20 Burst results for "William Faulkner"

Purim Torah - Anna Solomon

Judaism Unbound

06:54 min | 7 months ago

Purim Torah - Anna Solomon

"Anna solomon. Welcome to judaism unbounded. It's really great to have you. It's great to be here. So we've been doing this series on the bible and it's really exciting to be able to talk to somebody who's written a what you call exactly a biblical novel. A you know that generates itself from a biblical story. But i love to start by understanding like how you chose to write a novel based on the biblical story. You know you've written other books before wh what was the process that brought you to take this on the initial impulse really came from a children's book that i was given to read to my own kids which was sort of a children's version of the book of esther. I expected it to be simpler somehow or to kind of make the book of esther more straightforward and it turned out didn't it all in it actually raised all of the questions that had always had about the book of esther but it was like wait a second. Why was it that. I was always told that esther was really virtuous and it turns out. She's concubine a harem. And what about this fusty character. Who seems to actually have made what we would consider to be the quote virtuous choice by saying no. I won't parade make it. There were all these questions and then plot holes Hush worse who it seems by the end is sort of shocked by what heyman has been doing. This genocide earlier on is like yeah. Sure whatever you know. There's just so many there's so many sort of plot holes and inconsistencies and and my kids had all sorts of questions and it kind of made me want to go back to the book of esther itself and investigate on which is not something. I really have a lot of experienced with the local tax that that was the initial impulse that drove me back with all of these questions. You know a lot of times on this podcast. We've talked about wanting to have people. Will we call regular jews. You know people that are unauthorized. Feel empowered to take on jewish topics and jewish practices and reimagine. Them and a lot of people are intimidated to do that because they say well. I'm not a rabbi. I didn't study. How do i know how to do you know and so. I really love to talk to somebody who's done that kind of day. She's move of saying well. I'm going to really you know. Come to this. Not as somebody who's had a tremendous amount of expertise before i started and i'm curious both about the process of getting started. And did you feel intimidated in that way. And how did you get over it. And also the process of like. How much research did you do until you felt confident to the point of saying okay. Yeah i actually can write a novel about this or like you say i can contribute mid rushed to this book which you know other people say well i mean who are you after. Two thousand years totally. It's a great question. And i am absolutely a regular jew as you said i love that term and i think actually the what you said so the the research was totally tied into my getting to a point of being able to say i can do this but but not in the way. You'd expect not so much. Because i got to a point and i i felt like i knew enough it was because i got to a point and i realized that no one knows and so it gave me the freedom to go in. You know. I mean. I i began by going to my rabbi. This is in park slope brooklyn congregation. Bethelehem rachel to moaner. She's really wonderful. Insertive saying pronounced guest. Oh yeah She so great. And i said you know where do i even start and i was really open about how little i knew and she really you know is like in her office. So here's where you can even begin to go looking for interpretations translations other stories Mid rush of course. And i think for me one of the things that was very freeing in particular was was reading. The very ancient rabbis takes on The book of esther which were wild like really really wild things. That don't have any seem to have any basis in the book itself like in one hayman's daughter Heenan has a daughter first of all and she mistakes heyman for mortified or the other way round in in prayed and drops feces on his head on her father's head and it's like where does that come from in in many things like this and i think the more i read in the more outrageous at all was thought well if the ancient babylonian rabbis could do this then i guess i can. Do you know. I wanted to talk a little bit. About how your book is structured because on the one hand it's not unique to your book. There are many books that have a structure where you know chapter by chapter sort of different. I guess it's not different narrators in your case but different protagonists. I remember reading As i lay dying in school. Growing up by william faulkner which was like my first time with that and i didn't like that book i found it very disorienting but do i have grown into that style and i bring it up because i actually think you could see it as like. Oh interesting counterintuitive style for a novel or you could say when it comes to biblical text. I'll speak for myself. This is how i read it. Basically like when i'm reading a biblical text my process in my head is like For smidge i am in the text. I am like in the book of esther and then flashing to my life and that. I'm back to the book of esther and then maybe i'm to my parents. Lives are my ancestors recently but what was happening in terms of the structure of the book and in what ways might actually have something to teach us about how to approach whether it's biblical texts or any kinds of ancient texts that we work with. Yeah it's so interesting. What you say when you describe the way that you read the text in that you're going between them to your own life and two other to your ancestors etc because i think that's i think that's sort of how he read any text in a way. I mean we're always projecting ourselves into it in onto it and Whether consciously or or sort of subconsciously. And so i think in a way the weaving as you're talking about that i do in this book between these different narrators and really without between these very different times. 'cause there's the there's contemporary brooklyn there is nineteen seventies washington. Dc in ancient persia is meant to really have the effect that you're talking about that you have read which is which is to bring us closer together and to reckon with not only how much has changed but actually how much continues to be the same. In how how shaped we are by the stories that have come before us in shaped we continue to be and that we become i think then also more aware of the power of the stories. We are telling now you know to ourselves to our children to the people around us and the effect that that will have on their lives and their future. The potential for that kind of writing but also for reading is to make those connections and maybe be a little more conscious of our own powers as we as we tell our stories.

