21 Burst results for "William Branham"

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:00 min | 2 months ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Has gotten so bad that some hospitals in the northern part of the state are having to ration the care. They give. Idaho has one of the nation's lowest vaccination rates. Only 40% of the population is fully vaccinated. As William Branham tells us, many of the ICUs have been pushed to their limits. Judy. The decision by state officials to allow for the rationing of care means that if hospitals are so overtaxed, they can decide to limit ICU rooms to just those patients who are most likely to survive and then move other patients to non hospital rooms for their care. Elective surgeries have also been cancelled or seriously cut back. And these problems seem to be accelerating. Elsewhere in the state. Covid cases are up more than 40% in the last two weeks and hospitalizations up 25%. Brian Whitlock is the CEO of the Idaho Hospital Association. All of the state's full service. Hospitals are members of his organization, and he joins me now from Boise, Brian Whitlock. Great to have you. I'm sort of alarmed to hear what's going on in your state right now. Can you just give us a sense of what you're hearing from different hospital officials? Thanks, William Appreciate the opportunity. Our hospitals all across the state have been stressed for a couple of weeks. But we saw starting at the beginning of August was just a rapid increase in the number of positive cases, which translated into hospitalizations, which translated into ICU visits and also An increase in the amount of covid deaths. So that's been concerning since the beginning of August. And and we've been doing all that we can to prepare to move into contingency modes to move hospital space into nontraditional spaces like classrooms. Hallways and other areas where we can at least try to meet the demand that's coming through the doors. But we've reached the point where we are almost on overload and have an inability to transfer patients to other areas of the state. Or even the region because of a lack of capacity around the state. When people hear terms like rationing or crisis, standards of care, they're troubling sounding terms in a practical sense. If I'm a patient who has been in I C U for a while or I'm a patient who is arriving at an ICU. What does that mean for me? It means that there may be a longer wait. If you are just arriving, Um Had a sobering conversation just yesterday. Where, um All of our hospitals get on a call each day and we we tried to load level and make sure that we can transfer patients. One small, critical access hospital. They jumped in as all of our larger tertiary hospitals were saying that their ice use were completely fallen. They couldn't take transfers. This tiny hospital said. We just had a covid patient pass away in our ICU. We will have an ICU bed available in about 30 minutes to try to offload some of the pressure on these larger hospitals that have just been inundated and And in some cases are on divert. Um, So if you did need to go to an ICU that might be closed, and they might have to send you to the next closest. I see you are hospitals. They're at a point where they might have to choose that ventilator goes to this patient. And perhaps not to that patient and William. Those are difficult conversations to have, but they are taking place. If you have somebody in an ICU that's been on a ventilator for a couple of weeks and is not showing any sign of improvement. And you do have somebody who it might be younger whose conditions may not be as as acute as, um, That person that's been in the ICU for a couple of weeks. Those are conversations that are taking place about moving back one patient into comfort care and freeing up the ventilator in order to hopefully save the life of another patient. Are these patients that are filling these ice to use unvaccinated patients by and large, more than by and large, almost all of the patients that we are seeing in the hospital. And certainly in the ICU are unvaccinated. We do see some vaccinated people and with breakthrough cases that do need hospitalization, But it's nowhere near as serious as it would be if they were unvaccinated. I mean, that's got to be incredibly dispiriting for hospital staff to know that 95% of these patients could have avoided this with a free safe vaccine. And that's the challenge. Our our nurses and our doctors and all of our hospital personnel are going to continue to be passionate and and provide that compassionate care. But there is some fatigue. Knowing that this is entirely preventable when you have a hospital that has 200 beds in north Idaho. And, um, more than 100 of those beds are taken up with Covid patients that they didn't need to be there. It could have been prevented. And yet you still have people who Have other conditions, heart attacks breast cancer. I mean, there are other things that you mentioned. Elective surgeries have been canceled, but now some of these urgent surgeries are also being postponed. Because those hospital beds are being taken up by covid patients who are unvaccinated. I mean, we've seen and I've talked to health officials and hospital officials in various parts of the country. Do you have a sense as to where that hesitancy is coming from? I think there is a lot of misinformation. Um, I think in today's world, people get information from social media. They have friends who have friends who are on social media. Who heard somebody say something and My encouragement is that Most physicians. Most researchers don't publish their findings on YouTube. And peer review doesn't mean the most number of likes that you get on social media. And so please do your research but do it with credible sources of information and then make a decision and hopefully that decision is that you choose to get a vaccine. That's the only way that we're going to get ahead of this pandemic. Lastly, do you have a sense of the arc of this? I mean, I understand. I've read one analysis that you might be up to 30,000 new cases per week, mid month this month. Do you have a sense of how? How bad this might get. I think all of our hospitals and health systems that are doing their projections, Uh, fear that it still maybe a couple of weeks out before we peak And when you look at, um all of the projections in their totality Some of those are saying we may not even peak until the middle of October. And yes, in a small state like Idaho when you're having 30,000 cases predicted that That is overwhelming. And.

William Branham Brian Whitlock William 30,000 cases 95% Idaho Hospital Association 200 beds north Idaho yesterday YouTube about 30 minutes more than 40% middle of October more than 100 25% one patient one analysis each day today one
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 5 months ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The PBS news hour from W. To studios in Washington and in the West from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. The U. S. Is in a far better place this summer than many other countries witnessing new covid cases. But the delta variant of Covid Now expected to become the dominant strain in the U. S. Is posing serious dangers in areas with low vaccination rates. It is spread in many countries worldwide, and that's triggering shutdowns and fears of more deaths. William Branham begins our coverage with this report. Across the world. A wave of new lockdowns are being implemented as nations scrambled to get ahead of the coronavirus strain known as the Delta variant. The risk is real. And we need to act quickly. The fear spans entire continents Cities across Australia, a country praised for its initial handling of the pandemic, but now with limited vaccination Are imposing stay at home orders. As of midnight person. Peel will be entering a four day lockdown in several Asian nations, Indonesia and Malaysia. The variant has threatened to overrun hospitals. Travelers in Hong Kong hustled to get on the last flights to the United Kingdom before a travel ban went into place, killing people with thousands and across Africa. The virus is hitting hard, it's forced South Africa to reinstate bans on alcohol sales. Gatherings and indoor dining for the next two weeks, President Cyril.

