19 Burst results for "William Barber"

"william barber" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

07:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"william barber" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"Of people in this country who afford low wells at they have the power to change every election in this country, even in the south of third of all poor people living in the south, a third of all poor white people live in the south in the three states that trump Warren Michigan Wisconsin Pennsylvania. He while bound hundred thousand votes, two point one Nelia poor at low wealth. People did not even vote when I talked to him where we talked to a of say why so, why don't you vote or why did you vote? Republican saying I didn't vote Republican I. Just don't want why 'cause nobody talks to us. I'M GONNA use this issue. I WANNA. Use this shift a little bit. To your to your book because you, you've just released a book call, we are called. Be a movement. Based on a sermon that you. That you gave not long ago. But you talk about Psalm one eighteen and I've just found the way you interpreted that powerful do you? Do you know about heart? Stove eating. Projected. This is the day that the has. So, and you talk about and I. Had never you know I grew up in southern? Baptist Church I've heard Psalm one eighteen several times, but had never really understood it until I read. Your book and read your sermon, and and it kind of you know when I was. When I was running I was asked by somebody on my campaign why I became a Democrat. Why are you a Democrat? They're going to ask you that and answered as honestly as I knew how I said you know I think that. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, my little twelve year old thirteen year old self new somehow that I. would be someone who might one day. Need someone to help fight for me and that I might be someone who was was. It might be stone in the in the words of someone eighteen that the builders rejected and I am I gravitated towards? Bill Clinton and Al Gore in ninety two. Because you know, they seem to be fighting for others fighting for. The least of these and I didn't really know what was going on with me, but I'm new somewhere. There was something about me that that probably would be one of those least of these that would need fighting for one day. And I was probably one of only three kids, and my middle and my middle school, who was very pro, Clinton and Gore in ninety two, and told that story to my campaign advisor, and she had a little tear in her eyes, she said. Don't you ever tell that to anybody? And I said what she said. It's a beautiful story, but people like strong people like winners. So don't look vulnerable and I just loved reading your book because there's a whole bunch of things I pulled out, but you said rejected must lead the revival for love and justice, and you talk about the power of being rejected, and how the people who have been rejected in the past journey, truth and Elizabeth Cady, Stanton and Lucretia Mott rallied together to to gain the right to vote for women Nelson Mandela was rejected, and he led a movement to take South Africa. Out of apartheid and you talk about the power of. The rejected. And and I can't help, but think I appreciate the fact that I was rejected. I gain strength from and in many ways and I. Think a lot of people gain strength from being an outcast. Why do we as a country? Value and appreciate an only gravitate towards those who are strong and win, and not toward those who are rejected what what is it about us as humans or as Americans? Will there certain is a serious psychosis? Because, it's so. So contrary to industry you know and you talk about religion, you know. The church had a civil war before the civil war in this country. That's why you had no other precedents. Southern I pretend southern Baptist and all that stuff. It was over the issue of. How do we deal with the slave on the one hand, but then claim to serve a god who made everybody and I could go through that whole history you know even race is a false category. It was created at the baker's rebellion with black or white people stood the government against oppressive. They said we got to come up with a way to separate people, so we started looking at people through. The prism of race and separating people will listen. You know if I might take a moment just to test to to. Push on this question. Subway first of all biblically everybody we celebrate in the Bible was rejected. So I don't even understand somebody who's personal faith thing that that people don't want to deal with that. Moses had couldn't tall. Allies your head. Issues of of of of of mental issues of what we call bipolar is of you could say you know. Peter had his own problems with Paul on in the flesh. Jesus demands was people have rejected by his own Amana clean it with solid. Everybody in our history that we celebrate the outside the Biblical history that we celebrate heads certain levels of rejection. You know sometimes you read stories about George Washington and tossed about what he wasn't and yet what he became read stories about you know. Who had you know had epilepsy, but look at what she became our greatest presidents. MAITLAND head is issue. Franklin Roosevelt head polio was at a wheelchair, but he's served longer than any other Kennedy had problems and stole so. Sad that we have come to a point, some people have where they look at people by the by the they'll look at them based on the content of character. But they look at at other ways, and sometimes it has been based on their physical strength or perceive strength, and that leads to what we have now narcissism. least what we have now. I can't help it. I can't help but say that highlighted the section about Caesar in. Caesar. You didn't say it in the book, but I thought it. Season to Bill Towers these allowed to put his name. Sees a water. His name on everything cedes control. The Senate sees about his money got him away scenes a with kill that destroys enemies season about the mess around with Weber. Why do we hear this on Saturday and then forget it on Monday. With that we don't even heroes. But, but but you know what there are a lot of people evangelical who have who have really been the movement on the Republican side at least have been the base. They hear this stuff about Cesar on Sunday and Wednesday night, maybe and they for some reason, it's not connecting. If why do you think that is? How has the? Has the Republican Party able to co-opt religion in that way. When I listen to Jefferson Texas. That's not what he's principal sudden. Yes, we told him president that he was God called to be on the wall I mean. How do you get that out of the Bible? The Bible said Jesus tore down the ball. So we have a Lotta Non Gospel going on that's goes traces all the way back to slave religion that. The dugout loved the Gospel of Jesus Christ, but I hate the religion of the slave master, so we to understand that there's a lot of false religion being preached in Foster Christianity in Churches You gotta go back to. Kevin.

Bill Clinton Al Gore Caesar Republican Party Baptist Church Warren Michigan South Africa psychosis Bill Towers Moses Franklin Roosevelt Nelson Mandela Elizabeth Cady Amana Wisconsin Senate Jefferson Texas principal president
"william barber" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

09:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"william barber" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"It's Thursday July ninth. A little less than a year before Dr Martin Luther King. Junior delivered his I have a dream speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC. He delivered I in November of nineteen, sixty, two to a small crowd at a high school auditorium in Rocky Mount North Carolina. Eight years later in the tiny town of Plymouth North Carolina less than an hour's drive to east. A second grader named William Barber would become one of the first students to integrate Washington county schools. The line between those eight years and sixty miles may seem very thin and insignificant, but for anyone who knows the work of William Barber. Reverend Barber. To connection between him and Dr. King is anything but loose an insignificant. In, fact Dr, Cornel West put it as bluntly as saying that Dr Barber is. The closest thing we have to Dr Martin Luther. King Junior in our midst. His work, advocating to expand voting rights healthcare living wages, immigrant rights public education Lgbtq rights even earned him one of the most prestigious accolades in America the rare MacArthur Genius Grant. And The New Yorker called him an indispensable figure in the civil rights landscape, and perhaps the individual, most capable of crafting a broad-based political counterpoint to divisiveness of trumpism. His newest book we are called to be a movement is arousing reminder of the power in every one of us to make change this week, a special episode from on. A free flowing discussion with Reverend William Barber about race poverty, and whether America is capable and ready to rise to meet the moment before us, and if positive change is truly possible in this moment. How the heck are we going to get along? I'm good. Thank you, thank you so much for doing this. This is incredible. Where you stand these days. Raleigh right now. Hold Up. Rally stuck inside quarantine. Are you and when county? Coroner James Damore map to have you come down in? Some for still saying, are you kidding me? Yes, sir, we do so in if. You didn't do a gospel. CBS or something. I did I did a Christmas album that got classified Gospel. Ruben did a gospel. I'll bring him about saying. I was even thinking about maybe doing. This as we get close to the election. We're doing. Have we have anywhere from? Thirty to forty one hundred thousand people turned into a livestream on Sunday morning. And we got. We got people coming from thirty nine states in about seven countries. And maybe one Sunday morning. I. I had one of your CD's or something. But I still want you to come in I. Want to come I want to come in person. You guys aren't far spent plenty of time out there in goals for myself. To is. I don't know if you know. Three years ago. I I've been invited into several colleges officials. And but I. Did Not. Feel comfortable in a couple of. Won't that is led by a same gender loving woman Bishop Your Vet Plunder. California sees a famous Gospel Singer, but also A. Professor! And and I was consecrated bent to the College of affirming bishops. Wanted a few. Straight persons that have ever been and I. I did it theologically because I'm so tired. Of the church thinking that we had to affirm. Persons who were same gender loving? Maybe, we would want the head the problem, a church nine, so anti low, so maybe we need it to be affirmed and consecrating, and so our church Aaron Goldberg. You know it's open and affirming and rights of all people to the table It's been interesting and besides. Actually sitting here, thinking it was I'm pretty sure it was Goldsboro where I was around the time right before I decided to run for Congress in two thousand fourteen I was either in in Goldsboro Princeton, or somewhere around there, and there was at Golden Corral, and I remember sitting there and there was A. Same Sex female couple and they clearly a couple, and they had three or four kids with them at the table. And, it was clear that they had adopted the kids. They had adopted the kids, and all three of the kids had had some sort of mental or physical disability. And that moment you know what here or two women who have been in. The least of these right. You know. At that point, they were not in North Carolina allowed to get married, and that's never been my number one issue, but it just sort of indicative to me of. God just? Papa crecy right Lou defeat. Agreement I had a couple come last year. They've been in church. And have been told by one past because they're very serious Christians and very powerful. Musicians, in all one of them is singer. I want you to stay but I just don't want you to ever letting the body and they did it for eleven. Years said they couldn't do it anymore. And so they came Greenlee for year, and then they asked me. Would I do their wedding I said sure and Nancy Petty and work through Nancy. Good friend of mine at PULLAN. She's like my sister. You Know Nancy of course. I've been rob yet pulling and it was it was. Interesting for some people. But you know I had some people that were there anti couple of folk even at Church. Even they knew our open. We were, but since that time. I've had some of them. Come back in and actually apologize repent and say you know what. We. Don't stop this foolishness of disliking people that God me know. Then to think about the number of people who over the past sixty years have had to do that same thing on any number of things. That we have why the second we we didn't behave correctly in the. Sixties? ETC So you know it's it's. I knew that that would be I. believed had faith that we'd see that day. It's happened a lot faster than I thought it would in north. Carolina and I'm glad for it, but you know what. Talk about some of because I wanNA talk about the connections between one of the things I've been teaching. People is how to connect things like racism to all of that. Because what we find is team is like pause and then your system. It it may touch one organ, but eventually it's going to bank your whole body septic in. Let's well. I would love to we. Will you open? Will you start us out with a prayer? We need right now. If you don't mind a quick prayer and we don't have forever, but I'd love for you to start us out with that, because I. If you don't mind, that'd be great shoe. gration Sunday Turtle God. We are reminded. Of Your. Trump! That morning by morning. We see. And Greatest Nice faking for this greatest unfaithfulness. The midst of Topsy Turvy World amidst the. Trials and tribulations we don't understand. And sometimes what we do on the state, which makes them more harsh. With thankful that you're faithful. Somehow you turn out tribulations into transition boots. Somehow you bring. Strength in the midst of our weakness. And sometimes God even in the midst of death. You Bring Resurrection Reconstruction and revival. And so we thank you for your great faithfulness. Now help us Oh God and granted to fate that will not shrink. The, Obama by ever vote. For giving your name, have we believe it done? I man. Thank you you. Don't so thrilled that you're willing to talk to me here that I don't even really know where to start, but I want to start with you. Set in the prayer there about God, bringing revival and rejuvenation out of tribulation and death and I think about this last. month. That we've been through the country five six weeks. And I've asked a lot of people on this podcast in the last five or six weeks. If this is a different. Time and this and if this situation, if what we've gone through in the last five weeks in the wake of the death, murders of George, Floyd and Brianna Taylor And several others. If. This is different. If this is the moment in American history where we will see the tide actually turn instead of. People talking about the time turning. Do you think that this one's different? You know that is an interesting and having and. Perceptive question for you to raise. Now being a person of faith and being a person studies.

Reverend Barber Dr Martin Luther King Nancy Petty America Dr Martin Luther Rocky Mount North Carolina Plymouth North Carolina Cornel West Lincoln Memorial Washington county CBS Junior North Carolina The New Yorker MacArthur James Damore Ruben
"william barber" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