Anna Solomon Heyman Esther Park Slope Brooklyn Congregati Bethelehem Rachel Heenan Hayman William Faulkner Persia Brooklyn Washington
Refounder: The Essential Longevity Plan for Every Small Business

The Small Business Radio Show

08:47 min | 8 months ago

Refounder: The Essential Longevity Plan for Every Small Business

"What we've all heard the term founder and many of us our founders of small businesses. But what is a re founder and can you be one of them. Help us with that. Is patrick colletti. Who's a leadership at organizational cultural expert champion for founders and author of the upcoming leadership leadership. Book rebounder patrick. Welcome to the show. Thank you invite me here so been surviving during this pandemic. We've been making lots shifts Founder should you know finding the opportunities and being candid and honest about what needs to change. And as emily it's been It's been terrific so we all know. When a founder isn't a lot of us are founders. What's a refunder. Well refound herships the same john as founders though is expressed in different ways so let founders visa visionaries they take a different approach But they're the turnaround artists. These men and women who reimagine existing but broken structures and aimed to improve them. So i like to think of them. In a way as very practical magicians taking the raw materials of the company a culture or even life and transforming them into something more meaningful so put more simply be founders used their magic to create something better from something broken and founders typically start and founders two to draw a parallel but a difference they really start with nothing a create something so refunders. Really take something that's broken and make it better so our refound. There's always someone from the outside or kenny founder. become a refunder or they can't because as they say you can't read the label when you're inside the jar. I absolutely believe that people can change. So i would say while it is not that typical that founders then become a founder. I say they are where when given the right stimulus whether it's a crisis Something with their business with their family. Something dramatic happens in other book point to the fact that he to change that they change in history shown that that absolutely can happen so give us give us some examples of history where outside persons coming been rebounder and actually found gold in something that perhaps the founder had given up on shirt yet. This is it's actually quite common. You know there's a. There's a life cycle for those enterprises. That are fortunate enough to grow passed. A few million dollars inevitably after a few years. Some form of entropy occurs and so whether it's the founder that gets them stimulus that recognizes something needs to change more likely somebody within the business typically visit trigger now as you know with small businesses Most of them don't crush that two three four five our they do the need for change. Change die becomes pretty critical and so virtually any business today. That is over. Ten million dollars in revenue has had to make some pivots that all would point to having founder in the business. Now that may be a middle manager. That's pointed out that the product line needs to change that could be a co founder Or it may be found as well. Yeah it's interesting because you see very few businesses. They're able to go from nothing to billions of dollars. I mean the michael dell's of the world. The bill gates the world's although bill gates had partners to typically the skills that you need to actually get something started are not the same skills to grow it past at least in my case past ten million dollars it also indicates that there are not a lot of one companies right and so while you know what what gets you to. The party isn't the thing that will necessarily keep you there. It speaks to the fact that you know you may be one trick Business and you may have one. Particular product speaks to an audience. But that doesn't necessarily create a real thriving. Enterprise that's just a product you know. It's it's interesting to me because what you're saying is the refounded necessarily a partner or owner in the business. It's just some kind of person that works with you. That's a catalyst absolutely so founder doesn't need to be an owner in the business. In fact when. I speak to college students or young professionals one of my encouragements to them is every employer wants this. Every employer may not provide a fertile ground for but once they once you share on these your founder characteristics. They want you there. You're gonna be the future of the business and there's go ahead. Yeah there's really four steps in so one could argue. There's four kinds of founders instead of behavioral models that are that are linked to this. But i think the easiest way to think about it is every founder follows four typical patterns in the first one is a refunder. Isn't afraid to take silver. Look at hard reality and when you think about those folks that are on the front lines and maybe do in hand to hand combat in sales part of that has to do with ignoring problems sometimes and ignoring the knows that you get to keep going another day and so that may not fit well with somebody who is focused and taking a sober look at a hard reality. And that's not. Take a shot at salespeople at all Salespeople are very important. i'm a salesperson. We all need to sell. We're going to be successful but that particular behavior taking a sober look at hard realities. Takes a very special kind of person in personality. The second step is identifying. What's broken and you think about that. In terms of your strength finders. The level of conscientiousness that takes imprecision to find what's actually broken. And then to to take a phrase from the book which is taken from william faulkner to kill your darlings because candidly most of us to have too many options and it's difficult to close doors and so if you can be wise enough to kill your darlings and selectively focus then you go to the third step of of being founder. And that's where you imagine a davis in bold new possibilities and even if those possibilities seem remote it just for a moment juxtaposed that with step one which is not being afraid to take a sober. Look hard realities those people in particular. Think about your conscious. Cfo or an accountant that may fit into that category than imagining audacious bold new possibilities. And so that's the third step and then the fourth is refunders spring to action and the key here is execution and so we all of her execution is key. But there's there's an important asterik here. And that is that they have to execute by creating better realities for people those in their communities in the world large because just executing to get it done that may work for a short period of time. But unless there's a just cause a real purpose that re founding effort walton fail in. I don't really want to sell short. How difficult this is really for. A founder because founders are used to doing it themselves right so have you found that founders may not want to refound your because they say i can do it. I can turn around or they don't wanna work with someone because they don't want to miss something's wrong absolutely image part of the human condition and so therefore it's just a reflection of the organizations institutions that we run whether they're not for profits for profits. So yes i mean i think this is part of the the human condition and and really i think the bigger question is how large of an impact do you wanna have. Do you want to have a comfortable life with a very small business. That teeters on the edge or do you want to run. The kind of enterprise that has global impact or create flourishing for hundreds of thousands of people. We're talking with patrick colletti. He's the author. A book called founder. I think it's difficult for a lot of founders. Patrick because there's so much ego tied up in their business that change is difficult. I'm running my next book. Is called change masters and how hard it is for people to actually change. Unless they're in incredible pain and they have no choice. I'd found that sometimes the best opportunities arise during a moment of crisis and it might be a giant burden on your heart broken relationship or just a corporate hot mess. But it's in those moments that i think you can trigger a great refounding

