19 Burst results for "William Burroughs"

"william burroughs" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

01:46 min | 8 months ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Is it A. Mood out there with with deal. Yeah now. Kilo down. there. Always. Willing borough, there's always a borough or hindrance there. Are they come up to the? Regular migration you want to come up. allows. The Henderson North, Carolina's. I like it because it's worn that makes sense right there. You could have just moved to the Poconos and doing all that she don't want this. I don't know I wouldn't is even willing borough. This Orangeburg William burroughs or even? Though he was South Carolina or North, Carolina Board they flock down. As Nice weather with the black people. I can't. Borough. Carolina or Charlotte a lot of people go there I'm rob. Younger I say, I'M GONNA. Tell you already I think. I did. Is here we're good morning assigns. Cunard Ruth issue. You're lying so Why am I? Great City. Kill It i. told You Black Folks Living..

Carolina William burroughs Henderson North Cunard Ruth Carolina Board Great City Charlotte
Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

TMV Podcast

07:10 min | 1 year ago

Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

"Welcome to the team podcast brought to you by the Muslim, vibe. I'm hosting possum. And this I'm Rushton in my introduction because the root. Team members of Muslim vibe team and other associated people in the office are not happy about the fact that I'm recording this for whatever reason. So I'M GONNA keep it brief. I'm joined this week by William Burroughs who is a London based research in sociology. He looks at how young Muslims in Europe and North America, navigate, race, class and gender barriers from a D., colonial and restorative perspective. That right I'm. Just reading off his website. William is a an individual who has. Countries the Muslim vitamin the posses made assume videos for us. I'm going to Lincoln description. We talk about them at all the beginning. We also talk in the podcast about white privilege and the current academic project that he's working on. which kind of looks at reverse engineering? What the British establishment has done to Muslims, and how people are able to, and have successfully on a fullback and space themselves. I'm quite a wide ranging discussion I'm hope you enjoy it. Without further ado, because of the rude people in the office to and not allowing me to speak too much on this. Sound policeman. Harris Michael Mercedes with William. William Thank. You thank you for for joining me on this podcast so I guess some people may be familiar with your face that watching this because we've done what you produced a series of of committing documentaries for us. Around some random topics. I'm trying to think back to how it all came together. So I think you got in touch with US maybe a couple of years ago. And and you had at the time I think we shed one of your videos which around? was like this. Robot version of the of the Muslim influence. Oh, yeah, that was Yeah, what working? I haven't seen that because I. Think it's hard to actually. They got that video struggle to find him for it last. What was that? So basically, it was an experiment in the sense that. You know if I can put things this way Assessor Gist, which is my job. My job is to understand. Why do people do certain things and? It's basically like being a psychologist before crowds for movements trends. But at the same time when I started my mic, my studies I as a Muslim academic. There was something that for me like a religious duty. 'cause you know for example if I talk about the topic. Is Between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand words, a chapter of my book or Article but not everyone has the time to re this and necessarily understand will jog on and stuff so I i. consider you know known as? That's minorities. Jala is not valid until it shed. And you know so. How my question for the DOT words. How do I make it? These topics complex topics accessible for most people, and then I got inspired by. Keynote these like age a-plus videos. And I thought yeah, let's try to do some videos. In a similar way, a very short format with like culture, popular references and stuff, but also did some fictions individual. You mentioned actually was one of these experiments. Where basically it's a it's a stop in fiction where I imagine. What if all these influences that we see on Instagram Youtube? There were actually robots designed by Google facebook a for Muslims to abide by the government's guidelines, so that was the NC. How people would respond to such narrative so this. Would you actually I play like a scientist and? A friend of plays like a robot actuaries ten still out for three minutes, and we use like google voice from Google, translate to for the speech and. It was. I felt like when video came out. It definitely started conversations I'm sure it ruffled a few feathers, but also got people thinking and people talking which I'm sure was your kind of Ame behind that in some sense, and then also and I'll probably try and put a link to all the different video that we discussed in this in the in the description, but does also A. Series. That we did on the most imbibed. Within that we, so we sat down. We kind of Map Tau different conversation topics. We wanted to discuss so things like politics white privilege I was actually another one and look at my note masculinity. An. What was that journey like? Because again I the the kind of brief I. Guess We gave to you is that we want? To have pieces on this one conversations to be had around this, but we don't want him to be kind of light. We WanNa go quite deep, and obviously with your kind of academic background as well. We want to really be able to get hawk. Get to the heart of these conversations. And and I think we kind of did that like that. I remember the the white privilege episode was yourself and Two or three other white Muslims that you had that interview. I'd that will combat I believe as well I they were kind of unpacking and exploring in discussing direction, relative privilege, and whatever else and. It's interesting because there was it was very feedback that one person was asking for example why there was only white people on the documentary on the on the mini documentary that we produced. And I guess what was that whole Jenny like like off of the different mini documentary that we wanNA marriage as well. What was your favorite to record in research and and I think you know although these topics are very important for me. Because all of these topics were more or less part of my journey, not only it's not only topics I research in the university this topics that are impacting on my personal life, the life of my friends, and so on and so on, and you know especially when it comes to things like a me, metoo movements who black lives matter. The problem I felt was that lots of men and lots of white Muslims you know when that people expressed that you have these like global movements, so people feel attacked and they take it personally. and. The thing is a some men and also white Muslim understand what comes from?

