18 Burst results for "William C Moyers"

"william c moyers" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:58 min | 5 d ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"Betty ford foundation. I'm your host william c moyer's welcome. Thanks for joining us. Our topic today overcoming addiction in a time of racism. Our guest peter hayden. I've known peterson's i. I went to work at hazel in one thousand nine hundred six. And everyone said william you need to meet and you need to listen to what peter hayden has to say. And i think it's fair to say that. I've been listening ever since but not just listening but learning and along the way admiring what peter has done for people in recovery particularly people of color. He is the founder. The president and the ceo of turning point based in minnesota. Peter welcome and thank you for joining us today. We see maurier's our you. I'm going okay. Thanks tell me. Peter nineteen seventy-three. Why does that year resonate with you. As time i changed my life. I was just a quick story. I love the friend's house. We have been doing cocaine driving home. I ran into a car in front of the police station. I'm sure y'all god works. I ran the car in front of the police station. Felicia came out. they saw. I was drunk. And he took me inside of their building from there I have been sober. Every since i went to a place called metro treatment center For res forensic psychologists told me said you know if you follow this program your life will never be the same and william. My life has never been the same. What was it like growing up in the one thousand nine hundred sixty s as a african american man in the twin cities and as somebody who was addicted who presumably was running along a narrow path. At that time it was interesting. Because i'm originally from kansas city missouri. And at the time. I was going to school. Schools were named after black people. It was around the time of topeka versus the board of education. So i knew my history. I went to a school called Wwe it's my friend. Went to school called banner ker so all these schools were named after people. Who looked like me. When i came here to minnesota There were a grants and lincoln's. And all these people who i knew nothing about And it was interesting that the environment in which you come up in Makes your life different and so just thought that black people lived over north minneapolis and you were tad down there. You didn't go downtown. And i'm talking about minnesota and it sounds like i'm talking about mississippi but in the sixties that's what it was and i graduated from de la salle military academy in kansas city and come here and see some difference. Things happening that. I just didn't understand. What did you become aware of first racism in your life or substances and their impact in your life understood. Racism i because i come from a racist area. Missouri from saint louis is missouri. If you're from. Kansas city is more resume three you know and i understood all that and but nothing stopped me from getting a good education going forward. When i came here it was silent. It creeped up.

peter hayden Betty ford foundation william c moyer Peter nineteen metro treatment center For res minnesota william maurier peterson turning point Felicia peter kansas city Peter north minneapolis topeka missouri board of education de la salle military academy lincoln
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

07:34 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"I could not square power of of god's will god's power with the fact east six people standing underneath one of twenty million trees in the national forest were struck down by on acts of god. I didn't fly for me. So i went from blind faith to know face between the time i was twelve years old and i began my journey and recovery in one thousand nine hundred nine and and and and even then when i was relapsing i was in an hour in and out between eighty nine and ninety four i. I kept saying why are come on man. Why can't i get it. What i learned was that for me. It wasn't about believing in god. It wasn't about believing it got belief is important but from me. This hard headed alcoholic. Who tried to live a perfect life for me. It wasn't about believing in god. It was about trusting god. God could do for me. What i could not do for myself so my fundamental fair when i was at my bottom knocked over the twelve of nineteen ninety four and finally that day. I hope finally found my recovery. I said okay. God i'm done have me and i didn't have moved way. I want you to do it the way i expect have me. I am compliant. i am plato. Do with me whatever you are going to do with me so that i can gain my recovery before i kill myself and it worked so we all have our beliefs. We all have our expectations. We all have our needs The key is to mold them to fit. What works for us. We make that jury a beautiful beautiful idea. I mean that that incident that you just talked about. I mean that that could be very solid justification for. There's there's no such thing as god and there's a lot of things like that those things used to be my certainly be my arguments against any kind of higher power you know. I mean i knew a guy who is a cop who Was adamant that there was. He was adamant atheist and he cited very specific things that he saw in his police career. That were sewer heuristic. I mean absolutely. There can't be god if this you know and in those moments there is none my opinion. i just think when there is none in that particular situation possibly and so i can make an argument for or against so that being said that means. There's a choice. If i can make an argument for it or against. It doesn't exist without dark. The concepts don't can't work without the other one so i kind of look at the. There's a duality to the universe. In that way there's love and hate there's kindness and cruelty you know. There's horror and ecstasy. I mean there's all that stuff. It's a full pallet. So what am. I going to focus on if they both exist. I don't think one can. I don't think you can exclude the other side or deny it. I think there And i i don't i just don't want to. I want to move away from embracing that and focusing on the darker side to choosing choosing what what again what works and That's kind of what we're i've landed as far as that. You know people say well do you believe in god. I got most of the time not always. I can't say that i do. They be underneath underneath underneath. 'cause i 'cause i exist so and life energy than yes but certainly you know mentally no no. I can't say that. I heard somebody say one time that as relates to what we're talking about. Religion is a destination of the mind and spirituality is journey of the heart and the point is is that i do believe him. I don't like that in is a journey. And that's why people have the spiritual awakening and they're sort of like okay had the spiritual aching. I guess it's all done now. No you really only just beginning. I mean the hard work is comes afterwards and by the way in my journey recovery just like everybody else. I've had a lot of is and how lows i think is. The hardest thing in the world has hit bottom with this with addiction and now that was easy. Why because i never felt i was under the influence. When i've discovered it's harder hit bottom sober at because you feel it and i have felt a lot of pain in my sobriety pain that i don't think it's very fair or some of some of its was self inflicted But it's been painful. Because i've been sober and when those things happen to me as they do i don't say why did you let that happen. When i do is to just know that this is one other teachable moments. You wanna Do a little plug for how people can get a hold of you or hazelton or what. What what the next step would be if someone's out there struggling and you want to find out a little more. You're going to tell us. Yeah well first thing. I want to say that people who are going to be watching some of whom are going to be celebrating years of decades of recovering some of who are struggling in this moment trying to understand what is all about whether it's attainable is. Don't give up. Hope there is always hope. Don't let yourself or your loved one hit bottom because the only bottom it's is you'll notice death anything. Sure that is a way out so reaching out for hope for hope and help. I'm easy to reach. I work for an organization as i said hazelton. Betty ford my email addresses w. moyer's mo y. e. r. s. w. warriors at hazelden. Betty ford dot org the best way to find ways to go. Look william seem warriors on face while can send me a message But i can be reached at healing. I'm on the internet. I'm on your program And and and i can help you I'd say probably half the people that reach out to me for help. Coming to a hazel in bay for sylvie together half i make sure get whatever's clinically financially appropriate whether that's a summation army or local treatment center. I help people. Because when i help people as you know bob it helps us right so there is hope. Hang in there. I appreciate you giving me the opportunity to be part of this. This conversation. Thank you so much. I really appreciate your time and certainly the the wonderful work you've been doing for so long so have a wonderful day. Thank you so much. Thank you god. Bless take care. Thank you folks for listening to the exploding human. Please visit the website. The exploding human dot com and you can also listen to the show on youtube. The exploding human with bob nick mun and the exploding human facebook page once again. Big thanks to williams seymour's and his message that he carries and has been carrying across the nation for the last twenty five years. You guys have a wonderful day. Thanks for listening..

national forest plato Betty ford hazelton hazelden moyer sylvie william bob bob nick mun williams seymour youtube facebook
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