Patrick Colletti Michael Dell Emily Patrick Kenny Bill Gates John William Faulkner Davis Walton
"william faulkner" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:15 min | 9 months ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Up call handle on the news starts now. Yeah. Handle on the news. Handle the news. Use your common sis. Forget the blocks. Forget how you feel about me Hate me if you want to love me if you want, but just use your common sense Well Telling me back and now Here's Bill Handel, Friday morning, January 15th. Good morning, everybody Today we calm down a little bit today. It's not all politics today. There's a lot of other stuff going on. Finally, I mean, it will have plenty of politics specially next week. As we approach Joe Biden's inauguration. So let me say hello to the crowd, Jennifer. Good morning. How'd you sleep last night Horribly. Excellent. That's Ah, Yeah, Okay, That's good, Uh, us. I'm just curious. I'm just curious. Wayne. How'd you sleep? Fine. Okay. That's one for one or one for two. No. One for one. I lose count. Hey, 123. It's not my fault, Alex. Yes. Good morning. How'd you sleep? Considering I wake up in about one o'clock every morning. Not great. See, that's another one by everybody I know now is not sleeping worth a damn I sleep fine. I mean, you know, I take that you know, CBD, which I use on Duh. I eat Ambien like Skittles. Okay, John, I have a quick question. Yeah. What the hell are we talking about? Oh, no, I just came out. Yeah, I feel like I've been dropped right into the middle of a Christopher Nolan movie. Yeah, that's probably true. No idea. What is this? I don't know. I just came by just came up it stream of consciousness. William Faulkner. Okay. I mean, is there something you want to say about how you slept? I just fine, Okay? Yeah. John, You're not going to sleep for a very long time because you are now in morning with your annual Disneyland passes, which are being done away with Uh, kind of sort of, but anyway, so okay. Once I flipped to the other side of the pillow, okay? All right. So much for that. Do you sleep with that little dog of yours? That little rat? No, he actually stays in the site has his own comfy little bit. He'll hop up once in a while, but, you know, I don't know if you know John Hey, has this little thing It's It's basically a good sized rat. Named Double door. Ah, yeah. Okay, guys. We've got plenty. Why not ready to have what? We've got Plenty of news. We have plenty of things to talk about to tell you about and it's I'm updating it. We're doing that We're starting. That is a matter of fact. Because we go right to our fire maven. This is let's do it handle on the news, Jennifer Wayne and me and the Let's do Breaking Fire news. I.

John Hey Jennifer Wayne Joe Biden Bill Handel William Faulkner Christopher Nolan Alex
"william faulkner" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Okay you are a book reader yes what book are you currently reading at this time that's an anti can help you on this one yeah and the answer is here's the ball fastball in three and one well I'm I'm reading a William Faulkner book right now it's a little sort of academic but none of this this morning you have to apologize yeah my friend I I just read a book that a friend of mine wrote three one pitch is low ball for the giants have a base price for the first time and it's a leadoff walk in this storystream trading bases by Joe Peters San Francisco author there you go baseball book Wall Street book great Greenville those are the questions people want to hear yeah I do what's with the if you read a good one lately it's so good that I can actually think of the title right now awesome and there's your weekly book recommendations folks from drain caper them watching well good series here's taking a straight shot just one right down the middle it's on one the getting caught up on game of thrones yeah I'm I'm on top of that one it's the season three hello I'm almost caught up in these the guy leads away from first nobody out Kershaw will throw their any throws high student jumps up to take that rose almost went over his head Sunday night we we've got the five o'clock start here three hour game get home just in time for Sunday's game of thrones yeah the only one to scooter here's the pitch scooter it's a high fly ball left center field circling wildly in his locker who broke back into his left and then it became screening yeah that one was not hit very hard scooter retired and for god is still at first base run away Saturday Southland no that series ender Justin season on season three of son of all who's offering one grounded out to shortstop is first time I've had a good at bat though now another wild pick off throw this time Hairston literally leapfrog over forgot it was sliding back into first and lunges to his right and makes a backhanded catch that saved the ball from going down the right field line show may have to stop making pickoff throws James found his weakness here's a fastball up and away took him five years but they found one he cannot make an accurate pick off throw force throws to first it's James hammerhead of guys over there at first base against him to figure that out until now it's amazing how shop holds a spell over this J. Steve James have hit a lot of great pitchers.

giants Greenville Hairston James hammerhead J. Steve James William Faulkner Joe Peters San Francisco baseball
"william faulkner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In as for the author sound and fury damn mumbling Jon blank or at least you know the answer James Falk nerds no it's not James fox nerds I can't give it to you it's William William Faulkner I had a cocktail bar in Brooklyn called the Faulkner grown a yeah I know it had grown in the yeah this slouching towards Bethlehem and the year of magical thinking author always shells out the extra four blocks to upgrade from French fries to these deep fried circular appetizers Leah Joan duty onion rings yeah that's really a the Frito lay company is honoring the Nigerian author of americana and we should all be feminists with a limited edition run of this crunchy bright orange snack available in jalapeno flaming hot and original crunchy Leah is holding her head lance is just shaking his head at me it does we're looking for is Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie toes all right this is exciting this is very exciting this is your last clue wondering how this to kill a mockingbird author kept a tight well into her eighties finally a question elicits the response the answer she subsisted solely on microwaveable low calorie frozen dinners Leah I'm like embarrassed.