William Branham United Kingdom Hong Kong Africa Australia Washington PBS President Walter Cronkite School of Jour four day thousands U. S. Malaysia Arizona State University Indonesia South Africa this summer Delta Cyril many countries
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:53 min | 5 months ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And months and months without any therapy, none just because he didn't have his mother couldn't afford it. And there was no access. The least we can do with these kids is given therapy. We just have to decide as a country that these kids matter. And that we're going to do what we can to support them just as they support each other. I want to make sure that she feels okay about talking to me. She goes through a lot. Then I just check up on her alive, and I hope she feels like I do too. Tai Shan and Eva haven't recovered from their trauma, but they're facing it together for the PBS news hour on Stephanie Side. While Covid 19 vaccination rates in some parts of the country are approaching President Biden's July 4th goal of 70% other areas are seeing rates flatten or even decline. But as William Branham reports in some states, the rates have dropped dramatically. That's right. Judy and vaccinations in the southern US have been especially slow. Mississippi's is the lowest in the country. With just over 28% of the population fully vaccinated. Louisiana's rate is 33% and no Southern state has yet topped 40%. So why is this occurring? Dr. Joseph Cantor is an emergency physician in Louisiana. And he also serves as the state's top medical official, Dr Canter. Very good to have you in the news hour. Two thirds of Louisianans are not fully vaccinated. Do you have a sense as to who those people are and why they are not vaccinated yet? Thanks, Rory. Um it's really nice to be with you. You know, it really does run the gambit across Louisiana and I'll just say, you know, we've done a lot of great work in Louisiana. We are not where we Want to be or need to be, and what we're seeing is different. People have yet to choose to get vaccinated for different reasons. We do see a lot of access issues, still, particularly amongst marginalised communities. We have a lot of marginalized communities in Louisiana, Also a lot of earned mistrust. The system and we have a lot of baseline mistrust of government and suspicions. I'll tell you these myths that are out there about the vaccine had become really pervasive. And challenging to combat. So who's seeing challenges both in urban areas in rural areas? We recognize the strategy differs a little bit depending on who you're trying to target. And we still have a lot of work ahead of us to do. So. Let's talk about those two different slices the people who are hard to reach. Maybe you're not so sure about the people who are delivering that message to them. How do you reach those communities in Louisiana? I know there's a lot of rural parts of your state. How do you reach those people? It's all about trusted messengers, and that actually stands. Anyone that you're trying to reach and we got to be humble and know that the government or myself. Likely not the best messenger for everyone in Louisiana. There's no question about that. But somebody is for everyone that harbors concerns or hesitancy about the vaccine. There is someone that they listen to. Whether it's third position, whether it's a three liter whether it's a community leader. There is somebody that people listen to, and what we're trying to do is to hone in on those individuals and empower them. To help spread this message and can be in conversations. This is going to be a slower process. It's going to be a more deliberate process, but we think it's probably the only thing that's been a Encourage people who have yet to be vaccinated to feel comfortable in doing so. How concerned are you about this? The delta variant, the one originally discovered in India, We know it's more contagious. We certainly seem to believe that it's more likely to make you sick and hospitalized. You is it in Louisiana, and isn't that a real threat? It is. There's no question about nationwide. It's doubling in prevalence about every two weeks and, uh, that accounts about 12 to 13 13% of all the coded in our region. Down here in the South, which is above the national average. So we look at what we have for risk and the next coming months, and when the weather gets warmer, it's already pretty hot. It's the same thing that happens up north where the weather drives people indoors that increases transmissions. So that puts us that liability Delta variant which, as you mentioned, William is more transmissible and the naked people sicker and spreading quickly. Because that liability too, So we know what we do right now with vaccinations is larger than a dictate what our fall and our winter will look like. We know that a lot of states around the country have had some success with incentives trying to lure people in to get them to get the shot. I understand. You just made an announcement about a big lottery and some scholarships. Do you think that those things are going to work? Yes, I think they have. I don't think there are silver bullet. I don't think there is any one single silver bullet, but I think they help. I think they drum up excitement. And I think for some people, it is an encouragement and look I think there's a lot of conversation about whether you know these are worth money and right, Iran But we're in 100 Year event right now, and we still have people dying. We announced seven new deaths today We're averaging in Louisiana between 45 65 just a week. When you're still seeing people die when people's lives are on the line. Got to consider everything. Nothing's off the table. And that's the perspective that we take on this. All right, Dr. Joseph Cantor, State health officer for the State of Louisiana. Thank you very much. Thank you. Good pleasure..

William Branham India 33% Rory 40% 70% Tai Shan July 4th Joseph Cantor Eva William Mississippi Canter PBS Louisiana today Stephanie Side two third position 100 Year
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 6 months ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the long running TV show Law and Order s V U resume production in September. Executive producer Warren Light, announced he would hire as many unemployed theater actors as possible more than 30. So far, we were aware that people were losing health insurance and Broadway. People are. It's been a tough time. We just thought, Let's not fly people in from other cities. Let's not look too so much to to the TV acting cool. Let's try and keep the local Broadway pool that we've always relied on. Let's help as much as we can. Plus, Light, says his show benefits from the talents of suddenly available top Broadway stars. The objection is sustained. Several, including Tony Award winner Adrien Lennox have played judges. Judges need a certain kind of, um Authority. And if you can hit the back wall of the Winter Garden, you can handle arraignment Court here. Of course, there are only so many judges even on the law and order franchise. The real questions When will Broadway return? And what will it look like? We have had no revenue for nine months now, we most likely won't have it for another eight months. We are the first industry that without and almost likely be the last one in Charlotte, Saint Martin, president of the Broadway League, the trade group for Commercial Theater in the U. S, says Broadway faces unusually daunting challenges. Broadway is a very, very expensive business. We looked at socially distancing because The state was asking us to try and the most seats that we could fill in the biggest theater was 27%. We need 75% for most shows. To even break even for now, Saint Martin and others say the focus must be on sustaining the people and the work. They do that make up this great American industry. So there will be an industry to return to for the PBS news hour. I'm Jeffrey Brown. The growth of the so called Delta Covid varied in the UK and more recently in the U. S. Is worrying health officials. Vaccines have proven effective against all the variants, particularly when someone is fully vaccinated. But the pace of inoculations in the U. S is slowing. Last week the U. S was averaging about 800,000 doses a day well below this spring when 2.5 to 3 million were being given each day. By the administration's goal of getting 70% of adults inoculated with at least one shot by July, 4th is looking harder. Given that a month long campaign has begun with incentives from state governments, sport leagues and businesses all to get people to roll up their sleeves. William Branham has the.

Adrien Lennox William Branham Warren Light Jeffrey Brown 75% 27% 2.5 September 70% UK nine months PBS eight months Broadway League Last week July, 4th U. S. U. S Light more than 30
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We will be ready. Dan Bush and I was looking at that live stream of the vote counting going on there in Pennsylvania yesterday, so we know that has been Has been taking place. Alright. Daniel Bush there for us in Philadelphia. Thank you, Dan Separately are William Branham has flown to Michigan and he joins us now from Detroit. William. Thank you for being here. As you know, the just moments ago. The Associated Press. Called Michigan on and said Joe Biden is the winner. This is even with both campaigns having spent a lot of effort there. I know you just recently arrived. But what are you hearing from? The campaign's about this? Well, I think as John and you, Misha laid out, the campaigns have staked out their traditional positions. The Biden campaign thinks this is great news season is part of their consistent path to victory. The Trump campaign is really arguing this whole case. I'm actually standing here in a huge convention center in downtown Detroit. This is where those votes are still being counted regardless of what the Associated Press or any other news organization, says Philadelphia All of sorry all of Michigan will continue. To count those votes. They're very nearly done. But as we came into this facility today, there were protesters outside, similar to the ones you saw people on the Biden side, saying Count every vote. People on the trump side saying Stop.

Joe Biden Michigan William Branham Dan Bush Detroit Philadelphia The Associated Press Daniel Bush Pennsylvania Misha John
Trump panned over reports he called US war dead 'losers'

PBS NewsHour

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Trump panned over reports he called US war dead 'losers'

"William Branham reports on the fallout intensifying today over an article that alleges President Trump made disparaging remarks about U. S troops. It's a fake story, and it's a disgrace that they're allowed to do it. President Trump is firing back after a report in the Atlantic magazine and later confirmed by multiple news organizations, said the president several times called fallen American servicemembers, losers and suckers in the Oval Office today, the president again flatly denied ever making the comments. And instead touted military spending under his administration. There's nobody that considers the military and especially people that have given their lives in the military to be the heroes. Who the heck does he think he is his Democratic opponent, former vice President Joe Biden, whose own son, Beau, served in Iraq. Called the reported comments deplorable. But my son volunteered, enjoying the United States military as the attorney general. I went to Iraq for a year. Won the Bronze Star. Another commendations. He wasn't a sucker secretary of state Mike Pompeo, who was on a 2018 trip to Paris when the president allegedly made some of these comments. Told Fox News. He doesn't remember them have never heard the president used the language. Those certainly has said in that article. But going back to his 2016 campaign, Mr Trump has had a complicated relationship with the military theme. He's often praised those with military experience and has had many working with him in the White House. But other times he's questioned their service. Like his widely criticized comments about Senator John McCain, who was tortured and imprisoned for more than five years during the Vietnam War, a war hero. I like people that weren't captured President Trump overwhelmingly one among veterans in 2016, But since then, his approval rating among members of the military has dropped to 38% in a new poll from Military times. With two months until Election Day. Mr Biden has a four point advantage with thes voters.