08:18 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"Or after living behind the gates of a of a exclusive community in malibu i i. I'm william seymour. Public advocate as one betty ford with an with a phone number listed in the phone book on the internet. And you know. I'm accessible and that's what so many people are looking for is somebody who's been there and done that. And if i don't share my story not just addiction piece but the recovery piece of i don't share that then people are going to see me. What what. I am in which you said somebody who's been there done that in recovered and can help other people and it's incredible. How many people struggle with an isolation to your point in the loneliness with this disease and don't know what to do about it you know if they get arrested they might get a away out by then. It's too late out. If they fall down the stairs from their leg maybe their doctor will recognize have in addition to a broken leg. he's treating there also have alcoholism. But if we don't share our stories in podcasts. Like yours or as i said in other ways i've done over the decades then nobody's going to know and how are they gonna get help more thing. I want to tell you that you mail this to. Which is the single. Most important word. I think and in the twelfth step pathway to recovery the first word we because addiction isn't elvis of 'isolation and the antidote to. It is exactly what you said community. It's why when a ship sinks the survivors. Don't swim away from each other. They swim to each other And the same is true for those of us who ship sank thanks because of addiction and when we suddenly pop to the surface that we realized survived that bottom then we swim to each other and we hold on. You know i was looking Reading through the twelve steps And counting how many times it says we our us and it's something like twenty six times in twelve steps. There's no i at all it's all and it's it's a lot it's you know it's just it's amazing that the emphasis on the group community connection piece is is the underpinning my opinion the underpinning. It's me and you talking about what the truth is for us and and feeling safe to do it so true. That's what i believe to. And the other part to it as we know it he's four there their many pathways to recovery twelve steps is a good one helps millions of people but there are other pathways to yoga church. Other group experiences appoint is that. They're all experienced. That happened with other people. I don't know too many people who are able or capable recovering all by themselves. I suppose as says power to them but the that group experienced that that community of connection key. Also it's more fun. It's hard like getting a you know a laughing jag when you're by yourself it's just not as it's not as easy 'cause you know that peace let's can we talk about that piece for a second the idea of being able to laugh at yourself Even about the dark stuff. That's in the past how important that is to healing. 'cause for me that. Is you know such an attraction to me to be around a group of people who've come out of something so horrendous and billeting and now they're they're laughing greatest feeling in the world. We're fortunate that we can laugh because we made it. You know. I think of all the people who can't lack of either dead what they've lost a family member to the illness or Or they're still locked in the throes of addiction. There is nothing. I there was a time when i thought i was having fun when i was under the influence looking back on it all these decades later i realized it was a whole lot of fun there at all really been moments where i thought fun fun. I've had over the years the satisfaction that ipad from my recovery. Not anything that happened to me when i was under the influence And being able to share that whether it's an a recovery group in downtown. la. Or whether it's on the beach in malibu or whether it's to salve -ation army in downtown saint to share that with other people just multiplies by the number of people in the room. The the goodness of it the joy of it the fun of and salvia right being with each other critical again. I'm on the side of what works. Do it and man. It's as simple as it gets eight. It is and and and that's why That's the other thing too. The beauty of the twelve steps. I think is that nobody does exactly the same way as anybody else. There's there's remember what they say. Take what you need leave. The resolution reason for man's because the step stick to us differently based on any number of external internal factors And so that's why. I say to people who might be struggling to find a pathway to recovery out if you don't like him going and you know maybe veteran you'll find the dynamic that works for you That might include some aspect of the twelve steps might include other things to stick with it. That's that's the question. I asked myself about almost everything including does this belief system. I have about something worker. Not work you know. And that was one of the things i have to say when i got sober was the elimination of the belief system that i had moving through the world systems. The characters i was playing is survival tools to You know to get by. They'll i went. Oh that's really not working anymore. You know like for example being a cool guy that that's exhausting and it didn't work. But i thought that's okay. Well i have to do that in order to fit in. You know. I'm gonna be this type of guy or even the character of the misunderstood guy. Oh poor me Misunderstood nobody gets me that worked for me as a survival tool and those Those character traits that i manufactured for myself as survival tool having to smash those by realizing they didn't work. You know this isn't working anymore. was a huge revelation to me where i went. Oh my god. I pride myself on being the most one of the most honest people. No bullshit guys. You know i was a standup comic. I'm supposed to cut through societies bullshit on the safety valve offers. I'm the truth. Tell and all the sudden. I'm going like i'm not really that honest about myself. That was a kind of a brutal awakening for me for me on that struggle that i had had a lot of struggles but the one for me that really required me to have a wholesale change in my belief system was in. I have the role of my higher power in in my life. I as a seven on the side of a southern baptist minister i grew up with a fundamental understanding of power graded myself gio d. I call it with a capital g. And and that's how i was until i was. I believe untraditional. I wasn't i guess you could say i have blind faith. I just believe unconditionally. But i was twelve years old adage tragic experience in my life. I wrote about in my memoir broken. Which was i witnessed the death of six people who are sending tree. They got struck by lightning in the middle of a national forest. And i could not..

william seymour malibu betty ford ation army la
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

07:58 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"Like come on also did the a lot of people. A lot of people were our age will remember back in nineteen eighty seven eighty eight. He did a series of joseph campbell. Joe campbell and the power myth and joe camel mythologised. Who influenced George lucas and steven spielberg among others. And i data interview and it was before right for doak campbell. Died and joe campbell. Had that famous saying follow your bliss and and that series resonated with a lot of people. That's the point. I mean and here's the other thing i use my own story in my public advocacy. And he's on bay because we are committed to smashing the stigma. You and i are smashing a stigma in this conversation. Why because we're sharing our experiences in the public arena the public arena being your podcast and your audience. And i think it's an i. I haven't shied away from sharp by store. Because so many people in the public and in the media and in policy circles in congress and state legislatures they think that addicts not halt through some of the collar that they live under bridges. That's are not educated that they're bricklayers. They come from broken homes. Well i'm a prime example. I have a hunch your prime example two of the fact that you can be raised in a good environment and still have this and still have this. You know it's yeah it doesn't you know it's kind of like it's a disease doesn't care who it affects. It's some it's like. They took whoever they are took a big a bunch of alcohol. Alcoholism drug addiction dust through it up in the air and it just lands where it lands and it doesn't care where it lands it just lands in certain on people and you know i have to say that i think betty ford herself was a huge influence on getting people to see that it was. There is not a there. Should not be a stigma attached that this can happen in any family and it usually does every family's got somebody. She had the bully pulpit of being former first lady and be married to the united states as she talked about her breast cancer. And that was also another illness in the sixties and seventies or up until the sixties and seventies and had a loss stigma and misunderstanding about it and of course mrs ford used her own story to talk about her dependency on pain pills and alcohol She was probably. I don't want to save the. I would perhaps the most prominent non hollywood type who is willing to stand up and speak out and share both the power of addiction and promise and possibly recovery in fact In fact she came to hazel and here in minnesota. I live in saint paul worm joining from today. She came to minnesota in one thousand nine hundred two to learn how it was that we did this thing call treatment at hazel and we were started in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. Mrs ford found a recovery through the the naval hospital in california and and begin to go to meetings and so on and she wants to open a treatment center. She can't she came here and here in minnesota and visit with us and learn. The ropes initially went back to palm springs and started ford center. Never did we imagine that they would come twenty fourteen. The two organizations would merge into one so mrs was. She's actually an inspiration. The i got to be with her and president ford in colorado in the late ninety freezing tasty in front of them. Small group of their influential donors and advocates. Mrs fortson. demy something that she pulled me aside they split you know when the real reason was tell our stories. Yes we wanna smash stigma but the real reason that we tell our stories is to help other people young and i thought yeah you're right that's exactly what we do. And that's why. I'm very public about my own story of an had been and it helps have the cachet of a last name. It's recognizable some people into compton back on a come from what i never imagined in sharing my story we'd be the sheer number of people that reach out and ask for help. I get four or five requests for help a day. Three hundred sixty days of the year and to come to me by telephone or by a snail mail letter or somebody shop front porch here at my house saint paul today. I get it through the internet facebook messages. I get scores a facebook messages from people. Who say can you help me. And why do they reach out to me. Because i'm doing what i'm doing right here with you. I'm sharing my experience. You know i'm being open about. This is the face of that alcohol. Here's how treatment can work and this is what recovery looks like. you know. it's i always say you know i. I found a way out of that life. And i was like. There's a way out. I i mean. I was very surprised that there was a way out. I one. I didn't know what i had in the ones i found what i had. Then i found out there were people that found a way out. And i'm like oh where are they. Let's go. Let's let's see if i can relate to it in any way and i did. Well there's the irony bomb you just nailed it man. We never worried about our anonymity using substance is true. So what happens to us when we find recovery for those of us who finds twisted. Suddenly we become an ominous. And i understand the issue of anonymity believe me. Bill wilson was brilliant when it came to wyan an entity mattered and anonymity has helped the spiritual foundation of anonymity has how loud alcoholics anonymous to survive since nineteen thirty five but it has the anonymity issue and the way people confuse it with public advocacy has kept us in the closet so to speak Because when we get well we disappear as the ad in the alcohol that we used to be and people say oh. Look at. Look at william there. He's better now must be going to church. They must've poem so up by bootstraps there. Or maybe he got in trouble. Well that might be a little bit of it but the fact that matters we got well because we got access to treatment but more importantly we got access to a recovery program at tends to work for lots of people and and yet we stop sharing the news outside the rooms. And i and i understand it india. And i'm i do my very best never to talk in public about my participation in any recovery program. All i do in public words have rotary meeting whether fun president. Mrs ford and air group. Whether it's on oprah or on larry king or in my book so whatever it is i try to. I try to honor the spirit of anonymity but still share with people. The fact that addiction is a disease. That doesn't discriminate. Treatment can work and recovery is possible and this is what it looks like. That's an that's an important message. You're so many people struggling in the other piece of it. You know it is that. I've i've heard this quite a bit but other people haven't that the opposite of addiction is connection and i always liked that because this that one you know we can't do it alone and two when you connect with another person on a very spiritual level or soul level or human level. That's where healing can begin. That's where the lights come on and possibilities happen so putting a message out there like that is allowing for connection if people are contacting you. It's because they feel safe to contact you you've connected with them. I'm also easy to find. You know i work at hazelton betty ford. I'm not an athlete.