James Falk William William Faulkner Brooklyn Bethlehem Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Jon blank James fox Leah Joan Frito lay company
"william faulkner" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Seems like a dream state quite often people said people will say in this incredible yeah but I was never there and now let's sit back and I reflect on it how would the incredible miracle every day I truly miss the care to some websites sometimes I could just cry because never have a voice like that again welcome to speak whatever I feel my heart that's the one thing I'll always cherish about their character because if I say you won't believe it but when rocky said it was the truth yeah and a great writer William Faulkner one said all autobiographies fiction and all fiction his autobiography and I don't think there's been better ensure words spoken about writing and the written word we got the thanks of us just alone for that for offering that up to the public are you can go on you two been cat so much good stuff about the making of rocky but we thought we'd bring you it from Stallone's mouth himself and you could tell he stumbled on something he just knew we stumbled on it all goes back to watching that fight Chuck web near the bay own bleeder Muhammad Ali just saying Hey let's do it on a lark lets this give this guy shot nobody gave me a chance and he put the champ down I'll never forget that because I'm a Jersey kid rooting for this Jersey guy you just make it through around I mean people thought he wouldn't survive around and still won't have the sense to know what was going on there and frame a movie around that feeling that fought that idea that character.

rocky writer Stallone Muhammad Ali William Faulkner Chuck Jersey
David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

Oh No Ross and Carrie

12:54 min | 2 years ago

David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

"Very happy to have a David Mickelson if you don't recognize that name you will likely recognize the site that he created and runs it's called slopes slopes dot com and I think we all Oh David a great debt of gratitude thank you thank you for being here you're welcome thanks for having me for being on owner Rossen Kerry today's just Ross ended and our friend Spencer and Charles were here at Sei con twenty nine thousand nine you've been to either this conference before similar ones way back when the amazing meeting being used to go to I probably passed in the hallways and they had no idea that you were the one solving all of my online battles actually I used to go with a friend of mine who lived here in Vegas and we thought US kind of Bari Pie be more interesting to go to the other side and go to the UFO convention and the vicar convention what the true believer Oh you're talking my language well that's what I do with the other skeptical crowd rather than the Arthur's or what have you so maybe WanNa join us on a future investigation or something let's tell our audience a bit about slopes in case for some reason they don't know I don't know what working to hide under for the past twenty five years or how to have not heard of snow but you started in the year of the lion king that's how I see nineteen ninety-four IC- yet what got snow going what started this I wish I could claim I had the foresight twenty five years ago to recognize you know the Internet thing fake news going to be a big problem come the twenty first century so I'm going to get a head start on it but no Not really that visionary it was just kind of a hobby that got out of control I worked for a very large computer company so you're kind of hooked in the Internet before most people had heard of the Internet back in the old ninety ninety four that's the very early days people are on netscape navigator for in back in the the usenet newsgroup days and there were no blogs even at that point no search engines no youtube yeah yeah alter Vista Dog pile of the company that made Alta this over really is okay I'm letting people go back K. situate themselves were in nineteen ninety four the Big Bang theory episode whether the doing favorite nonexistent search engine if I'd been involved in newsgroups about urban legends Disney and when the first graphical browser came out from Wola SORTA started writing up little Disney related urban legends okay this is kind of fun because carry my co host her other podcasts is called hit Mickey's and she talks about the deep seedy underbelly of Disney and did very investigation of the rumors around Waltz head it turns out he actually was interested in cryogenics but he didn't have his head frozen or any part of him actually that was one of the first investigations we realtors going out to force lawn and actually photographing the burial site or at least the martyr they are for anyone who wasn't able to access the -Fornia or Glendale at least give them a vision of of his grave and kiddingly trying to round up people on the Internet Tawhid in Forest Lawn overnight off the spot exactly what was this is the deep kind of investigative digging that's nope isn't even before it snaps and so I talked about with you before you know it kind of like figuring out a way to get into club thirty three the big mystery because it wasn't only Internet I just sort of you know the the basketball court in the matter homer and all those sorts I have been in there all the the hidden supposedly hidden risque stuff in Disney movies that's really where snow started a house and then when I ran through all the Disney legends I could think of branched out into different categories and then my wife the time started chipping in intending it to be kind of like a Wikipedia for Urban Legend Yeah not with the wikki part of everyone editing of it just sort of this authoritative Encyclopedia Urban Legends that's why it was originally called the wheel the urban legends reference phages and urban reference or legend Urban Legends Reverend pages right earlier yeah that doesn't roll off the time that does not I'm going to work so hard not to go down the rabbit hole of wanting to talk about Disney civic stopped I worked for Disney to mention working for big companies and love that kind of history so we'll talk about it some other time other podcasts so quickly took a left turn because as we were just discussing this was way back before search engines even yacht who was hand compiled yet just in index directories of websites did you get on that index but notes all word of mouth really kind of quickly became this place where everybody emailed anything questionable they came across on the internet or even in the real world and so it was all dying children trying to collect the the largest number of business cards birthday cards at Christmas cards and lots of computer virus warnings many which were hoaxes and missing dialed appeals many of which were hoax is you know before they were kind of clearing houses for all that stuff right now that was and there was no wikipedia the time so so which came first kind of the website format or the name snow pts well I started using the name snowpacks way back in the pre webbed as okay or yeah once the origin of this term slopes is the name of a family of characters that appear throughout the works of William Faulkner I'll and that has absolutely nothing to do with anything other than just way back when I was familiar with falters work so I doc named my cats nope site had personalized plate that said snowpacks and so my college roommate's called me that and when I started posting on the old newsgroups on the Internet the Stott there's you know whatever twenty million David's out there who's going to remember David I need like uh-huh Dinette so using snow pts and it really just were doubt fortuitously now it's become a verb yeah it's kind of like is Amazon Gogol it's short it's catchy distinguishes us from competitors 'cause everybody else in our spaces fact something or something check or something and we're the ones who are not yet we did a similar thing at least with our podcast is called owner Rawson Kerry because there's no indication from the name itself what the podcast about so slopes itself at least has just become a household name so okay so it wasn't anything to do with snoops the character from the rescuers which is what what my crazy conspiracy believing cousin Catherine calls it she snoops we actually did once getting Anki irate email from someone who threatened to report us to the Faulkner Foundation or so really not realizing that there are a number of people the world who actually have the surname snow he invented it's not like we called ourselves Sherlock Holmes or something as soon as you settle with me those families then you can come after me that's funny it reminds me of I think goes Murray Gelman who named the quirk after a James Joyce Reference yeah three quirks for muster mark so he made that his new particle name anyway will you know what to step back even a little bit farther again let's say somebody at this point is still not familiar with slopes haven't been there what's the basic format so you come to snaps if you've heard an urban legend or someone shares a claim that could be true or false yes and they get to see synopsis telling them either it's true it's false it's mostly falls somewhere in between and then an explanation right yes about we're doing these days unfortunately as political that's what's consuming everyone in the era of fake news and Yeah and Post Truth and all of that as lawyer work is cut out for him yeah so you you know someone's forty you this screed about some company is funding you know genocide eight of gay people in some African country or just something that sounds really horrible are hard to believe or you know Nancy Pelosi is going to become vice president trump resigns or some vaccine question right and so then somebody just has to add on their online debate forum while the to do is go to another tab and just type in snoops and then that key phrase that company and they get a handy article they read it very quickly and then instead of them having to do a ton of re research and share it with their crazy cousin they just copy the link and say please go read this note article so early on how many of the articles were you writing was it all you are did you have writers from the beginning at the very beginning when it started it was just me road all the Disney stuff the first few categories as I said than my wife at the time Barbara started chipping in in writing but said we started this back in nineteen ninety four it wasn't until twenty years later Haute very recently relatively recently back to doing it on my own and one of hired a couple of contract writers and then as the twenty sixteen election proved to be the most contentious in US history roundup with more more writers or editors so maybe you can help me out is it true that the pope endorsed Donald Trump for president. it's not true yes not wanna Vatican City as yeah how how do you differentiate all of this language around fake news versus is hoax or parodies how do you kind of internally classify all these things well one is we we avoid the USA fake news really now just because it's been completely co opted practically meaningless us like urban legend used to be just a a synonym for false or anything that you neal's they don't lie leave just call it fake news and also news doesn't have to be fake to be Eh misleading like you can create a one hundred percent accurate article only tells one side of a story you know it's like imagine a criminal trial where the prosecution put on a case of just stop there and it went to the jury the lies by omission yeah it'd be highly misleading so fake doesn't cover it all so we're still kind of calling it junk news item apparently our president has moved onto corrupt news media yes we're not quite calling it that yet tell me a bit about your process first of all how does an idea become eligible force a bunch of people submitting forms online saying please is a settle this for me or is it something you take interest in now our topic selection methodology is we tackle whatever the most people are asking about her questioning at a given time we do that through a variety of metrics what people are emailing us what the searching for on our site what's trending on Google what people are posting on our facebook pages what's what's on the front page of read it kind of there's a whole lot of inputs that gets synthesized and we don't make any judgments about the stuff is too silly or CBS or unimportant rust cover you let the interest level Kinda dictate house exactly sometimes it's kind of distressing but people are interested in to the exclusion of things are actually more substantial or important subjects to a lot of criticism where people complain you were debunking obvious satire must be there's nothing obvious out there and if we're if we're writing about it it's a whole lot of people had ask about it because they didn't get it will