William Burroughs Google Rushton Europe London Assessor Gist North America Lincoln Jenny Scientist Michael Mercedes A. Series NC
"william burroughs" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"That's why it was thinking like that. I was thinking all these straight line songs are bit. Predictable. So sometimes it's a way to throw the words and images around inside, the music and other times, you wanna be straight on the meaning, you know, like if you're right in something very specific about something you saw in the news, you might use much simpler words than if you're writing from the complexity of an emotional relationship because it's never quite as simple as the simplest love songs. You know, the pain and the elation of is all much more complicated. And it also takes a lot longer. So songs you're also magically making an editorial decision to which part of the story. Oh, yeah. Talent. That's the other thing to consider that part of it is craft. I guess like if you'd think in terms of camera if you were going to focus on one detail in the in the picture. Yes. You have to know what the stop is. And how the lens works to do that. But your decision to do it is from emotion of from the need to tell a story, and that's the same as choices in songs. So when you mentioned brightness. Story about some new. So in the news, are you still regularly catcher in little bits and pieces of things you hear or titled you see somewhere or maybe in a magazine, or so I think, you know, somebody said, how'd your rights? I would say that's a good starting place in, you know, the cut up the William Burroughs thing the cut up which David Bowie is famously used Brian was another person who uses those chance elements of writing they were a part of wise up ghost. They were big power wise up goes, the record did with quest love and save Mandel ended up being credited as roots record, though, really the members of the roots really appeared as instrumentalists on record that we the three of us made an I love exchanged ideas through Stephen, you know, and then we would bring in different people to play on it. And some of the members of the roots and pain Apollo Dino played very angry who's sort of zilla replay of the roots. But from a lyrical point of view, I did really do cutoffs on my own lyrics, initially because the rhythms. Are so different. I thought well, this could be the story that we've told in the impostor song bedlam, I could take those lyrics, and I could make the emphasis more deliberate on the words because the beat is more insistent one. It's not the music isn't as fast and furious bedrooms, a good example because the music the impostors creation of Mississippi the record reflected the chaos of the lyric. But if you took time to say, the same Larry, very slowly, there was a different emotion. The emotion was one of of more like where something happens and the stunned silence. And then you start to piece together what happened? Whereas in the middle of something portraying it, then you want the music to actually be as frenetic as the ideas, you know, both have choose saying something calmly can sometimes be more Jilin threatening. I'm not in putting them in competition. I don't see why they can't both exist. And what was interesting about the processes has. We learned our working methods. We were then able to create brand new songs that didn't have any element to them. Maybe in the music they did. But not in the lyrics..

