17 Burst results for "William Fry"

"william fry" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:54 min | 4 months ago

"william fry" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Definitely going to be at least three parts. Because there's just so much there you know the the tears make an ocean and and and they don't stop coming so so there will be at least one more. Yeah there's really there's almost too much 'cause sometimes look into things like okay. Well what is the what's the mythological ramifications of this. Are there any treatments of this. Mythology or religion was something like tears. The answer is is yes every religion every mythology pretty much. You know So it'd be it'd be it's easy to get lost sort of. Just try to chasing some of these ideas down and then trying to figure out which ones are worth talking about which ones or not. And then of course from the scientific point of view there we've already rolled through. I think some of the science of tears and we have a bit more to cover today. We've got a lot more to cover on the science of tears on the last episode We talked about some of the basic uncontroversial biological facts about tears basil tears and reflects tears what they're made of. And how the how. They're secreted from the lacrima glands and what they normally do but the big question. The big sort of mystery about tears is this question of human emotional tears. Humans appear to be the only animal that sheds tears as a response to emotional states and so one of the huge questions is why what is the biological purpose and thus what is the evolutionary justification unique to our species of liquid. Coming out of your is in response to feeling emotions as we talked about in the last episode at you know because this is not a settled question. There are just tons of hypotheses that have been put forward over the years. We talked in the last episode about several very unlikely ones. For example tears being a byproduct of alleged aquatic ape past for human beings This is almost certainly not correct. Because we we don't put much stock in the aquatic ape. Hypothesis another one. Is this idea that maybe tears are somehow derive from a condition response of our ancient ancestors. Getting smoke in. There is at funeral pyres after they started controlling fire There are several reasons be talked about in the last episode that that's probably not correct either so over the next couple of episodes were going to be exploring a bunch more of the existing hypotheses about the evolutionary purpose of emotional tears. And i think you can sort these into three broad categories of the first being there there is no purpose maybe they're just some kind of byproduct the second being the purpose is intra personal meaning internal to the body of the person who's crying and the third would be that the purpose is interpersonal. Meaning that tears. Serve some kind of external or relational function now on the score of No purpose explanations. Here's a kind of surprising fact. Apparently charles darwin actually believed that emotional tears served no purpose of their own but rather were a byproduct of other purposeful adaptations notably facial expressions and vocal expressions in his eighteen. Seventy two book the expression of emotions in man and animals Darwin wrote quote the shedding tears appears to have originated through reflex action from the spasmodic contraction of the eyelids together. Perhaps with the eyeballs becoming gorged with blood during the act of screaming therefore weeping probably came on rather late in the line of our descent and this conclusion agrees with the fact that our nearest allies enthralled amorphous. Apes do not weep So the second observation there being that that the other apes that were most closely related to they do produce tears of course basil tears in their eyes and irritant tears but they don't produce emotional tears so that observation is correct. But i think darwin's in for instance in the first half of that paragraph there is almost definitely wrong. His ideas that well when we get upset we cry out with our voices and this makes like blood rush to the face. 'cause you're screaming and maybe all the blood sort of makes your eyes swell and then there are also when you're upset their facial muscle contractions like involuntary reflexive contractions of things like the eyelids and this just sort of squeezes tears out as an accidental. Byproduct i. i don't think i can go with darwin on this one. This sounds really wrong. Yeah i mean on one hand we've already talked about the the various sounds and screaming. Type a taxi with with other primates. I mean if you've been to a zoo or you've been to natural where primates make their home. You may have heard this they are. They can create the kind of screaming. That i guess could theoretically caused the eyeballs to become gorge with blood. So that doesn't seem to have much weight to it. Yeah it's not that it would be impossible for contractions of the facial muscles to cause tears. I do think this may even be an explanation I've seen this invoked an explanation. For why sometimes your eyes get teary when you yawn like when you yawn. That may put some kind of pressure on the lacrima. Glands that causes some excessive tearing which you know it leads to blurring of the vision. After you're done yawning you might need to wipe your eyes. Maybe a similar thing with coughing so it's not impossible that contractions of the facial muscles could cause some tearing. It just seems like the tears being produced by the lacrimosa glands during an emotional episode or something that exceeds this this kind of tearing and And i know most researchers who focus on this area really do think that this is not a plausible explanation. That seems pretty clear. That tears are a true adaptive trait that served their own functions and function independently from just The contractions of the facial muscles. Because another question would be like well. Okay i if this is true for humans how come other like apes that were closely related to don't also cry when they contract their facial muscles in emotional episodes. Your like i say it seems like we just have. We have more evidence to the contrary this point. Yeah so it seems like tears are probably purposeful. A true adaptive trait of some kind. So the next category would be well. Maybe tears have some kind of intra personal purpose. They they do something within the body within the self And there are many ways of approaching this but to cite a characteristic example of this type of explanation. I wanted to look at the detoxification hypothesis. This is one that used to be pretty popular but has really fallen out of favor. Historically i think this is one of the most popular hypotheses for explaining the function of tears. It was advanced by the american biochemist william fry in the nineteen eighties. I think First published in nineteen eighty five. I believe and fries reasoning. Went like this okay When humans are under stress you're having some intense emotional about of emotion there is a buildup of potentially toxic substances in the blood. So think about all the different Strobe effects of stress you learned about you know when when you really distressed your your bloodstream. Floods with cortisol. You're you're freaked out. You can almost feel it. Moving through your body or at least a maybe. It's an illusion. But i feel like. I can like when i'm having a stressful experience. There's almost a somatic sensation the spreading of this kind of like aggravating numbness and fry posited that when this happens when your body fills up with all these potentially toxic contaminants or hormone stress hormones. Things like that. The body cleanses these excess Contaminants by purging them. Through the tier response with the lacrimosa. Glands acting like kidneys. Do for the urinary system so under this hypothesis you are. You're peeing out.

darwin charles darwin Darwin william fry
"william fry" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

