17 Burst results for "William Bullock"

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:26 min | 9 months ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right with a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour there was good like it that's not bad at all there's like it was a flat press you have the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the type setting with a cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour there's a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yeah so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and way invalid comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah the most amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top doing that the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand sheets per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yes so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet presses needs some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah like I feel like he was close to making it I he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delayed crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and in thrall been watching a a newspaper operation being printed a set for head I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think I said it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post there are some one of the hokey **** shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this there there's the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical that's the is suddenly is breaking out it's crazy I was like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this yeah I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one like kids second unit was from holding I'm hoping I just love the cats Mister show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class when I was a Ron Howard movie yeah because you know how to make movies for the most part yeah they did was at the Star Wars movie the do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now thank you for it third what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things I'm great it yeah I would say it had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what stars fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just gonna get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on then how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name Dicker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's name yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah and this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and it's been a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to a city center in the case of London he said in four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes in a man a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is guess is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so it was closed in who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jackpot yeah there were a few of I don't think we said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off which is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby get study with wings and goes super super fast yeah than he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield I don't eat four hundred was like a man like a flying ambulance yeah so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia protest flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happened interesting so he then this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time.

Chuck William bullock
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:09 min | 10 months ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when there's a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour there was good like it that's not bad at all there's like it was a flat press you have the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting so it's just fun and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour there's a huge leap frightened by it I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yes so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and William bullet comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah what was amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top during the the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yeah so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet press is needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah like I feel like he was close to making it I he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delayed crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a a newspaper operation being printed I said for heavy I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think that's it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post there are some one of the hokey ist shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this they there's the cameras is moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical that's the is suddenly is breaking out it's crazy I was like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this yeah I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one I like his second unit was I'm hoping I'm hoping I just love the cats Mr show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class with those of Ron Howard movie yeah those guys know how to make movies for the most part yeah they did was it's a Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it third what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things yeah great it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just gonna get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on then how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name Dicker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's terrain yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah in this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and it's been a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to the city center in the case of London he said in four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes it meant a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is guess is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so that it was close and who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jackpot yeah there were a few of I don't think he said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off which is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby yeah it's W. with wings and goes super super fast yeah then he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought can take the place of Mike military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield I don't eat four hundred was like a man like a flying ambulance yes so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia for a test flight I also saw it was in Taiwan really.

Chuck William bullock
"william bullock" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

12:39 min | 11 months ago

"william bullock" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"All right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when the shuttle landed on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing and the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right and up to end by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour that was good like it that's not bad at all there's like it was a flat press you have the type set on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the typesetting with the cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour this is a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yes so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and we invalid comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah what was amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top doing that the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks to you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yes so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven one of his boat press is needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah very unlike I feel like he was close to making it I he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delayed crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a a newspaper operation being printed I said for heavy I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think I said it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post there one of the hokey just shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this there there's the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical that is certainly is breaking out it's crazy I was like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one so like as a second unit was from holding I'm hoping I just love the cats Mr show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class with those of Ron Howard movie yeah this because now to make movies for the most part yeah that was that the Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it third what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things great it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just gonna get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on and how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name Baker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's terrain yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah and this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and is it in a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to the city center in the case of London he said and four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes it meant a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is guess is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like an ambulance uses for it as well so it was closed in who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jet pods yeah there were a few of I don't think he said I mean speed about four hundred ten feet to take off which is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby yet still be with wings and goes super super fast yeah than he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield and the four hundred was like a man like a flying ambulance yeah so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia for a test flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happened interesting so he and this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time the aircraft went right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down and kill them yeah it would shut up five hundred to seven hundred feet and yeah aunt left and crashed and that was that and that was that I don't I'm curious I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that I'm curious what the statuses I I couldn't find anything about it it's the company that he founded that was developing it is absent eight the C. E. N. and I couldn't find with the status of that thing is I hope they continue on with that because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing is I mean these were jets but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent yeah so it's not like we're just here jets in in our inner cities guys constantly wide might analyzer yeah relatively inexpensive from yeah but you need to solve that straight up and straight down thing well all our I. P. Michael decker and RHP all those inventors except we see are not really interested in wishing him well who who died by their own invention hats off to you for your spirit of curiosity and.

Chuck William bullock four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet seven hundred feet million dollars fifty percent
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:36 min | 11 months ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right with a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour that was good like it that's not bad at all there's like it was a flat press you have the type set on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the typesetting with the cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour there's a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yes so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and we invalid comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah the most amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top during the the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks to you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yes so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet presses needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah very alike I feel like he was close to making it he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick a belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delayed crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a a newspaper operation being printed I said for heavy I'd have you because that doesn't ring a bell yeah I think I said it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year it's called the paper no the post the post there are some one of the hokey just shot of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this there there's the cameras is moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical the is suddenly is breaking out it's crazy I was like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one like as a second unit was from holding I'm hoping I just love the cats Mister show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class when I was a Ron Howard movie yeah because I know how to make movies for the most part yeah they did was that the Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it the what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things right it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just gonna get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on then how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name Dicker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's terrain yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah in this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and is it in a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to the city center in the case of London he said and four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes in advance a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is this is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so that it was closed in who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jet pods yeah there were a few of them I don't think he said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off which is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby yet still be with wings and goes super super fast yeah then he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield and eat four hundred was like a man like a flying ambulance yes so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia protest flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happened interesting so he and this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time the aircraft went right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down in kill them yeah it would shut up five hundred to seven hundred feet and yeah aunt left and crashed and that was that and that was that I don't I'm curious I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that I'm curious what the statuses I I couldn't find anything about it it's the company that he founded that was developing it is absent a B. C. E. N. and I couldn't find with the status of that thing is I hope they continue on with that because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing is I mean these were jets but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent yeah so it's not like we're just here jets in in our inner cities guys constantly required muchas yeah relatively inexpensive from yeah but you need to solve that straight up and straight down thing well all our I. P. Michael decker and RHP all those inventors except we see are not really interested in wishing him well who who died by their own invention hats off to you for your.