Joe campbell doak campbell joe campbell Mrs ford mrs ford minnesota joe camel joseph campbell Mrs fortson demy George lucas steven spielberg betty ford ford naval hospital saint paul hazel congress breast cancer palm springs
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

07:39 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"Were saying. I'm going to get back to your story a little bit. You were saying perfection was was an issue for you. Yes i talk about that because that's really interesting to me because it's a belief system that was in there that doesn't work obviously because nobody's perfect but still i have a little bit of that myself so i get that one. I wouldn't be surprised if most of your listeners viewers have had that in some aspect. Just because you struggled with perfectionism doesn't mean you become an actor alcoholic which is why. I say that. I've got two things going on with me as it relates to the dynamics of my illness one is i have a boner ability to substances my brain's just genetically different darn it in all. I didn't ask for it and it's not my fault but it helps to explain. Why a person like me can do the exact opposite of all those things. I know i shouldn't do all the way. I was raised on all those things. So i got a brain. That's vulnerable to subsidies and when i medicate myself it turned on a light switch in my brain which i always say i cannot turn off of my own free will again. It doesn't excuse the things i did under the influence but it explains it. So that's one component of maleness to the profession is that i say i have a hole in my soul and i if i were standing up well off set up. I have a hole in my soul. It's right here underneath my ribcage. And my whole in the soul bob. If aches with a sense of imperfection it aches with the sense. That i'm not good enough or i need to be better than again. Back to the analogy in a big book causes me to be restless irritable and discontent as it relates to my place in life. You know how hard it is to be perfect right. it's impossible why customers human beings there is nobody who's perfect but growing up. I didn't ever feel like i was good enough. I felt like i wasn't worthy of. I felt like i was on the target. But i wasn't the middle of the center of the target. So i was always striving to do things to get your attention to get your love to get your adulation and and it was a very difficult situation. I that's why. I know before i ever took the drinkers drug. I know that i was alcoholic in that sinking feeling in that place and when i used substances for the first time it did turn on that lights which in my brain but it also sues that hole in his soul. I didn't have to try so hard anymore. And so I dealt with my perfectionism which is not a surf certifiable. Illness stretch the money. But it feeds it. It i dealt with my perfectionism by medicating myself the relief of those moments extraordinary. It's no surprise that you want to keep doing that. Because it's you know There that that sense of relief you know when you're a child on your feeling that tension and that unsettled feeling inside and you hit the point where you're old enough to medicate for some people. It's very young. It's ten eleven years old or could even younger and for some people it's usually the teenage years and the i remember some of those moments where i went. Oh i can relax here. I'm okay great feeling well and you know in my case. It wasn't even a question of feeling. Great resist a question of feeling more at ease. It was a question of not having to try so hard. My parents have been married for sixty seven years so i don't come from a broken home. I don't come from a background where i didn't know. What the unconditional love is. My parents loved me growing up. They continued to love me. I also come from a family where i lacked for. Nothing growing up financially always had money in my pocket emotionally had issues teenagers but auditors. I've issues but i was a pretty well. Rounded fellow rowing up financially emotionally morally. My parents taught me the difference between right and wrong. Good and bad and love and hate so. I was raised with good morals. And the other thing. That's interesting to bobby's that i i was raised with somebody who believe in a higher power. You know. there's a lot of the public thinks that addicts alcoholics people who are morally bankrupt or spiritually bankrupt or just bad people or live under bridges. Or don't have money don't have a college education i'm the opposite of what the public's perception of addiction because i lacked for nothing growing up nothing and and in fact. My father is the journalist. Bill moyers and a lot of viewers or listeners. Probably wouldn't know who he is. He's been retired but my father was a well known widely respected journalist for thirty years. He one thirty or forty emmys couple of pulitzer prizes before that. My father was president lyndon johnson's chief of staff and press secretary in the sixties before that my father set up the peace corps president kennedy in nineteen sixty one. What most people who built as don't know is up before my father was all those things. My father was ordained southern baptist minister when i was born in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine in fort worth texas my father was in seminary and he and my mother would that time married for five years at the age of twenty had had Pastoring small turks of central texas. Am i share that. Because i had it all then i had. I have everything you can have grow up even that connection piece of their But i said yes. And i think all those other things contributed to this irritability and my whole soul and i don't know how i did it up to the time fifteen but when i was fifteen years old in about nineteen seventy four seventy five. I smoke marijuana. Willfully for the first time i didn't smoke wanted to get high marijuana to find the answer. I smoked marijuana. Because i was a teenager and it was offered to me and i wanted to be part of when i smoked for the first time. You know how. We all remember that i drink of that. I being out of the influence. When i smoke marijuana for the first time man i this doesn't hurt so much anymore. I'll have to aspire to be the son of bill and judith voyeurs. I'll have to try to be better than i can. Just be made. And then next fifteen years off i went i get. Your story is similar to mine In terms of you know not really having any struggles in the Survival camp and that first time you know to get loaded was fantastic. You know and Let me say just I do know who your dad is. love bill. Moyers have always loved everything about him every time he was on television. Unlike i gotta watch this guy. He's just too smart too great and too caring not to watch. It was fantastic. I did not know he was a minister. That's the only thing i'd but would make sense. I mean there was a very high moral compass. There that was always an enjoyable thing to watch and i and i remember watching him just going. Why can't everybody just walked out because he makes sense. It's just makes sense. It's.

bob rowing Bill moyers lyndon johnson bobby president kennedy pulitzer peace corps texas fort worth judith Moyers bill
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

07:20 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"Addictions besides drugs and alcohol. You do to their food or or or other things like that or is that a separate type of facility that somebody would go to great question you know. We don't treat anything other than a dependence on legal and illegal substances so alcohol cocaine marijuana. Opiates of we do see a lot of our patients coming to us with what we call call occurring disorders and that could be an addiction to food addiction to gambling addiction to technology the internet addiction to sex. We will when we have patients who are like that. We will stabilize their their addiction to alcohol and drugs. Make sure they get on the road to recovery then we will recommend or refer them to another facility. That's more Competent if you will in addressing those other addictions yes like you. You wanna clear the mind as much as possible to take a hard look at the the other things. I have a friend used to say. If you wanna find out why you drank stop drinking. you'll find out yes and you know and that's the other point here. Which is that. Recovery is a lifelong process. And and then and just putting down. The substance is important right but it's not the only component of our illness People like you and me have an illness of the mind. The body and spirit. And so we've got. We've got to address those and just simple. Well there's a famous sang. That says what what are you. What good is sobering up a horse thief. If they're still going to be a horse thief so yeah you want to get him sober. But then you've got to address all other behaviors and those attitudes resentments. That's why in the twelve steps of alcoholics anonymous. As i remind a lot of people the substance is only mentioned one thai. It's mentioned in the first step. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol. Percocet we'd whatever. We admitted. We were powerless over alcohol and our lives have become unmanageable and steps Through twelve there is no other reference to the substance out until you get stepped well-worked folks about working with other alcoholics will. Why is that. Because you and i have a drinking problem but are bigger. Problem is a life problem and so learning how to deal with life on life's charms without the substances is what work in the staffs and walking. The walk is all about so yes. Got to address the substance. And then you've got to address people places and the things that cause us to be as big book says restless irritable and discontent on our own. Scans remember the first time. I read that phrase restless irritable and discontent and i my first thought was. How do these guys know me. So well i was that guy. Bef- a kid and i was like i don't know why i don't even try to figure it out but i you know one of the things that's come up a lot in my podcast. No matter who. I talk to with the anything in the field of healing and health is trauma. It comes up all the time. So when i know that obviously there is a physical addiction piece and so it's nature nurture kind of thing but how how much does Trauma in just in your experience. How much does it play into people's addictions. And what are some of the ways that you guys deal with. Trauma at hazelton question is spend the rest of the podcast. Talking about sure is debilitating trauma comes in many forms but it also has the same effect trauma can come from. Ptsd come from being sexually abused as a child could come from. Witnessing the death of a parent that can come from Being child of parents who divorce a drama each's own drama is never a good thing And while it could while it can be difficult to sort of define as it relates to each of us it has an adverse effect so much so that some of us learn to medicate with mood and mind altering substances So many of our patients come to us with some form of trauma even if it's the trauma of imperfection which i like to talk about in my own story about imperfection can come back to that. Maybe but and then there are others who have sort of diagnosis trauma. I'm not sure. I know in the added alcoholic who hasn't had trauma in their life experience whether it's clinical trauma or the trauma of life and and and so we have a lot coming to us that we we recognize it treated. It can be treated with of course therapy Talk therapy group. Therapy can be treated in some cases with medications and in some cases it's so good militating that people need to go to treatment four drama. I four trauma amount of what else have else on. There are some good programs around the country. we're good at diagnosing. We're good at addressing it but there are other programs. I think that are better. Frankly in terms of dealing with one other thing. I would just tell you is that when i went to treatment hazel in one thousand nine hundred nine for the first time about seven percent of our patients showed up at the front door with what we call a co occurring disorder. They had a substance used problem in the may have depression pharma. Ptsd whatever That was back in one thousand nine will today. It's about ninety percent. And why is that. Well for one thing. We're better at recognizing and diagnosing it Secondly on people are sicker. People are just sicker these days Certainly as we emerge from the pandemic a whole new rafto of issues around 'isolation loneliness and those sorts of things so so people come to us with all kinds of problems couldn't trauma the key that we believe in is the focus on arresting the substance use and then going from there to treat all of the things. It's amazing. i think it is more diagnosed because people have become really aware of it. Yes i've been you know. I'm just absolutely fascinated with that topic And you know like you were saying trauma can just be life. And i think you know i don't i personally don't have any Big traumatic event. But i always felt You know like life just kinda hurt too much or it was just it was just so i think you know not saying i'm i guess i am saying i'm sensitive are aware of the sensitivity and i think most people are the that little child. They're all sensitive some more. So than others some take things harsher and Some of the events that you know. I felt you know. I'll just say traumatized by.