The Story Song Podcast

02:49 min | 7 months ago

"william fry" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

"And his partner. Chip davis was the wrote the music for the for the song. So lewis chip davis junior was born september. Fifth nineteen forty seven in hamlet ohio and was a musical prodigy and composes first piece at age six. He toured with choir after attending the university of michigan. And then after a short stint as a musician he took a job at boselli jacobs where he met william fries chips and fries. What a pair. And he wrote the music for fries lyrics for the now famous old home bred campaign. Now here's the thing about chip davis. Hey hey do you like weird christmas music. Do you like music. That sounds like it's from the future and the past you. Well you can thank chip davis who founded mannheim steamroller in seventy four. That's for those who don't know mannheim steamroller is a large orchestral group who combines classical and modern music right so so a lot of like muted trumpets. Oh ever going to say. Don't know if you don't know who man. I'm steamroller is you do exactly. Yeah it's because if you've ever been listening to a christmas song and thought. Why is this christmas song scary. You're listening to mannheim steamroller. They released mannheim steamroller. Christmas and christmas music would never be the same. Some will say for better. Some will say for worse. I will tell you this. There is not a christmas that goes by that that is not pumping in my house. Love it. i'm not gonna lie to you. I am a mannheim steamroller fan. You guys how do you feel about like. Do you makes it a little trans siberian orchestra or use sickly. Are you maine. Are you main lining the mannheim. I am most sleep. Mannheim mannheim also. You guys my other podcasts..

Chip davis first piece chip davis september Christmas mannheim ohio mannheim steamroller boselli jacobs six christmas Fifth nineteen forty seven Mannheim seventy four lewis university of michigan siberian
"william fry" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"At nine. We're gonna alive to the west front of the U. S. Capitol for the inauguration will carry that live right now. In Washington. Confirmation hearings underway for Alejandro My orcas who was the Residents President elect's nominee for Homeland Security secretary who's asked by Republicans would you enforce existing immigration laws? His answer was yes, he would. California has a you know, a United States senator a new United States under following the resignation of the woman about to begin her vice presidential duties more from CBS News correspondent Steve Futterman. Two days before the incoming Biden administration takes over, Kamila Harris formally resigned. I'm not saying goodbye. In many ways, I'm now saying hello as your vice president taped message, she directly addressed her constituents here in California. I do want to thank you for the honor of representing the place of my birth around the same time that was taking place. Governor Gavin Newsom formally appointed California Secretary of State Alex Padilla to replace Harris. He becomes the state's first Latino senator, the director of the U. S. Census Bureau. Stephen Dealing Ham is resigning Before the end of his term, he was getting flak for using census data to figure out how many Non citizens live in the country. Here's demographer William Fry and why he decided to go early. I think he probably has felt that he's been pressured a lot by the administration to do things that he didn't want to do, or that people in the Census Bureau didn't want to do. And now with the new administration, there's even pressure from the Democrats, I think for him to step down. In other words, I don't think there's any chance that the census will try to subtract undocumented immigrants from the totals, which is, which is what the Trump administration wanted to have done. On impeachment, CBS reporter Caitlin Huey Burns, says the president's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, Will not be part of a second impeachment trial, and there's a good reason for that. He said that he can't represent him at the trial because he himself or did. Giuliani may be.

Kamila Harris Rudy Giuliani vice president California U. S. Census Bureau William Fry Governor Gavin Newsom Stephen Dealing Ham United States Caitlin Huey Burns Washington President CBS CBS News Homeland Security senator secretary Steve Futterman Biden
"william fry" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Census director resigns nearly a year Early demographer William Fry says the census was politicized by President Trump in controversial, I think largely because the administration has put a lot of pressure on him in the Census Bureau to do do things that they don't normally do. Efforts to compile lists of undocumented citizens have been abandoned. Stephen Dealing Hams departure clears all high level trump appointees from the bureau and one of US Final executive orders President Trump spells out plans for his sculpture Garden of American heroes. He proposes more than 240 statues ranging from Wall Disney to Whitney Houston, Christopher Columbus and the late Jeopardy host Alex Trebek. The president orders the secretary of the interior to find an appropriate site, though all that may be rescinded by the Biden administration. After her release from a came in prison again, 18 admits it was selfish to break covert quarantine to go watch your boyfriend jet ski. 18 year old Skylar Mac tells ABC is Good Morning America. No reason that I can give you to grant me a second chance. I don't expect anybody never forgive me, but I would like for them to at least Let me be able to show them that I did learn from an expert just over a month behind bars, she says she is happy to be back home For the second year straight. Brookhaven cancels its Cherry Blossom Festival five K. Mayor John earned sightsee ongoing pandemic, saying he had hoped it would be under control by now, Since that is not the case, he says the health threats too great to host the event in April. It's traditionally one of the first music festivals in metro Atlanta. Each spring. A California man spends three months hiding out at Chicago's O'Hare Airport at night sleep. Being eating and living undetected in Terminal two provided food by passengers. Reporter Chris Ty says he told authorities he was too afraid to fly back home because he feared he'd get Cove ID there. A stolen I D badge gave him access to secure areas he's facing felony trespass charges. Lottery players snap up tickets to Mega Millions and Powerball's that combined jackpots Reach $1.6 billion. Tonight's mega Millions Drawing for $850 Million puts it in the top three in lottery history Tomorrow. Powerball reaches 730. Million. No one said either jackpot since September, the drawings are just before 11 P.m. on Channel two WSB News times. 7 18 Next Traffic update will reject the Southside. I 75 delays, the less than two minutes WSB meteorologist Kurt Mellish and his defendable five day forecast sponsored by Breda Pest management. They handle bugs and critters looking at very nice weather for us again today above normal temperatures will add some mom or clouds this afternoon, but stay Dr Eireann 59. Lows tonight 38 to 41 Tomorrow..