Chuck William bullock four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet seven hundred feet million dollars fifty percent
"william bullock" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when they come in landed on. yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating. in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining and speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour there was good like it that's not bad at all is like it was a flat press you have the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flat thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour there's a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yeah so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and way invalid comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah the most amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top doing that the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand she's per hour in today from what I. saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I'm impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yes so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his boat press is needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the. exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah like I feel like he was close to making it. he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick a belt back onto a pulley. and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so. yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene. through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delayed crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and then throw been watching a a newspaper operation being printed a set for have I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think I said it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post. there are some. one of the hokey ist shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house. and they're arguing and they're like this there there's the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical that's the is suddenly is breaking out it's crazy hours like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one like kids second unit was I'm hoping I'm hoping I just love the cast Mr show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class when I was a Ron Howard movie yeah because I know how to make movies for the most part yeah they do unless it's a Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now and care for it. the what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things I'm great it yeah I wouldn't say it had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like. part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just gonna get slaughtered for this so that's fine. I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on then how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name taker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's name yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah in this is a really interesting. idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea. he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and it's been a quick time. and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to a city center in the case of London he said in four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes in a man a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is guess is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so that it was closed in who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jet pods yeah there were a few of them I don't think he said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off it is about a hundred twenty five meters. and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby. yeah it's W. with wings and goes super super fast yeah than he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters..

four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet million dollars
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And the dancer Joni challenge today at dancer Tony dot org that's dance Forgione dot org now get moving from the American home furniture and mattress weather center this report is sponsored by American home furniture and mattress this is meteorologist Eddie Garcia from K. OB for what your weather updates tonight we're looking at mostly clear skies with a low of sixty five degrees tomorrow looking sunny and hot with a high in the mid nineties American home furniture and mattresses celebrating Labor Day with storewide special purchases and new markdowns the guaranteed lowest prices in town American home is the low price leader for quality furniture new Mexico's number one furniture and mattress store hi now free to watch the sequel to the karate kid movies with the original cast used to be exclusively available to paying subscribers until you two decided to switch up and strategy and make its premium originals available is ad supported shows well the company intends to make its original free to watch paying members will get immediate access to every episode in the show's new season the general public will have to wait for each episode become available tech report Larry Olson NBC news radio you're hearing one of over twenty five thousand podcasts available to you right now all for free by downloading I heart radio this is the I heart podcast channel all right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when there's a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press.

Eddie Garcia K. OB Mexico Chuck Joni Tony dot Larry Olson NBC William bullock sixty five degrees
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And renters warehouse dot com renters warehouse list invest rent all under one roof from the American home furniture and mattress weather center this report is sponsored by napa auto parts this is chief meteorologist what hit the organism KO before with the weather update expect a hot one for the rest of your Thursday with overnight lows in the mid sixties heating up on Friday and for the rest of the weekend for that matter with highs in the mid to upper nineties right now and I bought a parts stores you can get a five core jug of napa conventional oil plus a pro select oil filter for only fifteen ninety nine that's number know how general states pricing sales prices do not include applicables state local taxes or recycling fees offer ends August thirty first two point two million American Indians and Alaska natives are important members of our country's diverse culture a world where today's American Indian and Alaska native children grow up to enjoy the highest levels of physical emotional and spiritual life is one you can help create join us at the Indian health service to provide care today that will change their tomorrows learn more about scholarships loan repayment and careers at I. H. S. dot gov forward slash career ops same event will be a new macbook pro with the display size somewhere over sixteen inches apple's launch event is rumored to be happening September tenth Spotify's extending free trials of its premium subscriptions from thirty to ninety days in an attempt to get users to eventually shell out for its premium service the three month freebie is now the same length as apple music free trial period that report Larry Olson NBC news radio this is the first station exclusively devoted to podcasts and podcast discovery podcast all right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when the couple added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press.

chief meteorologist Alaska apple Spotify Chuck napa auto Larry Olson NBC William bullock sixteen inches ninety days three month
"william bullock" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"All right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five in by god we're doing all five that's right when the shuttle landed on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right and up to end by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour there's good like it not bad at all is like it was a flat press you have the type set on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another one they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour this is a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yes so fast forward another thirty four two thirty three years and William bullet comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah what was amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top during the the front near the cylinder on bottom during the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yeah so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet presses needs some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah like I feel like he was close to making it he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene they're complications of surgery from gangrene bought on delayed crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a a newspaper operation being printed I said for heavy I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think that's it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post there are some one of the hope yes shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this there there's the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical the is suddenly is breaking out it's crazy hours like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one I like his second unit was from holding I'm hoping I just love the cats Mister show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class with those of Ron Howard movie yeah because I know how to make movies for the most part yeah they did was it's a Star Wars movie the do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it third what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things I'm great it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just gonna get slaughtered for the so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on and how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name taker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's terrain yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah and this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and it's been a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to the city center in the case of London he said and four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes in a man a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah and in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is guess is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hot short distances or medium distances any had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so it was closed in who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jackpot yeah there were a few of I don't think he said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby get study with wings and goes super super fast yeah then he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like a military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield an easy four hundred was like a man like a flying ambulance yeah so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia for a test flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happened interesting so he then this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you're like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time the aircraft went right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down in kill them yeah it shut up five hundred to seven hundred feet and yet on the left and crashed and that was that and that was that I don't I'm curious I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that I'm curious what the statuses I I couldn't find anything about it it's the company that he founded that was developing it is absent a B. C. E. N. and I couldn't find with the status of that thing is I hope they continue on with that because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing is I mean these were jets but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent yeah so it's not like we're just here jets in in our inner cities guys constantly quiet yeah relatively inexpensive yeah but you need to solve that straight up and straight down thing well all our I. P. Michael decker and RHP all those inventors except we see are not really interested in wishing him well who who died by their own invention hats off to you for your spirit of curiosity and ingenuity.