Larry William Burroughs Mississippi Jilin Mandel David Bowie Stephen Brian
"william burroughs" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"And the the dream machine is kind of new to me what exactly is a dream machine. So the dream Shing came about as a result of the artists Brian Geiss in who was a companion of William Burroughs, and they did a lot of experiments the whole cut up method early surrealist tool, but they took it a step further and actually wrote a book believes called third mind. Your to fact, check me on that, which is basically a novel made out of cut ups. And they saw cut up. Specially boroughs is almost a magical activity where you were again, this gets to this idea of what is magic by where you are to creating something new out of something that may be shouldn't wasn't intended to be used in that way, and you change reality. So when you take a tape recorder in you cut it up, and you let the random is Asian of where you're going to place, the the pieces you you've created this new thing. I mean, even at its most base level, you could call that Majer, right? But but he actually saw that as having given a Tory potential and actual magical potential run. So this story for and that's important because it gets too is understanding that it has to do. I think with this interplay of consciousness and material culture, medium, culture, media culture. Right. So Geiss in the story is that Brian guy soon was on a boss. Very tired sleepy trees is a tree lined street. And the sun was flickering through the leaves in such a way right onto his is that he went into almost like a trance stated started to hallucinate. And he immediately thought why can't we built something that does that? So e engineer friend took a took a piece of thin cardboard folded into a tube, and you cut out certain patterns onto it you just put it on a record player. Dangle naked light bulb into the middle of it turn on the record player in stare into it. That's it. That's all you need to do. You can get the plans online this flicker. And we know this now medically admitted find typically we know that this flicker can actually change your brains. Wave states bring you into like, these delta. Data. Yes states. So this became an incredibly popular tool for relations artist to use to induce the sort of create new creative states of consciousness, and I think this I give a magical state of consciousness is important. You know, Alex Kroll definition of magic as a sensually the art and science of causing change to occur in the world. According to will a later magician Dion fortune put a gloss on that magic is the Arden scientists causing change to occur in consciousness, according to will. And I think if we stay on the plane of consciousness, again, this idea of whether it's metaphysically true or false or can be measured or proven is relevance because we're just talking about consciousness, and we're talking about the imagination and the creative possibilities at a rise out of that. Exactly. Yeah. So Ronnie decided well, I'm gonna do this. But what he so he started a dream sheen. And then he started to get interested in by neural beats. And so he thought he could combine the two, and so what was the effect the Ronnie once he had had it included the by Nora baits. He actually founded to be even more beneficial than transnational meditation by this became for him. Like, this is the tool now, I also talked to maker by the name of Mitch Altman, and he invented something called the brain machine. And the brain machine is a kit. You can buy it or you can just get the plans probably make magazine struggles, you basically just take a pair of protective glasses you use for like doing shop work at you drill a hole in them in the eyes,.

Brian Geiss Ronnie William Burroughs Mitch Altman Shing Majer Alex Kroll Dion fortune engineer
"william burroughs" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Whatever happens to be right. Well, I guess let's look at that. Let's deeply look at that which is. Certainly, all drugs are not equal and the sense that there are certain drugs that have. Far, more damaging effects on the human being than other drugs, right? All drugs have ricin benefits, and some drugs have a greater risk profile in certain areas, addiction potential things like that. But we have to understand and most important point that needs to get across is the vast majority of all drug used. No matter what drug you're talking about. The vast majority of people who use that drug use it non problematically and in fact obtain benefits from it, and that's true with stimulants. That's true with opiates as well. We just see in the media and in our own lives. The worst case scenario we notice when people are having problematic drug use. I'm going to give you an example of something that. William Burroughs. There's something William Burroughs said that. I remember when I heard it, I thought my God, this is just awful that he would say this and it's terrible, and he's just rationalizing really horrific thing. And then in retrospect is I've thought of it just from a rational perspective. I guess it's kinda right and he was saying that heroin injecting heroin into your body, physiologically is not really that damaging. No, it's not doing it all. In fact, that early addicts were doctors who at the turn of the last century who had access to it, they live long healthy lives surgeons operating on you wall. They were on their heroin. I mean, no, thanks though. Like like if I went to my doctor and it's like we're doing a surgery next week, I'm going to be so fucking high on hair. We'll wait. Let me blow another myth for you. So they have heroin maintenance programs in Switzerland and Germany, eve. Even some in Canada, we're talking instead of methadone or suboxone. If your attic, you can enter the program and they just give you your hair win as much as you want. You can go in three times a day, helps people get back, get their lives back, put food in.