President Trump Census Bureau Chris Ty president WSB Skylar Mac Stephen Dealing Hams William Fry US Brookhaven O'Hare Airport ABC Biden administration Alex Trebek Dr Eireann director Atlanta Kurt Mellish Whitney Houston Breda Pest management
"william fry" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on WTOP

"Through and Williams still had the speaker's device or destroyed it of a capital Riot is part of the reason, singer Garth Brooks says he's saying you Joe Biden's inauguration. Brooks is the Republican, he says. It's about unity, not politics, that it's up to Americans to make sure there's no repeat of the violence from nearly two weeks ago, those thinking about repeating it. Think about your family. Think about what the mark you're gonna leave on this planet as a human being, and with the Children that you raise And then make your decision. Donald Trump is an hour away from starting his last full day as president here, CBS is Paula read with just one full day in office remaining, the president plans to issue between 50 and 100 pardons or commutations. The pardons air very positive thing for president, Former aide Steve Bannon and personal Attorney Rudy Giuliani could both get last minute reprieve. Giuliani today denied that he was paid to lobby the president for pardons. Mr Trump has insisted he has the power to pardon himself. But that could anger Senate Republicans who will serve as jurors in his possible impeachment trial. One of California's top scientists wants the state to stop using the Madonna covert vaccine. For now. Kovr TV's Marissa Pearlman is in Sacramento. Six patients had allergic reactions after getting the modern, a shot at the San Diego site next to Peck. Park. One you know is within expected, but two or more you know, on the same day should raise people's concerns. There's maybe this is happening more frequently than he should be. We learned 330,000 doses were sent to 287 providers statewide. They arrived between January 5th and 12 and make up roughly 1/10. Of all the vaccines sent to California. Even dealing him was supposed to run the Census Bureau till December, but he's leaving Wednesday instead. Brookings Institution. Demographer William Fry, says he faced heavy pressure from the Trump administration. He probably has felt that he's been pressured a lot by the administration to do things that he didn't want to do, or that people in the Census Bureau didn't want to do. And now with the new administration, there's even pressure from the Democrats, I think for him to step down the CBS News Sponsored by progressive Insurance drivers who save with progressive, save over $750 on average, call or click today and find out if we could save you hundreds on your car insurance. It's 11 or three and this Monday, January 18, 35 and D. C. Partly cloudy, cold, diminishing winds lows in the twenties in the suburbs to near 30 in the cities. Good evening. I'm kin Duffy the top local stories. We're following this hour with each passing day. We continue hearing Maura about arrest made in relation to the capital breach. Court documents indicating one of the people arrested was on probation and the GPS monitor he was wearing helped reveal his location. Brian Betancur of Silver Spring on probation for burglary. Was given permission.

Donald Trump president Garth Brooks William Fry Peck Census Bureau CBS Rudy Giuliani California Trump administration Joe Biden Marissa Pearlman Brookings Institution Williams San Diego Senate Duffy Maura Steve Bannon Brian Betancur
"william fry" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Thing for president, former aide Steve Bannon and personal attorney Rudy Giuliani. Would both get last minute reprieve. Giuliani today denied that he was paid to lobby the president for pardons. Mr Trump has insisted he has the power to pardon himself. That could anger Senate Republicans who will serve as jurors and his possible impeachment trial. And presidents often ramp up their clemency actions before leaving US office a part and wipes away a person's conviction while a commutation commutation merely shortens or ends a sentence. The head of the Census Bureau will leave his post on Wednesday. 11 months ahead of schedule. CBS is thief, Futterman reports. It's a job that normally doesn't get much attention. But during the Trump administration, there were efforts to get the Census Bureau take Help determine how many people were in the country illegally. With the new administration coming in director Stephen Dooling Ham is stepping down William Fries, an internationally regarded demographer, controversial, I think, largely because the administration has put a lot of pressure on him and the Census Bureau to do do things that they don't normally do. Willingham has been accused of pressuring Census Bureau workers Steve Futterman, CBS News and the latest coronavirus numbers out this evening, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Is reporting over 3200 newly confirmed cases and 52 more deaths. Today, there are over 2200 hospitalizations tonight. 427 of those patients are in the ICU. The seven day average positivity ready currently sits at 5.91% and over at Mass General in Boston, officials say they've had to open up a new overflow ICU to deal with the surgeon covert 19 patients. The regular I see you at the hospital has been full for nearly a month. Now, officials say they're working to create more surge ICU space on top of this new unit that they've opened up its 11 03 traffic and weather together. Now the Subaru retailers in New England all we'll drive traffic on the threes with Jack Hart. How's it going, Jack Not do bad damage that light traffic out there of a Monday night. We do have some work going on right down to the south on route 93 South bound the ramp to 24, South bound and Randolph that's closed until about 5 a.m. overnight work going on through there otherwise Down south all as well as it is out to the west right now on routes. 1 92 90 route to from lemon stood a little don't know issues up to the north. All is well right now. We did have a crash earlier on 4 95 south in April that's gone closer to downtown. We've got some work going on north bound on route 93 inside the tip O'Neill tunnel That's causing a short delay for people on the expressway. And for anyone coming out of the tip O'Neill tunnel on the Excuse me. The Ted Williams tunnel on the westbound side trying to get the 93 North bound. Gonna find that ramp is closed. You'll have to watch for detours, but you'll be just fine if you do otherwise. A short delay on Storrow Drive that leverage circles the only thing to vex you downtown Right now there are young people across the world facing tough choices. Continue their dreams of education or drop out to help their families put food on the table. You can help.