trauma hazel depression
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

07:11 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"I would assume yes you know we have evolved. As lots of healthcare organizations evolved over the years to sort of meet the the dynamics of of what research tells us about addiction treatment tells us about addiction. We are an accident base organization. We believe that is the way to go For most of our patients but In in twelve steps hang on the wall of every one of our treatment facilities whether it's residential outpatient we have. We have an outpatient in in los angeles san diego west. La so we are absence based but i will tell you that india opioid epidemic. We began to realize that our approach to to opioid use disorders. People who are addicted to pain pills primarily the absence twelve step way was not necessarily effective with all of them and so we began to incorporate the use of a clinically appropriate medications anti craving medications to help particularly quiet that craving brain of on of our patients who were addicted to opiates. So we we are actions based but we also try to be innovative in stay on pace with the times that would make sense. I mean i sort of stopped. I stopped doing now all that stuff. Thirty six years ago. So opioids. Were not a thing. So i don't know any. I really don't know about that world but i know that it's Causing enormous problems. And i i like the idea of maybe weaning somebody off it with antic- craving because that you know that piece of it if it's that strong of a of an impulse that you can't stop and there is something that can stop it long enough to get traction get some traction. Okay then yeah. Why not. I mean i always say to people. You know I'm on the side of what works and if something's working keep doing it and if it's not working that's when you might want to change bob you get that and for an old timer like you and i don't mean to say that in an age wives walking your walk as you said for thirty six years now a day at time does that up after awhile for an old time like you say that is very encouraging because i will be candid with you When we began to incorporate these anti craving medications you've been orphan or suboxone into our treatment regimens for opioid dependent patients. We got a lot of blowback on. We got a laudable. Back from the recovery community Particularly the twelve step recovery. That were saying wait a minute. Wait a minute what are you doing. You're using drugs to treat drug addiction. that's not fair. I even had an old timer in recovery with forty some odd years of sobriety. Say to me. You're ruining a you being hazel. You're ruining a 'cause you're discharging your patients into the recovery community of the twin cities and they're under the influence and i said wait a minute. What do you mean. And we it out and i explained by these medications where appropriate. We weren't forcing our patients to use them but if they wanted to use them as part of the regimen and we really recommended the shortly could our goal is to taper people but the fact is is that they were just just committed to their recovery. As anybody else long story short when my when this timer rene said you're ruining aa by discharging people community and the influenced schlock so for example. I said i tried to explain it in. After we got done during a cup of coffee over we went outside and he reached into his pocket pulls out a pack of cigarettes lit one up and he took a long drag said go. You're ruining a what do you mean said. You're using a substance. I e nicotine to maintain your forty years plus sobriety in a. Hey and kinda looked that deaths stacking took another drag says. Yeah you know you're right. I understand it. Yeah i get quite being there many pathways to recovery there. Many crutches at people can use to get upright and the appropriate use of fda approved. Medications like suboxone helped opioid dependent patients. You know it works for them in the same way that smoking or or tune. Tobacco works for old-timers. We know that bill w and dr bob were sober for many many decades but but they use nicotine in fact they die from the uses nicotine sewer. I'm not gonna say shame on those who use nicotine is. I'm not here to judge the point being that But that people like us us many things to help us along and and As long as you're not a legal or or compromising other people saw wellbeing power to us. Yeah i always lake the saying We the things in the order that it's killing us so so if you've got something that's killing you and something else you know is preventing you from you know and then you quit that thing next when you're ready to do that yeah can't even tell you how much sugar and caffeine i consumed beck in the early days of you know abstinence from drugs and alcohol. It was enormous. I had got and i i was twitched out on caffeine and sugar and those things don there there are substances that do alter your body. Chemistry pretty strongly particularly sugar. Well it took years to to distance myself from that not only also the body chemistry but they also proven sciences. Researchers showed us at like food or or nicotine or sugar has a has an impact in the brain in the same way that other addictive substances do and again you know if we have somebody coming into hazel and betty ford. Who's addicted to alcohol. First thing we're going to do is to is to get them on their recovery. We're gonna treat their alcohols and that means they have to continue to smoke. We'll offer them whatever it takes to off of nicotine but we're not going to tell them to stop smoking because we'd rather get them to stop their alcohol use for we Approaches other addictive substances. So as probably more of a complicated controversial subject than we want to get into but But i but he's limited ford for seventy two years now has has has really walk. The walk of about hawks anonymous in comics anonymous now and on And we believe in that and we always will but we have become more progressive. You will be have altered. Our approach our perspective so that we jan embraced the reality of today's addicts. Now paulison and what they need to get. Well are there other treatments for other.

dr bob san diego los angeles La india bill w rene bob fda beck betty ford hazel hawks ford paulison jan
"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

07:05 min | 3 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"We're fortunate that we can laugh because we made it. you know. i think of all the people who can't lack of either dead or they lost a family member to the illness or or they're still locked in the throes of addiction. There is nothing. There was a time. When i thought i was having fun when i was under the influence but looking back on all these decades later i realized it wasn't a whole lot of fun there at all really moments where i thought it was fun. The fun i've had over the years the satisfaction that i've had from my recovery. Not anything that happened to me. When i was under the influence and and being able to share that whether an a recovery group in in downtown. La or whether it's on the beach in malibu or whether it's to salvation army in downtown all being to share that with other people just multiplies by the number of people in the room the the goodness of it the joy of the fun of it and salvia right being with each other. Are you curious about discovering ways of making your life. Better than. Welcome to my podcast. I'm bob nick. Mun and this is the exploding human. Listen in while. I talk with all kinds of people in the fields of personal growth. Health and healing alternative therapies psychology spirituality environment. And the future. I'm looking for those answers that make life better for everyone. You'll meet cutting edge practitioners. Doctors artists filmmakers business people and those who have overcome challenges the brave curious anyone out there helping us humans to explore expand and explode. Welcome to the exploding human. My name is bob nick. Mun my guest. Today is william c moyers. Who is the vice president of public affairs and community relations for hazelton betty ford and we're gonna be talking about addiction treatment and recovery today. But first i'd like to invite you to visit my website the exploding human dot com over. There you can listen to all the episodes read synopses of the episode see photos of my guests little bio on myself. And there's a donate button. If you'd like to support the show much appreciated you can also listen to the show on youtube. That is the exploding human with bob. Nick mun ed with bob nick mun and the exploding human facebook page as i said before. My guest is william. C moyers has been associated with hazelton betty ford for about twenty five years and he is a very strong message about addiction treatment and recovery which he carries to audiences across the nation. William has appeared on larry. King live the oprah winfrey show. Good morning america and he's been on. Npr is the author of several books including his own memoir. Broken my story of addiction and redemption. He's a very open honest guy and talks about his own story. I talk a little bit about my own story. And william talks about what actually goes on at hazelton. Betty ford and the options people have and the many paths to recovery and if somebody is struggling how they might go about finding a new way of life through recovery. So here he is. This is william c. moyer's. I'm so happier here william and just tell us what your title is and gimme a brief thing of what you do so then we can go from there. Because i know it's great work. You're doing hazelton. well yeah about. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate you up to carry a message. I abilities. I'm since nineteen ninety-six as an employing hard to believe of in your twenty five years or solve. I'm the vice president of public affairs and community relations and that's sort of a long title that can encompass any number of activities and responsibilities but the bottom line is is. I am really the public advocate for the organization. So i'm always about pre pandemic giving three or four speeches a week doing presentations Carrying the message. In the pandemic mike focus was on on zoom of course social media but i i really have been over the last twenty five years or so the face and the voice of the organization in the public arena though that is evolving. Of course because i'm getting older and the face and voice of the organization is getting fresher and changing as it always does with some of us old timers soul around long time. I really am the public advocate. And i love carrying a message of hope healing. Well that is the best message there is. You know i i Know that hazelton is a multi purpose kind of a place. There's a treatment there and there's all kinds of things go on. what exactly. What are the types of things that you guys do there. Because i have a lot of literature from air that i that i read pretty frequently. So that's my association. With great point. Bob you know. A lot of people only noticed as the publisher of the twenty four hour a day. We'll pet little black book Or some of the famous pamphlets around king baby and And four step activities you know we. We are publisher. We're the largest publisher of self-help material in the world outside the federal government and a lot of people know that way now a lot of other people know us for how we were born in one thousand nine hundred forty nine minnesota where i live today. We were at treatment center and we still aren't treatment center. A not for profit treatment center. Were now call. The hazel and betty ford foundation merged with the betty ford center back at about twenty fourteen. So we've got treatment. We got residential treatment. We've got outpatient treatment and in this pandemic we've had virtual intensive outpatient treatment. We are public shirt. We have an accredited graduate school. People can come to us and get their masters in addiction studies We are an education organisation in the sense that we educate doctors and other healthcare professionals about addiction treatment and recovery. We have a research a set of the butler center for research we had an advocacy arm. Which is what. I've been very involved with over the years. We are a really multifaceted organisation. But we really do exist and thrive in the space of addiction treatment and recovery in. It's a twelve step based organization..

bob nick Betty ford william c moyers Nick mun bob nick mun hazelton betty ford william Mun hazelton salvation army malibu mike focus moyers william c oprah winfrey Bob La moyer Npr larry
"william c moyers" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

03:11 min | 5 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"What are some of the more memorable books that you y'all have discussed over the last year and a half that you've been meeting I think so that lasts month. I think people really like this. We read blackout by sarah. Huckabee and shoes. Journalists who it's recovery memora- memoir that really stood out and also hollywood occurs. Quit like a woman. Could she goes into some different ideas. But i will say that in the group one gravitates books differently but one thing i liked about blackout was she you know. I haven't written my own recovery memoir. So i'm it's a tricky thing to figure out how to do. And sometimes people find describing drinking as triggering you know. See you gotta have a good balance with that. But really describe what happened but she she did a great job at describing. How your maybe wanting you're wanting to drink less. That's the dangerous part you know and how that can go from an intention. Have one glass of wine or champagne or whatever it is at dinner and how that can turn into a really disastrous night. You know and how quickly it gets out of control. Says she described that really. Well i'm also right now. I'm reading though. It's not for my book club. I'm reading broken. By william cope moyers. That's a long one and he's he does a approach but he really described relapse very well and and what goes into that. So i think for me. I often gravitate to books. Were they describe one shouf. Quit drinking or once. You're working in drinking like what the piel can be to start again and what to watch out for you know and and how that can that can be dangerous but we've also so that's Like blackout and broken. Those are memoirs. But there's also put an quit like a woman is part memoir you know impart information. But there's books such as This naked mind by any grace and alcoholics. Alcohol explained by william porter. I've read that one. Yeah i had him on a podcast episode. that's awesome. I'll have to look really nice. I like following him. One of my favorite things about him as he definitely has written numerous books he has a following but he still has a day job and he still is so active in engaging with his followers. Just really impressed on how he does that. But so there's books like alcohol explained. That just sort explains what alcohol is doing. Really good job with a really simple way that anyone can understand. You know i. I did a great job. Plus i love how. He also supplements that with his facebook page and his website and he connects with his audience. He's pretty pretty cool. What he's got going. yeah..