Chuck William bullock four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet seven hundred feet million dollars fifty percent
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:19 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right with a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour that was good like it that's not bad at all is like it was a flat press you have the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flat thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour this is a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yes so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and William bullet comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the book press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah the most amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top doing that the front you go to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklet in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yeah so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet presses needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah like I feel like he was close to making it he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications surgery from gangrene brought on delay crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and in thrall than watching a a newspaper operation being printed I said for heavy I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think that's it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post there are some one of the hokey just shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this there there's the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical I suddenly is breaking out it's crazy hours like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one I like kids second unit was from holding I'm hoping I just love the cats Mister show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class with those of Ron Howard movie yeah because I know how to make movies for the most part the other day was that the Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it the what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one that was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things I'm great it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just going to get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on then how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name taker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's terrain yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah in this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast and it's been a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to a city center in the case of London he said and four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes yeah man a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is this is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so it was closed in who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jackpot yeah there were a few of them I don't think he said I mean street about four hundred ten feet to take off it is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby yeah it's W. with wings and goes super super fast yeah then he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like a military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield I don't eat four hundred was like a man like a flying ambulance yes so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia for a test flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happen interesting so he then this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you're like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time the aircraft went right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down in kill them yeah it would shut up five hundred to seven hundred feet and yeah aunt left and crashed and that was that and that was that I don't I'm curious I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that I'm curious what the statuses I I couldn't find anything about it it's the company that he founded that was developing it is absent a B. C. E. N. and I couldn't find with the status of that thing is I hope they continue on with that because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing is I mean these were jets but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent yeah so it's not like we're just here jets in in our inner cities guys constantly quiet muchas yeah relatively inexpensive.

Chuck William bullock four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet seven hundred feet million dollars fifty percent
"william bullock" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when there's a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour that was good like it that's not bad at all there's like it was a flat press you have the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour there's a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yeah so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and William bullet comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the bullet press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah the most amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top doing that the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yes so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet presses needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah I feel like he was close to making it I he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delay crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed in and throw than watching a a newspaper operation being printed I said for heavy I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think I said it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the posts the post there are some one of the hokey ist shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they're like this this this the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is bobbing David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical that's the is suddenly is breaking out it's crazy I was like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one like kids second unit was I'm hoping I'm hoping I just love the cats Mr show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class with those of Ron Howard movie yeah because you know how to make movies for the most part yeah they did was it's a Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it the what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one it was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things I mean that's great it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just going to get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on and how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name Dicker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's name yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah and this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast it has been a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to a city center in the case of London he said in four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes in a man a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is guess is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so it was close and who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jackpot yeah there were a few of I don't think he said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off it is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby yet still be with wings and goes super super fast yeah than he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield I don't eat four hundred was like a mess like I'm flying ambulance yes so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia protest flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happened interesting so he then this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time the aircraft went right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down and kill them yeah it would shut up five hundred to seven hundred feet yeah aunt left and crashed and that was that and that was that I don't I'm curious I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that I'm curious what the statuses I I couldn't find anything about it it's the company that he founded that was developing it is absent a B. C. E. N. and I couldn't find with the status of that thing is I hope they continue on with that because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing is I mean these were jets but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent yeah so it's not like we're just your jets in in our inner cities guys constantly wide yeah relatively inexpensive yeah but you need to solve that straight up and.