David Mickelson Rossen Kerry Ross Spencer Charles Twenty Five Years One Hundred Percent Twenty Years
"william faulkner" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Cars funded school textbook and father of Adrain. You must read another one on how to be a comedian. I shut about the drank cherries online. You know, I don't see what there is to became about Mr. Milo, and I don't like him manage crazy about you. I didn't ask to see you. I don't mind you don't like my manager. I don't myself put it bad, I grieve over the mall evenings. And I don't mind rich the drinking lunch out of a bottle. Don't waste your time. Trying to cross examine me people. Don't talk to me like that. That's the thing that I noticed right away. I took the opportunity of the re descript at us applied for us before I reward the film, and in the scripts when he first meets the insert what she's wearing a skirt in in his described in stage directions. He he looks at her legs. You know, she has he's beautiful eggs. Right. But in the movie, he's wearing pants. You do get that same of this good later on when the sitting in his office G what's the scratch a knee. And he goes described which is like that live will of intimacy in a cut of abstract way. Yeah. I have to say that the screenplay really stuck to the book. Pretty well. In a lot of cases. And again, those moments that we talk about what the dialogue. I mean. Of course, they changed it from you're not very tall from your very tall. Because Bogarde is a lot shorter than the six foot one that Marlo is supposed to be. But a lot of these lines. Like I was saying like how he goes home and grieves about as bad manners. That's pure Chandler. And they knew they were smart enough to keep those things in there. And when they don't have Chandler providing dialogue or providing it's interesting here. We don't have voiceover that. We talked a lot last week about the voice over Marlow. We don't have that though, we stick so close Humphrey Bogart that we are never apart from him, which is interesting. So it's almost like first person POV net quite like lady in the lake or anything. But we are there with him every single time those moments that they stray away from him. I mean, we do have the bracket and. William Faulkner in the driver's seat on this and them being held for vied dialogue as just fantastic stuff. I mean, like I said that prank phone call scene is one of my favorites. And that is not in the book at all. And that is a great moment of bonding between two characters because they don't really bond in the book. This whole idea of them falling in love that doesn't happen in the book. There's none of that stuff. There's like a moment where they might kinda get together. But it's more Vivian manipulating Marlow than it is, and sort of genuine feeling and with this feels like it might be genuine thing at the end of the film, a lovely of a number of novels in a seen a number of these. She did Rio. Bravo, most other things withholds when having a female viewpoint is benefits, the film and having somebody who's said, granite pulp rotting the way Lee brecca was a puff from his screenplay would strengthen sings coast. She led Roman too. Have a career low with body, presto was movie, but a puff from that? She thought tested..