Census Bureau O'Neill tunnel Rudy Giuliani president Steve Futterman Mr Trump US CBS Steve Bannon William Fries Jack Hart Senate Ted Williams CBS News Boston Subaru attorney Massachusetts Department of Pu Stephen Dooling Ham Willingham
"william fry" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Health care marketplace healthcare dot Gove. The other 14 states in Washington, D. C. Do have later deadlines. Gonna be a while before we have final numbers. But early indications are the number of new people signing up for health coverage was about the same as last year, and that is despite The fact that millions of people have lost their jobs this year and presumably the healthcare that came with him. Marketplaces Samantha Fields explains. What's going on. Given what we know. Right now, The number of people who've lost health insurance in the pandemic is actually lower than experts worried. It might be. Karen Pollitz of the Kaiser Family Foundation, says one reason is most of the people who have lost jobs during the pandemic. Didn't have health insurance to begin with, because their jobs in restaurants, retail and hospitality didn't offer it. Paul, it says many of those who did lose coverage through employers were able to replace it. People have been figuring out if they did lose job based coverage and if they still make too much for Medicaid, but they did have a qualifying events there. Figuring out how to sign up for marketplace coverage. That means the affordable care act is working as intended, says Aviva Aaron, dine of the center on Budget and Policy Priorities and protecting people who have lost their jobs lost their coverage from becoming of an uninsured. There are still about 29 million people who are uninsured. Many are eligible for free or low cost coverage and just don't know it. Kavita Patel is a doctor in Washington, D C and a fellow at the Brookings Institution. She had an uninsured patient come in a couple of weeks ago, and when I said have you looked into whether you qualify for Medicaid or potentially even a subsidy to buy health insurance is that I have no idea what you're talking about. That's common, she says, in large part because the Trump administration almost eliminated funding for open enrollment marketing. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. You have heard probably stores of people fleeing big cities in droves and yes, in some cities, and in some limited numbers, people are leaving. But overall, Americans have moved less during this pandemic. Not more. And there are studies showing Americans have been less and less on the move for decades now, and it's not because they are thrilled where they are marketplaces to bring Benesch or has that story. So a lot of New Yorkers might find this story familiar after a week or two of both working from home and are 500 Square Foot Brooklyn apartment we just realized, you know, we needed some more space. Jesse Garretson and her fiance left Brooklyn and moved to Pennsylvania. A study by moving company hire helper found 80% more of its clients moved out of New York, then moved into it between March and June. But that is New York. And that is the pandemic most everywhere else and up Until the start of the pandemic. Americans have been moving less. We have reached a post World war two low William Fries, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution he's talking about last year, 9.3% of Americans moved in 2019 that is less than half the number in the fifties and sixties. Really the last 10 years, The drop office has been bigger. A lot of this is that usually young people moved more than anyone, and Ah, whole generation has had a rough time this past decade, they were hit by the 12 punch of a bad housing market and a bad labor market. Part of it is also the Americans just don't change jobs as much as they used to, according to Heaven star at the University of Maryland's Smith School of Business. But all that could change, he says. In a work from home world, it's much easier to change jobs if you're just sitting at your computer. And so I think that the growth and work from home that the pandemic has spurred is going to reduce labor market frictions, but only for people.

Samantha Fields Brookings Institution Medicaid New York Kavita Patel Washington Kaiser Family Foundation William Fries Aviva Aaron Karen Pollitz Jesse Garretson Benesch University of Maryland Paul senior fellow Brooklyn
"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We have reached a post World war two low William Fries, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution he's talking about last year, 9.3% of Americans moved in 2019 that is less than half the number in the fifties and sixties. Really the last 10 years that drop office has been bigger. A lot of this is that usually young people moved more than anyone, and Ah, whole generation has had a rough time this past decade, they were hit by the 12 punch of a bad housing market and a bad labor market. Part of it is also that Americans just don't change jobs as much as they used to, according to Evan Star at the University of Maryland's Smith School of Business. But all that could change, he says. In a work from home world, it's much easier to change jobs if you're just sitting at your computer. And so I think that the growth and work from home that the pandemic has spurred is going to reduce labor market frictions, but only for people who can work from home in New York. I'm so prevent ashore for marketplace. Three words for your listening pleasure on the morrow marketplace. Morning report. Check it out. Mm hmm. Mm hmm. Last stop on our tour of small businesses. Making a go of it right now is Phoenix, Arizona, where Route Newbie runs an e commerce clothing brand. The last two weeks have been very busy, which has been nice. We weren't sure what to expect. Not this past weekend, but the weekend before was our busy weekend. You know, we like to keep that momentum going that we've had. From the beginning, but it did drop off a little bit this last weekend, so we don't really know We're hoping for the best and planning for that, but we're not sure what to expect. Husband. Strange because my family is really holiday oriented we wanted, you know, every holiday we spent together and none of that's happening this year. Both my parents and my sister's. The other owners are in Prescott together, so they see each other all the time. But it's fine since we're able TOC been touched so much through the business than it feels like. We're closer than we are through newbie running the label by three. She does it with her sisters. They're impressed. Good. She's in Phoenix, Arizona. Its final note on the way out today from the marketplace task of personal grooming and government regulation. There was a new regulation from the Trump administration out this week about showerheads. Going back decades now to Clinton, The limit for water flow has been 2.5 gallons per minute. As multiple showerheads in the same shower became more popular. The Obama administration said Nope. Total limit is still 2.5 gallons per minute. No matter how many showerheads you have the new rule from the Trump administration. 2.5 gallons per shower head, no matter how many nozzles you've got in your shower now, you might remember President Trump has publicly bemoan showerheads without enough flow, he says, And this is a quote. He says he needs more water because his hair has to be perfect..