06:47 min | Last month

"william barber" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"One host, and then you can start a whole outbreak that can lead to a pandemic if a passenger arrives in New York City, with a novel disease like Eight, seven and nine flew. It can very well begin to spread undetected in a matter of weeks a novel. Influence. Spain will incapacitate or city. MMJ warning how this would play her own city of new. York which is now the epicenter of the outbreak around the world. The state alone has more cases than any other country across the globe. The document dad workshops like this one a scenario two years ago provided to health care staff, quote China notifies who van influenza virus, no cases outside of China. What would New York City do? This was what she was modeling, and it brings us back to a point about funding signs, but dad was not just issuing a general warning. She pressed lawmakers to fund preparation for hospitals for viral outbreaks. Noting we do not know when the next dangerous pathogen will arrive in our country, but we do know it will happen sooner or later. That was December. Days before Chinese officials I alerted the W.. H., O.. Now Madonna also laying out the grim prospect of the overwhelming number of deaths, if the US and other countries were not proactive, warning more bodies than more could handle a tragic detail that so sadly proved true. But, demand for burials will become overwhelming. And more will begin to overflow just like with I one thousand, nine hundred, and did anticipation of a surge of course virus victims in the next few weeks. The city is now building a makeshift morgue comprised rows of white tents outside of Bellevue Hospital. At the worst point, bodies were stored in refrigerated trucks because the mortgage hit capacity. Now in the same category of experts, advocating solutions and funding to get ahead of a pandemic. There were policy. Gurus like Obama Homeland. Security Advisor Lisa Monaco. Now. Do you remember say September two? Thousand Eighteen. Washington was busy with the cabinet hearings, but that same month Monaco was warning trump that federal funding for pandemics by fifty percent was going to cost way more than it saved noting those cuts funding to its lowest levels, since the twenty four teeny bowl response and warring trump's poor pandemic prep was creating new vulnerabilities in health infrastructure for when the next global outbreak of infectious disease hits. Now that was Monaco sounding a public plea for anyone who would listen including the president. We also now know she personally led trump's national security staff and a pandemic scenario training right before the inauguration. We put together an exercise for the incoming national security team. I said that we needed to add pandemic scenario to this exercise because I was so concerned that and thought that it would be a certainty that the next administration would deal with some type of public health. Crisis A certainty. Now, that's a homeland security chief who deals with all the threats from all the countries that attack the homeland, and all the other threats like lone wolf terrorism, and here she is stressing public health pandemics had to be on that priority list now. Trump was not only downgrading those efforts putting resources into a wall. Remember the wall. Remember all that. Monaco also warning. The US could not make itself safer by walling ourselves off, noting the greater risk was the trump administration will be challenged by quote, some new pathogen one that no wall will keep out. says. Right on the money type stuff. Now Up to this point with the examples I've given you some could say well. That still fits within a debate between administrations from opposing parties who fight over everything. But I want to be clear Monica was reflecting top medical experts. Take Doctor Joan Zet also. A part of running that predict program I mentioned for a decade and charting how this outbreak quote was going to involve quote. Corona viruses jumping easily across species lines, and those are the ones to watch for pandemics. And she warned the threat was growing. Preparation was not. We aren't much better prepared for the next pandemic than we were one hundred years ago. We remain completely blind to the next one. Where will emerge and win? Clearly, that didn't shape federal policy or frankly much media or public opinion. Many didn't listen to these warnings. and. They offered of course early context for how everyone might try to scientifically interpret. When one of these POPs up like the first signs out of want now for all the incredible and brave journalism during this time this tough time. which includes reporters literally risk their health around the world. There were also to be clear headlines like this Washington Post. Health reporter in New York Times columnist, downplaying the virus early on telling people to get a grip and it was like the flu. Crucial early time squandered even though misled had been emphasizing that the medicine and science shows how these outbreaks work, and that it shouldn't take waiting until one hits a wealthy country for action. Does it take until it gets to the wealthy right now. It is but what we're trying to do as catalyze a change when we. Know about viruses. We aren't necessarily doing the right thing. We have the responsibility now that when we know, we do something about it. We characterize them more fully. We take steps towards understanding them better so that we don't wait until they hit our shores. Don't wait till it hits your shores. This was available expertise in public, but that same CASSANDRA effect I mentioned here it is an action, some of the most prescient warnings and those early solutions specifically disbelieved. and. We can now test for it in the locations where we know it exists, we can also look for it in other locations, so we can predict where it might occur. We don't have to test the entire state. In the Middle West or wherever they may be, we don't have to test the interior state. I think it's ridiculous, so that means we can put in place educational campaigns about how to prevent infection and spillover Oh. Let's blood and trump with this new cokes..

New York City Lisa Monaco trump Trump US York Spain Bellevue Hospital China Monaco Middle West Obama New York Times Doctor Joan Zet Washington Post Madonna Advisor Monica
Dying of whiteness during the coronavirus pandemic

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:41 min | 3 months ago

Dying of whiteness during the coronavirus pandemic

"I'm Jonathan Kaye part. Welcome to Cape Up. Jonathan Metzler back sooner than I expected because of the Corona virus pandemic in his book dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing. America's heartland Nestle the director of Vanderbilt University Center for medicine. Health and society put a human face on the opposition to many policies that would save lives and livelihood a warning of the lengths to which the white working class voters could either have underlying racism or be manipulated to vote in support of wealthy donors corporations but against their own life stance. And it's just been on steroids since this pandemic started. Listen to mental. Explain why those anti stay at home protests in state capitals Egged on by the president that historical pattern and why the politics racial resentment is a deflection. That works right now. Jonathan Metzel. Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. It's great to be back. I you were just on the podcast a couple of months ago and I try not to go back to Previous guests sooner than say six months but the situation that we're in right now with the with covert nineteen sort of demanded that you come back. We had on Reverend William Barber talking about the racial disparities that we've now been forced to reckon with with the corona virus. And you sent me a message. Reminding me that everything that you wrote about in Europe antastic book dying of Whiteness is playing out in this corona virus and the covert nineteen pandemic. Talk about that well. The book I wrote Diana Whiteness was was really. I mean I who knew at the time but what I was talking about in. That book was about the ways in which there were kind of undercurrents of white racial resentment that shaped Attitudes among politicians and certain white voters particularly in mid in America. That am caused them to what you would think. Vote against their own biological self interests and so the story. I told him that book was a story. About how for example and working class and lower income white voters rejected the affordable. Care Act. Which would have helped them a lot because they thought that immigrants and minorities were gaming the system and I looked at The rise of guns as symbols of kind of white self protection. And you know that was. That was a a book that I thought was kind of how to beginning a middle and an end it was kind of a warning of the lengths to which when white working class voters could either have underlying racism or be manipulated to vote in support of wealthy donors in corporations but against their own life stance. And it's just been on steroids since this pandemic started. I mean everything from in you know. It seems like the best possible for many red states would be to expand Medicaid if people health and transferred this moment of dire need and you would think people would be rallying to get Medicaid. It would help them. Not just medically would help them. Financially not incur bankruptcies pay less for medications but instead trump has been actively actively not expanding Medicaid and and people have been supporting him and the same thing with guns are the the gun story as is eight hundred percent rise in gun sales in some states in in in conjunction with this idea And and so kind of across the board this idea and and of course brought to bear most recently by these protests are across across many red states where people are literally out there saying and we we want to support trump even if it costs us in our family members and our communities days and months and years of our lives and and the racial currents are just. I mean just absolutely unavoidable. Okay so let's let's start with the with those protests because as I watched the video coming from Lansing Michigan and other places and people is openly. Define what we all knew when they were protesting to be true that the corona virus is spread. If you are not socially distancing if you're not wearing a mask if you're shaking hands if you have any kind of physical contact and these votes were acting in total defiance of everything of everything we know up the is it. Are they being irrational in what they're doing or are they being rational in that support for Donald Trump and resentment of and racial resentment are enough for them to ignore science? Well I think there are a couple of things that are important to keep in mind about this process. I just always make clear when I talk about them. That those protests are not all all white Americans. They're not all trump supporters. That's a kind of vote very vocal very threatening fringe group. That has gotten a lot of validation from from trump and a lot of funding from the Devos family and other places and so in a way. Because we're all stuck at home. It's hard to see that there are a lot of people in red states who are terrified of what those protests represent Democrats and Republicans and so first of all. I think it's unfortunate just given the way we're all many of us at at home right now and it looks like that's every Republican out there and that's not the case that being said I try to avoid saying that anything is irrational You know I think would my research. I came to realize that there are there are deep and ideology said that makes sense to people and I think this idea of government. Overreach this idea that Social PROGRAMS ARE GONNA benefit immigrants and minorities and and at the expense of of white people. do these ideas are very very ingrained and I think that also when you when you combine that with a moment of real despair this I this moment of you know not just a more the risk of mortality but also this fear of you know real real economic trauma that people back on their deepest their deepest fears. We've seen that you know the rise of Nazi Germany on down that people when they're who've been there the most desperate it's not like they become the most centrist They they become the most terrified. And so it. At a moment like this people fall back on extreme ideologies. It's not like everybody's GonNa come to the middle and I think trump has been very artful at manipulating those anxieties and shifting blame race. That I think are very dangerous but it's not I. It's not irrational. If it's based in a particular reading of reality and and also Lib reality for a lot of people you know one of the big stories to come out of out of the corona virus coverage is the the health disparities disparities in impact that overwhelmingly the victims of Corona virus have been Americans and other people of color particularly African Americans. What role do you think that plays in the mindset of people who might be looking in saying you know that's affecting them and so therefore I don't need to be concerned about this? Well I think certainly that's been framing an edge of course true right in other words. Many of the people who died in this early phase are emigrants of members of minority groups. People who have to either have to go to work In in conditions are live in areas. Where there's a lot of density I certainly think that that led to a feeling of kind of white and bits ability especially in the people. I've been interviewing people in this idea that oh no. This won't be because this is kind of black and Brown problem. I certainly think fueled part of the feeling of invincibility surrounding mess But it'll be interesting to see. I mean I think there are two caveats that narrative of I is that I guarantee you. A lot of these deaths in rural white America are being under reported. Just because there's not great data gathering and so I do think there's a lot of despair in in rural areas that we're not hearing about and and I think the other point is because of these protests and particularly when these red states start opening up if if they do which seems insane. We're GONNA see a lot of of working class white very sick and dying and so it'll be interesting to see what happens to that narrative when it really starts to hit home for people