Humphrey Bogart Marlow Chandler Mr. Milo Adrain Marlo Bravo William Faulkner Bogarde Lee brecca Rio six foot
"william faulkner" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Right. But you gotta watch counseling video before you can open the file, and I don't have an EMMY to do it the distance. Hey, this is not a predetermined thing. Don't get hung up by have this is something to watch out for. And I don't even wanna know. I wanted to all be surprised. So why twenty three and me aren't there? Like a bunch of those services. I gaze one cent. Right. A kit. There's one more credible than the other Dono donating. It wouldn't have the thing. You're going to die from like. I mean, everyone's got looking at the same things, right? Yeah. What they've I don't know. I gotta look they might find something out. No, they don't do like medical tests. So I can't bring my it. Yanni? Are you cool on scroll brains, not not feeling interest? Not really put your mic up your top guy wrote in. We're talking about whether Missouri is in the south. And I'm saying I keep talking about this has anyone here familiar with the with the the thing that was written some years ago called equine gothic. And it has to do with. That's very difficult like scholars of the American South who discussed southern literature have often had a very difficult time defining. What is southern literature? What does the litter the litter the literature of the American South, and why are some writers from the south not considered southern writers like Truman Capote from the deep born in the deep south, but is not regarded as a southern writer, his work, isn't regarded southern literature. But then you look at someone like William Faulkner, obviously southern writer, Larry Brown, obviously, a southern writer, and the scholar did this thing called equine gothic, and he found that the real test isn't like is the person from the south do they have a masculine voice. Do they identify with southern issues?.

writer Yanni EMMY Truman Capote Dono William Faulkner Larry Brown Missouri
"william faulkner" Discussed on In The Draft Show - NASCAR Talk

In The Draft Show - NASCAR Talk

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on In The Draft Show - NASCAR Talk

"I have a story for you after the show and i cannot tell it on the air okay all right well we'll get rid of this folks we're gonna go just sit by the bay this think about wilson religious kenyan only right folks if only four wilson i'm was daycare self and someone else it's been in the draft with wilson was this day in history yes this day in eighteen fifty eight miss minnesota became the thirty second state no really how about that right next to you right next to literally like five minutes i can cross the border i'm in minnesota william faulkner of collections of short stories called go down moses publishing nineteen forty two member of that happen i i was there nineteen ninetyseven deep blue the chess playing supercomputer beat gary casper off oh really in a rematch of that's definitely definitely you were you had a soda in your hand i had a big sign and i was yelling as loud as i could and then the out you're like deep blue who deep blue and that's how it is and also of course in this day nineteen twelve data became the emperor of the byzantine empire wow and then he events at the telephone and then hopefully because he invent the telephone and telecommunications got so big comcast will be part of the nascar yeah please we'll see next week everybody enjoy hans ass by thanks for listening to in the drop with wilson laws.

wilson minnesota william faulkner moses gary casper nascar thirty second five minutes
"william faulkner" Discussed on Start the Week

Start the Week

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on Start the Week

"Why i i keep returning again and again to as i lay dying with really important to me and yes william faulkner and i thought that it might be interesting to maybe right my own version of the southern road trip except you set in the modern south and of course with characters of african descent you edisons an unfolded you call the fi it's time which was a collection of essays about africanamerican experience and you question james bolden in this past contains for all its horror something very beautiful people who cannot suffer can never grow up can never discover who they are this book is full of horrors you but you think there is a venue to today's horace de you you sign up to that the as a beauty it's a very tough quote that isn't it i mean it is that is very tough tough quote but i am in my experience you know as a as a person of african descent who you know grew up in the american south in who still lives in the american south you know i feel like i feel like my life has continuously shown me that that that there is beauty and that there is joy in the you know that we find i think hope and strength in each other you know in our communities in in our families in i think the legacy of that history you know that that that is a testament to our survival it's interesting that they're very loving family relationships in your the role as you just alluded to very very dysfunctional one might almost say the three child nar narrates because linney who is the mother of one of the other the writers is not really grown up tool is she she's northern adult she hasn't been able to cheat that now unfortunately my theory is.

william faulkner james bolden linney
"william faulkner" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on Kickass News