william porter william cope moyers sarah Huckabee one glass of wine One last year and a half one thing one shouf facebook mind favorite things champagne one
"william c moyers" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

05:20 min | 11 months ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on Scott H Silverman's Happy Hour

"Point is that I also produced a series online once a month called chasing the news. Stone cold sober. How does they sober during a pandemic is the main topic and we have very lustiest. People are next. Show is october twenty second at five. Pm california time eight pm new york time as if those are the only two places that should exist And a lot. William moyers william cope moyers is our host every month. We have a number of artists. It's this episode is called the rebels. It's filmmakers artists and authors would seem under the thing. I think they all have in common. None of them have a nine to five job but they're all very active in very successful and very sober and very sober. And all i think this is an incredibly challenging time. Other conversation is about zoom rooms. You know how they are. They're part of your sobriety or not. It's just it's a hard time. I luckily go to one. Real what i call a real a meeting every week every thursday in a park just so i could be around my people but anyway so the show is called chasing the news stone cold sober and it's online. It's easy to find and relates to anything. It seems to relate to everything Every day that goes by. I get closer to living in terror. I think scott our families genetically know what it was like to be put on trains to detention camps and to anyway. I don't wanna get there. I love being sober. Sobriety on my god wanna get. It's twenty six years ago. I drove to the betty ford center. My goal was just to rest up for a month just Get away from the drama of my lights of what it was. I also thought i was about to be arrested. I thought if i was debating ford center that the when i came in arrested me. The judge would look kindly on the fact that i was in rehab. I did not go to to get sober. But that's what happens when i was there it like at the end of the month. Wile i just went a month without drinking or doing any drugs. That is incredible. That is something. I didn't think was.

betty ford center William moyers william cope moyers california york scott
"william c moyers" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"Here, , we are another interview and art. . Let's talk podcast series. . Thanks for joining US I'm your host William seat. . MOYER's these podcasts feature experts on the gamut of issues that matter to his Betty Ford. . The same issues that matter to you, , our audience from substance use prevention to cutting edge research treatment of addiction and recovery from it. . These conversations have become quite popular the past two years, , and if you're a regular viewer or listener to the podcast particularly if you're viewing them, , you'll note that for today things around the set look a little bit different. . Of course, they , do were in the recording this in the midst of the pandemic has affected all of us. . He's four, , take seriously the need to do everything possible to prevent the spread of coronavirus among our patients and our employees. . Even here in the studio, , we are following public health guidelines. . As a result I can take off my mask for this interview because the production crew, , the executive producer, , and yes even my guest Dr Victor Vines are elsewhere in the building good social distancing one. . Doctor. . Vines was hired as our regional medical director from Minnesota and join our. . In January of this year twenty, , twenty talk about a baptism of fire in the middle of Minnesota winter. . But Dr Vines, , you've got to Hazel Betty Ford. . Expecting to plunge full bore into addiction and addiction medicine and being part of the vital team in all of a sudden you found yourself part of the Kobe response team with a pandemic on your hands. . Yes that was completely unexpected and. . Quad surprise. . I was I was delighted to be invited to be a part of the Code Command team you know I've. . At the time of this recording and we're we're doing this in June of two thousand twenty. . I am still not completed. . I have still not completed my on boarding process that was going to be about a three month or three and a half month process. . With learning. . That would be scheduled and continued for for a long period of time but. . Less than two months into into the process cova came along and turned everything on its ear, , and that has that's it's actually been a real benefit for me because I've gotten to know and work with directly many of the people in leadership positions throughout the Hazelton Betty Ford. . Organization. . On. . Both coasts and in between and ways that I never would have as if I was simply functioning as a medical director. . So the CO Vid <hes> Task Force the the instant command team that we have has been a real plus for me in terms of getting connected into the organization and what has that response team had to do the last couple of months so To. Give . you some time timeframe. . We. . First met our very first call organization of our command team. We . stood that up on Thursday, , March the eleventh, , and it's important. . You know we did that even before the president announced that that this was a national emergency, , he did that on on the next day on Friday the thirteenth and we had we had already put our organization on notice that we were going to do something different today before. . You know the first thing that we did was to to acknowledge that there were risk factors out in the community and the possibility that the virus could be brought onto one of our sites specifically one of our residential sites, but , it also affected our intensive outpatients. . Was the recognition that if if the virus got foothold in any of our sites and spread that we would look at the possibility of having to close down one or more of our sites and. . We took extremely aggressive measures to make sure that did not happen. . How do you balance Dr Vines the the the attention, , the energy, , the goals. . Up treating potentially two fatal illnesses within a system of care, you've , got addiction, , of course, substance , use disorder, , and then you've got the pandemic corona virus it's how do you do it? ? Absolutely in our medical director Dr Mark was the one who I put that out for us to all see and that was that when we are looking at to potentially fatal illnesses, , we have to make a risk determination. . Do, , we close down because we don't want covid or say we will find a way to treat and try to keep covert out for our patients that come into treatment when people's lives have gone so far off the rails that they need residential treatment. . The likelihood that they're addiction will be lethal to them is higher than the chance of developing a Ovid <hes> illness that would lead to a death. . We we recognize that <hes>. . However, , we can't completely discount the risk of Kobe because we have employees and we have other staff and we have the <hes>, , the patients who if they were to get <hes> an infection with code it could it could potentially be a devastating illness, , and so we had from the very outset <hes>. . We put into place steps and measures to try to identify what was who would be at risk try to separate those folks from others who might <hes> who might be at. . Risk of becoming very ill, , and and then tried to keep the doors open and keep everything rolling as best we could