Donald Trump America Jonathan Kaye Jonathan Metzler Diana Whiteness Cape Up Jonathan Metzel Vanderbilt University Center F Europe Heartland Nestle William Barber President Trump Director Lansing Michigan Brown Germany Devos
"william barber" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

11:03 min | 3 months ago

"william barber" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"To go mobile and people have just said yes and so now we're hooking up with all kinds of groups We put together a moral response to poverty. It in the midst of pandemic move on Dot Org. Just push it out. You had had a broadcast with them Still Harrison myself. What a million people showed up John. A QUARTER OF A MILLION ON LINE. A quarter of a million. We only announced it like four days in advance. And so you know we have. Nearly you know thousand thousand hoops. Fan this agenda. We just had a briefing with select members of Congress and religious. Read just this past week. Swing of the real data. How we got here. What's going on why we can't fix this unless we do right by the low income people And so we're using. Every tool is social. Media and what barrack go see is herself? America's GonNa see white farmers standing with fight for fifteen worked as Americans see Calabria with Dasa daughter before the pandemics because Who's asking America's out the WHO lives in Alabama and they refused expand health? Care stand with. Amy Jo was a white teacher from West Virginia and a mother who makes poverty wages as a teacher. She's low income. They're going to see a coming together of people as religions and advocates. Like we've never seen before course who've who missed this pandemic saying this Jonathan. This is a question we're raising now. You knew you only had forty eight hours so breath because a lot of people in this pandemic if they find out they have they some of them have only had forty hours breath left and then this data as also saying if you knew you only have forty eight hours breath. What kind of world would you leave your last breath to fight for what I love it you fight for? What kind of policies would you fight for? What kind of justice you fight. But what kind of mercy would you fight for? And then they're saying it's taboo to do that. We're going to other all of these people. That are needlessly dying because of government policies because they were poor not because the virus was so powerful but because we we made all of these deliberateness delivered wrong steps. We did CLOSYS fishing than those of us. Who yet breathing as long as we have breathing having Marl obligation to fight for better world a better society and a member and that means protesting. It means going to the polls. It means challenging policy. It means using every bit of the breath we have debris you new understanding into the life of democracy remember. Let me end with with this question. And since you are A man a man of the cloth in Amana face So I mean every obviously I hear everything you're saying I agree with what you're saying. One of the things I think is missing in all. This is a leader is a president of the United States for whom that is a goal and so I would love for you to talk about from your perspective. The impact of having a president of the United States who on a daily basis shows a complete lack of empathy for the nation. He leads you know I am GonNa talk about this from the perspective of being Perjure version of everything else. I was talking about you know because this is from that perspective John you know. Two Thousand Scriptures in the Bible old New Testament Hebrew Bible Christian New Testament. And and you can find couplets to this in the Koran and most other face to thousands of scriptures in the Bible that speak to the fact that the greatest second greatest in its mistreatment of the poor and the least of these the women of children and the immigrant and to sit however the number one san in the Bible is idolatry dollar. Dollar tree is most often sin that leader engaging and I- i- dollar tree in the Bible which always when there's a nine dollar just leader a narcissistic leader a self worshiping leader. The seconds thin mystery report released of being is always Exact is always greater whenever there's a dollar in leadership and throughout the scriptures throughout the scriptures Leagues with Zeal Dollar Tree and Lynnfield ugliness of society particularly toward the least of these Sh that's just the fact look at scripture as the pokes mix And I love what he said he said are not necessarily the judgment of God but pandemics force is a way of of the universe. Sports us to make a judge a judgment about what is the world. We're GONNA have what kind of lead us we have and are we going to truly care for one another care for these poor. You know because it's not as though talk not into office By just putting himself We talk a lot about him but sixty something. Negative people voted for him and hug million people stayed home and yes there was a lot of digital voter suppression into three states. That anyone by eight thousand votes There's a lot that he has a lot of enabling us you know and I think there as much or more to blame than four and and and I'm not taking away as I was doing because he's mean he's narcissistic every every day at six o'clock listing public idolatry. You know which is very dangerous very dangerous. It is a terrible thing to have the kind of leadership. Trump is this show but also the apron. Don't let McConnell. We have to really say the McConnell Shaw tweets. We have to. We have to say that about all those who who who lied and refused to allow this to deal with the impeachment issues. There a lot of folks that are to blame for him having having the platform in the first place. Fox News giving him constantly over and over again. And then you having the reporters there who are cussed. Live rebroadcasting promoting All the lives all of the distortions but but in the midst of this pandemic is forcing all of us to choose. Because because we're having to deal everyday with three things that forced humanity to have to make your choices. They'll steal your own mortality. That JEREM has shown us that the St Of Your monetary resources. You don't know what you may or may not have tomorrow at the fear of being able to have mutual relationships all those things on the line and my prayer. My prayer is that even in scripture every time there was a pandemic and a narcissistic leader even a leader. Just coming out of each. That would be so ugly enough to crucify a person focused on love on the other side of that. There was a resurrection on the other side of that that was departing up a rich on the other side of that that was something and even in American history last alongside ugliness authoritarian idolatry like leaders. We've always had moved. Let's that would rise up and it didn't always start with. The political persons started many times among the very people who are being hurt people who were being compromised. They would find a way to come together. The community And work toward the change of the nation. That is my prayer. That is what native I decided. I decided if I only have forty eight hours a breath. Well that's what I'm GonNa give my attention to at working with people who feel like what we don't have to accept this. We don't have to accept this bullying of this president. The reporters in the room said on your part. If you don't have to take that some of the reporters ought to stand together one day and unit. Say Are you crazy? You don't say that against another one about but I know what you're not supposed to be the issue but there comes a time when you have to plant in on violent waves and stand up and call some things and I'm hoping that all of us you've been doing it but I hope that all of us across the board we'll say we will not turn over our country or our lives or protection to one individual as April. We have better than that. Reverend William Barber President of repairs of the breach and Co Chair of the poor people's campaign a national call for moral revival. Sir Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. Bless to take care of. Beketov your list with Tom. Thanks for listening to Cape Up Tune. In every Tuesday you can find us on apple podcasts and stitcher and how about doing me a huge favor subscribe rate and review us. I'm trying to think of the Washington Post you can find me on twitter at Cape Heart Jay..