President Trump Trump administration Phoenix Arizona William Fries Evan Star Brookings Institution Obama administration senior fellow University of Maryland Prescott New York Smith School of Business Clinton
"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the state Medicaid program. Neither of them have responded to that accusation, and we should point out that experts seem to agree that the death count is actually undercounted nationwide. In this pandemic. That is OK. Henderson of Radio Iowa, the news director there. Thank you so much. Thank you. The general election season is officially in full swing, and both presidential campaigns are mapping their path to November but shifting demographics and a more diverse electorate. Have changed the voting picture in many ways, 2016 to help walk us through some of these changes. I'm joined by NPR senior political editor and correspondent. Domenico Montanaro! Domenico. Welcome back to the news hours. Very good to see you. So let's start by talking about the voters. It all hinges on them. The people who make up the act electorate. Tell us how that electorate has changed. How does it look different from 2016? Well, was really curious about this because so many people keep talking about the 2020 election is it is the same thing as the 2016 election. So I talked to the demographer at Brookings, William Fry, and he walked me through some of the big change is the biggest one is that white working class voters from 2016 to 2020 have dropped four points. They went from 45% in 2016 to 4. The 1% as a share of eligible voters is what we're talking about. And meanwhile, if you look at white voters with a college degree and Latinos, each of those have gained two points each overall, if your combined white voters with a college degree and Latinos to level overwhelmingly democratic and pit them against white voters without a college degree who vote overwhelmingly for President Trump, you see that the gap has almost completely vanished from 2016 when white Voters without a college degree, had a nine point advantage over white voters with a college degree and Latino. So really, we're seeing a big change here, and President Trump's base is really shrinking. So interesting. So let's zero in on the states that are most competitive. The states where the candidates are focusing most of their attention one of the issues on the ground. What does it look like? Well, you know, if you look at our battleground map, there are about 16 states that are really in the competitive category. When we say that we talk about states that lean toward President Trump. Toss up states and states that lean toward Joe Biden so you can see here within those states. That trend also continues. When you look at white voters without a college degree in 14 of those 16 competitive states. You see whites without a degree on the decline for inversely see Latinos on the rise in 12. Of those 16 states. So those demographics making some big changes big shifts and is part of why you see in a place like Wisconsin, for example, and Arizona, where you have to sort of differing reasons for the states to be competitive in Wisconsin in rustbelt state that was super close in 2016. You had a whites without a college degree down farm boys and yet whites with whites with the cause of up three points. That's the real ballgame. They're Latinos are down in Wisconsin. But if you look at Arizona Totally different story. You have white working class voters, whites without a cause degree down and Latinos up six points and the big difference here. A cz faras 2016 to 2020 and why Joe Biden is competitive is Latinos. They now make up about a third of the overall eligible voters in Arizona. But a thing to keep in mind this is not about who's going to vote. This is just who's eligible to vote and as you can see, with 31 Percent of Latinos in Arizona being eligible to vote as big difference from 2016 when only when they only made a 15% of the electorate. Well, one voting bloc Domenico That's getting a lot of attention this year suburban voters, especially suburban women, we know President Trump one suburban voters in 2016, but the midterms I saw a change in the suburbs. What does it look like now? Has been a huge shift, You know, in 2016 As you mentioned, President Trump won the silver One suburban voters narrowly 47 to 45 when you look at the Pew Centers validated Voters survey compared that to 2020 When you look at our poll, the PBS news are NPR. Maris POLL You have Joe Biden of the 61 36 advantage over President Trump in the suburbs if those numbers hold It makes it very difficult for the president to win reelection campaign managers who we talk to Republicans up and down in these competitive house races. You know, why would these states Can these house prices continue to be competitive when these air Republican leaning suburban district and that's why? Because President Trump is a dragon, the top of the ticket for them? At the same time, the group that he could try to get out is those white voters but out of college degree, they only turned out of 58% rate in 2016. There's room for them to grow because it's only about on par and even down from some past presidential elections. A lot of wild cards, but really important information. Looking hard at the electorate. Domenico Montanaro of NPR. Thank you so much. Just so long And thanks for having me. 2016 was only the beginning..

President Trump Joe Biden Arizona Domenico Montanaro NPR president Domenico That Wisconsin William Fry Henderson director Iowa political editor Pew Centers
"william fry" Discussed on Michigan Policast