Betty Ford Dr Victor Vines medical director Minnesota cova William seat MOYER executive producer Kobe
"william c moyers" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"Jennifer store is the author of blackout girl. . It is a memoir published by Hazel in twenty eleven and it's about to have its second printing. . Read the book and You won't doubt the power of addiction in the day to day life of a young woman, , the subtle persuasion of alcohol, , the pervasive violent consequences, , one drink too many and the sheer luck some my call at grace to survive at all Jennifer Storm. . Welcome to let's talk. . Thank you so much for having me. . You know one of the dynamics of our mission at Hazelton Betty Ford is that we published books and we publish your book in twenty eleven it's done. . Very very well in fact, , it's about to have its second printing. . What does that mean to have a second printing of a book? ? It's such an honor truly to not have the story come out once and reach an audience but for it to have a whole new audience to touch <hes> I, , it's it's a wonderful experience. . It feels more relevant today than actually when I did publish it unfortunately <hes> just because of what we're seeing with sexual violence and addiction, , it's still dominating headlines. . The headlines more than it ever has. . So it feels really timely and on the heels of the metoo movement I know there are a lot of people that are suffering in silence and so my goal is to get to those people and we'll come back to that in a couple of minutes. . Cisco back into your own. Life. . . For people who haven't read your book or no the story <hes>. . Tell us a little bit about your introduction to alcohol and what happened as a result. . So. . I came from a mother and a father who both came from very abusive alcoholic homes and they of found themselves in high school and really vowed to to get away from that and so they married young my father went off to Vietnam my mother he returned my mother started having US Children's I'm one of three I'm the youngest and they did their best to keep us away from all of those family members that were heavily. . Addicted at the time, , they had their own demons, , and of course, , their own traumas that they never dealt with and for the most part though they did a really great job trying to raise us I really was only exposed to alcohol when my parents would have it at family gatherings, , and then a friend introduced me to alcohol when I was twelve years old and I had my first beer which literally led to ten beers and I drank. . The first time I picked up a drink and I write in the book that I it never felt that thirsty before my life and I blacked out that night and subsequently a came to well being raped, , and so I had this horrific introduction to alcohol this very addictive introduction alcohol and yet it was the first thing I turned to to deal with the trauma of that incident. . When you were sexually assaulted a home. . was that your bottom as it related to alcohol it was the start actually. . So it's what really propelled me into continuing to drink because. . I had all this shame and this guilt in this anger and rage that I didn't know what to do with it and I was young and my parents coming from their own alcoholic abusive homes didn't have the coping mechanisms to deal with their own stuff. . Let alone now watching their daughter go through this horrific trauma. . So I started drinking you know and this was in the eighties. . So alcohol was in everyone's homes. . We all had the you know the liquor cabinet, , and so it was really easy for me to access <hes>. . What happened to me led to the breakdown really up my. . Parents marriage, , and so the supervision and our home started to deteriorate my parents divorced by the time I was fifteen and so I was kind of left to my own devices as where my older brothers and drank alcoholic and that gave way to starting to use pills I would do anything to numb the pain I was having and so if it meant alcohol, , it meant pills it meant marijuana that led me to LSD, , which then quickly led me to cocaine <hes> but everything every single time I drank the result was always the same I drank I drank to excess I blacked out. . and. . So the introduction of cocaine when I was around fifteen sixteen helped kind of. . Sober me up. . If you will I always say that parentheses it would keep me from blacking out. . It would allow me to retain control because when I was putting myself in situations where I was blocking out of course, , then I was vulnerable to more violence and more abuse and I didn't want that. . So the cocaine and the alcohol then became this really damaging codependent relationship and. . And how long did that codependent relationship work before? ? You had your bottom. . So eventually I turned to crack cocaine at age seventeen and I had my bottom at age twenty two and I it was brutal and I attempted to take my life. . I didn't have any hope I was completely destitute. . I didn't see a way out of my addiction I couldn't go a day without being high and being. . Completely out of my mind and that got to a point where it felt so. . That I wanted out and I didn't like I said, , I didn't have any hope. . So tried to kill myself and <hes>. . By. . Some measure of grace I am here today and I woke up in hospital bed the next day and I. . I had sliced my wrists pretty severely to the extent that of one was bandaged to to hold it together done so much damage and it was a miracle and the doctor looked at me and said, , it's a miracle that you're live and I was in a psych ward because that's that's where they. . Put you was nine, , hundred, , Ninety, , seven and <hes> an intake officer came in and kind of started going through the questions and she looked at me and said you, , you're not. . You're a drug addict <hes> do you want treatment for that? Because ? you you shouldn't be here? ? Do you want to go to Rehab and I said, , yes, , it was the first time I had made the admission that my solution was actually my problem. . And then you got treatment, , did I went to a traditional twenty eight day treatment facility in Allenwood Pennsylvania <hes> by all accounts a great facility I they didn't they weren't trauma informed which that's the term that I would come later to understand and really appreciate but they didn't take into consideration the underlining trauma that I had dealt with. . It was solely twelve steps addiction recovery. . We're not going to deal with these outside issues right now you're here to get clean and sober and that worked for me <hes> my first night and Rehab came to share her experience strength. . And hope much like I do now and she had said something that profoundly impacted me and she said that her secrets kept her sick and that has been my mantra since that day in that Rehab and it told me that all this stuff that I was running from all these bad things that had happened to me and these pains and these traumas these were the causation. . These were the reasons and I needed to deal with these if I really wanted to be clean and sober for the rest of my life, , and so I did that work on my own. . The trauma work did yes. . which point you decide that you're story. . was worth telling. . In a memoir. . I started writing that night in Rehab writing has always been a source of of empowerment and healing for me. . Even after the rape I have a book of poems that that I wrote I would stay up all night i. . now know that that's post traumatic stress disorder I couldn't sleep. . I had insomnia had irrational fears so I would right and that would calm me and so because I couldn't talk about my trauma in traditional treatment facility I wrote about it. . And I kept writing and then I did my fourth step and I kept writing and kept writing and you know I was an avid reader at the time and that's really when memoir was starting to come into play and I wasn't finding my story anywhere and so I thought well, , I have a good story. . Maybe I'll maybe I'll submit it and I was a big fan of melody babies and so I just happened to twelve of her books. . So I happened to look in the book and see well their published by this amazing place called women, , and so I reached out to Hazelden and sure enough they were interested and it was it was an incredible

Jennifer Storm Hazelton Betty Ford Hazel Jennifer store Ford Foundation William C Moyers Cisco
Is It Addiction? Questions to Ask Yourself

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Is It Addiction? Questions to Ask Yourself

"I'm your host William Moyers and today we're talking about the essentials of addiction we know that addiction affects about one in seven Americans in this country. But of course, our guest Christianity and can tell us addiction is everybody's problem. Chris. Thanks for joining us today my pleasure, William. Thank. You. We're here at the Betty Ford. Center where you are the administrator running the show here in Rancho, Mirage California how's that been for you? I'd spend an incredible honor and a wonderful experience. Obviously, we're encountering people at a very painful intersection of their lives, but it's deeply rewarding because of what recovery offers in terms of people getting their lives back who are struggling with addiction as you just said a moment ago it's everyone's problem. It's hard these days to find someone. Who doesn't know another person impacted by this disease talk more about that addiction discriminate. Absolutely, not we know the facts people from all walks of life and we see it every day. Right? It doesn't You know `economics doesn't protect financial backing doesn't protect someone from addiction it's. Affects, people irrespective of race or ethnicity or gender The, the solutions oftentimes have not always been equally offered to jewels. I think one of the wonderful legacies of the Betty Ford Center is early on the recognition of the way this disease affects women as much as it does men. and So that's a wonderful part of the legacy because it does impact. So many different people and families and children. So it doesn't discriminate at all. Unfortunately what are the signs that somebody might be struggling with a substance use disorder? Yeah. That's a great question The most basic sign is loss of control. a substance use disorder or addiction isn't simply just the misuse of a substance that leads to harm. addiction is really about compulsive use that leads to progressive brain changes. addiction is actually a chronic but treatable medical disease that impacts the brain It involves genetics the environment, a person's life experiences, and the interactions between those areas that leads to compulsive use often also involving harmful consequences That's the more technical. Definition from the American Society of Addiction Medicine but it's fundamental. Characteristic is a loss of control and part of the person, and is that true that drug is a drug is a drug and so if you've lost control over one drug lost control over all drugs I, think that's true of addiction right? The loss of control is addiction but depending on the drugs or the type of substances you're using it can have a different impact on the individual based on their genetics and based on the drug itself. If somebody's watching this right now and feeling a little bit squirrelly because they feel like you're talking about them, what would be the signs? The symptoms? The evidence that you would recommend they look at to determine if they might have a substance use problem. So squirrelly the juice. Yeah. Perhaps, Concern Yeah another great question you. First of all, you could see you could begin to ask yourself We'll take a look at the harmful consequences of us have you attempted to control or stop your US another good sign is to think about the amount of time you spend thinking about the substance or using might say preoccupation. So to what degree do I spend a Lotta time of my day either using or thinking about using or focusing my behavior on using, and that's also Another simple way to begin to think about the potential of having a an addiction or a concern here. What about other consequences? well, there's a whole variety of consequences. One of the older definitions of of addiction as I mentioned a moment ago that's been updated recently to include the concept of it being treatable, which is really important. But one of the older definitions broke it down in terms of biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations of the condition of the disease, and so we can think about how it affects our body right in my experiencing harmful consequences in terms of anxiety, the inability to sleep well Other ways that it might be impacting me physiologically psychologically how is it impacting my perception, my emotions, my experience of the world psychologically socially. That's a real good clear indication socially and behaviorally as well how's it impacting my relationships and that's another key factor. So we could go on but there's lots of different ways that addiction impacts people powerfully,

American Society Of Addiction William Moyers Administrator Betty Ford United States Betty Ford Center Chris Mirage California
Evolving Care and Closing the Access Gap to Addiction Treatment

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Evolving Care and Closing the Access Gap to Addiction Treatment

"I'm your host William Moyers today I'm proud to introduce our guest president and CEO mark. MIC welcome mark thank you. You well I'm glad to be glad you're here too hard to believe. You've been the presidency now for twelve years. It's amazing time flies when you're having a good time. And of course we look back on retrospective, but we want to look forward here in the future of of addiction treatment and here we are at the Betty Ford Center in the winter of two, thousand and twenty. And this podcast, hopefully we'll have a nice long shelf life, so we'll have to look out even further than just the next couple of weeks. But what do you see in the years ahead? When when it relates to what we at Hazelton? Betty, Ford, we'll be delivering in terms of treatment. Well it. It's a great question There will be I. think tremendous changes coming in the field. In the clinical model in the way we deliver care and I think we're GONNA. See A lot of change has to do with virtual care and telehealth now virtual care are telehealth spin around for many many years, and it's been delivered in a lot of different settings. What hasn't happened, though is the treatment world the treatment of substance use disorders hasn't. Hasn't really grabbed onto. It the way it's going to happen. In the future the the population that's coming up the young, the young men and women who will be moving into work will be suffering from substance use disorders in the future have a very different way of approaching the world than when I do. They use their phones they. They user devices. They are comfortable on them, and so how we meet them meter patients where they're at in the future part of that has to be that we are very good at and understand what parts of the care that we deliver can be delivered virtually what parts of the care that we deliver can be delivered over a telephone How can our? Our patients access content access lectures on demand. That's going to be really critically important going forward so that so that's one thing that's going to happen the second thing that's going to happen. Is that I really do believe we're in a stage now where we're gonNA, have a real shaking out of the field I think that because of the. Requirements to invest in Electronics Isla chronic health record to invest in virtual care to upgrade your facilities to participate in health insurance. A lot of the treatments centers out. There won't be able to do that. They don't have the capital to do it. They don't have the the expertise to be able to move into the insurance world and so I. Think we're going to see A. A lot of centers that are going to close or merge with that'll do for us is GonNa to put even a heavier demand for our services. We are going to see as we're seeing today. a continued escalation of people coming to us for Karen, service, so this organization going to need to invest in of all things, bricks and mortar. There's no question about it. and And we've got a plan here. For the Betty Ford Center we've got plants throughout the Organization for the next five years, but looking well into the future people attending treatment in person is not going away. It's the preferred modality you know. Addiction is a disease of isolation, so people need whenever possible the Common Person and so there'll be a high demand on our on our sites to be able to provide more and more care, no question about it. One of the things that's happened in the evolution of the way we deliver cares. There has been a surge under your leadership in outpatient. Can you talk more about the role? That outpatient will play in the future? Sure our our chief medical officer Dr Marvin. Sepla told me when I first. First started here that ninety percent of the people who get care for a substance use disorder do it on an outpatient basis. And at that time we really had no outpatient services. So I'm pleased to say. Today's sitting here this morning. About of four patients three of them are getting services on an outpatient basis in the organization in one out of four are getting on A. A residential basis, and that's the way that it should be so outpatient is critically important for access for people to be able to Get Care in their neighborhoods where they live for an affordable price, and that's what outpatient patient allows us to do.