William Burroughs heroin methadone Switzerland Canada Germany
"william burroughs" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"I think all these identities are fluid, and we're beginning to recognize that in society. And I wish there was more attention paid to. How is worth being done by other individuals who have other identities? I would. I don't know about that. I haven't gotten to that yet. I hope I do. I can. Yeah, I just I fierce another blindspot out there. The signal community where we could be more. Open and do things. Yeah. Funny I was. I was thinking the other day about William Burroughs y'all, hey letters when he went to Peru and drank Wasco. And he talks about turning into other races and other genders. His, I walk experience and. Again, a second experience. Has the potential to break down all those two Audis. And I think it's a rich area that we can all learn a lot from. What did the women say about the lessons they take away and the way they as as you said earlier, the the, the Houston Smith quote fits well of, we're not looking for a bright flash of elimination. We're looking for a steady abide, a steady of biding candle of light. And so what kind of lessons did you hear that people really got a chance to bring home and fundamentally change how they were living. I would say one of the biggest pieces. Is that so many women. Through their work with psychedelic substances and it's a whole variety. Right. I was really looking at a broad spectrum of I wa- ska LSD MDA. Right. I, I understand that in some ways problematic because they are different substances. And yet a lot of the work is often similar in a lot of women talk about being empowered as women. And again, I don't think this is necessarily unique to women. I don't think it's a gender thing, and yet I do think it's particularly important for anybody women or other people who have not felt empowered in their lives. Right? That live in a culture that has not handed them, you know, a high place in the power structure. So I've heard amazing stories. I mean, literally, it may sound like a small shift, but women. Who say. I had this experience and I kept working with it, and I felt more confident in myself and my own ability to find answers within myself and listen to my inner voice and my own intuition, and I stopped being so afraid of my ex husband. I was finally able to stand up to him, you know, maybe about a child custody issue. We're selling the house, and I'm thrilled that I hear these stories of how women put these lessons into practice in their daily lives that it makes a difference for them in their relationships at their jobs with their families that they feel they can be more authentic. And feel bicker feel they are more able to make their own way in the world and create their own realities. It's a big thing for a lot of women I speak with and is one of the really important points. I feel I comes out of the your publication is the dearth representation of women as elegant explorers, instead of being. Good girls gone bad or trivialize trivializing it. There just aren't that many great books out there about all of these amazing female writers and artists pushing the envelope in doing research and taking part as healers pioneers of exploration indeed. And in fact, if someone was was listening one to learn more to a couple of favorite books that you would recommend for people learn more about women in psychedelics in the history. One book I've loved is called sisters of the extreme. I don't remember the editors off hand, but it's a compendium of women's experiences..

William Burroughs Houston Smith LSD Peru
"william burroughs" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Eat very straightforward for soulful food that's devoid of bullshit yeah there's there's a lot of boesch it around is there as with anything yeah the in terms of like when you travel and stuff that i had this weird moment when i was at the diner over there the neptune diner at a write off of the of the whatever by the triborough brady when i lived in queens right gone there late night just to get pie and i saw two in the back of the room that i swear to you like having seen enough mafia movies i was like they they just dumped the body right you know and they were just sitting there go for so by right but i'm sitting there eating my pie with my fucking dumb notebook jokes and may be william burroughs book and they're they're probably just wash the hands of blood but the one thing that rises beyond good and evil is fucking pie right at there's some part there's something about food and i know you my sense when you travel around the world that 'cause i always had this thing about one pakistan the nuclear bomb in india pakistan there was there was tension that in my mind having not been to the countries but having the food i thought how can they be so upset they both have such great bread and and you must sense that the human element and i think it's part of your show for the spirit of it that this food and what food represents culturally transcends almost anything well you know it may not be the to sit down with people and eat with them and express a little interest in their food or what makes them happy it made up the answer to world peace but it's a start.