Chuck William bullock four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet seven hundred feet million dollars fifty percent
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:33 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right Chuck I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but we only do seven or eight of them this is a top five and by god we're doing all five that's right when there's a little added on yeah this one William bullock billable like in eighteen thirty two there was the printing in the printing press you know the history the printing press in fact we should do on that too at some point you bet really fascinating in many many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining speed just getting more efficient and be able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour right end up in by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour that was good like it that's not bad at all there's like it was a flat press you have the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off for flip it over and then print another one another when they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that and then this guy named Richard hello came up with he replace that flag thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting so it just fine and you just move that paper on and off as fast as you could and all of a sudden you could do like a thousand to four thousand papers pages an hour there's a huge leap brightened by I think eighteen thirty two is when Richard house invention came along yes so flashforward another thirty four two thirty three years and way invalid comes along again a great period of invention in the world and in the United States and he created the bullet press which was I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now which is right a rotary press which had not sheets of paper but one big huge a roll of paper some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continue only cranking these things through and all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour yeah the most amazing about so before like it it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving he still had a human who had to take up a paper off after was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this it was just fully automated you had a cylinder on top doing that the front here to cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper he could print two sided twelve thousand she's per hour in today from what I saw those rotary presses that balik invented move paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred and twenty eight page booklets in an hour now there there that fast which is I'm impressed it's it's come a long way but billable look like you said kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press and I mean think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages an hour now it's twelve thousand thanks you you feel pretty good about yourself plus he was a newspaper editor to so he was kind of doing this based on his own observations and how to make improvements in his own industry and he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books so I am impressed with William bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life yes so because he was invented this machine he would work on himself he would adjust it and make repairs himself and that was at the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven on one of his bullet presses needed some work so he went in there himself was working on it and the exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that yeah during an operation to amputate the leg yeah like I feel like he was close to making it he was here's the thing though from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick the belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in their instructed that means he was doing that while the machine was operating area that's exactly what happened so yeah not that impressive but he yeah that's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delay crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off brought on by being a brilliant inventor great guy nothing makes me more relaxed and in thrall than watching a a newspaper operation being printed a set for have I'd have you because it doesn't ring a bell yeah I think I said it we're talking about the the the the movie that last year was called the paper no the post the post there are some one of the hokey ist shots of ever seen in my life is in that movie do what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think there it Tom Hanks is house and they're arguing and they it like this there's the cameras just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic seen in one of the shots is Bob and David for Mister show yeah like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm yeah and then the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein Hammerstein musical the S. suddenly is breaking out it's crazy I was like who directed this and then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this again I thought I think is maybe B. or C. director maybe came up with that one like kids second unit was I'm hoping I'm hoping I just love the cats Mr show was that it was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie have you seen the paper that much Michael Keaton yeah that's what I was thinking of that's that is a world class with those of Ron Howard movie yeah because you know how to make movies for the most part yeah they did was that the Star Wars movie do they make one yeah Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie I didn't know that did you see it now I don't care for it the what the one I saw that I like to is a row one of one it was great yeah my lead another thing to do with anything right it was a well known things I'm great it yeah I would say I had nothing to do with anything but it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what's ours fans call that the canon yeah we're we're just going to get slaughtered for this so that's fine I've been slaughtered for less so let's move on then how are you going to how do you pronounce that guy's name Dicker Michael decker that's what I'm going with all right you're keeping all the letters I looked it up and I couldn't find any news coverage of it that's usually how you can find somebody's name yeah this is surprising because this was written very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one yeah and this is a really interesting idea for an invention if you look at these things I assume you check out the pictures yeah of the jet pod dude so this guy's idea he was born in the U. K. in nineteen fifty six was a pilot in the British Army and but good pilot and he had this idea for something called the jet pod which is basically an air taxi so he was like if I I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much runway to take off can go really really fast it has been a quick time and landed in a in a kind of a truncated area then I can speed up I can make like a a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to the city center in the case of London he said in four minutes from heath Heathrow to central London yes did which I'm sure you know this from when we did our U. K. tour it takes an hour yeah at least to get there by regular like car taxi yeah by the by black cab it's horrible so the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes in advance a dream by itself right yeah these things are cool looking they really are and from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track yeah this thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft which is a type of VTOL vertical take off and landing which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport you can have like a dedicated say airstrip but it could be it would just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city and if they were gonna selling for a million dollars which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty Bucks yeah that's as much as a cab ride yeah it in four minutes rather than an hour and the the whole point was this is this is going to ease congestion it was going to be a cheap and easy way to to kind of hop short distances or medium distances and he had some ideas for military and yeah like ambulance uses for it as well so it was close and who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was it during a test flight of one of the the the jet pods yeah there were a few of them I don't think he said I mean feet about four hundred ten feet to take off is about a hundred twenty five meters and it would go like three hundred and fifty miles an hour which is awesome yeah but he had three models the T. one hundred sort of if you look these things up it looks like a little ultralight plane but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centers it looks like a a short bus plane is what it looks like they because it's yellow yeah you know it's totally Dennis like stubby yeah I'd still be with wings and goes super super fast yeah then he had the M. three hundred which was bigger bigger this is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters right or not take the place of but you know assist with right removing injured soldiers from the battlefield I don't eat four hundred was like a man like I'm flying ambulance yes so these things like you said they were speeding along again not pie in the sky this is a real thing that was happening and then on August sixteenth two thousand nine not very long ago he took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia protest flight I also saw I was in Taiwan really yeah I I couldn't tell where it actually happened interesting so he then this is where it gets a little frustrating because he he could not get airborne on three attempts and that to me is when you like all right let's just grounded for the day and figure this out but he tried it a fourth time the aircraft went right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down in kill them yeah it would shut up five hundred to seven hundred feet yeah aunt left and crashed and that was that and that was that I don't I'm curious I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that I'm curious what the statuses I I couldn't find anything about it it's the company that he founded that was developing it is absent a B. C. E. N. and I couldn't find with the status of that thing is I hope they continue on with that because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing is I mean these were jets but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent yeah so it's not like we're just here jets in in our inner cities guys constantly wide yeah relatively inexpensive yeah but you need to solve that straight up and straight down thing well all our I. P. Michael decker and RHP all those inventors except we see are not really interested in wishing him well who who died by.