President Trump Vice President Military Times Joe Biden Iraq William Branham Senator John Mccain Mike Pompeo Atlantic Magazine Fox News Oval Office United States U. S Beau Attorney White House
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The protests. At the women's March. On Saturday, demonstrators prevented security officers in plain clothes from detaining a man with a camera they had tried to pull from the crowd. It was a very different atmosphere at one of the smaller pro regime rallies, The authorities have hastily thrown together and responds to the three week old protest movement. Thie goal of the protest is to come to power and then terrors away from Russia. We can't let that happen. Riot police were nowhere to be seen on television crews and photographers could operate openly for the PBS NewsHour. I'm Simon Ostrovsky. This global pandemic has again driven home the crucial role that our healthcare system placed in our health and our well being. And tonight we began a special Siri's about how we provide health care in America compared with how it's done elsewhere in the world. William Branham and producer Jason Kane film this Siri's In the weeks before the pandemic broke out, and William joins me now to explain a little more about the Siri's so high. William. I know you, you two work very hard on this. Tell us a little about what the Siri's covers. Well as you said, Judy. We started this before the pandemic broke out. And the the idea was to look at the state of American health care how it is today. And as you know, this is a country with remarkable innovation in that field, remarkable innovation. And yet this is also a country with incredibly stark disparities. There's over through 30 million people who have no health insurance whatsoever. So we thought, Can we learn something about Can we learn something from other nations that do a better job of covering everybody, And there's obviously a political side to this. We saw a big debate going on in the Democratic primary. We know this is going to be a big issue in the presidential campaign. Rice. President Biden wants to expand the affordable care act and get us closer to universal coverage. President Trump says he wants to get rid of the A and replace it with something better and to lower costs. But we thought since there are so many nations that are already doing a very good job of this, let's go there and see how they're doing it. So inevitably, as you say, it is going to be a part of the campaign. Where did you go to make these comparisons? We went to three countries that provide good, inexpensive universal health care to their people. And there's been a thisted bait happening in this country about is health care, actually a right These are nations that are not having that debate. They're just doing it for their citizens. And the key metrics that we looked at here are access quality cost and how they take care of the disadvantaged in their societies. And the US frankly doesn't do that well in a lot of those metrics, So we went to several nations three in particular the United Kingdom, Switzerland and Australia, all of which measure better and we wanted to see how do they do it? Let's look at exactly the mechanics of how they get there. And as you say, you started filming you were filming before the pandemic broke out. But, of course, since then it's become a huge public health concern. How did you look at how these countries were dealing with that? Well, initially, we're not looking at that We really wanted to stay focused on this issue of universal care, in part also, because the way these countries responded to the Corona virus pandemic is only partly influenced by the structure of their healthcare systems. I should say at the end of this serious we will have a conversation very specifically about how they responded to Covad. But we really wanted to stay focused on how is it that these countries are able to cover everyone at seemingly a reasonable cost? And what might we learned from that experience? And so for that we begin our story here in the U. S in Houston, Texas. This's a boy saved by American innovation, bouncing, rocking, joyful testament to the miracles of modern American medicine in his life was transformed here. In what's called the largest medical city in the world, the Texas Medical Center in Houston here, doctors test artificial organs built from scratch, technicians designed robots to speed efficiency. Surgeons use virtual reality reconstruction to see tumors inside the body before ever making an incision and kids like six year old case in Cox come back from near death, Kayson was born with only half his heart functioning normally, the hints of blue and his skin a sign of a little body hungry for oxygen. Most kids with this condition don't live very long. But I can remember it perfectly. It was pouring rain outside, of course, and I was by myself, and my doctor told me that she sees that Cason Heart is underdeveloped. So it was a very few dark days for me. But in 2017, using a new and highly complex surgical technique at the Texas Medical Centers, Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, Dr Jorge Salazar change the course of cases, life casing was going to die and had we done what we've always done. He would have had it transplant already or it's it's hard thing to say that he would've passed away already. Now we have a normal child in front of us. Dr. Salazar came out with the biggest smile on his face, and he said, I did it. You did it. He did it and it works. So I mean, I think we all started crying. Cason Cox is one story. The Texas Medical Center performs 180,000 surgeries every year and it like other gold standard medical centers across the U. S. Hundreds of thousands of patients from around the world. The technologies and innovations created in the U. S..

Siri Texas Medical Center Cason Cox William Branham Russia Dr. Salazar Simon Ostrovsky Texas Medical Centers Dr Jorge Salazar PBS President Biden President Trump Covad Cason Heart Texas
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Moves one by the Food and Drug Administration, the other by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have again raised questions about whether the Trump administration is injecting politics into the nation's pandemic response. William Branham has the latest The first instance happened on Sunday night when President Trump and the head of the FDA, Dr Stephen Han, came forward to announce the emergency approval of convalescent plasma as a covert 19 treatment. Han overstated how effective treatment was And, after much criticism, had to walk back his comments. Then yesterday, the CDC changed its guidance on who should be getting tested for Corona virus without explanation. It removed its earlier advice that people with no symptoms get tested. Even if they've been exposed to the virus. I'm joined now by Dr Thomas Frieden. He ran the CDC for eight years, and he's now the head of a global health initiative called Resolve to save lives. Dr Frieden. Great to see you again. Could you just What is your sense? What do you make of these two changes is this is just par for the course for science, or is there something more troubling going on here? This is not part for the course. This is unprecedented. And William. The fact is that the virus does not respond to spin the virus responds to science. And these two moves taken together are very concerning their concerning in particular for what's going to happen in the coming weeks and months with the rollout of a vaccine against Cove it because of that vaccine is the single most important thing we could have to protect ourselves against the virus. It's not going to be quick. It's not going to be simple and getting people to take a vaccine requires a lot of trust and confidence and these air two moves that have undermined confidence of the public health community of the scientific community, and I'm afraid of the broader community as well. I want this issue of the testing change with the CDC. As I had mentioned you ran the CDC for many years to news outlets today reported that pressure from the Trump administration came down to make that change. Do you really believe knowing the men and women who run the CDC and make up its scientific Kadre? That is really possible that that kind of pressure could be exerted and would have this effect. I cannot remember a single incident in my nearly eight years running the CDC or nearly 20 years working at the CDC, where any entity other than the CDC got something put on the CDC website. Unfortunately, that has happened repeatedly in the current administration, and that's dangerous because it undermines confidence in what has been one of our most trusted and trustworthy public health institutions. Admiral Brett Drawer who is running the testing sort of the testing's are for the Trump Administration's Corona Virus Task force. Said today that there was no pressure involved. I'm going to read a quote from him, He said There was no weight on the scales by the president or the vice president or secretaries are of HHS. He says. This was a product produced by these scientific and medical people that was discussed extensively at the task force. So if we take him at his word, and there wasn't pressure do you believe the science? Merits, not testing. People who are asymptomatic that thus far has been a public health strategy that we all know. Let's be Frank. We don't have enough tests. The administration perhaps doesn't want to say that, but there aren't enough tests that can come back. In a meaningful time friend, one or two days. Therefore, we have to prioritize. That's reasonable, symptomatic people. People who are in congregate facilities like nursing homes, homeless shelters, correctional facilities, meatpacking plants where you can have massive outbreaks. Are higher priority. Some asymptomatic people aren't low priority If a college wants to test every kid coming back to campus. That's not a high priority when we have limited tests, but a contact of someone who's got cove. It is high priority because they may have the infection without having symptoms. They may actually be the source of the infection. Without knowing that they have it and you can't stop chains of transmission unless you can find chains of transmission, so it's really not defensible to say that asymptomatic contacts should not be tested. Let's turn to this issue of convalescent plasma and Dr Han, seemingly to make a fairly basic scientific, mistaking, overstating the effectiveness of that he later as I mentioned, walked that statement back Do you just chalk that up to a mistake, urd or again with that particular issue? Do you see something else afoot? There's no question that there was a desire to describe this as a major breakthrough when in fact, what we have is a 100 year old treatment that may work somewhat for some patients. And whether or not an emergency use authorization is justified. The bottom line is we're not going to be able to learn how to help patients. Most If this kind of politics is played with science, we have to do a careful studies. Maybe certain antibodies work better than others. Maybe certain patients will be benefited more than others. Maybe it's only useful in the first day or two. After people get sick. We don't know that and now we may not know it for even longer. This is about figuring out how to control Cove it not how to control the news cycle. All right, Dr. Thomas Frieden, former head of the CDC, and now CEO of Resolve to save lives. Thank you very much again. Thank you..