Betty Ford Center President And Ceo William Moyers Sepla Ford Betty Karen Medical Officer Dr Marvin
Help for Children in Families with Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Help for Children in Families with Addiction

"My Name is William Moyers I. Am the host of our program here today joining me Cynthia Galaxies. Leave US welcome. Cynthia, thank you. You are the supervisor of the Children's program here at the Betty Ford Center Tell me about your personal passion for the subject of Children in Addiction. It was actually something that I didn't realize I had a passion foreign to. The first kid who allowed me to be a part of their world and start sharing how addiction had hurt them in their family that I realize the privileged. I was having about being there with them when they shared their story. With the Hazel. He's one Betty Ford Foundation for thirteen years working in the children's program since the beginning No, I've been with the Children's program. Almost seven years prior to that I was working in the admissions department at the Betty Ford Center for six and a half years, so I had to listen to the stories from incoming patients and their families. The opportunity to hear it from a kid's perspective really has made a difference in my life. What is that children's perspective that that that resonates with you? Think. It's just that they know more than what they're giving credit for. They might not know that there's a substance being news, but they know behaviors. Where maybe mom sleeping too much, so they can hang out with her. Dad's missing. You know left a couple of days and hasn't been back and just the impact that it causes them and at all times because they don't have the answers to what's going on, they can start to blame themselves or think that it's something wrong with them and that impact on children is really significant in this country. Right I think it's one in three. Families Suffer from addiction, and so the children do, too. Is that right? That's right that's correct. And I think there's a lot of programs out there for the patients, which is great There's family programs Alanon even teen, but it seems like we're really afraid of asking the younger ones what they know in how they feel, and yet they have just as many feelings as the adults do, and so tell me how the children's program here works. Children come into the program on that first day. So on the first day we have variety of emotions. There's some kids that are really excited to be here whether they're used to. Going to camp or their parents may be explained to them exactly what they were doing here. We have kids that you know. Don't even WANNA. Look at us Because maybe it's during summer break and they wish they were you know at home sleeping playing video games, things like that and within an hour, the magic of the program you can start seeing a difference as to how the kids are starting to feel more comfortable, and this is way before we even introduce each other and talk about how we're here to talk about action, and you use Use props like this I? Don't even want to say this is a prop. This is more of an icon. Tell us about. The Marine is a very special kid. He's here to my heart. special just like every kid that comes through our program he addiction and his family as well so both parents are trapped by addiction, and he has a series of books where he kind of explores along with the reader how he deals with it, so he learns that addiction has been a family secret for very long time. gets better. That doesn't even be more at ten years. old gets offered alcohol by kids, and so the kids get to explore that with him and relate because he is another kid and the kids start to understand that they really aren't alone. What about the children though that are? More significantly or adversely impacted, or who come here and a aren't certain what to do, and they have a nice warm person like you to talk to, and they've got a character like beamer, but they're still not coming out of their show. What do you do to to bring them into the process and bring them into the group I? Think the the magical part of the of the program is because we balanced our program between fun activities whether it's hide and seek tag going to the pool, watching fund movie and what? What we call sharing learning activities, so the kids really to get in tune with that inner kid obviously their kids, sometimes a little easier for them, but then they see grownups get in tune with that as well and so it helps them understand that you know I've had addiction in my family and okay, and I'm helping other kids, and so it Kinda brings comfort to them to know. Here's some adults that are freely talking to us and more importantly, they're listening to my story and not correcting the facts not. Letting US know that our feelings do matter. What are some stories that you hear when you when you talk to these children? Most of the stories revolve truly around just loving their parent regardless of what the parent has gone through whether they've seen the parent or not is just this unconditional love for that person and that hope that you know that they get better soon and so although you know they're. They're sad or sometimes angry about what's happened because of addiction, there's still that underlying love for that

Betty Ford Center United States Cynthia Galaxies Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Supervisor Alanon DAD Beamer
Hope Gets Real: Finding Recovery at Age 22

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

07:58 min | 1 year ago

Hope Gets Real: Finding Recovery at Age 22

"I'm your host William Moyers and today. We have a story of hope. A story of hope brought to us by my guest. Tucker are welcome. Tucker I great to be here. Thanks for bringing your story to our listeners in our viewers today on this. Let's talk podcast. You know we have a lot of people tune in just want to hear from people who have been walking that walk and made that journey. Tell us a little bit about your use of substances. Well I guess that would probably start back when I was close at thirteen years old Which is when I had my first drink and the first strength that I ever had I was alone in my bedroom I believe I'd been grounded for some reason or another And I like to say that I kind of skipped that honeymoon phase that a lot of people have with alcohol where I just went straight to to drinking by myself And it was an awful night got very sick but the next morning I woke up and it was the first thing that I was thinking about And from there it just kind of steadily progress. You know I. I grew up in a very small town Where you know. Most of the shops close at nine. There's you know movie theater with two theaters generally just not so much to entertain young people. So what I found out fairly quickly. Was that what a lot of people do. High School for entertainment was to get high or go out and party And I was indoctrinated into that really quickly you know and it it felt like you know as I slowly discovered that that I had arrived into something that I'd been waiting for for my entire life. You know I felt I finally felt a part of something For as long as I could remember you know I was crippled by this anxiety and this worried that everybody else knew the secret to life that I just didn't have in that in that. Set me apart from everybody else and it was you know when I finally you know arrived at that party scene where I finally started to feel like I was part of a group. You know finally meant something and like I said it just started to progress over time and It got just exponentially worse Put Off College You know that was under the guise of wanting to get some life experience but the reality of it was. I just really wanted to keep using and drinking on on impeded and You know moved a number of times to try to get the monkey off my back which you know never really worked the geographical switch. Yeah Yeah and I found that in each city. It really just kind of continued to progressing at worse like your shadow like my shadow. Did you come from a family that had been impacted by substances? I did yes On my mom's side she has a sister and brother who struggled with the disease. My grandfather had thirty years in a thirty years of recovery So it's definitely you know it's a family show. So when was it? You had that moment of clarity when you said yourself you know what this isn't working anymore. I need to do something to get help. What what what was it you know? It was kind of prolonged over time. I got to say that when I was you know. Even after the first night I realized that there was something not normal about enjoying getting drunk by yourself and from there it just kind of it kind of continued But I have to say that the real moment of clarity was when I was. You know it had gone for me. You know partying in high school to being homeless on the street in Boston Flying assigned having no connection with my family. No friends And just spree really. I was alone with no. I had nothing left. And that's where I it. It took. Unfortunately it took that much for it to become abundantly clear that I needed to make some changes in. How did you make that change? How did you go from that? Divide between full blown addiction your bottom and that first step in to help what happened I was fortunate enough to have a family and some good friends and really solid supports. Who who just kind of refuse to give up on me And prior to you know my final treatment I had been to three others. And each one kinda progressively pushed me in the direction that I would eventually end up in You know the first treatment was to kind of just a piece of my parents and get them off my back. The second treatment it was you know started to become clear that you know. Maybe there's something that I need to do. Changed my lifestyle to to be. You know to be a better person but I'll figure it out down the road. The third treatment was like okay. I you know very clearly need help. I need the help of some sort of program a number of supports. But I'M GONNA do it my own way. You know I was still I still was really hanging onto my own well and it wasn't until the fourth treatment that it was like okay. I'm ready I'm ready to finally surrender. And take some suggestions and surrender. You was not about giving up But it was about taking responsibility and and picking up those tools right and you came out to Minnesota and you you found those tools and you pick them up and you start using him. When was how old were you when you did that. Last treatment when I arrived crash-landed take crashlanded in Minnesota. I was Twenty two about two years ago And I was broken and I was. I had over the past four years. Watch my friends Graduate College Go on to live and start to thrive in successful lives and it was You at twenty two. I was finally you know in the right place at the right point in my life where I was ready to make the necessary changes and was your drug of no choice as we say. Was it just alcohol? We're using other substances as well up to that point. Initially it was alcohol. That was that really brought me to my knees when it got to the point where I was ready to make some changes with alcohol I had one of my best friends died and instead of processing in dealing with that grief. It was just so unending On receding that I I needed to alcohol. Alcohol wasn't working anymore and I needed to find something stronger. So that's when I ended up turning to heroin and then very quickly you went down. Came got treatment was the use of medication One of the tools that you found in your programme of treatment and recovery it was maintenance Has played a pretty significant role in my recovery. it was initially something that I was really hesitant to take that step because why because I didn't want to feel like I was trading in one addiction for another and that I was becoming you know relieving one of my dependencies just to become dependent on something else and it's unfortunate that I hung onto that for so long because I think if I had maybe you know turn to to maintenance a little bit sooner I maybe could've fixed my life up a little bit quicker but I try not to focus on that too much. What matters now And what I like to focus on is that this is a battle of life and death in maintenance has just been one of the tools that that I needed to utilize to to take the step in the right direction and for that. I'm unbelievably grateful.