queens india pakistan william burroughs
Phyllis Cochran, William Burroughs and North Brunswick discussed on Deminski and Doyle

Deminski and Doyle

01:00 min | 3 years ago

Phyllis Cochran, William Burroughs and North Brunswick discussed on Deminski and Doyle

"Five dot com authorities say a woman was driving drunk when she struck and killed a recycling company employees earlier this month fifty two year old phyllis cochran has been charged with reckless manslaughter emba hitler homicide a forty nine year old william burroughs of north brunswick was working for a private company when he was struck seattle mariners all star second baseman robinson can noah's been suspended for eight games for violating baseball's joint drug agreement can tested positive for diabetic a subsidy says was given to him by a licensed doctor in the dominican republic to treat a medical element canot claims he did not realize the drug was banned he says he's accepted the suspension one of the most difficult decisions he's ever had to make middle school students in jersey would be taught about the social emotional and legal dangers of sexting under a bill monday in the senate jenny lumuna the new jersey principals and supervisors association says an agent content goes viral there's no such thing as being able to control information that means unfortunately for our young people adolescent angst can be multiplied a thousand unfold in just a few hours citing data from the company you know kids alone says nearly half of.

Phyllis Cochran William Burroughs North Brunswick Robinson Dominican Republic Seattle Noah Senate Forty Nine Year Fifty Two Year
"william burroughs" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"So leeann schreiber was repeatedly kidnapped by his own parents what back and forth between them oh oh no like way fucking crazier than that so his mom was some every stereotype about hippies you could imagine like just everything applied to drivers mom she was just weighing lsd she used to hang out with william burroughs she like lived in commune's and just very crazy woman and his dad was from a wealthy jewish family and i think he was a he was an artist but it came from like a banker's family or something like that and i guess after one particularly bad lsd trip tribes dad tried to have his mom committed and she just took little two year old lee ev and just fucked off and took off and he had a private investigators after them for years he eventually kidnapped leave into his custody kidnapping if you take your kid back from kidnapping i have no idea that sounds fair well he's been with but then they had like criminal charges on his dad for having done this because she just she just took him and left he found them living in some commun in new york city or something like outside of new york city and bush his dad grabbed baby of when he was three years old and took him back and then by the time he was four like it doesn't explain how he was back in his mom's custody again like she just got him back somehow his dad's stopped for gas and she's just grabbed him and left so eventually by the time he was five i think the custody battle was finally actually in the court this whole time since he was one to five it was just his parents being crazy i don't know why mom ended up getting custody when she was the one who was like repeatedly institutionalized and had a history of just going on these crazy acid trips all the time well somehow she ended up with maybe she's rad is fuck.

leeann schreiber lsd william burroughs kidnapping new york bush three years two year
"william burroughs" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WTMA

"Sea it's strange from my research i found that he this was something that came from him this was he was very much his own man or his own boy he used to draw sailing ships daydreamer he would draw sailing ships when he was supposed to be paying attention to his lessons this was one of the comments that one of his tutors made and this was for whatever reason this was something that he wanted to do and and it's interesting because unlike bligh's where it was sort of a step up to try to get you know to be on the track to get a commission for someone like william burroughs who came from position and then wealth he was also a bond on his mother's side which had deep roots in philadelphia and he you know he convinced his father this is what he wanted to do and even those his father who actually was had served as officer marine so he had no lose about what life was like i would imagine he you know he realized that sun was pretty well flip out and this is what he wanted to do and he he he got him aboard the portsmouth when it was making a transatlantic crossing the france and then that was where he began his naval career boroughs boroughs rose through the young american navy following this is after the revolution because washington and then adams and jefferson all committed to building a fleet and maintaining a fleet although jefferson wanted a coastal fleet and wash a blue water fleet did borough serve bluewater end coastal ships he did he was he was off the coast of of north africa during the barbary pirates wars ethics ethics wasn't he he was.