CDC Trump Administration asymptomatic Dr Stephen Han Dr. Thomas Frieden Food and Drug Administration President Trump William Branham control Cove Admiral Brett Drawer HHS president Frank CEO vice president urd
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Delivery of mail in ballots this fall. Uh, joy told members of the House Oversight Committee that he was not responsible for those changes, which have now been paused until after the election. I did not direct the removal of blue collection boxes. For the removal of mail processing equipment. Any further assertions by the media or elected officials is furthering a false narrative to the American people. Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney, Democrat of New York, challenged to joy for downplaying the impact of his policies in his Senate testimony on Friday. She pointed toe leaked internal postal service documents showing widespread delays in delivery since he took the job if any other CEO had this kind of plummeting record. In his first two months on the job. I can't imagine why he would be kept on Republicans took to his defense, calling the delays temporary growing pains, as did Joy works to reform the agency. But I'm disappointed at the hysterical frenzy whipped up around this issue by my colleagues on the left, and their friends in the media is the postmaster general sabotaging the election by removing blue postal boxes in mail sorting machines. No. The hearing turned testy when some lawmakers demanded to joy clarify his policies moving forward on that same front. Will you put the machine will not I will not will not. You will not well they ago. Other conflicts centered around accusations from Democrats that D Joy who is an ally of President Trump and was a major Republican donor is trying to influence the 2020 election. President Trump has repeatedly disparage the use of mail and voting on Twitter. Today, he again made the untrue claim It leads to fraud and would set the table for quote a big mess. This followed a weekend tweet seeming to discourage people from voting by mail by claiming again with no evidence that in person ballot drop boxes are not quote Cupid sanitized. While do, Joyce said today these comments were not helpful. He was steadfast in denying any accusation of political intent and framed. The changes to the Postal Service has cost cutting measures. All my actions have to do with improvement is a postal service May that mighty only one in this room that understands that we have $10 billion a year loss. On Saturday, the House approved $25 billion in emergency funding for the agency and reverse those operational changes. More than two dozen Publicans back to measure, but their colleagues in the Senate are unlikely to vote on it. And the White House has threatened to veto it for the PBS NewsHour on William Branham. That's it From here. Let's go back to Judy for more on tonight's kickoff of the Republican convention. Congressman Steve Scalise is the second highest ranking Republican in the House, and he is just hours away from speaking later this evening at the Republican National Convention. He also represents the first district of Louisiana, where, as we reported earlier, locals are bracing for not one but two tropical storms. Representative Scalise joins me now from New Orleans. Congressman Scalise So good to see you. Thank you very much for talking with us. What do you think? The main myth? Absolutely. What do you think the main message should be? From this Republican convention. How much of it should be about Donald Trump? And how much of it should be criticizing Joe Biden and the Democrats? Really, Judy? I think first of all through the week, you're going to see a vision for what we need to do to get the country back on track. Through covert 19 and everybody's dealing with it all around the globe. But here in America, there are a lot of things that we're doing. Tio number one help people safely reopen, whether it's businesses or schools. But also this this rush towards making sure we can put all the energy of the FBI and other agencies the final pure in a vaccine, and we're very close to some remarkable breakthroughs there. And so the president I think really, His message needs to be what he's done to deliver on the promises that he's made over the last four years, delivering for hard work and families, we built the greatest economy our country's ever seen. Just over the last two years, and now we're at Oh, but obviously things were different, but who best to bring us back through that then the president who already did it, President Trump said today at the Republican National Convention, he said he and the Republicans have always protected pre existing conditions. But he is now his administration is asking the Supreme Court to throw out the affordable care act, which protects pre existing conditions. Well, The problem with the affordable care act is it's not affordable. I mean, you can look and see how premiums have gone up dramatically. Millions of people lost the good healthcare. They had that old promise. If you like what you have, you can keep it probably most broken. Promise in the history of politics with President Trump wants to do is focus on letting patients and doctors decide the best health care, not Washington bureaucrats and lowering premiums while protecting for existing conditions. That's not happening right now. The premiums are too high were people with preexisting conditions even right now are paying in some cases, $10,000 deductibles and they can't even afford A free healthcare that quote unquote that was sold to them. So we need to focus on rebuilding and strengthening our healthcare system, giving people real options buying across state lines protecting people with preexisting conditions by lowering premiums for everybody, not by raising him where everybody's paying too much. Well, it's a it's A It's a much bigger subject protecting preexisting conditions. But my point is that that's been a central feature. Of the Affordable care act, and that's something that the Trump administration is trying to dismantle. But I want to ask you about covert relief. Congressman Scalise is you know, the House passed the Democrats version of covert relief. It was at the end of May. So it was three months ago. Then the Democrats offered. To reduce the $3 trillion price tag to two trillion. The Republicans still have not passed legislation in the Senate so that the two sides can get together and work this out. This is not the way things are supposed to work in Washington, is it Well, I would like to see everybody at the table and in fact, you saw Mark Meadows, the president's chief of staff. Over at the Capitol just the last few days trying to meet with Speaker Pelosi and she was too busy. She would not meet with him. I mean, when you when you won't sit down and meet with the president's chief of staff, you're showing you're not serious. They brought us in Saturday to do this vote on the post office when the Post office themselves have said they have enough money to get through the middle of next year. Our small businesses need help right now Families. Need help in relief. We've got Judy over $500 billion of money that we sent out in the carriage, Zach and all the relief packages that's not spent yet over $500 billion, I would say before we get into a negotiation of how many more trillions we give, for example, the states like New York that were already having problems beforehand. We can't be worried about bailing out states that have their own problems. We need to be worried about saving small businesses. Helping.