president John United States Dot Org America Harrison Washington Post Congress Fox News barrack West Virginia Amy Jo McConnell Shaw Jonathan McConnell I Who Tom apple
"william barber" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

10:26 min | 3 months ago

"william barber" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Of this pan-demic. That's Reverend William Barber. President of repairs of the breach and the CO chair of the POOR PEOPLE'S CAMPAIGN. A NATIONAL CALL FOR MORAL REVIVAL FOR YEARS. Barbara has preached about how racism poverty voter suppression the lack of access to health. Care are all linked. Now comes the corona virus that has forced us to face these fissures in American society and Barbara says the American people are eager to fight back but there are supporters of the president who are fighting back against their states. Day At home orders demonstrations. Barbara believes are misguided. We'd need is gone winning. Grace towards and stuff we don't need the flag waver we need three testing have three healthcare. Hear more from Reverend William Barber Right? Now Reverend William Barber thank you very much. For being on the PODCAST. Thank you always brother by the Cape Cod. And thank you for all the work to keeping the truth out there and very objective way why I am trying my best and I wanted to talk to you in this global emergency that we're in and especially here in the United States the corona virus pandemic as. We've been reading for the last couple of weeks. Now that the African American community is bearing the brunt of this Of this pandemic and I wanted to talk to you because the issues that this is bringing up factors into what you've been talking about specifically over the last couple of years. So how about you talk about at the outset From your perspective what. The Corona Var virus pandemic in the United States is bringing up that we should paying more attention to where you know sadly There are times that you Wish you were not right. And you wish a movement that you Participate in or is not right and they sit because because when you write it really exposes a lot of people are facing a lot of hard and we've been saying Who repairs of the breach and in the poor people's campaign a national call for revival that America choosing not to address the reality of a hundred and forty million people living in poverty and low wealth in this country. Try to this pandemic Forty three percent of this nation Sixty one percent of all African Americans in poverty and low income which is about twenty six million people Somewhere between twenty seven thirty percent of White Americans which is Sixty six million people Sixty two million people living without Living wage thirty million people healthcare eighty million people who who did underinsured and and seven hundred people dying a day Jonathan from poverty and low income BIN's worth stats fire to this stand and then the pandemic kits and all of the major researchers will tell you. I've been in conversation with Dr Bastiat from Abu. Who's a public health epidemiologist in conversation with? Dr Ford from UCLA. Who's a public health Epidemiologist researcher my own daughter. Who's a PhD at Drexel Report Harbor? Who's a public health special? And they all shout one thing with the same way had been. Spring is and exploit the fishers of society and the United States. Has Many many wolves open worlds from a structural racism and the criminalization of poverty and refuses to adjust and those realities make us and made us even more susceptible to resprayed of this pandemic the life of this pandemic and this pandemic And if you because we were already bundle. It's not so much that the germ is so powerful when you add. The jared can be ineptitude and inadequate response administration to the open wounds and fishes caused by poverty. Systemic racism ecological devastation and a country that puts fifty six especially dollar into the economy. And only fifteen cents. Wherever disgracing dollar into jail with things like education infrastructure. There so for for so long. It produced an environment that made us end up where we are right now. And if we don't address these reality which is right now not in the future if we all the drugstore and right now this bad it will continue to export these dishes and is disarming. Reverend harbor into that point One of the things. We've been watching of late are protests against the stay at home orders instituted by governors and various states around the country where you have a lot of people particularly supporters of the president who are out there protesting at state capitals not social distancing. Not Wearing masks all congregating together demanding that their states be opened up. And I'm wondering given what we're talking about is the reason why they're doing that is because they do not those people protesting. Don't feel that it has hit them and I bring that up because again we've been talking about the fact that the corona virus has been very hard on the African American community. We saw stats out of Chicago. Where seventy percent of the deaths were African. Americans and African Americans only make up thirty percent of the Chicago population or in in the south in Louisiana State of Louisiana. Seventy percent of the deaths were African Americans and they also only make up about twenty something thirty. Something percent of the population is it. That folks are protesting the president supporters protesting because they don't see it as a quote unquote their problem. Well seven seventy percent of people in Mississippi Who died from this are African American and the highest per capita Rate of Corona virus section. That dot is in place call of Saint John Parish Louisiana Which is also in cancer alley and they also had the highest rate of deaths prior to the hitting of the pandemic. You know John. I don't know if it's that simple I think that's a factor in it I think that's the fact that I think that Because as I said we have sixty one percent of black people that are poor and twenty six million people but we also have Sixty six million for and low income white people and so this. This fish of poverty is beat across this country. I'm in conversation with people who in Appalachia coal miners. Who had. Who had like lugging say when this thing is is i? I don't know what to make of some of these protesters particular when I see them in Michigan who are so captured by the meanness in the madness of our current president they would move in the street protests something that is to protect them and I think that that part of it is here you know when people are afraid. They do some strange strange thing. You're talking about cabin fever. But when you afraid and then you have you put your folks in authoritarian person. You know you put your hopes and someone who is always saying if somebody else's problem who's lying to you and you get caught up in those lives. You can do some strange things I mean. We've seen that down through his. I mean through history And it's always a danger you know when you combine some things like A pandemic and then you combine economic downturn. Remember in the in the twenties. You had the swine flu you had which was a pandemic and then you had the Great Depression now. In America we ended up getting Rosa but in Europe they got Muslims and became a kit that but I do think the fact that that that that there are some people who who have you know. The issue of poverty is not out is do this. They tried to blame it on the Chinese different from you know the President. They share this about asking my community. The surgeon general did not help at all when he suggested. That black folks need to be stopped. Drinking stopped doing Tobacco and drug as their protection for Kobe rather than dealing with the Stock Issues. And we not had data on topic. I think it will make a terrible mistake of not saying this hour shitting me. But this.