"That's bullshit you can't film it all you can do is a guy comes in the door so a lot of people make a lot of money writing that garbage and putting it in two of film script but i figure all that you can all you can put in a film script that's usable is what the people said and the cameras looking at and so if you're even write something like the day dawned reluctantly right that's kind of a writer lee thing to say but how the fuck and you shoot it yeah yeah the audience is never going to be able to appreciate that yeah so the problem is most of the problem is such a turnover in the movie industry always has been because nobody knows what they're doing so people come and they spend their time legitimately backbiting each other between each other and trying to hold onto the the slippery rock they have no idea what they're doing they're but they're going to do whatever they can to stay just like you and i would but so if you're not there for a long time and you don't know what a screenplay is and that you can't make the connection between here's what the screenplay isn't here's what the movie is here's what the movie did you're more apt to be suckered into buying a pig in a poke of a screenplay that right the is you know it sounds like it was written by by by william faulkner with the description of the weeping willow vines you know and the sweat the sweat steaming off of the carter because that's going to create a feeling in you just not a screenplay.

william faulkner carter writer lee
"william faulkner" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

"Police in those people as it was the best bands in a world that's going to be a blast it was a big reason also my brother was on the team at the time that'll hi i went two games i used to go down there all the time so i was familiar with it and i i was one i had to go to a place that had major power five football i couldn't go to school like i thought about maybe like b you or schools like that but i said i need that football every saturday in the fall to be able to go out at eddie right there good one i was making my led one what are your favorite activities money would you go so you could go to and october 20th big ten game a ball game in like late june in wrigley on a sunny day you could go to see a show and as i this is not a useful conversation i have drawn out the parameters she i will just i'll i know where you're going with it i will try laham all as someone who has been very fortunate to work in sports and go to so many different types of been covered the nba finals when i worked with the lakers i've been to world series game saive if you want to do the checklists thing guide trip the naira one thing i would tell you to do is go to an sec game go to a different location every year i've been the georgia in athens i've been to oxford i've been to tuscan liu said they are awesome awesome place lovesey gains i mean i shouldn't we do that let's all get our uh our resources together make sure we do one every year i'd love the died last night i hear you guys l lsu mad at valley is unreal baton rouge is crazy i hear that's a different experience the what the number one for me and and look at all depends right we as oxford people magistate my easel say that because the the the girls at the school where castilian dresses all the sorority girls and all the guys all the boys wear a william faulkner like outfits that khakis with the blue blazers in a red tie and uh i don't they're all drink in and party and i'm like.

eddie wrigley lakers georgia william faulkner football nba
"william faulkner" Discussed on Pop Culture Continuum

Pop Culture Continuum

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on Pop Culture Continuum

"The kheirkhah cure of him came from this movie yes sure here he's like a snivelling little toad a healthy yeah on the character usually involves a big a big fat guys his counterpart also please falcon yeah uh i see here it was cited by panorama do filmnoir america as the first major film lara which yeah probably so forty one that's pretty early um and the big sleep uh based on the other great more mystery writer of the time a little later actually but a reema chandler's book this one directed by howard hawks uh written by william faulkner the screenplay and with bogey and bakol and it is what do you need to know raymond chandler i mean yeah either get battery though so uh yeah two more noirs this really was like the best age for or i guess um i might one of these movies might come up in my list later in one of these movies just missed might list so they are both awesome uh all right what do you got for number four number four another thai mrs a tie that doesn't make sense accept the fact that it's say the same director emily director who's pretty much the opposite of capper as as in his personal life uh philip his story medicare grant and guess late guess landslide i almost picked i but yet didn't quite make it it's a wonderful way dark movie but i i think it's also on my list because it's become a gay the the idea the film has become like a cultural yeah phrased i i think that's interesting and it's nice to see it's nice to see the movie wear came from ingrid bergman again i think she's been in a few my moves and and of course angel ansberry where it's just amazing how long she's been around yeah her and as the made of straw if you story that as the lead with with the talk the accent you hat yeah and guess like 94 and 44 and phillipi stories a asleep that is.

america lara writer howard hawks william faulkner raymond chandler director ingrid bergman emily
"william faulkner" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"For all attention was like i can't use that word because i use that word to paragraphs ago and seven had find a different word said that not repeating myself those are the challenges that he's done faces a sri matter and i think with as as the novelists who'd gonna find that right balance you now you've got to keep the the narrative moving or the suspension the tension of it so so you just can't go off too deeply into description always least depending on what you're writing it's a it's a tough balance to strike sometimes and and i do think that the white writing strips is good for now us uh i think a lot of novelists novelist several have a tough time moving the action forward and you know by writing a script you're just you're just naturally more focused on on keeping the story moving instead of going to me because novels in some ways that don't have any boundaries so you could go into backstory for fifty four hundred pages and some people some writers like william faulkner have been successful in that but but most of the time you're not contributing to the suspense intention of the ford movie narrative the great i thought would wrap up this possession of your book by talking about envy because you do a nice job describing it it you have a quote here envy is like drinking poison in waiting for the other person's to die and so is looking up online to see who the person wants he said that and it turns out that you could find base lets him quote with almost every other negative word stuck into the word of the place of envy sailed a grudge or revenge basically any negative motion is terrific that drinking poison but it's really kind of what it feels like i i remember early in my career being really envious of david batty off identing noaman is a great guy so either there's ridiculous for me to be envious of him and i also do wonder if.