Michigan Policast

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on Michigan Policast

"To switch the water supply and against the Federal Environmental Protection Agency for its part covering up the lead contamination, and as you heard, it will probably end up costing us over a billion dollars. Donald. Trump's latest racist appeal is aimed at what may be the decisive. In this election suburban women but he talks of suburban housewives seemingly harkening back to the days of Madman's betty draper or the beavers June cleaver or Wilma flintstone fictional white women who greeted their husbands at the door with an apron where he pearls and holding Martini for their man Arnold Weidenfeld this as a director of State University's Institute of Public Policy and Social Research. He says those images of suburban women are decades out of date Walter. There's just no question today suburbs no longer look at all like the lily white places that the president jurors may think they are from the nineteen fifties and the nineteen sixties. There are several trends that have been taking place especially over the last decade that have been noted by demographers such as William Fry Brookings, and Richard Florida whose name might sound familiar to some of your listeners who now writes for Bloomberg City Lab. You know the fact of the matter is, is that over the last decade or more? wanted a first trends that had impacted suburban growth, his immigration. Immigration as been noted, is increasingly suburban ads of the last census in twenty ten. More than half half of all immigrants resided in the suburbs that trend of immigrants moving to the suburbs for schools quite frankly is continuing the second trend now that we've seen is is quite honestly is been going on for longer than a decade. And that is the racial and ethnic transformation of of the suburbs. So when you looked at the statistics between nine, hundred, seventy and two thousand, the share of African. Americans for instance, living in suburban Atlanta increase from seven percent to seventy eight percent. in the suburbs of Washington. DC It rose twenty five, percent eighty, two percent. And these trends have continued to accelerate across the country not only is it the result of Gentrification, as as we've come? Understand that another words lower income African. Americans being pushed out. Of those parts of cities that are being redeveloped and become too expensive but you know there is a black middle class and black middle class has chosen to move to more upscale suburbs 'em when we think of Michigan. We have an example You know that I liked point to, and that is the city of Southfield after the riots in Detroit over the next couple of decades, it wasn't just whites fled the city was middle class blacks and. One of the places they to Southfield and when you look at the demographic shift. In the city, of Southfield, over the last few decades you you know that you might remember maxine Berman former legislator maxine Berman represented Southfield for many many years a white Jewish female. Wants maxine left. We have seen nothing but African Americans represent southfield. We have an African American congresswoman from Southfield in the Michigan delegation so. Here in our own state we certainly seeing that occurring and what we've got is a trend that summer calling mop melting pot suburbs. With momentum minorities now constitute thirty five percent or more of the population as a matter of fact, between two thousand and twenty change been noted that whites comprise less than ten percent of the growth of the suburban population while minorities constituted for greater the net. So. Would you say that the the shift in voting patterns that we saw during the two thousand eighteen election which much democratic in the suburbs is not an anomaly but rather a ongoing trend. Well, that's hard to say because the president actually won the suburbs by four percentage points in two thousand, sixteen election. I think would points to the walt is the political power of the suburbs and you know the fact of the matter is, is that while on the one hand I've talked talked about the changing demographics in many of the suburbs and how they no longer look much like the June cleaver leave it to beaver suburbs that many folks of our generation boomers in particular or even older Americans might might have in mind. Still. There is the fact that on the other side of the Coin Tan of the PRICIEST ZIP codes in America are all in the suburbs and even when we think of our own suburbs here in Michigan no some of the priciest Zip codes reside in Oakland County in this state and the like. So so you've got an interesting picture. Of, the suburbs are really a greater reflection of the country as a whole in many respects and the growing inequality income inequality gap between rich and poor. So if nothing else I, think the suburbs have increased in political power over the course of time and it'll be interesting to see what happens in this upcoming election certain. Two thousand eighteen the strength of the suburbs in in creating a democratic congress all those that came out vote will have to see if that happens again. Part of the transformation of the suburbs by senses it was because it was a lower cost of living than in the cities people could get more for their money that obviously a shifting now a home in Bloomfield hills, it's gonNa cost you a lot more than a home in downtown. Detroit is this likely to be sort of like a juggling act going back and forth and back and forth in part because of the cost of living. I think cost of living has Is One factor schools are another factor. Is it's multidimensional. You know Certainly. We've got suburbs that are thriving and successful in the fastest growing most affluence, and then there are others that are facing growing poverty and and mounting economic issues, and in some cases, even economic decline those suburbs of, for instance that have been able to adapt twenty-first-century industries and technologies and find places where the jobs are those suburbs that have medical industry, those suburbs that even have university. So eds and meds again continues to play an important role in the growth of suburbs. So I think tangling back and forth isn't a bad analysis but I think we have to remember that much like growth and decline anywhere. It's never anyone thing. What about the significance of the growth of the Internet having broadband available especially in the suburbs where every suburbs got really good Internet for certainly for white collar workers that can make a difference in were they locate A can but I would remind your audience that for as much as we like to think there is good broadband access and connectivity in suburbs or in denser communities I've been involved in broadband. Since with Municipal League and had to go through the rewrite of the Michigan Telecom Act back in two, thousand, six, it was and it's just not the case there are pockets whether it's here in the city of Lansing, or if we want to consider a an area such as a bath township just north of east, Lansing which has become a lot denser their pockets, many pockets even in this region that have poor Internet connection It really is a question of of location location location and you've got to be careful because you might be moving into a new subdivision in a suburban area and just like you're checking on the schools and everything else you better check on your broadband connection. or wonderful.

Southfield Michigan Detroit maxine Berman president Federal Environmental Protecti Trump Donald betty draper Lansing Wilma flintstone Bloomberg City Lab Social Research Bloomfield hills Institute of Public Policy director William Fry Brookings Martini State University
"william fry" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KCRW

"Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. Pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. You think that would have cost even more if they waited, And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything changed the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate. Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber inthe e month of April where we typically would get Navy. 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the National Realestate brokerage Redfin, he says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom. Covert has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw you knew everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of strange Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us during my pleasure. I've read that. This is the song that kind of got this album started. Is that right? Yeah. Nobody.

New York Willie Nelson William Fry Miriam Manhattan Navy. Connecticut Montclair front porch Brookings Institution Glenn Kalman Hearst Postal Service NPR Monica Schwarber National Realestate America Steve
"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog. Louis as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. The pandemic clinched it be in the epicenter, the washing of the hands. Just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. She thinks it would have cost even more if they waited. And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area. Since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media And in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber in the month of April, where we typically would get Navy 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money on Ly the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the National Realestate brokerage Redfin, he says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom covered has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Hurry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of strange Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us about I've read that this is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah,.

New York Miriam Willie Nelson William Fry Manhattan Louis Connecticut Montclair front porch Brookings Institution Glenn Kalman Postal Service NPR Hearst National Realestate Steve America Monica Schwarber CEO
"william fry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. Pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. She thinks it would have cost even more if they waited. And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service. And moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate. Here's real estate agent Monica Schwartzberg inthe e month of April where we typically would get Navy 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the national real estate brokerage Redfin. He says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed over love started. First rule of Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us. Sure about pleasure. I've read that. This is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah, but.

New York Willie Nelson Miriam William Fry Glenn Kalman Connecticut Manhattan Montclair front porch Monica Schwartzberg Brookings Institution Postal Service Hearst NPR Redfin Steve America
"william fry" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KCRW

"Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. Pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other bids. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. She thinks it would have cost even more if they waited. And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything changed the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate. Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber inthe e month of April where we typically would get Navy. 75 enquiries. In a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the National Realestate brokerage Redfin, he says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom. Covert has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills near a lake that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, But the picture has shifted once again. Over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs, more movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw her he knew everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of strange Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson. Thanks so much for being with us. Sure about. I've read that. This is the song that kind of got this album started. Is that right? Yeah..

New York Willie Nelson Miriam William Fry Manhattan Connecticut Montclair front porch Brookings Institution Glenn Kalman Navy. Hearst Postal Service NPR Monica Schwarber National Realestate America Steve
"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"william fry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In New York. Like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios. Restaurants. You can walk to art galleries, even a film festival, Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is covert related. New Yorkers used to say maybe one of their one day now they've decided we don't have. Look you lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out. There are which says people are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management, and Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. The pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other biz. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. You think that would have cost even more if they waited, And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber in the month of April, where we typically would get Navy 75 increase in a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the national real estate brokerage Redfin. He says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom covered has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills, nearly that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, but the picture has shifted once again over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs. More movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says. New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson, Thanks so much for being with us about I've read that this is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah, but he can.