Chuck William bullock four minutes thirty four two thirty three y hundred twenty five meters four hundred ten feet seven hundred feet million dollars fifty percent
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right. Chuck think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens, but only do seven or eight of them. This is a top five in by God for doing all five. That's right. With landed on. Yeah. This one William Bullock, Bill Bullock in eighteen thirty. Two though was the printing and the printing press, you know, the history of the printing press. In fact, we should do on that too. At some point really fascinating. In many, many people, contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining in speed, just getting more efficient and be able to pump out, more and more. What you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour. Right, and up to and by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour was good like this not bad at all. There's like it was a flat press. You had the typeset on, like a flat board that came down, and you'd take the paper off, or flip it over, and then print, another one, another one, they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that. And then this guy named Richard ho came up with he replaced that flat thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting. So it just spun and you just move that paper on an office fast as you could. And all of a sudden you could do like a thousand four thousand papers pages in our lives, a huge leap, right? And by eighteen thirty two is when Richard hose invention came along. Yes. So flash forward, another thirty four. Four to thirty three years and William bullet comes along, again, a great period of invention in the world and in the United States, and he created the book press, which was, I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now, which is a rotary press, which had not sheets of paper. But one big, huge roll of paper, some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continually crank in these things through. And all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour. Yeah. What was amazing about so before, like it, it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving. He still had a human who had to take a paper off after it was printed and put a piece of blank paper onto the next one with this. It was just fully automated had a cylinder on top doing the the front and you had a cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper. So you could print two sided twelve thousand per hour. And today from what I saw those rotary presses that Bullock invented move paper through twenty miles an hour. And can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred twenty eight page booklets in an hour. Now, they're that fast. Which is I'm impressed. It's come a long way, but Bill Bullock like you say kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press, and I mean think about it. Think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages our now it's twelve thousand thanks you. Feel pretty good about yourself. Plus, he was a newspaper editor too. So he was kind of doing this based on his own observations in how to make improvements in his own industry. And he was an orphan, raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books. I'm impressed with William Bullock, except for one of the last things he ever did in his life. Yeah. So because he was invented this machine, he would work on himself, he would adjust it and make repairs himself, and was the Philadelphia public ledger. In eighteen sixty seven one of his Bullock presses needed some work. So he went in there. Himself was working on it, and exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers. And there was no pulling out at that point in crushed his leg. That turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that. Yeah. During an operation to amputate the leg. Yeah. Very feel like he was close to making it. He was. Here's the thing, though, from what I saw what got him was. He was trying to kick a belt back onto a pulley and if his leg got caught in there and sucked in. That means he was doing that, while the machine was operating. Oh, yeah. That's exactly what happened. So. Yeah, not that impressive. But he. Yeah. That's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene brought on delayed. Crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off. Brought on by being a brilliant, inventor, great guy. Nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a, a newspaper operation being printed, have I have you because it doesn't ring a bell. Yeah. I think I said it we were talking about the, the, the movie that last year was called the paper. No, the post the post their, one of the hokey shy. Shots have ever seen in my life is in that movie. What is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think they're at Tom Hanks's house, and they're arguing and the, like, the, the, the, the cameras, just moving around the room, just taking in all this frenetic scene. In one of the shots is Bob and David for mister show like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm, and the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical. Suddenly breaking out. It's crazy. I was like, who directed this? And then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this thought, I think his ABC director, maybe came up with that won his second unit was day. I'm hoping I just love cats mister show. That was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie. Have you seen the paper the Michael Keaton? Yeah. That's what I was thinking of. That's that is a world class with Ron, Howard movie. Yeah. Know how to make movies for the most part. It's a Star Wars movie. Did they make one? Yeah. Ron Howard made the, the Han solo movie. I didn't know that. Did you say it? I didn't care for it. The what the when I saw that I liked to grow wanna gone. That was great. Yeah. Nothing to do with anything. Right. Great. Yeah. Say I had nothing to do with anything. But it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what stars fans call that the canon. Yeah, we're just gonna get slaughtered for this. So that's fine. I've been slaughtered for less. So let's move on then. How are you going to? How do you pronounce that guy's name? Dacre Michael Dacre. That's what I'm going with. All right. You're keeping all the letters. I looked it up. And I couldn't find any news coverage of it. That's usually how you can find somebody's terrain. Yeah. And this is depressing because this was very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one. And this is a really interesting idea for an invention. If you look at these things I checked out the pictures of the jet pod tude, so this guy's idea. He was born in the UK in nineteen fifty-six was a pilot in the British army and a good pilot. And he had this idea for something called the jet pod, which is basically an air taxi. So he was like, if I, I think if I can invent something that goes doesn't need very much. Runway to take off can go really, really fast and in a quick time and land in a in a kind of a truncated area, then I can speed up. I can make like a, a jet taxi where people can get from like an airport to a city centre in the case of London. He said in four minutes from heath Heathrow, central London. Yes. Dude, which I'm sure, you know, this from when we did our UK tour. It takes an hour, at least to get there by regular like car taxi by the by black cab. It's horrible. So the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes, a dream by itself, right? Yeah. These things are cool. Looking, they really are. And from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track. Oh, yeah. This thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft, which is a type of VTAM. Oh, L vertical takeoff landing, which like you said, it just needed a very short strip of land, which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport. You can have a dedicated say airstrip, but it could be to take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city, and they were going to sell them for a million dollars, which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty bucks. Yeah. It's as much as a cab ride. Yeah. And in four minutes rather than an hour. And the whole point was, this is this is going to ease congestion, it was going to be cheap and easy way to, to kind of hop short distances or medium distances. Any had some ideas for military and yeah. Like ambulance uses for it as well. So it was close who knows if we might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died, and he was it was during a test flight of one of the, the jet pods. Yeah, there were few of them. I don't think we feed about four hundred ten feet to take off, which is about one hundred twenty five meters. And would go like three hundred fifty miles an hour, which is awesome. Yeah. But he had three models. The t one hundred sort of if you look things up. It looks like a little extra light plane, but it's a jet this would take about fifty trips a day, back and forth between the airport and city centres. It looks like a short bus plain is what it looks like they, it's yellow, it, totally stubby, yet stubby with wings and goes super super best. Yeah. Then he had the m three hundred which was bigger bigger. This is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters. Right, for not take the place, but, you know, assist with removing injured soldiers from the battlefield the four hundred was like, like flying ambulance. Yeah. So these things like you said they were speeding along again. Not pie in the sky. This was a real thing that was happening. And then. On August sixteen thousand nine not very long ago. He took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia. For a test flight. I also saw. I was in Taiwan. Really? Yeah. I, I couldn't tell where it actually happened. Interesting. So he and this is where it gets a little frustrating because he, he could not get airborne on three attempts. And that to me is when you're like, all right. Let's just grounded for the day and figure this out, but he tried it a fourth time. The aircraft went to right straight up into the air vertically and then right back down in kill him. Yeah. Five hundred to seven hundred feet. Left and crashed. And that was that. And that was that I'm curious. I would imagine that this thing wasn't completely scrapped after that. I'm curious what the status I couldn't find anything about it, the company that he founded that was developing it as absent ABC an and I couldn't find what the status of that thing is. I hope they continue on with it, because it would just be wonderful to have these things because another thing I mean, these were jets, but something they had some sort of technology that cut the jet noise in half by fifty percent. Yeah. So it's not like we would just hear jets in, in our city skies constantly. Yeah. Relatively inexpensive. Yeah. But you need to solve that straight up straight down thing. Well, all our P, Michael Dacre, and RIP, all those inventors, except we see are really interested in wishing him who who died by their own invention. Hats off to you for your.