President Trump Democrats Congressman Steve Scalise president Senate Judy Republican National Convention Postal Service Congressman Scalise House Oversight Committee Washington Carolyn Maloney Joy CEO New York Louisiana Twitter Joe Biden fraud
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Contributions to your PBS station from viewers like you. Thank you. The Postmaster general of the United States today testified before the Senate facing the first public scrutiny of his recent moves at the Postal Service, which reportedly have caused widespread delays in mail delivery. Democrats have accused Louis to joy of sabotage, saying that he is trying to limit voting by mail, which is expected to surge this fall because of the pandemic. William Branham has a report on today's hearing. Thank you, Chairman Johnson for calling this here From the start of today's virtual hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, the newly appointed postmaster general addressed a central question. Would be expected surge of mail in ballots be delivered on time. I want to assure this committee and the American public that the Postal Service is fully capable and committed to delivering the nation's election, male securely and on time this sacred duty is my number one priority between now and election Day. Did you discuss those changes our air their potential impact on the November election with the president or anyone at the White House. Postmaster de Joy, who was appointed by the Postal Services Board of governors, was in his prior life. A major donor and fundraiser for President Trump. Today. He pushed back on the idea that the reforms he's instituting are being done to help the president's reelection. President Trump has repeatedly and incorrectly said voting by mail is rampant with fraud. And demanded it be stopped. Senator Gary Peters, Democrat of Wisconsin, pressed this line of questioning. You will give us your word today under oath that you have not taken any action whatsoever in your capacity. This postmaster general for any political reason or at the suggestion of any any administration officials. So I will tell you my first election now meeting instructed the organization the whole team around us and out in the field. Whatever efforts we will have Double them. We are very committed. The board's committed the postal workers committed the union or AH, leadership is committed to having a successful election and the the insinuation is quite frankly outrageous Changes to joy has implemented which today he said he would suspend until after the election included reducing overtime hours for mail delivery people. Decommissioning hundreds of large, high capacity mail sorting machines. Senator Maggie Hasson, Democrat of New Hampshire, described how one sorting machine in the city of Manchester had been sold and the remaining one broke. When we have only one machine that could do a certain kind of sort of our largest distribution center in the state of New Hampshire, and it breaks and everything has to stop till it gets fixed again, You're really sabotaging the Postal Service's ability to sort mail efficiently. And you're undermining postal workers commitment to that every gay delivery. So will you commit to having your team look into this person and I don't agree with the premise, but I will comply with your request due. Joy said The removal of some of these machines was normal post office procedure in response to the decline in envelope sized male and to make space for the increase in package size male But senators from both parties, including Republican Rob Portman of Ohio, said these male delays had RIA world implications beyond the election. We have a number of veterans who contacted us and said We weren't able to get their medication and one is a 70 year old. Certain Vietnam has COPD has trouble breathing. The inhaler refilled was mailed through the Postal Service due to delays he ran out of it will be hard to arrive. Importantly for November. 2 Joy promised that almost all election male would be treated like first class mail, which would ensure quicker delivery. There had been reports The Post office was considering a slower category for ballots to joy sought to assure the public that despite what they've heard, the Postal Service had more than enough capacity to handle this volume of ballots. In the fall. We deliver 233 million pieces of mail a day. So 150 million ballots. 116 million balance over a course of Ah, week is a very, very small Despite these assurances, many of the joys critics aren't satisfied. As the hearing began today, six states and the District of Columbia, led by Pennsylvania filed suit against the Postal Service and postmaster to joy, saying these changes have made it harder for states quote. To conduct a free and fair elections. In the end Postmaster do Joy defended his reforms as much needed fiscal discipline for the post office. He and others have noted that the service lost $9 billion last year. He argued that in the age of FedEx and ups, the post office needs to change in order to compete. I believe there was an opportunity for the Postal Service could better serve the American public. And also to operate in a financially sustainable Mac. Our ability to fulfill that mandate in the coming years is that fundamental risk Changes must be made to ensure our sustainability for the years and decades ahead. Postmaster to Joy will testify before a House committee early next week. And today, the Post Office's board of governors announced that they are establishing a bipartisan election male committee. This would be to help a lot of these states who are going to see a surgeon voting by mail, help them work out their programs. That same board of governors also today offered its full support for postmaster to joy Judy. So, William, you mentioned a lot of the criticism of the postmaster is it thought that he did enough today to allay Of these critics concerns It's not totally clear, Judy. I think that the big concern is is that and this was cited by several of the senators during the hearing today is that the president himself keeps politicizing the post service with everything that he says all of his accusations, false accusations about voting by mail being full of fraud, so everything that the joy does is seen through that lens..

Postal Service de Joy Post Office president Postal Services Board of gover William Branham President Trump fraud United States Senate New Hampshire Louis Senator Gary Peters Senator Maggie Hasson Judy FedEx Chairman Johnson House committee Manchester
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well, I've actually heard several Republican senators say they're against it, including. I believe the majority leader Mitch McConnell, but what I want to ask you also about Larry Kudlow is unemployment benefits. The president mentioned that he thought he might be able to do something by executive order. How would he do that? Where would the money come from? I know there's some unspent money from what was passed in the spring. Is that what the White House is looking at? There may be some repurpose ing of unspent funds. Judy I can't say I'm not a lawyer there combing through a number of things. I don't want to give away to wanna negotiate here. I'm just saying it's something we're worried about. First of all. I mean, look, the economy is doing much, much better. We all still believe in the V shaped recovery. We had very good news today on unemployment claims dropping for again. We've seen a housing boom. A manufacturing boom inventory is at rock bottom. It looks to us like a self sustaining recovery, but There is still hardship. There is still heartbreak as we deal with the virus, and we want to make sure that people have a good constructed unemployment plan with my mine add added benefits for returning to work, So we are looking at all that carefully. But just to clarify this is the 20th straight week when over 1,000,000 Americans have filed for unemployment benefits over 30. What is it 33 million Americans? Have lost their jobs. So for you to say the economy is doing better. I think you know that needs to be in perspective. But I do want to ask you. Are you saying that there's money that was appropriated? That you're saying the president that the White House believes that he could then Create unemployment benefits, What $600 a week, which is what was flowing up until last week. Well, I don't want to put numbers on it, and I don't want to give away any of the legal draft. I'm just saying it's something he is looking at very carefully. Along with the eviction and along with the payroll tax, and along with some student loan breaks as well. These are all part of what our council's looking at Treasury any C O M B and so forth. And yes, we've been very keen on that. I just want to say one thing Judy, though I appreciate the context of the jobs, as I said. There's still a good deal of hardship going on out there, however, jobs have come back by nearly eight million. In the last couple of months. Unemployment claims have fallen substantially from the highs of this winter. And a lot of people have gone back to work. And some of that was because of a bipartisan rescue package last March, which really helped the job story and really help deal with the virus. Unfortunately, we can't seem to find any more bipartisanship. That is a problem, which is leading the president to act on his own. But I'm sure you don't deny that until there's a vaccine until there's a some sort of a solution that is not in sight. Right now, Many small businesses will remain closed. Businesses are just not operating anymore. They can't employ. People, but very quickly I want if I may. You know, you mentioned that look way spent an inordinate amount of money on vaccine research right now. There are six or seven companies better in stage three Phase three of a vaccine, which our ex correct, but it's nothing may come before the end of the year, So I'm really proud of that and hopeful and prayerful that we can get that done. And I know everyone shares that that hope on and that prayer but just quickly on this divide on schools. As you know, the Republican proposal is to make 2/3 of that money contingent on schools being physically open in class experience. A lot of teachers. A lot of parents just are not prepared to send their Children back to school. Why have If you will a punitive approach in terms of giving money to schools. Well, look, I mean, we've offered over $100 billion so many groups. There's divisions here, like everything else. But so many groups of doctors and experts and psychologists and psychiatrists have said the very best thing for our kids is to get them back in school. Now, there may be some mix that is acceptable Judy in terms of in the school, as well as by computer, but no We think the overwhelming weight of the evidence is what's good for the kids. K through 12 in particular, get them back to school, and by the way, it has economic impact, as a lot of parents can't afford additional care at home. So from an educational standpoint, from a psychological standpoint, so many professional groups have said, Get those kids back to school. Right. And in just a few words, How long is President Trump prepared to wait before he acts unilaterally on this? Well, I let him make that decision. All I want to say this evening to you, and I appreciate coming on the program is he's working very hard at it, and we're looking at all of our executive options. Larry Kudlow with the Council of Economic Advisers. Thank you very much. Many schools, speaking of schools around the country are changing their plans, and they've decided to start the school year with distance learning. In some cases, school districts have reversed course in just the past few weeks. William Branham is going to look at the dilemmas that school districts, teachers, parents and public officials are all facing in two states, but first let's hear from teachers who have been grappling with their own tough choices. This was produced by our student reporting labs teams. Our school has really ambitious plans. Right now. They've decided to use a hybrid in that there's a plan for us to go back in person and a plan for students to take classes online. It's ambitious and a little scary right now. I love my career. I want to go back to the classroom. I just wanted to be a safe classroom. This is historic. We have never had a school year like this. So the challenges are gonna range from my own child care to my own hell..