bligh william burroughs philadelphia portsmouth france american navy washington adams jefferson officer north africa
"william burroughs" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Sea it's strange my research i found that this was something that came from him this was he was very much his own man or zone boy he used to draw sailing ships daydreamer he withdraw sailing ships when he was supposed to be paying attention to his lessons this was one of the comments that one of his tutors made and this was for whatever reason this was something that he wanted to do and and it's interesting because unlike bligh's where it was sort of a step up to try to get you know to be on the track to get a commission for someone like william burroughs who came from position and wealth he was also a bond on his mother's side which had deep roots in philadelphia and he you know he convinced his father this is what he wanted to do and even though his father who actually was had served as an officer marines had no allusions about what life was like i would imagine he you know he realized that his son was pretty well flip out and this is what he wanted to do and he he he got him aboard the portsmith when it was making a transatlantic crossing the france and then that was where he began his naval career bros burrows are rose through the young american navy following this is after the revolution because washington and then adams and jefferson all committed to building a fleet and maintaining a fleet although jefferson wanted a coastal fleet and wash it and wanted a blue water fleet did serve servant blue water and coastal ships he did he was he was off the coast of of north africa during the barbary pirates wars he was on ethics ethics wasn't he he was.

bligh william burroughs philadelphia france american navy washington adams jefferson officer north africa
"william burroughs" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WTMA

"Us from portsmouth england in eighteen in seventeen eighty three to philadelphia america in seventeen eighty five and then onto the battle itself the setpiece five september eighteen thirteen off could point this is a near bristol maine outside of portland the battle of the atm's boxer and the uss navy brig enterprise that name enterprise of course is magical in the eyes of all people who serve the us navy and those who watch star trek david congratulations and good evening the battle of boxer and enterprise in five september eighteen thirteen was this at the time considered a momentous occasion or was this a minor battle in the war of eighteen twelve it was both for the people who live in chemically peninsula was it was pretty momentous and it was one of the things that makes the battle standout was that it was the only battle at sea that was witnessed by landsman and and quite a number of them you had a chance to gather because the commander of the enterprise william burroughs was very methodical how he approached his adversary the commander of the of samuel blyth and waiting for the winds to change to come out of the south the south west let's look let's look at the lives of these two men before we do the battle because david's book is very careful in recreating the the navy traditions of both the american navy and the british navy and how they fought battles how they approach this the ceremony of contest all of you reading brian novels about aubrey and matter in are familiar with the romance of this based on the famous lord cochran that ten thorough of dundonald david's piece is about to junior officers who have the same traditions and are based in history both of them buried on american soil david bly samuel bligh these born in portsmouth i believe in seventeen eighty three is my calculation who are who are as people his people the the seafaring the people of england his grandfather spent his nearly on tire adult life actually some of his youth that see and with somebody who had served under hood who was the the man who lured nelson is probably the most famous figure of the world at that time considered the finest officer in the royal navy and he was at the the battle of the saints and in the.

cochran england brian us uss navy brig america philadelphia officer nelson portsmouth bristol maine aubrey british navy american navy david samuel blyth william burroughs commander atm portland
"william burroughs" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Us from portsmouth england in eighteen in seventeen eighty three to philadelphia america in seventeen eighty five and then onto the battle itself the setpiece five september eighteen thirteen off pem could point this is near bristol maine outside of portland the battle of the boxer and the uss navy brig enterprise that name enterprise of course is magical in the eyes of all people who serve the us navy and those who watch star trek david congratulations and good evening the battle of boxer and enterprise in five september eighteen thirteen was this at the time considered a momentous occasion or was this a minor battle in the war of eighteen twelve it was both for the people who live in chemically peninsula it was it was pretty momentous and it was one of the things that makes the battle standout was that it was the only battle at sea that was witnessed by landsman and and quite a number of them you had a chance to gather because the commander of the enterprise william burroughs was very methodical would how he approached his his adversary the the commander of the box of samuel blyth and waiting for the winds to to change to come out of the south the south west let's look let's look at the lives of these two men before we do the battle because david's book is very careful in recreating the the navy traditions of both the american navy and the british navy and how they fought battles how they approach this the ceremony of contest all of you reading o'brian novels about aubrey and matter and are familiar with the romance of this based on the famous lord cochran that ten thorough of dundonald david's piece is about to junior officers who have the same traditions and are based in history both of them buried on american soil david bly samuel blythe these born in portsmouth i believe in seventeen eighty three is my calculation people his people the the seafaring people of england his brand father spent his nearly his entire adult life actually some of his youth at sea and with somebody who had served under hood who was the the man who lured nelson is probably the most famous figure of the world maybe at that time considered the finest officer in the royal navy and he was at the the battle of the.