Bill Bullock William Bullock London Richard ho Michael Dacre Ron Howard ABC UK Bullock Philadelphia public ledger Chuck Michael Keaton Tom Hanks Steven Spielberg William bullet United States British army editor canon Han
"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right. Chuck. I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens, but only seven or eight of them. This is a top five and by God for doing all five. That's right. With. Yeah. This one William Bullock, Bill Bullock in eighteen thirty two the was the printing and the printing press, you know, the history of the printing press. In fact, we should do on that to some point really fascinating. In many, many people, contributed to the printing press gaining traction in gaining in speed, just getting more efficient and being able to pump out, more and more. What you would call sheets per hour paper sheets brower, right? And, and by eighteen thirty two they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour. Those good like not bad at all. There's like it was a flat press. You had the typeset on, like a flat board that came down, and you'd take the paper off, or flip it over, and then print, another one, another one, they could do like four hundred sheets per hour like that. And then this guy named Richard ho came up with he replaced that flat thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting. So it just spun and you just move that paper on an office fast as you could. And all of a sudden you could do like a thousand four thousand papers pages in our lives, a huge leap. Right. And by eighteen thirty two is Richard hose invention came along. Yes. So flash forward, another thirty four. Two thirty three years and William bullet comes along, again, a great period of invention in the world and in the United States, and he created the book press, which was, I think this is sort of the one we're more used to seeing now, which is a rotary press, which had not sheets of paper, but one big, huge roll of paper, some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continually crank in these things through. And all of a sudden you could get twelve thousand sheets per hour. Yeah. The most amazing about so before, like it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving. He's still had a human who had to take a paper off after it was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one with this. It was just fully automated. You had a cylinder on top doing the, the front, and you had a cylinder on bottom doing the backside of the paper, so you could print to sided twelve thousand she's per hour and. Today from what I saw those rotary presses that Bullock, invented move, paper through it like twenty miles an hour and can do, like I think, sixty four thousand hundred twenty eight page booklets in an hour, now, they're, they're that fast which is, I'm impressed. It's come a long way, but Bill Bullock. Like you said, kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press, and I mean, think about it think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages in our now, it's twelve thousand thanks you. Feel pretty good about yourself. Plus, he was a newspaper editor too. So he was kind of doing this based on his own observations in how to make improvements in his own industry, and he was an orphan raised by his brother who was self taught in mechanics just from reading books. I'm impressed with William Bullock, except for one of the last things he ever did in his life. Yeah. So because he was invented this machine, he would work himself. He would adjust. It and make repairs himself and was the Philadelphia public ledger. In eighteen sixty seven one of his Bullock presses needed some work. So he went in there. Himself was working on it, and exactly what you think happened happened his leg gets caught in one of these rollers. And there was no pulling out at that point in crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that. Yeah. During an operation to amputate the leg. Very I feel like he was close to making it. He was. Here's the thing, though, from what I saw what got him was. He was trying to kick a belt back onto a pulley, and if his leg got caught in there and sucked in doing that, while the machine was operating. Oh, yeah. That's exactly what happened. So. Yeah, not that impressive. But he. Yeah. That's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications in surgery from gangrene. Brought on delayed. Crushing brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off. Brought on by being a brilliant, inventor, great guy. Nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a, a newspaper operation being printed or have have you because it doesn't ring a bell. Yeah. I think that's it. We were talking about the, the, the movie that last year was called the paper. No, the post the post their one of the hokey show. Lots have ever seen in my life is in that movie. What is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at I think they're at Tom Hanks's house, and they're arguing and the, like, the, the, the cameras, just moving around the room, just taking in all this frenetic scene in one of the shots is Bob and David from mister show, like pointing into the chest of the lawyers like in rhythm, and the lawyers are backing up in rhythm almost like it's like a Rogers in hamlet's Hammerstein musical. Suddenly breaking out. It's crazy. I was like, who directed this? And then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this thought, I think his ABC director, maybe came up with that won his second unit was I'm hoping I just love cats mister show. That was pretty great did not expect to see that in that movie. Have you seen the paper the Michael Keaton? Yeah. That's what I was thinking of. That's that is a world class, that was Ron Howard movie. Yeah. Know how to make movies for the most part. Star Wars movie. Did they make one? Yeah. Ron Howard made the, the Han solo movie. I didn't know that. Did you say it? I didn't care for it. The what the when I saw that I liked to grow wanna on that was great. Yeah. Nothing to do with anything. Right. Great. Yeah. Say I had nothing to do with anything. But it wasn't like part of the I don't even know what stars fans call that the canon. Yeah, we're just gonna get slaughtered for this. So that's fine. I've been slaughtered for less. So let's move on then. How are you to? How do you pronounce that guy's name? Dacre Michael Dacre. That's what I'm going. All right. You're keeping all the letters. I looked it up. And I couldn't find any news coverage of it. That's usually how you can find somebody's terrain. Yeah. And this is surprising because this was very recently and we're going back to rockets again with this one. And this is a really interesting idea for an invention. If you look at these things I checked out the pictures of the jet pod tude, so this guy's idea. He was born in the UK in nineteen fifty-six was a pilot in the British army and a good pilot. And he had this idea for something called the jet pod, which is basically an air taxi. So he was like, if I, I think if I could invent something that goes doesn't need very much. Runway to take off can go really, really fast and quick time and land in a kind of a truncated area, then I can speed up can make like a, a jet taxi where people can get from airport to city center in the case of London. He said in four minutes from heath Heathrow, central London. Yes. Dude, which I'm sure, you know, this from when we did our UK tour. It takes an hour, at least to get there by regular like car taxi by the by black cab. It's horrible. So the idea of getting from central London Heathrow in four minutes, a dream by itself, right? Yeah. These things are cool. Looking, they really are. And from what I can tell this is not just like some pie in the sky kind of thing like this guy was on track. This thing was like the real deal is something called very quiet short takeoff and landing aircraft, which is a type of VETS. Uh-huh. L vertical takeoff landing, which like you said it just needed a very short strip of land, which meant you didn't have to you didn't have to have an airport. You can have a dedicated say airstrip, but it could be just take up a very small amount of land in the middle of the city, and they were going to sell them for a million dollars, which meant that trips on these things would have been like fifty sixty bucks. Yeah. It's as much as a cab ride. Yeah. And in four minutes rather than an hour. And the whole point was, this is this is going to ease congestion, it was going to be cheap and easy way to, to kind of hop. Short distances or medium distances. And he had some ideas for military and yeah. Like ambulance uses for it as well. So it was close who knows if you might have these things by now because in two thousand nine the guy died and he was it was during a test flight of one of the, the jet pods. Yeah, there were few of them. I don't think we feed about four hundred ten feet to take off, which is about one hundred twenty five meters. And would go like three hundred fifty miles an hour, which is awesome. Yeah. But he had three models. One hundred sort of if you look things up. It looks like a little tra- light plane. But it's a jet, this will take about fifty trips a day back and forth between the airport and city centres. It looks like a short bus plain is what it looks like they, it's yellow, it totally stubby, yet stubby with wings and goes super super fast. Yeah. Had the three hundred which was bigger bigger. This is the one that like he thought could take the place of like military helicopters. Right. But you know assist with right. Removing injured soldiers from the battlefield e four hundred was like, like flying ambulance. Yeah. So these things like you said they were speeding along again. Not pie in the sky. This was a real thing that was happening. And then on August sixteen thousand nine not very long ago. He took one of the eight seater models a prototype in Malaysia. For a test flight. I also saw. I was in Taiwan. Really? Yeah. I couldn't tell where it actually happened. Interesting. So he and this is where it gets a little frustrating because he, he could not get airborne on three attempts. And that to me is when you like all right?.