president Larry Kudlow Judy executive White House Mitch McConnell President Trump William Branham Council of Economic Advisers C O M B
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Trump failed us as the virus spreads in a number of states. Some officials have had to dial back there re openings on Monday, Texas and California both reported record increases in new infections. Cases in Florida are also soaring in Arizona. Hospitalizations have nearly doubled in the last two weeks, prompting Governor Doug boosting to scale back his state's re openings. Meanwhile, the 31 nation European Union announced today It will open its borders to 14 other countries. United States because of its outbreak is not on that list for the PBS NewsHour on William Branham. With more than half the country grappling with this summer Covad Surge eyes are on Congress with calls for a new economic relief package. We turn now to the speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi. She represents. California, one of the state's hit hardest and earliest bike over 19. Madam Speaker. Thank you very much for joining us. We appreciate it as we have been hearing there is this new surge alarming reports on the comeback. Of this pandemic, and at the same time people looking to the Congress for economic relief, But right now Democrats and Republicans seem to be in your separate corners. You said over the weekend. You think Republicans are going to come around? What are Democrats prepared to do? What we were prepared to do is pass the Heroes Act, which we did, and everything that is in there. Almost 99% of it is what Republicans have voted for before. But as you go through these statistics about covert understand this in the Heroes Act, we have an answer. We can open our economy by testing testing testing. They're talking about mask. I agree. Washing your hands. I agree, keeping your distance. I agree. But testing, tracing, treating and distancing are the tools that we have at our disposal. Now this administration has been a terrible failure. I don't like to dwell on them. I want to go forward but for them to call come out there and say their plan from the start. Put us in a good place. Over 125,000 people died from this because the president called it a hoax delayed denies death pursuit We have in the bill testing that is the answer to all of the scientists tell us the academics tell us you must test many more people every day test trace and then treat so that we can stop the deaths, which disproportionately hurting our communities of color. Her as well. So in that ville is an answer. It's a strategic plan, and they haven't thought strategically. Our first bill on March 4th on the Cove it issue was for testing testing testing a recent bill. Most recent Philip was about helping small business and testing, and they still haven't embraced a strategic way to go about it instead. They are just I feel so sad for the vice president from what he's being forced for most, but for legislation to be passed, of course, Madam Speaker, both parties have to be on board. The Republicans have said. You said the Republicans need to give some my question is, are the Democrats we heard? The Senate Majority leader, Mitch McConnell, say today that this unemployment benefit 600 Dollars a week above the normal unemployment benefit, he said. It's too much. It's it is allow its paying people to stay home from work. Is that an example of something that you think Democrats are prepared to give on? Forgive me for not appreciating, giving so much time McConnell's objections to $600 to people who are out of work. We'll have that negotiation. But enough in this bill in the first pillar of it is honor our heroes. State and local assistance is Satan local government for their outlays on the Corona virus, as well as the revenue lost because of the Corona virus. All of that if you look at speaker, doctor slash heroes at speaker, doctor slash heroes and look anyplace in the country and see how those These are helped by the Heroes Act and then remember this. That is only all of that money is 1/2 of what the Republicans had in their tax breaks off 12 17 gave 83% of the benefits to the top 1%. So he's saying we need a pause and testing. We need a pause in helping state government needed pause in Unemployment insurance. We need to pause in food, a the food stamps when your paws in all of this because he's worried about some poor person getting $600. That's a negotiation, but it's not a reason for him to make it as if we have no place to go. All of those other things the Republicans have voted for before. Shame on them. Shame on them for not helping state and local governments where Democrats and Republicans Outside the Congress have come together to say We need these resources. We have to balance our budget by June 30th and shame of warning about $600 when everybody's gonna lose their unemployment insurance by the end of July if we don't absolutely Let me turn you Madam speaker so much to ask you about butt a national security question. And that is this new evidence that looks very solid that the Russians paid the Taliban to kill US troops in Afghanistan. The New York Times is now reporting. President Trump was briefed on this back in February. The White House is saying he was not briefed. Who do you believe? What I have said is if the president wasn't briefed. It was probably because they were afraid to tell him anything. Any bad news about Russia and his friend Putin on that, maybe they might be afraid that he would call Putin and And warn him of what we knew already. But whether the president that the point is is that this is a force protection is the purpose of intelligence on 25 years and an intelligence force protection how we initiate hostilities, How we respond to assault. But fourth intelligence is that how we protect our troops and how they want so that for somebody to make an assault on our troops and there to be any question as to whether the commander in chief would be briefed about it tells you what disarray exists in the White House and how serious this problem is, if they're even afraid to tell him Whether it's break..

Congress Madam Speaker President Trump president Mitch McConnell California United States Covad White House assault Putin European Union William Branham Florida Arizona vice president Texas Doug
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Viral outbreak of this new coronavirus and is only now starting to allow scientists and public health officials from the outside to assistance efforts William Branham takes a look at how the country is coping well the vast majority of infections and fatalities are centered in eastern central China in who bay province this outbreak is increasingly being felt across China for a look at how things are on the ground hundreds of miles from who day I'm joined by David Rainey he's the Beijing bureau chief for the economist magazine David thank you very much for being here could you just give us a sense right now what is it like in Beijing so today in Beijing where I am what would normally be absolutely packed it's the end of this very long extended lunar new year holiday literally millions of migrant workers are due to be coming back to the big city here from their homes in the countryside where they went to see their families not factually should be starting up shop should be starting up none of that is happening it's still unbelievably quiet this is a city of twenty two million people and most small shops are closed wrestles a close the schools are closed no parents will put that kids are in the playground of the park it really is a ghost town so it's a huge city it's really extraordinary how this enormous city just feels completely completely dead and I understand that people have basically been ordered to quarantine themselves inside their homes how are people reacting to those kind of orders from the government so it's a mixed picture if you also king how did the Chinese take your eyes are being told to stay home and affected the cancel the biggest holidays a year on this amazing acceptance I was the villages where you know a dozen or so people will literally locked in that bedrooms for the whole of the Chinese equipments going to Christmas and thanksgiving rolled into one because they had come from jobs in who had the worst affected city and so they were immediately just quarantine and told I couldn't even see their own families that kind of quarantine that is amazing acceptance people use these propaganda phrases that you see on red banners hung around the street by the policy saying that this is a war this is a people's war of back in and they really do feel a thing like foot still images in that battle that's one side of it there is another side of it which is how much people trust the government assurances that this is on the control and how they seem to really cover this up for several weeks at the start and has not made this a bigger crisis than it needed to be exact we're seeing a really tremendous on the usual amount of very political anger on Chinese social media and what about the economic impacts we've seen some car manufacturers outside of China basically stop production because they're saying that they can't get parts from China but I'm curious how was the local economy in China holding up I think that it's the next couple of weeks that will tell us a tremendous amount about public maral inside China because people are gonna eyes and not be able to come back to the jobs of tool or you know tens of millions of people were expecting to come back and pick up that job is a ways was a clean in an office building well working in apples but all the flights are canceled well the restaurant to close all the office buildings are telling people to work from home so if you were counting on that income it's not going to be that now sound lost a couple more weeks if the infection numbers keep climbing then that's going to become a really serious domestic issue and in as much as big factories the post of global supply chains are also not able to get up and running what's at the moment a kind of Chinese domestic market is very quickly going to become a warning for the whole of kind of global comments what is your sense about how president she and the central government being perceived in this crisis I mean this obviously has to be an enormous test for them prison she has been presented for the last several years as the supreme leader the man with all of the wisdom to run this country but right now he's clearly the man on the hook for miss seeing the propaganda machine pushing very much this familiar narrative that if there had been any mistakes made it's because of bad apples at the local level who will be sort of routed out by the central government investigators and anti corruption kind of detectives but in the meantime president she's you say has has has been touring hospitals and medical says he's here in Beijing he was called to come on the of the people's war against the epidemic today by the state media they're very much presenting him as the kind of the general in charge but that is not tremendous distrust of alone what the government is telling people and people can see images the ticket from his worst affected areas like the city of Wuhan whether a little frightened six people who think they might have the virus when they get to hospitals that completely overwhelmed by the doctors and nurses are getting sick they just on the supplies and so in as much as things are going wrong and it's a massive change to any country that is a very hard thing to manage if you are the team around president xi Reverdy presented him is this also the infallible benevolent kind of imperial figure out not raises the stakes for him when a big crisis like this needs managing all right David Rainey Beijing bureau chief for the economist thank you very much thank you stay with us coming up on the news hour how to clean a sacred water way the difficulty of washing away the pollution of India's Congo River the former president of Sudan is one step closer to facing justice for the most egregious of the crimes he allegedly committed during the most violent of Omar al Bashir's thirty years in power Sudan descended into civil war now is the government conducts peace talks with rebel leaders they've agreed to send Bashir to trial for more than a decade Omar al Bashir has been wanted by the international criminal court on charges of war crimes crimes against humanity torture rape and genocide in the Darfur region two days to dance transitional government and rebel groups and our four announced the deposed leader will be handed over to the court at the Hague and let the **** Isla we agreed on the appearance of those whose arrest had been ordered in from the international criminal court what we can achieve justice unless from humans with justice itself we cannot under any condition free from facing these crimes against humanity and crimes of war how this year has been jailed in Khartoum on corruption charges since mass protests and.