cochran o'brian us uss navy brig america philadelphia officer nelson portsmouth bristol maine aubrey british navy american navy david samuel blyth william burroughs commander portland
"william burroughs" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Things that third sort of wild you've got william burroughs air who's the grandfather of all that shit but like you know those guys those three are la people you could have seen any of them all right so now you're you're moving right your drugs or cowboy things are happening yeah things are happening i sorry to feel like oh my god you know me i am going to bike break out in i met all these interesting people but you know it's hardening an actor at lake i kept working but it wasn't like that i suddenly like god every job i ever wanted we did some white movies they're like i don't remember that we're probably movies at that were in his big as they could yeah yeah like he did work with lawrence kasdan yeah i love jessica lange lanxade gum and i support of myself as an actor which unlike so grateful for with this i love you to death at cutting remember that movie will get a small part it was basically about how kevin kline was cheating on his wife was play by tracy almond right and basically i was like one of the girls whose cheating on with did you meet river phoenix and were as i can't believe he died it's so so many people have died latvia where he was some nice sierra but getting back to david when she's got your meditating subtle unity do tv show yeah and then you do the movie and you're like 2021 i guess so 21 maybe yeah um but then you do i before were how far away is john well then i a kedo wingers there may be things and then it was like years later that i was in swingers and then i was in boogie nights then you did that to grows in a guy we i did that that was actually after bogey nice though was a came a i work with a lot of sexual harassers.

kevin kline river phoenix latvia john william burroughs lawrence kasdan tracy almond david
"william burroughs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At the morgan to our show ijaw height thank you so a lot of people myself included i think are encountering peter who jar for the first time through your show and so i guess maybe start by just who is he tell us who put his work in some perspective the peter users been best known within the photography world for the work you described portraits of his culture in the east village at and four friends such as susan santiago and neighbors like william burroughs uh who represented in a the one book that he published in his lifetime in nineteen seventy six portrait's in life and death but he did a much wider range of work over a much broader span of time and in this retrospective for the first time were putting together the story of his work from the time that he graduates high school and 1950 three until the end of his life 1987 and looking at what this story as to show us about an artist who really should be much better known it it is in fact the first retrospective on him have been retrospectives but i would like to say to the first based retrospective that really benefits from both hindsight and from the resources that can be brought to bear by an institution in speed of life white white wise epinay michelle well the the title speed of life simply came to me as something that described the way that huge are connected so many different worlds he was the one figure who knew what was going on here and there and someplace else in a given evening and was making photographs and all of them it's also the title of the first track on david bowie's album low which came out the month before huge ours only book there is a david bowie connection there were there are many such connections in huge ours life months once we start plugging it on the wall what will go through some of that but maybe first just again to kind of help us figure out who he is and get co twenty two what what are some of the themes that dominate the rent throughout this retrospect throughout the work that you're gonna put on a what you've first.