Bill Bullock William Bullock London Richard ho Ron Howard UK Bullock Philadelphia public ledger Chuck Michael Keaton William bullet Steven Spielberg United States Tom Hanks Michael Dacre British army editor Malaysia Taiwan canon
"william bullock" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"So he was kind of doing this based on his own observations in how to make improvements in his own industry. And he was an orphan raised by his brother who is self taught in mechanics just from reading books. I'm impressed with William Bullock except for one of the last things he ever did in his life. Yes. So because he was invented this machine, he would work on it himself. He would adjust it and make repairs himself and was the Philadelphia public ledger in eighteen sixty seven. One of his Bullock presses needed some work. So he went in there. Himself was working on it and exactly what you think happened happened. His leg gets caught in one of these rollers, and there was no pulling out at that point and crushed his leg that turned gangrenous and he died a few days after that. Yeah. During an operator. To amputate the leg. Yeah, very, I feel like he was close to making it. He was. Here's the thing though, from what I saw what got him was he was trying to kick a belt back onto a pulley. And if his leg got called in there and sucked in that means he was doing that while the machine was operating. Yeah, that's exactly what happens. So yeah, not that impressive. But he, yeah, it's a terrible way to go gangrene through complications of surgery from gangrene bought on, delayed crushing, brought on by not just stopping to turn the machine off, brought on by being a brilliant inventor, great guy. Nothing makes me more relaxed and enthralled in watching a a newspaper operation being printed for. Have I have you because it doesn't ring a bell? Yeah, I think that's it. We were talking about the the the movie last year was called the paper. No, the posts the post, their one of the hokey est shot. Have ever seen in my life is in that movie, what is it where the lawyers and the editors are all at. I think they're at Tom Hanks's house and they're arguing, and they like the the, the, the cameras, just moving around the room just taking in all this frenetic scene in one of the shots is Bob and David from mister show like pointing into the chests of the lawyers, like in rhythm, and the lawyers are backing up in rhythm. Almost like it's like a Rogers in hamlets, Hammerstein musical suddenly breaking out. It's crazy. I was like, who directed this? And then I saw the Steven Spielberg directed this thought. I think his ABB your see director maybe came up with that one like his second unit was holding. I'm hoping I just love that he gets mister show. That it was pretty great. Did not expect to see that in that movie. Have you seen the paper the Michael Keaton? Yeah, that's what I was thinking of. That's that is a world class that was Ron Howard movie. Yeah, know how to make movies for the most part. Yeah, Yeah, they they do. do the Star Wars movie. Did they make one? Yeah, Ron Howard made the the Han solo movie. I didn't know that. Did you see it? No, I didn't care for it. What the one I saw that I liked to as a grow wanna. Go on. That was great. Yeah, nothing to do with anything. Right. It was. I mean, great. Yeah, I wouldn't say I had nothing to do with anything, but it wasn't like part of the. I don't even know what Star Wars fans call that the canon. Yeah, we're, we're just going to get slaughtered for this, so that's fine..

William Bullock Ron Howard Philadelphia public ledger Steven Spielberg Tom Hanks Michael Keaton ABB Rogers canon Hammerstein director Bob Han David
"william bullock" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"All right, Chuck. I think we're down to two and this is weird because normally we do top tens but only do seven or eight of them. This is top five in by God for doing all five. That's right with leaded on. Yeah, this one, William Bullock Bill Bullock in eighteen thirty two though was the printing in the printing press. You know, the history of the printing press. In fact, we should do what on that too. At some point, really fascinating in many, many people contributed to the printing press gaining traction and gaining in speed, just getting more efficient and being able to pump out more and more what you would call sheets per hour paper sheets per hour, right? And up and by eighteen thirty two, they're up to about four hundred sheets per hour was good, like not bad at all. There's like it was a flat press a. You had the typeset on like a flat board that came down and you take the paper off or flip it over and then. Print another one. Another one. They could be like four hundred sheets per hour like that. And then this guy named Richard ho came up with. He replaced that flat thing with the typesetting with a cylinder with type setting. So it just spun and you just move that paper on an office fast as you could. And all of a sudden you could do like a thousand four thousand papers pages in our. There's a huge leap right? And by eighteen thirty two is when Richard hose invention came along. Yes, so flash forward another thirty four to thirty three years and William bullet comes along again, a great period of invention in the world and in the United States, and he created the book press, which was I think this is sort of the one where more used to seeing now which is a rotary press which had not sheets of paper, but one big, huge roll of paper. Some of these were up to five miles long where you're just continually crank in these things through and all of a sudden you. Could get twelve thousand sheets per hour. Yeah. What was amazing about so before? Like it, it didn't matter how fast that cylinder was moving. He still had a human who had to take a paper off after it was printed and put a piece of blank paper on to do the next one. With this. It was just fully automated. You had a cylinder on top doing the the front and go to cylinder on bottom, doing the backside of the paper. So you could print two sided, twelve thousand. She's per hour. And today from what I saw those rotary presses that Bullock invented move paper through like twenty miles an hour and can do like I think sixty four thousand hundred twenty eight page booklets in an hour. Now the they're that fast, which is I'm impressed. It's it's come a long way. But Bill Bullock, like you said, kick the whole thing off with his web rotary printing press. And I mean, think about it, think about making an improvement to machine where it was four thousand pages in our. Now it's twelve thousand. Thanks. You. You'd feel pretty good about yourself? Plus he was a newspaper editor too..