william faulkner david batty identing noaman
"william faulkner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yes oh yes oh yes drought was the humbling in inevitable two humbling that was a seventy wound and i even had carried in and barbara her she came to stay with me for a while near two dogs and unloved cardi north of guilty look at kardinia in the carding finley they're great american actors and what look what i'm doing how to wicket in this position and to do this but i mean there was nobody really there with me jenny was there but i can't say that she understood and i certainly didn't understood but i am i didn't know that i didn't yet have the right to create i thought that i could and and so i had to pay for an act to find out that there are boundaries and i'm fine with it i paid for it but then you went on in night altman well then altman the air robber robert altman he but for at first no i'm just a guy a union man who's uh looking for a to continue to make that make a living with my family and uh and so peter bogdanovich we thought was going to direct along by and a david picker was running an ictr artists and he was like friendly with me like a friend and so i went to see him looking for a job and he gave me the script of the longer by that was written by lee bracket who had collaborated with william faulkner on a every bogart's uh uh the big sleep through again i read it in its oldfashioned and and they will say he called it a prestige i like candy in august east like chuckles and dotson stuff that would be pass these to me there and so uh.

robert altman david picker william faulkner bogart peter bogdanovich lee dotson
"william faulkner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yes oh yes oh yes drought was the humbling in inevitable two humbling that was a seventy wound and i even had carried in and barbara her she came to stay with me for a while near two dogs and unloved cardi north of guilty look at kardinia in the carding finley they're great american actors and what look what i'm doing how to wicket in this position and to do this but i mean there was nobody really there with me jenny was there but i can't say that she understood and i certainly didn't understood but i am i didn't know that i didn't yet have the right to create i thought that i could and and so i had to pay for an act to find out that there are boundaries and i'm fine with it i paid for it but then you went on in night altman well then altman the air robber robert altman he but for at first no i'm just a guy a union man who's uh looking for a to continue to make that make a living with my family and uh and so peter bogdanovich we thought was going to direct along by and a david picker was running an ictr artists and he was like friendly with me like a friend and so i went to see him looking for a job and he gave me the script of the longer by that was written by lee bracket who had collaborated with william faulkner on a every bogart's uh uh the big sleep through again i read it in its oldfashioned and and they will say he called it a prestige i like candy in august east like chuckles and dotson stuff that would be pass these to me there and so uh.

robert altman david picker william faulkner bogart peter bogdanovich lee dotson
"william faulkner" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Well i think that in the late nineteen th century the confederal generals had this incredible mystique um even though as you as we know they they lost they came to symbolize kind of character and and the old fashioned virtue uh that uh people admired uh and i think the college coaches today this really successful oneself some of that same the mystique um they symbolize success on the national stage uh um and they're kind of delete they reflect though the contemporary south gatesentry was a very different timing the nurtured confederate memory to fit contemporary south is a a place of of uh businessorientated business success we admire business people is this kind of the icons of of uh uh uh uh our culture the old agrarian south simply isn't any anymore you know bear brive would not fit well and today is a kind of cultural symbol the way he did that is it is time moves in for that older south into the newer south now you know w we admire ceos and business executives they can bring jobs and and um and symbolize that that fact that the south can't compete now not only nationally done on a global scale is as well um the generals uh lost but the coaches win and that's why they're so successful i think in so um um such central figures in our culture today and if you're people who read the article you knew differently uh discovered today something that uh maybe they didn't know or had never thought about that uh one of william faulkner's.

gatesentry william faulkner
"william faulkner" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Uh there's so much to talk about on the on this campus but will also lay that for later on another show but i i am curious owes because of having been there recently um having been such a and being such a fan of that community uh in terms of the richness and not only of the past but in in literature with of course william faulkner's home being there something that you've obviously studied in written about to give us a before we get to deepen to the world of of college football just shearer up you're a little bit on on on what led you to this field and and and just how it intersects with society every day in in this part of the country well i could pay now part of a middle tennessee parents on both sides your from no towns north nashville tobaccogrowing country and uh so identified replenish see football like my dad did grow while the ten i moved to west texas any really grew up in all patched over it came back every summer with grandparents and um when i went to graduate school for university of texas have realized that the south uh southern culture was the fascinating thing to study i mean i'm a historian sosa confer a break subject but it was also personal interest to me um and so uh it became not in my career decrepit decipher what laid the south what it was what it has dan and how it's changed also have always been interested in that issue sort of continuity using changes in the contemporary shop.

william faulkner football dan tennessee west texas university of texas sosa
"william faulkner" Discussed on Bobbycast

Bobbycast

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"william faulkner" Discussed on Bobbycast

"At the same time that they have a voice and if someone as a voice like your inner voice and you're like me and they actually speak nia they they they seek i speak right lethal have have their well use me yeah i think so i mean mean he has three children i have three children the the way i really got connected them was was through grohmann dough proud that was the first song he had and then he invited me to come out to california when he was doing the movie flicker because they needed and entitled for the movie and saw went out there and it's been a couple of nights on set with him and met billy bob thornton it was amazing experience but just trying to soak up sights and sounds of that movie and so you know yeah well there is certainly commonalities too his live out would probably some ways the way we look at life in thinker similar this one here selling land big one young girl well i love i love the south on my daughter regime ally for went ole miss ease us more time it off an active in mississippi oxford has his amazing which to were books walk ins where books in it's got a great poster that says you know uh southerners we may not know how to uh talk what we sure know how to write and they had pictures of your door welti and near robert pin warn william faulkner and flannery o'connor in i decide started thinking about the distinctive way that southerners think talk and the way that we look at the world and it really is is very different than other parts of the country and just kind of what a southern voice is in so my friend bob bureau's from minnows not is from ohio but he yet.

oxford robert pin william faulkner bob bureau ohio california billy bob thornton mississippi flannery o'connor