High School Tucker Minnesota William Moyers Heroin Boston
Youth at Risk: A Convergence of Concerning Trends

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Youth at Risk: A Convergence of Concerning Trends

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcasts produced by the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to US issues that we no matter to you to Substance Use Prevention Research Addiction Treatment Recovery Management Education and advocacy. I'm your host William Moyers and today we're joined by my colleague Dr Joseph Dr Lee. Welcome good talking to you again. I couldn't well. It's great to have you on. I always learn something from your every time that we get to sit down to talk. I'm amazed at your depth and breadth of experience as our medical director on youth and family issues across our continuum our mission in this country. There's so many things that we could talk about your so well versed in all of those but I thought I would talk. Start by talking about something serious. Which is the mental health of our youth. Today what are you see is happening given the proliferation of social media? And all the things that you know so well. Where is the mental health of our youth today? Well I see concerning trends across our country. Actually you know in the world of addiction and treating young people with substance use disorders. You see kind of psychology Things are magnified stresses magnified Stresses and conflicts in relationships are magnified loneliness and anger magnified Ucla of young people who have use disorders who become what I call very fatalistic that is significant other. Breaks up with them. If they're met with some adversity they go downhill very fast started become suicidal and we know this is the standard course in the world of Addiction. But the scary thing is in recent years. I'm seeing the same trend in the same kind of psychology in our general social dialogue and I'm seeing it through social media and I'm seeing signs that are concerning with increased mental health issues and suicides. Not just for young people for for older adults. It's almost like there's a part of society I don't WanNa say is become addicted but the psychology of Addiction. The loneliness the anger the magnification. The polarization that comes with addiction is now upon us all. We just don't see it. Do we blame it on social media? I don't think it's fair to just have a smoking gun and pointed at one direction. I think they're all facets of society. What you'll find that is that social media is a lot like substances. A lot of people go on facebook. Instagram snapchat used fine without any difficulties. But there's a certain subset of high risk people that when they get sucked in really hurts them affects their mental health and so social media has way of magnifying things. When you see a pretty picture of a kitten everyone goes on like your picture. It's magnified when you see humane act and someone's helping someone else everyone's tearing up it's magnified but when you see polarize discussions when someone makes a a comment that's politically incorrect. Or maybe discriminatory and young people make mistakes by the way that also gets plastered and it's indelible and there's a magnification in that that I think is very dangerous for high risk people and then of course what exacerbates are some of the substances that you are using today substances that didn't exist in my using days of old. Can you talk to us about what you're seeing at our youth facility in suburban? Minneapolis in terms of the dependencies. That you young people come in with a lot of the convergence between substance use and technology and social media so they're celebrating some of their use finding peers. Who are like minded through social media and instagram posting pictures. It's always pictures before the social event when everyone's happy and they look like they're having a good time using substances. They never posted pictures. After the event when people have vomited and there have been fights. But it's always the before but but there is a convergence in Know vaping cocaine culture other kinds of drug use promoting it through social media giving a false image to other people but you also see the flip side of it so a young person may have made a mistake. Maybe they got too intoxicated on something embarrassed themselves at a social event well that also gets plastered on videos and messages and that is very for those individuals because then they get bullied. They get ostracized. The looking at everybody's feeds and everybody seems to be going on vacation. Everybody else has a new significant other. Everyone else got a new car for their sixteenth birthday and the more friends they have the worst this becomes and by comparison their lives seem lonely and inadequate and so for young people who struggle with mental health and substance related issues sometimes social media and technology can be a bit of a curse. How does it work at our youth facility? You see day in and day out. Because they can't have their phones when the young people come in for treatment do they have withdrawal. They don't have withdrawal. In fact you'd be surprised. With how many people actually liked to unplug a bit even young people? That's right in fact. We'll have conversations. Where like you know you have some friends that are maybe not the healthiest for you? They may be good people. But they're not gonNA encourage you to be in recovery or live a healthy lifestyle and they know that and they actually dread going to the Rolodex of their contact list. They wonder if they should change their cell phone numbers. They actually like the time that they have away from that. Because I think that's a lot of temptation for them and it's a draw. It's almost like Some people describe it as like being on a leash. They feel like they can't get away when they wanna get away so I actually hear more dialogue that they don't know how to navigate being plugged into technology and being in recovery and we have to teach them new skills to do that. What has been the impact that the legalization of marijuana is having across this country with our youth. The important thing to remember about legalization is that the skies not gonNA fall okay. Society is not going to fall apart because the legalization of anyone substance what it does create though is it does create a regressive economy and what that means is that most people drink alcohol. Fine but ten percent of Americans consume half the alcohol in the entire country. So there's a Paredo distribution in eighty twenty rule. Which means if you legalize a substance if you legalized lottery tickets if you legalize gambling at a casino the curve you see for consumption is not a bell curve. It's not that the average Americans going to gamble a couple of times and then only the people on the tip we'll have problems which actually see as a distribution where most Americans do fine and so they have no issue illegals Asian but there's ten to twenty percent of a population that might really struggle and they consume too much. They go to the casino too. Many times they buy too many cigarettes they lie too many vape pens. They drink too much and so we have this debate about are we okay. With simply a utilitarian principle were half of America won't really care and some people are going to make money and maybe we will generate taxes or do we also have a dialogue where we look at the minority population. The people that might be affected who will also try to sing the same tune as everybody else. I can smoke just as much. I can drink just as much. I'm just like everybody else. But they're not and do we have a special dialogue and conversation inclusive of everyone or do we just run amok with capitalism and. I think that's the concern that I see is not necessarily do we legalize or not. But how is it done? And how do we cater for the marginalized? Because if you're a company selling a pen. If you're a company selling marijuana or alcohol you have to make the margin of the people who consume too much you have to and they know that they know their own data and are we okay with that as a democracy so is it just simply majority rules or do we have special conversations to say we also have to protect those people who are vulnerable and that include young people on social media on vaping on the legalization of marijuana. What's your to parents. And how they talk about these issues with their children or grandchildren. Well I think people know their families the best and I ask them to kind of look in their. Mir's look at the the families look what their risk factors are and if there's somebody who There's a lot of addiction in the family. They should message differently. It's definitely not a one size fits all there will be plenty of people in America who smoke marijuana or drink alcohol or use different substances and be okay. They will not develop a use disorder but their children will also try to replicate that but their genes are different. Their environment is different. Maybe they face different adversity. Maybe they have different mental health issues and can we have dialogue in our country that is nuanced and mature enough to be inclusive of those people and right now. We don't have that dialogue. We have a polarization in shutting down of anything that goes against majority rule and there's capitalism that's behind it which I think is a bit sinister and And victimizes certain people so our organization is not against any drug. People are surprised by that. You know when I let them know. We're not anti-marijuana. We're not anti alcohol. We are advocates for the minority. We speak for the minority population a significant minority of people who will not react the same as other people when they use substances because they need to have a voice because other people wander stand

Marijuana Instagram United States Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Psychology Of Addiction America Medical Director Dr Joseph Dr Lee Facebook Suburban Minneapolis Cocaine MIR
"william c moyers" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"william c moyers" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And now more the Bob half show on talkradio six eighty WCBS and worldwide at wcbMcom folks, you back live on the Bob paths show. It is able to tell thank you so much of your just do it again marquee to how are you? I'm going to see you and Dan probably tomorrow, and maybe baby them so looking forward to that. But anyway, folks, I think I hopefully put a bow on that what we need to do in Volterra city. I feel this just as well as the love and the passion that I have for all six of my kids. It breaks my heart on a daily basis to see what's going on in this city, and we can change this. We've got to come together as a city, collectively if you're out there, and you see some, you know, speak up speak out. You know, let's let's come together. But we can absolutely change this. You know, I think we should we should call for a March on city hall to demand. This mayor get outta there and resign she needs to move on. So we can Jack young seems to be well intended. I will give him out the jury's out. Still in my opinion. He's been around for ten years. He's kind of operated in the weeds. If you will we'll see what he can do down this chance. I know he's wanted to be the mayor in the past. And if she goes there he is. And so we've got him. But so what he's done so far I've been impressed with the city is definitely cleaner. So anyway, the other thing that I'd like to talk about on this show. We Bill this variety show. We like to touch on lots of different things. I'm a racist reader. I'm up to my think my nineteenth or twentieth. Book since January I like to be well informed. Well, you know, knowledgeable well informed. So I can share these things with you very passionate is, you know, about certain things suicide prevention is one of my things this Opie. You're at crisis is now, you know, my passions. Zach sat here in this chair next to me on December the twenty eighth, and I cannot look at that share without seeing my son there the latest book, I'm reading his called broken. All right broken my story of addiction and redemption by William cope moyers. Now, you probably don't know the name William cope moyers, but you may know the name Bill moyers Bill moyers, the the well-known journalist, we cope moyers is his son. And he wrote a book about that. He was addicted. This guy was addicted to everything. You know, whether it was alcohol crack cocaine crack head, and I'm giving you terms that he used so crack houses in Harlem and everything and it's an interesting read, I'm a little bit less than half way through it. Now. Interesting in that, I'm enjoying it. I'll tell you got some interesting mixed emotions. This is a guy by his own admission had a perfect life. His parents were married. His dad grew up in a in a farm community and Marshall, I think it was Marshall Texas..

William cope moyers Bill moyers Volterra crack cocaine Bob Dan Marshall Jack young Zach Texas Harlem ten years