New York Montclair New York City Miriam Cantor Susan Horowitz Willie Nelson Steve William Fry NPR New Jersey Uri Berliner BJ Liederman Glenn Kalman front porch Connecticut Gen Z Brookings Institution Manhattan Postal Service
"william fry" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"william fry" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Years from now when there's more mixed kids and that's naturally GonNa happen you know. How does that play into into the rules? And how do you adjust rules to facilitate for that. The bigger conversation may be about opening nine men to another group women women and girls. I think that'd be Super Fun. Amanda Lacy Plays Volleyball with the hurricanes. But she'd like to get the chance to play in nine man tournaments like improve that we can do it too like not just the guys we can do it too for the World Anna Customer Newton Massachusetts if you want a good understanding of how the economy is doing look at birth threats. Fertility rates. Dropped during hard times then bounce back when things pick up what happened in the years after the Great Depression in the nineteen thirties. But that is not what happened. And after the great recession that began in two thousand. Seven last year fertility rates in the. US hit an all-time low. That's according to a new report from the National Center for Health. Statistics William Fries a senior demographer at the Brookings Institution for Tilleke rates in the. US hit a record low in two thousand eighteen. Why's that yes? It's gone down for years in a row and gone down substantially since two thousand and seven in there actually women in their early thirties or having more kids than women women in their late twenties. So this tells you that there is pushing back of having fertility. Some other countries have shown Even bigger declines in their fertility in the. US still is is actually in pretty good shape in terms of what's called the total fertility rate which is the average number of children that women have over the course of their reproductive years If it's a two point one it means the population is replacing itself. The US is about one point. Seven in Europe. It's about one point five and in Eastern Europe. It's about one point three. Those countries are in real trouble. I think in terms of being able to take care of their aging population. Because they're having fewer people going into the Labor labor force then are aging out of the labor force. How long is it until the? US's the same impacts where where are we at right now well. I don't know if we're going to hit those kinds of levels that we see in Japan or Italy or Spain or Romania down at one point three or one point four total fertility rate level. And the reason I'd say that is because we have a somewhat younger age structure in our population due to the immigration that we've had over the last three or four decades reasonably high immigration does not that immigrants grunts had lots more children than the native born population but because they make the population younger And they're more women in those trial Berry Gauges that helps to increase. Our population gained oil as you pointed out earlier people in the US are having children later in life on. The report says the age groups have recorded increases in fertility rates. Are Women in their late thirties and early forties. It's also happening in Europe. So what is happening here. You see similar patterns on two continents. Yeah I think there are some things going on that intern sub in some ways. Better for women in some European countries because women in some Scandinavian countries in western European countries benefit from government programs which provide them with with a government subsidized child care paid family. Leave and this sort of thing. While it doesn't make their fertility higher. It allows women who do have children to have them more easily and to keep them in the labor force if we think the United States compared to European countries or Japan we're not aging quite as rapidly as they are And even though we have this lower fertility we're younger and we're more vibrant in some ways and we do have an immigration to this country that's at levels which we keep them and try to take care of those immigrants and their children. I think we're going to be in pretty good shape because you need these young vibrant people moving into the labor force and that means that Sort of young immigrant children and second and third generation enter Asian Americans are GONNA make us somewhat more vibrant I think than other countries which are aging much more rapidly than we are. William FRY is a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution in Washington. Thanks very much for being with us. William sure good to be with you. Here's the thing about holidays like Thanksgiving when you spend them abroad. You have to work harder to make the day feel like back home. We've been hearing stories today for military veterans who spent Thanksgiving's deployed around the world. Here's US Army Staff. Sergeant Brandon Brandon Davis of San Mateo. California he served with a civil affairs detachment in the second invasion of Iraq in November of two thousand four four while deployed in northern Iraq was in the Kurdish region living among amongst the Kurds in the area of the hook and the small team of Americans I was with. We were so far away from any other Americans in the area so we really can fend for ourselves a lot of times and as we approach Thanksgiving we had made plans for having some kind of meal together along with our Kurdish bodyguards and support staff. Getting things like can cranberries and stuffing mix and things like that was pretty straightforward. Everyone was asking friends and family to send it to the APO. The army post office. That would get to us. It wouldn't actually get to US directly though we'd have to brave going down pretty deep into Mozell to the southern part of the city which was pretty dangerous and and I remember throughout October and into November. We started having a pile of stuff near our kitchen assembling everything we needed for Thanksgiving having meal. The one thing missing Turkeys but throughout our daily missions going to these small towns in the mountains and whatnot. We all started to notice that in this one particular town near the Turkish border. North of an area called Zorreguieta. We are among these stone and mud huts. It's and I saw these two turkeys and basically kind of commented about it too or are interpreter. I said you know. Hey Height them. We had this thing uncalled thanksgiving. And Mitzpe big celebration. It's a meal. It's kind of on the scale of one of the Ramadan meals. We have all the ingredients we need. We just need Turkey's Missouri. Zor Away that we can buy a couple turkeys from the locals here. He's all go talk to them within a few minutes. We heard a a couple of gunshots and we freaked out. I split second and then the Peshmerga guards has come walking over with these two turkeys. They shot there. You you go so the next day we planned to make a meal and we're in the process of making it all when the person on Radio Watch said Hey. Hey there's two blackhawks flying into the Peshmerga compound in the southern part of the city. You need to go pick up. There's a general coming what to see us. There's only a a handful of us. Oh yeah he's bringing Thanksgiving meal in these containers that are sealed to keep the heat and whatnot. And so yeah we went with the pests down to the for Monday compound and these two blackhawks came in and this general in command of the whole the northern part of the region comes out and he brings this prepared meal. Oh for us so we. We ate Thanksgiving with our Kurdish allies and we spent a lot of time talking with the general and his staff and lots of pictures and handshakes and then we send them on their way few hours later and then we got back to our compound. Won't we have this other meal so we prepared that and I can't believe we ate it but I guess when you're burning six thousand calories a day go up and down mountains and whatnot. That's kind of a big deal but honestly with food you miss things being being in places far away like that you get used to local foods but there's something about those traditional meals that give a little taste of home that is is a good for the soul Staff Sergeant Brandon Davis remembering Thanksgiving fifteen years ago in northern Iraq. Davis told US after the Second Inter that day they they play pickup football and taught the rules to local kids. That's where our thoughts go today. Big thanks to all the service members share the Thanksgiving memories with us as well as to those who who are eating their Turkey. Dinners far away from home this year from the Bill Harris Studio at W. G. B. H.. Here in Boston. I'm Marco Werman back with you tomorrow. The world old is a CO production of W. H. Boston the BBC World Service Pri and Pierra.

