to consider when you're looking. For things. Also, the outer is a great idea. But you might also want to take him look for events that have happened in your family. So a death is a good example. We had a client where there was a fire in the history. So they knew that their relatives had passed away from this fire. What they didn't know and was found an article was this woman actually died a hero. And they cheat stood between her children in this fire to protect them when paraffin wax exploded. So it had more details. The details they had on what happened? Whether what really happened at what time period was this. And where it was early nineteen hundreds in the US. Yeah. You know, these fire stories are incredible and often these things will just bring tears to your eyes as you read them as if it just happened yesterday, and you consider what people endured, and that's the beauty of the newspapers. You know, we talk so much about DNA now and properly. So however newspapers to me is what really puts flesh on the bones as we figure out who are people are. And I found so many stories in fact in this recent hall of over one hundred and ten articles I found the reference to my dad's marriage to my half sister's mom back in nineteen thirty five even a birth announcement in my half sister the following year, which is really exciting to me. My best case came from my own great-grandmother house away from suicide back in nineteen twelve and newspaper article actually had her suicide note. So while nobody in the family through the years talked about it ever and everybody's gone by the time. It comes to me. I had in her words what was going on. And so the world to actually have that. That is really interesting. Yeah. Well, and I've found stuff over in Great Britain. I've mentioned recently about an eighteen eighteen article where a church parish. There was looking for my third great grandfather because he had abandoned his family of five and they were looking for him, and they were offering a reward because at that point the church was now taking care of them. And it was obviously his responsibility, but he pretty much disappeared. We never saw him again. But it was fascinating to see that. And understand why I saw his wife remarrying sometime later, but never found his death record, and it truly shows that he disappeared. Yeah. And that you couldn't find a death records. And she was a widow like they actually know. He just move someplace else. You can understand a lot of the records. You see? Well, you know, there's so many sites, and I don't know how many people consider that. It's really a good thing to subscribe to many of them as much as anything.

Brenda Johnson Pavlov Bergen New Jersey Great Britain Australia project manager William hardy Fischer Fisher US Dan seventy five percent