President William Barber United States Barbara African American community president America Cape Cod Chicago health Epidemiologist research Louisiana Drexel Report Harbor Dr Bastiat UCLA Saint John Parish Louisiana Mississippi Dr Ford
The moral dilemma of COVID-19: Difficult decisions on economy and saving lives

WBBM Late Morning News

08:46 min | 3 months ago

The moral dilemma of COVID-19: Difficult decisions on economy and saving lives

"Save the economy or save a life that's the key moral dilemma facing officials as they weigh which steps to take next in response to the pandemic president trump is eager to restart the economy but medical experts warn if the U. S. moves too quickly more lives could be lost the New York times held a video conference with five experts from different backgrounds to discuss the difficult decisions that lie ahead prominent political activist and Reverend William barber took part in that discussion and he joins us now from Goldsboro North Carolina robin thank you so much for waiting this pandemic has led to an unprecedented national emergency what do you believe the moral response should be thank you so much for having me along what we have to know first and foremost explore the issues and the breakages and societal inequalities and America has a lot of rooms in that area when it comes forward racism is structural issues and what makes you as they explore that they do when you don't close the pictures you deepen and expand the life of the pandemic so the moral issue is that before the pandemic ever happened we have seven hundred people dying a day from popular hundred forty million people four and low income pandemic we don't put your mall thing we haven't done in the trump administration McConnell there is a push for mobile arrest reveals about treating also corporation and gave the people people sales workers we have whole middle seats basically we can get tested but we don't have any insurance are we don't have a guarantee that they can have the right all the water will be shut off so we're actually in the midst of this pandemic you in the qualities and you deepen any qualities actually calling the plan poverty was the pandemic could be for this pandemic at river in our own Paula Reid who works in Washington asked to advisor to the president kellyanne Conway about why there was such a lack of diversity on the president's council to re open the economy she didn't have an answer for that I mean we're hearing more and more about how minority small businesses are really challenged when it comes to accessing a little bit of this these billions of dollars that have been set aside to help them stay alive financially is the government doing enough to ensure that all Americans financially survive this pandemic no they weren't doing enough for even the pandemic there was no diversity and that's the one hundred and forty million poor and low income people but for his friend six three of sixty one percent of Americans look for a little while well the twenty six million people don't forget sixty six million white Americans all formal well but also fifty four percent of all people living wage what will people of color there's this ministry has dismissed that he brags about one one half American unit but actually while wages have gone down and people looking both ways and go all the way for and then the administration has not done anything to really be staff recommend before you get those businesses the fact is one of my friends says black people are dying to mostly be tested at least we are saying over and over and over in communities that you're having the highest rate ripping in Mississippi seven percent of those are African Americans desperate because of structural racism and what was his Surgeon General say black people need to stop smoking stop doing drugs and stop doing alcohol and does not address the systemic realities of the lack of health care the lack of hospitals that lack of treatment and the lack of testing which all the structural issues if anything this administration is is widening the racial gaps and creating more hall finish creating cooler we had a conversation yesterday with clergy and the clergy across this country we will open letter to the president and vice president the task the server general saying listen we need hospitals in our communities of color we need testing sites and community of color we need to just ask authorization act you can ask and then it later so that you can price that out and we can get those things to our home and we don't need I'll less about personal responsibility which is always the way some people try to dismiss dealing with structural realities of racism rubber nose points are really important to those points are really important to highlight because as you as you say there are deeper rooted issues that has sort of eggs been exacerbated by by this pandemic for example we know that people with asthma are can be severely affected by Kobe nineteen a lot of black and brown people live in communities that are close to highways and so that that will have an effect on asthmatic conditions for a lot of people a lot of black and brown people a lot of immigrants are those front facing service workers that we rely on those of us who are all working from home and it's easy to say to people you know Netflix and chill but for a lot of people who need that paycheck the bus drivers the postal workers that bodega owners they're going to work every single day and they are coming into contact with people who may be a symptomatic and so these are some of the issues that are sort of coming to light even though black and brown people knew those issues existed before cove in nineteen you remember sometime ago trump's interests with the war was over as I said while I'm sitting here forty three percent of our country formal welcomes sixty one percent of Americans work for low income and it's not because people are lazy it's because their jobs will not be under the ground helping job with this company thank you just mentioned the Surgeon General of the day say about people need to stop smoking author of smoke people come from plants and telecommunications you can close the plants that are needing like you saying errors in Louisiana it has the highest per capita rate of death in the country before and then and now still has the highest rate of deaths from the pandemic those people all the diseases because of the cancer carcinogens that are produced by the plant skin cancer our issues that we have to do and they're not giving him we called the central workers and many people are among the orderlies the groceries the fashion work with nurses what not who are who are essential workers get broader than just we say people essential workers and they represent the soul of America will win all the dissension workers going to seat the soul of America we tell them to go to the front line we don't guarantee them healthcare we have not guaranteed them safely we have guaranteed them a living wage we've done all those things for the corporations we bailed out before there was even a full blown panic diminish what we left DC central workers with our assistance and and and we have to come to okay just relax everybody has a right to lead it if they don't we don't know if they are sick it's not going to stay among the poor low income workers lack communities are sick the Germans lock on the state Tino communities are safe it's not going to stay there is going to continue to spray it and extend the life of this pandemic to the rest of us one reason we've been pushing according to scripture and I said whoa onto the old legislate evil and rock for their rights we are seeing a robbing poor and low income people basic fundamental human rights the right to a decent wage the right to healthcare the right to sick leave and again a pandemic it does hurt all you might be able to hide it during a pandemic you will be exposed and by those things continuing to exist it will extend the life and in the end this number also soccer so everybody has a right to me you know if they don't we don't and we better hurry up and relaxed it and this administration but over the

Donald Trump President Trump
"william barber" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