morgan peter susan santiago william burroughs michelle david bowie
"william burroughs" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"You check your coat the coach jack you check your pants at the pants jack in there you go you join me on the baf once you figure out what the hell utech your napkin into diners report the freedom from clothing allows him to focus on thinking about the meal and who sat in their chair before they did oh that's it sounds awful it does sounds us terrible media we william burroughs naked lunch let us like way way ahead of the curve and that was not meant to be a comforting idea know they deserve just little mini baguettes that on that but he could feel bad the problem i have with all of uh all of these is has less to do with just do i want us you know sit around with a bunch of new people said i and just be cold all the time new i mean would you even eat alone in your house nude and why why would you do that here hanna is your next limit more dressing our customers bag so ira sizing wheeled take up peg five leaders of ranch is a big avalanche like beer it is sold by the gas or good if you hear that kind of person who meets the salad in is upset whenever anything actually crunches then you check out the hidden valley cag of ranch salad dressing as perfect when you need to go straight from kegs stand to cakes it.

jack hanna william burroughs
"william burroughs" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Fyre cay listen miss loan lenham 'let us spying so what this russ the dislike ceases this just two stone that's lou reed an f anita curtis welcome to fresh air and congratulations on your new biography of lou reed thank you so much it's a pleasure be here so let's start with that song which sums up so much about what may made lou reed different from other music being mehta at that time give us your take on heroin and how it fits into not only reads career but into the larger news iq of that time it's such a daring statement in essentially was recorded in nineteen 65 it came out in nineteen sixty seven and you know it was the height of the summer of love there was a sense in which this was just a very different sense about what popular music could contain i mean lou reed stated desire than when he had studied with the poet delmore schwartz in college and he really had this idea came out of the fact that del more heated rock lyrics liu loved rock and roll and he loved poetry and he thought to himself you know suppose we could make an album that someone like delmore schwartz uh would like the lyrics and yet we can drawn people like allen ginsberg and william burroughs and that's what heroine is and it's also such a depiction of.

lou reed heroin delmore schwartz russ allen ginsberg william burroughs two stone
"william burroughs" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Linda's diseases just is just that's lou reed an f anita curtis welcome to fresh erin congratulations on your new biography of lou reed thank you so much it's a pleasure to be here so let's start with that song which sums up so much about what may made lou reed different from other music at being made at that time give us your take on heroin and how it fits into not only reads career but into the larger news iq of that time it's such a daring statement in especially was recorded in 19th 65 it came out in 19th sixty seven and you know it was the height of the summer of love there is a sense in which this was just a very different sense about what popular music could contain up i mean lou reed stated desire i mean he had studied with the poet delmore schwartz in college and he really had this idea came out of the fact that more heated rock lyrics liu loved rock and roll and he loved poetry and he thought to himself you know suppose we could make an album that someone like two or more schwartz uh would like the lyrics a yeah we can drawn people like allen ginsberg and william burroughs and that's what heroine is and it's also such a depiction of.

Linda lou reed heroin delmore schwartz allen ginsberg william burroughs
"william burroughs" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"william burroughs" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"And he works with elvis scumacher who's been working with mardi for many years as his editor and so i work really closely with them i've done five films with him in one documentary and through that process it's a real kind of a joyous approach to making films it's really lively creative the film economy gathers energy and it gathers ideas as a grows and a process may take a year but it's a really fulfilling great process working with them is it is a different when you work with someone who knows music as well as he does well could work both ways i think mike relationship with marty is very creative i think because we both love music so much and we also low film but i mean i've workers directors who allowed me a lot of freedom to do it i want because that more fun it's all enjoyable but i mean that can be quite creative in a way that you have a lot of freedom to do it right and i kinda crave that i like to be able to go as far as i can go in creating music pieces till i have somebody may be pulled me back a little bit a hair which are you mentioned crash movement we're gonna talk about the lord of their rings a lot of these films are literary adaptations how do you approach a literary adaptation of a film i love to read and i always do a lot of research before i work on anything that has to do with great source material like uh william burroughs naked launcher jg ballots crash jrr tolkien's lord of the rings there's a lot of work to do to understand what inspired them to write the book dander stand the era the period than it was written why what inspired the author and then also what transpired after after the piece was written and the kiss lord the rings that was published in early 50s and a lot transpired after that people have rented all over the world has been translated into forty different languages so.

elvis scumacher mardi editor marty william burroughs mike