William Bullock Bill Bullock Bill Bullock Richard ho William bullet Chuck United States thirty three years
"william bullock" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Citation Needed

"And we're back when we left off. See so describing a bunch of people who got punched to death by the earth and pretty much died on impact. And that's been great, fun topic, but it's open. You might have some long drawn out, slow torture, style death to talk about the dog it. Why were you hoping on a mix up. Mix it up. Here we go so chemistry. There's an article that does not contain a quick or merciful death, so it scientists name, Andrei zone, Lenzi cough. Nice. I don't know from saying whatever. I'm just fucking wing that guy. Five years after he was working on an a lab on a nerve agent is hood, mill function and the Novacek five years working on got into a system. So he died of psoriasis, toxic hepatitis nerve damage and epilepsy after spending time in a coma cheese wanna point out that the Russian officials denied that program like this exists though. Out there and they threw a hard drive up in the air yelled Hillary's Email, ran the other direction. Nine caught it. And it works. I show a fucking overachiever brush. It can't just die of one cause. Or alcohol poisoning his family. So William Bullock invented few improvements that rotary printing press. If you never seen one of these, they look giant pasta machine. Well, Williams on top. One of these giant presses made, this is gonna go, well, this is going to happen. The press is running. Any tries to kick one of the Dr bell Zach, this holy. Oh my God, guys, good news. The belt became I was worrying all ring. My heart was in my throat about that. His leg became stuck, and he crushed it and develop gangrene answering that question, what's black, white and red all over. What do you do? Print is dead medium. The next day, some guys like, okay, new rule, no kicking anything. That's a giant squeezer of stuff. Okay. We need to make that rule, but let's put it up on the board, kicking giants as IRS. We all got that. William ruined yesterday. Oh, this isn't an invention because lighthouses have been around for two millennia. But this guy is in the article anyway and his name is Harry win Stanley. He built a lighthouse and the editors of Wikipedia had this to say, quote, win Stanley was recorded as having expressed great faith in his construction going so far as to wish that he might be inside it during quote, the greatest storm there ever was his wish. The tower was entirely destroyed on the night of November twenty. Seventh, seventeen three during the great storm of that year win Stanley was visiting the lighthouse that night to make repairs, and he lost his life and quote, and that is why you never wish on a monkey's paw bad. Every time Horace Lawson Hunley died like he lived. It is suffering invented the first combat submarine for the confederacy. The sub had already been in an axe. When the wake of a passing ship came in the hatch and killed five of the nine people on board. The others managed to escape those. So they made. Autre close that guys, my bad. We shoulda what separates shut the door. You guys have your galoshes. That's gonna be tight as a dish. You gotta ask. So Hundley takes command of the vessel when it's out doing routine exercises and it sunk and killed everyone on board. So say live by the time by this. I, I feel like a lot of the people on this list go down as people who almost invented yet. Exact amazing. Noah sitting by the shore and he's just like, okay, well, technically, now. I don't wanna be that guy. Also, what are the detail on this? They actually pulled that sub out when it sank. They fixed it and they used it again a year later to sink an enemy ship from from the union army for the first time in naval history, but in the least effective way possible because there were fucking stupid. They finally got going, they see the enemy ship and they're like, oh, shit. So what do we? What do we do now? Did anyone like invent under water cannons. Fuck. Smashed into the hull and kill everyone on both sides. Yes. Haematologist that experimented with transfusions named Alexander began, Dov died because of a transfusion, he would get transfusions from lots of different people, and he claim that it made his eyesight better and at it's slowed or stopped his balding got a bad dose though, and it either had malaria tuberculosis or it was blood type incompatibility. What the fuck is. This guy is just some vampire in the emergency room, a little Florida. You. Vampire sound like that. I don't do six voice. They it did stop his balding. So next on the list is a guy. We made a short about patrons. You'll remember this Thomas midgely junior g. You know, I'm going to read again from

William Bullock Stanley Dr bell Zach Horace Lawson Hunley nerve agent Thomas midgely psoriasis Hillary Novacek union army Dov Noah Florida IRS coma Hundley gangrene Autre Harry Wikipedia
"william bullock" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"william bullock" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"And she'd gladly show them these people included william bullock and sir joseph banks famous naturalists and scientists of the time as the years went on the hughes daughter finally was tired of carrying the severed head with no takers from us em's she finally sold it to desire henry wilkinson in eighteen fifteen the head remained in the wilkinson family's possession for more than one hundred forty years pretty soon the head took on a new name the wilkinson head during that time the authenticity of the head was called into question the first was in eighteen forty five when writer and historian of the time thomas carlyle called the head a hoax carlisle had never actually seen the head however and pass judgment entirely upon a friend's firsthand account but by this point few people cared enough about the head in fact most assumed the head was probably a fake can't say i blame them there's really no hard evidence to say otherwise what do you think i agree we really have nothing concrete to go on at this point but things did change for the skull in eighteen seventy five when another contender rose up to challenge the authenticity of cromwell's head this skull was called the shmole in skull the name shmole incomes from the museum where the skull was housed the ash million museum of oxford like the skull owned by wilkinson it had a pipe through its head leading many to believe it was really cromwell's at first the ash mullion head was declared that january article it has competition between the two heads grew demand check the authenticity of wilkinson's head did also so in eighteen seventy five famed zoologist and physician george rolleston examined both skulls to his surprise he found that wilkinson's head was not only authentic but even closer to the description of cromwell's head than the ash molin skull it boiled down to how the head was piked according to historical accounts cromwell's head was piked from the bottom to top the shmole in had had been stabbed starting from the top thus the.

william bullock henry wilkinson writer cromwell george rolleston hughes thomas carlyle museum of oxford one hundred forty years