13:34 min | 1 year ago

"william barber" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"They said we didn't know there's a direct connection between race and his uglies we gotta show people the very people who engage in racist voter suppression the President Chairman Today when they get that power guess how they use it to hurt mostly white people there are forty million more poor and low white people are black people get power using race then use the power to her enroll numbers why because if you take those former confederate states you get close to one hundred and seventy electoral votes if you can just control the thirteen former confederates date you get thirty one percent of the United States House of Representatives and twenty six members of the United States Senate now. Here's what I think is a problem. Mini type aggressors Democrats instead of fighting for the south with all the possibilities and all the demographic shift and I'm not just talking about doing it election. I'm talking about Iran is not unless they try to find some way to win without having to go through the south and that's a losing strategy at some point. You've got to decide just like a candidate decide. Just like <hes> rabbi heckled had to decide Fan Avenue Hamer had to decide that the south is like this place but you only going to break through if you have a Mara Fusion movement that connects to issue a five of systemic racism systemic poverty ecological devastation the war economy militarism and the false mar narrative of religious national you gotta go straight at it and unpack okay but the argument on the other side is that you know you wanna take a run at the fortress of southern white supremacy and God knows that that's absolutely right just calling but the strategic argument. I'm not endorsing it. I'm just saying what the strategic argument is is like look they've built that fortress over four hundred years and it's powerful as well and it's topped the walls and their battle and they're barricaded in there and then you know and there's other places where you could you could attack more more efficiently. Okay we're Maga to that was number one if you want to be biblical in the four hundred years the slave released and they and they into Bible so you want to be theological about but also keep losing a key ignoring the new demographics you reading people reading the south like it was ten years ago watch this the Stacey Abrams did what are how the hell look at what we did in North Carolina look at what happened and look at the fact that apps it took four counties that trump had gone in Mississippi. What could he have done if there was a fool embracing instead of this sense oh where we can't wear what if Labor years ago had said Oh we you can't win what at the civil rights movement had said after plus? Oh we can't win what if women sojourner truth and Lucretia Mott the quaker their fault for Women's suffrage said Oh well we can't win that is to me that is actually the wrong thing to do what we have to do is choose to battle and choose to organize and put the resources and the organizing where it needs to be and we've got models. I mean is right now. If you really really did deep doc focus in North Carolina South Carolina Georgia Florida Mississippi maybe now they're fundamentally can shift but you gotta believe that you had to act as though you believe in the way you work to me. The thing that betrays the fact that they can fundamentally shift is is the actions of the Republican majority that has taken every opportunity to create conditions through gerrymandered maps and and voter suppression because obviously you're not seeing the same thing in like their Republican controlled states in the north in the far North Mountain West where you don't see the same systematic assaulter because they're not as worried even though gerrymandering started in the North because of emigrants back which is a history. We don't talk about why Chris now. I'm owning a lot of stuff on your show you a good Catholic so I'm acting like this as confessions to some degree doors open look I hustle look cool in my day all right. Oh God now that's going to be on. That's going to be on the Fox News Network. Okay Okay I. I just got hustle APU. You don't cheat somebody. You can beat straight up right. Whenever I play pool I only snooker people hit the ball or put it behind when I was afraid of their game look? If people have half number one engaging the worst voter suppression we've seen since the sixties the worst gerrymandering cysts Jim Crow if they have to go all the way to Russia and get help if they have to lie every turn to get help if they have to rationalize things. They realize that if people really understood if you vote you get healthcare. If you vote you get some living wage if you vote right what if they have to do all of that the beat you don't you recognize that they are afraid and they know what that you should know and that is that if the flip side they came true they cannot win. It cannot win but Chris. I am convinced that's why we formed now. The Poor People's campaign national call for mall all revival. We've now got forty one states with people organizing and forty one st across this country thousands and thousands of people hoping to hook up more than a million people connect this campaign. We've got a hearing on Capitol here. We're announcing a major mobilization for six twenty twenty. Call Mass <unk> Lamar Macho washing why because often the check history pod never pushed us to progressivism right it was always morrow movements that pushed the political structure coach to do what do you what do you say to. There's a certain strain I think of sort of resurgent pessimism about the future of American racial hierarchy and I think it's grounded in a lot of just. Hard truths about America which is just the endurance of white supremacy and white supremacy and white racial hierarchy as a motivating factor to produce <hes> an economy and policies that are that are more reactionary than most of the other O._e._C._d.. Countries countries like we we we do not provide you know the same level of a social safety net universal healthcare things like that in the way that other countries do and a lot of people say look. It's and I think there's a good argument right that it's born of the power white supremacy the emotional and psychological wage of whiteness. It's given to people to sort of get them to ally along racial lines as opposed to sort of whether their class interests material interests and that and that ever will it be thus that there's a kind of you know just that is just the eternal truth about the American experiment and we're also pissed rolling the rock up the hill and then watching it roll down again what what do you how do you think about well. I see a little different from from some first of all as I walk around. I am a picture of the possibility of True Mall Fusion Asian. I'm part white part Tusker on Indian part black all of that runs through my veins just as a human being alright secondly I passed in denomination. That's predominant widened yet has a deep commitment to social justice and Racial Justice and believes we have to take the too seriously thirdly. I just believe part of the problem with the race piece is number one too often we tinker around with you know in this culture. We don't get all upset about racist so matt earns across a somebody says the bad word or something like that and even Charlottesville is ugly as it was as ugly as it was people will say I'm Charlottesville and a lot of people do that but if you check their voting record they're engaged in systemic racism every day in their policies this one of the things we have to turn this thing around and there's a book that talks about now how race culture racism is comes after policy races right that you decide you want slavery then you put in place evil bad biology either economic six sociology and Harare Heretical ontological. We've got to decide first of all that we are going to expose the lie that racism awesome done just hurt black people. That's why I always thought my penetration point for racist. It's voter suppression because then you can make the linkage to talk to the hundred and forty million poor and low wealth people and show them to make us. We did a study Chris and this is important. How we talk about disagreeing numbers by Institute for Policy Studies and others we commissioned a study called the souls of poor folk? I saw the poor for auditing America fifty years after the poor people's campaign two or three things came out number one we remove poverty of at the out of the political discourse thing we could have ever done and race as moral issues so you go through twenty six president election debates in two thousand sixteen not one of them was on poverty not one whole debate on even though forty the three point five percent of your people living in poverty and the wealth number two not one of them is about voter suppression and Gerrymandering and restoring voting rights at even though a two thousand sixteen you have less voting rights and you had nineteen sixty five when the voting rights was passed on August two six that kind of anemic week political debate and discourse keeps us in a Rut. It's not honest. It's not for real so we did this study and when we did this that we disaggregated all the numbers you you know we talk about poverty. People say what are more black people in power. That's not true. There's more of a concentration of poverty one black people but in raw numbers there's more white people empowered we'd have to have movements movements and debates that deal with real issues and when I go to place like Harlan County Kentucky Chris and I'm in the room with the Hatfield mccoys we have these honest hard conversation and then they join up with with the poor people's campaign same thing in West Virginia or down in Alabama when Kelly Green who's a mother who lost a child because Alabama wouldn't expand health care. She's now embracing white women and they're forming a force together to build a movement together we have gone up and down because we've never really fully on pat how the intersection of race and poverty and how it hurts. That's interesting to me. So what you're saying is your understanding of of what you call. Cultural Racism is is a a post talk rationalization of the institutions of extraction and oppression right that is not that racism created Slavery Slavery Create Racist Right that the the institution of faction oppression comes first and then of justification Haitian is created. We started with indentured service that will white from England and we started trying to do the NATO cost a whole genocide that first racism is a whole nother conversation that we have to be in the middle of this but then we saw we could do this this slavery so then we come up with. They're not human right according to the Bible they don't have a soul according to genesis it was meant this way <hes> biologically you can determine brain size by skin color sociologically. They can't be in close proximity or marry why three four then you come up with this evil economics to end justifies the means and then the worst thing of it all going back to what I just said. Early is heretical oncology that God awed intended it this way and so then race is not just a a sociological or a political feerick it becomes a way people understand ultimate reality and that thaddeus entrenched but you can't unpack that by tinkering around and that's my point. Is that for you the way you work back through that is it you don't go at the cultural aspects you the underlying structures as the first thing you attack right so like as opposed to like well. We need to have conversations about like cultural racism to you. Your your way in is like no we should talk about who who has power and who doesn't who has healthcare who doesn't and how race is used took rank all a blinders over people who actually would be benefit would benefit from let's open for them require. You Talk to me about racism. I don't know about you had a that's why that govern about me and Tennessee. My brother had just his dad a week earlier. I was not in a move you know he died from pancreatic cancer in thirty days. I was not in a mood to be played with and when I got on the stage. Go Ask me for pitch. I said I don't do those kind of pitches and then he started talking on with Martin Luther King 'cause I I to to a black person. <hes> and I'm I know where do you stay on health care. Where do you stand on this this racist voter suppression in his State? Where do you stand on living wages Jews and do you understand it as racist content in opposition to all of that that health care the Obama camp was framed from a racist perspective deliberately? Living wages is framed that somehow how it's just people who are laser or just don't need it any way social net programs were framed from Reagan and of us you know as being something that's GonNa help some lays Glatt proper with actually the majority of the people benefit from them away and we can't tinker around the edges you WanNa talk about racist. Let's talk about racist voter suppression. Let's talk about racism.