US Sergeant Brandon Brandon Davis Turkey Europe Brookings Institution Iraq US Army Staff Labor labor force Japan Volleyball Amanda Lacy younger age Marco Werman Eastern Europe William Fries APO
"william fry" Discussed on The Road to Rediscovery: A Life-Learning Journey for Growth

The Road to Rediscovery: A Life-Learning Journey for Growth

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"william fry" Discussed on The Road to Rediscovery: A Life-Learning Journey for Growth

"Hello and welcome to the road to rediscovery. I'm your host Aubrey Johnson. And I am so grateful for you. Tuning in and listening to this podcast. The roads discovery is about reflecting on the lessons that life throws at us to learn and grow from them and of course pay it forward to uplift others who were struggling. This EPISODE IS THE THIRD INSTALLMENT IN CAPS OFF. The three roads to wellness alignment series. We've been discussing some wellness practices. That can help us align with our self improvement goals in part one. We talked about meditation and mindful breathing in part two. We chatted about the wellness benefits of exercise and today for part three. We're going discuss the wellness virtues of laughter. Those who know me know that I am a huge advocate of laughing. In fact I'm not above going out of my way to find an opportunity to laugh. For example while most television commercials are annoying to people. I actually looked to find the humor in them. Breaking down the detail of each commercial when it comes to humor. One characteristic. I've noticed about myself is my ability to have an open mind and consider the humor outside of my demographic parameters for example. I not only laugh at things that would be funny to a typical fifty one year old man such as myself but I truly find laughter and things that are even funny to a seven year old. Boy I'm not ashamed of laughing out loud at most things people. My Age would consider quote. Goofy. I've always been wired this way. And speaking of childhood laughter. Dr William Fry Stanford University Psychiatrists noted that children laugh more than four hundred times a day whereas adults laugh only about a dozen times a day in this episode will reference several areas from his findings in author and political journalist. Norman cousins book anatomy of an illness as perceived by the patient he cites laughter as inner jogging due to the workout. A good hearted belly laugh actually gives to each system in the body. Let's start off by talking about how laughter can heal the brain for people suffering from chronic depression to the point where nothing is funny to them and they feel no reason to laugh. Laughter actually reverses this by triggering the release of feel good chemicals like endorphins and Dopamine. This is especially helpful for people dealing with chronic illnesses. Furthermore there are pleasure pathways in the brain researchers believe laughter activates for us. Let's touch on the immune system psycho. Neuro immunology is an area of research that is found that depression suppresses the immune system epping for an and cortisol are the stress hormones that have the potential to increase with depression. These hormone levels actually decrease during and following laughter medical students from the Loma. Linda University School of Medicine watched the series of comedy videos at a recent study. These students had a significant increase in t cells. These are the cells that circulate through the body and they eat up germs along the way. Additionally people with allergies have been known to have fewer allergic reactions after watching humorous films. I find these results absolutely fascinating and it truly speaks to the healing powers that something as simple as laughing has and then we'll talk about the heart when it comes to the heart quite simply laughter makes it happy it makes your heart happy. The result of a good laugh is an increase in heart rate and circulation much like an aerobic workout. So there you have it from mindful breathing to exercise to laughter. We've wrapped up our three roads to wellness alignment. I really really hope you find value in at least one of these practices as we've said in the beginning. I truly truly believe that before. We can pursue improvement in various aspects of our lives. We must first address. Our wellness aligning. Our wellness will provide the optimal condition for mental and physical states. Giving us the best opportunity for personal improvement and growth in our relationships finances careers in more. Thanks so much for tuning into this episode in all three parts of the series. It was such a pleasure sharing this with you. Please share this episode across your Social Media and tag me with any thoughts or feedback you have you can find. The roads rediscovery facebook page at our to our podcast or an instagram at. Aj Shark forty nine. You can also find us on twitter at Aubrey. Our to our and of course our official website roads rediscovery dot com. Your love and support is very much appreciated and never goes unnoticed. Thank you so much for taking this journey with me out against the roads. Rediscovery is an AJ short production. What better way to tap an evening then to take movie with friends or loved one spending an evening at the movies has long since been timeless tradition while entertaining and relaxing to us the result of a film represents the enjoyable yet hard work of so many in the film industry enter stage left the film arts and Hearts Film Festival coming to you from La. On April Twenty Fifth Twenty twenty market on your calendar because this is truly a can't miss event. The Film Arts Arts Festival celebrates the hard work beauty and creativity of directors actors writers. And so much more. It's a marquee event that is uplifting for everyone not only in film but the overall arts industry as well with forty five awards to present plus arts and music performances. We're only scratching the surface on the evening of massive entertain. Learn more about the festival at film. Freeway DOT com slash film arts and hearts best and tickets can be purchased here as well come see. Elliot was spree at the Film Arts Arts.

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