William Branham
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That of the sars epidemic how the president's budget calls for cuts to entitlement but the ladies eliminating the deficit seventy five years after the liberation of Auschwitz anti semitism is on the rise in Europe and much more this is the PBS newshour from W. E. T. A. studios in Washington and in the west from the Walter Cronkite school of journalism at Arizona State University as we reported earlier China is still struggling with a surgeon coronavirus outbreak one that spread in small numbers to at least twenty five other territories are countries William Branham gets an update now on where things stand today the official death toll from this corona virus has more than doubled in the last week the official number of confirmed cases has also more than doubled Chinese officials have said for several days that they believe that the number of new cases may be slowing but how accurate are these official numbers without knowing that we can't really know how bad this outbreak is or how bad it might get joining me now is Lawrence Gostin he's a professor of global health law and he directs the world health organization's collaborating center at Georgetown University welcome thanks for having me help us understand we know that there is this surging number of cases where do you see this going well I mean I think we have to be prepared for the you know reasonable possibility or even a likelihood that we won't contain this in the foreseeable future you've got to be more than a billion people in China with the readily transmissible infection if if it spreads in that congested population and then eventually the travel bans are lifted one can just foresee that it could escalate escalate meaning this could turn into a true global pandemic it could you know the the the the touch tone is two fold I mean one can be slower on mainland China to or they're going to be many epidemics in other parts of the world that's what happened with sars and right now we've got.

sars president Europe W. E. T. A. studios Washington Walter Cronkite school Arizona State University China William Branham Lawrence Gostin PBS official Georgetown University
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Outbreak of a new corona virus has paralyzed parts of China with mounting health and transportation concerns but the past twenty four hours have altered the political atmosphere there as well the death of a doctor who tried to sound the alarm about the virus has triggered a wave of anger among the Chinese public complete with memorials and online messages that backlash is the focus of William Branham latest report on China it's like a ghost town this city of ten million now the epicenter of this novel coronavirus outbreak is on an indefinite quarantine as the death toll rises every day Chinese officials are facing a different crisis public outrage is surging because of the death of doctor Lee when Leon he's the local physician who help sound the alarm about this virus back in December he died yesterday from the virus but back when the thirty four year old first spoke out police detained him in ordered him to sign a statement saying he made false claims Lee was one of eight medical professionals who warned about the virus at the very moment the Chinese government wanted to stay silent three weeks later China announced the outbreak had become a full scale national emergency this young doctors deaf in his treatment by police has triggered a rare public revolt against the Chinese government to many levy is now a martyr your whole thirty here he left us when we needed him to fight the novel virus and the memo here at the same time he was criticised in unfairly treated because of his report on the virus so we feel very sad the government should hear different opinions and allow different opinions to exist those restrictions were echoed in semi autonomous Hong Kong information.

China William Branham doctor Lee Chinese government Hong Kong
Power cut to millions of Californians to reduce wildfire risk

PBS NewsHour

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Power cut to millions of Californians to reduce wildfire risk

"The power is still out in northern California and across a wide swath of the state the blackout was planned by public utility officials to reduce the risk of wildfire as high winds mixed with dry weather but many don't agree with that timing or reasoning and as William Branham tells us the anger is building around the state as residents businesses and local government offices are trying to deal with it this is my neighborhood renown across northern California overnight entire communities turned invisible to the naked eye the region was plunged into darkness after the California utility company P. Jeannie shut down power over fears that high winds could bring down lines and start wildfires Jeannie initially said it would affect up to eight hundred thousand households which according to other estimates could impact nearly two million people well I think they jump the gun in my opinion turn off is good which

California William Branham P. Jeannie
William Branham, Geneva And United Nations discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

William Branham, Geneva And United Nations discussed on PBS NewsHour

"It is a dire warning the latest science paints a picture of the future in the grips of extreme weather William Branham reports on how much impact climate change and the way we use our land will have on the very basics of life if we don't quickly changed the way we grow our food and managed to land on earth we will not be able to avoid the worst damages from climate change that grim assessment comes from a new report issued today in Geneva by the United Nations Intel panel on climate change over a hundred experts from fifty three nations contributed to the report the report details a global feedback loop where our land management makes climate change worse and then climate change impacts the land even more right now how we grow food chopped

William Branham Geneva United Nations Intel
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"William Branham reporting for us from el Paso thank you so less than twenty four hours after the carnage in el Paso another tragedy are you Michelle cinder reports from Dayton Ohio thirty seconds nine shot dead in a community reeling from yet another mass shooting this time the violence unfolded early Sunday in a busy nightlife district here in Dayton Ohio police fatally shot the twenty four year old got it soon after he opened fire with automatic weapons he was just steps away from entering a popular bar Ned pepper's in the cities Oregon district if any Reynolds had just left the bar when the shooting began and it was gone far some looking around I I'm I okay was going on with the here right after this repeat it my shots like hi power some so we started really right on gravel because right now just are yelling to be confronted me by that's the mass shooter at one point he was just ten feet away from the shooter the shooters own sister is among the dead the motive is still unclear day to marinate Whaley said the quick response by the Dayton police prevented scores more from dying I'm completely grateful for the police department six police officers five of whom have been on the force for only three years ran toward the shooter aerobically not with the kind of weapon he had but with the weapons that.

William Branham el Paso Ohio Ned pepper Reynolds Whaley Michelle cinder Dayton Oregon twenty four hours twenty four year thirty seconds three years ten feet
"william branham" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"william branham" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In el Paso Texas and I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC and throughout the show this morning we're trying to understand what happened over the weekend to mass shootings two cities twenty nine people dead the attack at a Walmart in el Paso on Saturday is now being treated as an act of domestic terrorism the suspect there posted a manifesto online right before the attack describing his imminent action as a response to a quote invasion of Hispanics coming across the southern border he went on to say the attack was a way to quote we claim my country from destruction and quote in pairs Hannah lamb covers home grown extremism for NPR is in studio hello let's talk about the digital aspect of this because the the massacre in el Paso has a link to a platform called eight chan right can you explain what that is that's right HM began in twenty thirteen as a spin off to another site four chan and it would it it came about because a computer programmer named Frederick Brennan who has said he was on a psychedelic mushroom trip at the time how this idea to create a truly unrestricted form free speech no boundaries but what that's meant is that it has become a gathering place for extremists and we've seen white nationalist use HM for recruiting and increasingly as a place to dump their manifestos before going on the attack and that's what's happened three times so far this year in mass shootings in New Zealand in California and now in Texas I talked to William Branham at the start center to terrorism research center at the university of Maryland about why people are posting these statements on eight chan what purpose it serves and here's what he said it really feels like the customers are being aggregated into an ideology that is sort of a living ideology record and this gives individual utility to like.

el Paso Texas Rachel Martin Walmart el Paso NPR Frederick Brennan HM New Zealand California Texas William Branham Washington university of Maryland
"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"william branham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cameras customers are served by license staff who helped them make choices among the many different types of smoke about marijuana war if they prefer there's a dizzying array of THC infused chocolates candies sodas even creams to soon aching muscles in the end it's not that different from buying a bottle of wine at your local liquor store yet amid this boom there are still significant questions marijuana laws and regulation very state by state because marijuana is still illegal at the federal level many problems remain national banks for instance are wary of handling this business so many pot retailers still operate cash only I wanna grown and sold today is also far more potent and now for more available than it used to be and that's free some public health concerns researchers warn of a rise in what's called the marijuana use disorder where chronic use of the drug often negatively impacts the user's life some states have also seen an increase in cases of driving under the influence of marijuana I wanna related hospital visits are also up the most cases involves someone smoking or eating too much which results pretty quickly in some states have legalized the number of under age users went up but in others it didn't what we know is that the legalization of cannabis can have these public health and public safety impacts but it does not it is not clear that cannabis does because these a fax and so the best bet that states have is to recognize that these effects are possible in to try to combat them in advance before they become a reality legalization was sold in part as a way to put a dent in the drug trade but in many states the police say the black market for marijuana has increased since legalization another selling point of legalization was let's stop locking up so many young people for what's usually a minor non violent crime between two thousand one in two thousand ten before the legalization tied began roughly eight point two million marijuana arrests were made nearly ninety percent of them were for simple possession in states that have legalized arrests have gone down dramatically but racial disparities do remain I wanna legalization is a complicated social and political experiment that this country is now running and it's all happening very quickly we're kicking off a new series called the green rush we'll explore issues including weeds increase potency and potential effects on the brain racial equity in the industry and in policing and the pressures from big business and regulation the PBS newshour I'm William Branham now the legacy of.

marijuana cannabis William Branham ninety percent
U.S. Navy SEAL spared jail but demoted after war crimes trial

PBS NewsHour

06:45 min | 2 years ago

U.S. Navy SEAL spared jail but demoted after war crimes trial

"Special operations chief Edward Gallagher was found not guilty yesterday of murdering a suspected ISIS prisoner in Iraq the decorated navy seal had been accused of stabbing the wounded teenage captive back in twenty seventeen William Branham has the story that's right Judy in addition to being found innocent on the first degree murder charge cheap Gallagher was also found not guilty of attempted murder of Iraqi civilians and of obstruction of justice the only thing he was convicted of was posing in a photo with the dead captives body for that he was demoted one rank he will serve no further jail time late last month this trial took a dramatic turn when one of the prosecution's witnesses navy seal Corey Scott testified that after he saw Gallagher stab the teenager Scott killed the captive by plugging his breathing tube Scott claimed it was an act of mercy Gallagher always maintained his innocence and on fox news this morning flanked by his wife and lawyer he reiterated his view that it was a group of disgruntled fellow seals who wanted to frame him I just wanna make make clear that this this small group of sales that decided to concoct this story in no way shape or form represent Nixon to the community that I've you know loved and gave my soul to for more on this case I am joined by Steve Walsh he's been following the story for keeping B. S. public radio in San Diego and he was there for the verdict and sentencing today Steve Walsh thank you very much for being here you've been following this trial all along with your sense that this verdict was a surprise it was a surprise in the sense that yesterday when the verdict came out and he was acquitted of the six of the seven charges and all and all six were the most serious charges there was a great deal of jubilation Gallagher was hunt was hugging his wife they were very celebratory as so there was a a feeling to this today that maybe Gallagher would serve no jail time at all these wouldn't get a sentence of any jail time but on this last charge the least serious of the seven charges the jury decided to give him the maximum sentence which is in this for months in jail and they reduce two men rank from a chief petty officer to a petty officer first class that's going to have implications on the Gallaghers of retirement in fact we were expecting Gallagher to come out and talk to us after the after the sentencing and in but instead he and his wife got in the car and they drove away Gallagher was originally accused by fellow seal members members of his own platoon which in and of itself is sort of odd given that sort of historically tight knit nature of the sea organization they said that he is one up in a sniper tower and Sean and civilians several of them said that they saw him stab this alleged captive ISIS prisoner how did how did Gallagher's team robot those witnesses well the Gallaghers team said that essentially bays trade this as an investigation that was out of control that the turnout targeted Gallagher from the very beginning the lead investigator for naval investigations Joe war Pinsky he'd only been with NCIS for two and a half years before he got this incredibly high profile war crimes case the the also portrayed these seals in Gallagher's platoon Gallagher is is forty years old now is it in the rest of his platoon was much younger yeah I'm on the stand his attorney said call them in title the young seals so in addition to having those seals who I I guess their their testimony was simply not believed by the jury there was also this piece of evidence of texts that Gallagher had sent to a fellow seal apparently he sent a photograph of the captives body and I want to read what these texts say one of them said I've got a cool story for you when I get back I've got my knife skills on another text said good story behind this got him with my hunting knife how did the defense team robot that bit of evidence well I honestly they didn't I mean if you think about this this is something that happened in Iraq in two thousand seventeen they have nobody in this case very little forensic evidence but the one thing that they did have were these photographs that Gallagher sent out to people in the United States and other members of the platoon with him posing with the knife up to the dead detain me so in the end that was what he was convicted of but I guess the the evidence citing a for Gallagher has a tax that says I can't wait to tell you the story about this I got right with my knife how did Gallagher's team push that offer to they just not address that will be addressed in the sense of big said that this was dark humor they also have other tax where he he threatens to kill his his platoon yeah he he turned to the jury of all members of the military marines in a Cup and one seal as a matter of fact and said who among us has had not had their commander threatened to kill them at one point or another and lastly there was this this piece of us sort of a bomb shell development where one of the prosecution's main witness as this medic who was there says after he saw Gallagher stab the captive it was he the medic who then kill the the captive not Gallagher I mean that's going to do something here case if they if your your key witness sort of says actually the the guy you think killed it didn't do it I did it it exactly this was a prosecution witness not a bit and so on cross examination that's when the defense brought this up it played into their overall narrative that this was a sloppy investigation they didn't ask the right questions to the right people at the right time of course there were some conflicting testimony I one other marine raider who was there also said that he saw no stab wounds on the dead body Leslie was we did we know that Gallagher's convicted of this one charge of posing with the photograph and what is next for chief Gallagher well that's the way it works in military court this will go to the convening authority for final approval of this sentence and then I his attorneys seem pretty eager to appeal this decision they don't want this sentence of confinement on his record if they can possibly avoid it so we probably won't see the final outcome for a while in the meantime he'd already served eight months in the brig that was basically good time so he served none of this four month sentence so he was able to drive off right after the right after his case was over

Edward Gallagher Iraq Eight Months Forty Years Four Month