Chris America President United States Senate North Carolina United States House of Represe Lucretia Mott Hamer snooker Iran Fox News Network Mississippi Martin Luther King twenty twenty Obama Institute for Policy Studies
"william barber" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"william barber" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Don't disagree, but people, and I'm not going to ignore the reality of the number of followers that. Boogeyman as well. It seems like you guys use boogeyman. Oh, John where you Barbara said this. Oh. Let's be quoting William barber who was who was just named the tar heel of the year was given an immense amount of coverage in awards and the long pine, and I mean, this is this is not me just deciding that William barber is an influential individual in the state of North Carolina. And and increasingly nationally this is the this is like the politicians and the various people that are that are also leaders. I didn't elevate him. I didn't. Go elevate him just like that helped elevate because they talk about it all the time. She she's an elected member of congress. The blew out the person who would likely be speaker of the house right now. What's your elevator by by nitpicking, what she said everything and I'm going to play I'm gonna play her audio and people can figure it out. You're you're contributing to your planner. Now, she's not she's not just some activists is a member of congress, man. Freshman member. Who has done what I mean? Dot. Three days as president. He has even spent three days in congress. So now I visit. I gotta go, but maybe eight let me can I come by the capital when you guys get built up. I just want to check it out. Let me know. Okay. For a little tour over there. I think okay, Zia Cortez thing. I what I'm able to recognize is that she has influence. And that influence, regardless of which direction to go its influence and its influence pushing it pushing her party in a direction. So I have to evaluate. Well, how's that going to be impactful for us? Well, you get more and more younger people that the twist the arms in in the more establishment Democrats, and they're able to get more inclusionary items in a spending Bill you think putting cocaine into a horned up Quayle's is a waste of your money. Just wait for it..

William barber congress elected member Zia Cortez North Carolina John Dot Quayle cocaine president Bill Three days three days
"william barber" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Creating greater wealth gaps then you lied you didn't just that's not just a right position you lied you know you tola when you put your hand on the on the bible and swear holocaust providing for the common defense if all you thinking about his defense military but then you leave children defenceless in cages or you leave people with bad water defensive you lied again that's damnable if you promote if you don't promote the general way instead you take welfare and you cut snap and you don't care about people surviving and you basically say that banks and corporation you're gonna treat them like people and people you're gonna treat like things and you're going to pay you going to say banks and corporations too big to fail but people are okay for them to fair that's just wrong and constitution says only when you provide when you when you ensure domestric giladi establish justice provide for the common defense promote the general welfare do you then have a liberty worthy of being passed on to future generations your posterity other words if the allowed to terms than only than do you have a blessed thing but if you pass on injustice if you pass on the denial of fundamental human rights if you pass on division you passing on curse and america's got decide right now not domon next day not nathalie right there what are we gonna pay reverend william barber president and senior lecturer of repairs of the breach co chair of the poor people's campaign national call for moral revival thank you very much for being on the podcast thank you so much thank you thanks for listening to cape up tune in every tuesday you can find us on apple podcasts and stitcher and how about doing me a huge favor subscribe rate and review us i'm trying to think k part of the washington post you can find me on twitter at cape part jay

america president senior lecturer washington post twitter nathalie william barber apple
"william barber" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And this is just constant was will be one of the thousands of low wage workers taking part in the nationwide protest it was inspired by movement fifty years ago just like the nineteen sixty eight movement today's campaign will last about forty days pastor william barber is a national co chair we will have what is called a nonviolent malraux fusion direct action where people will come together and put their miles in their bodies on the line to force the nation the media to have to see and hear the people that are impacted the list of demands is long calling for a higher minimum wage in a repeal of the 2017 federal tax law then gerrymandering it also calls for an expansion of medicaid in every state and then into systemic racism ecological devastation and military aggression among other things this is what the king understood when he said you have to deal with militarism poverty and racism together they are interlocking injustices barbara insists this is only the beginning michael jeffries is an associate professor of american studies at wellesley college he says the movement is coming at the right time but the focus may be too expensive it is a lengthy list and i think that's the piece of his that remains to be seen as can you sustain a social movement with as many issues as barbara is targeting barbara though says the mission is worth it we never lost the fight for justice we chose to fight the fights that have been lost he says are the ones no one chose to stand up for braxton booker npr news washington this is npr news statewide teacher protests keep spreading around the country so what's this moment like for graduates who are about to become teachers i need to focus on a making a difference it's hard but it's always been hard and it will continue being hard so just gotta have tough skin i'm ari shapiro teacher demonstrations plus the embassy moves to jerusalem this afternoon on all things considered from npr news begins at four thirty today here on kqed public radio where the.

associate professor wellesley college barbara washington william barber michael jeffries npr ari shapiro jerusalem kqed fifty years forty days
"william barber" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Children and this is just constant was will be one of the thousands of low wage workers taking part in the nationwide protest it was inspired by movement fifty years ago just like the nineteen sixty eight movement today's campaign will last about forty days pastor william barber is a national co chair we will have what is called a nonviolent malraux fusion direct action where people will come together and put their mouths in their bodies on the line to force the nation the media to have to see and hear the people that are impacted the list of demands is long calling for a higher minimum wage in a repeal of the 2017 federal tax law then gerrymandering it also calls for an expansion of medicaid in every state and then into systemic racism ecological devastation and military aggression among other things this is what dr king understood when he said you have to deal with militarism poverty and racism together they are interlocking injustices barbara insists this is only the beginning michael jeffries is an associate professor of american studies at wellesley college he says the movement is coming at the right time but the focus may be too expensive it is a lengthy list and i think that's the piece of it that remains to be seen as can you sustain social movement with as many issues as barbara is targeting barbara though says the mission is worth it we've never lost the fight for justice we chose to fight the fights that have been lost he says are the ones no one chose to stand up for braxton booker npr news washington this is npr news this is wnyc am and fm it's eight thirty fifty four degrees in new york we have delays on two three f m an ace subway trains nj transit has delays on the essex line and the northeast corridor.

associate professor wellesley college barbara washington new york william barber dr king michael jeffries npr essex eight thirty fifty four degree fifty years forty days
"william barber" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will be one of the thousands of low wage workers taking part in the nationwide protest it was inspired by movement fifty years ago just like the nineteen sixty eight movement today's campaign will last about forty days pastor william barber is a national co chair we will have what is called a nonviolent malraux fusion direct action where people will come together and put them miles in their bodies on the line to force the nation the media to have the see and hear the the people that are impacted the list of demands is long calling for a higher minimum wage in a repeal of the 2017 federal tax law ending gerrymandering it also calls for an expansion of medicaid in every state an intense racism ecological devastation and military aggression among other things this is what the king understood when he said you have to deal with militarism poverty and racism together they are interlocking injustices barbara insists this is only the beginning michael jeffries is an associate professor of american studies at wellesley college he says the movement is coming at the right time for the focus may be too expensive it is a lengthy list and i think that's the piece of his that remains to be seen is can you sustain a social movement with as many issues as barbara is targeting barber though says the mission is worth it we've never lost the fight for justice that we chose to fight the fights that have been lost he says are the ones no one chose to stand up for braxton booker npr news washington statewide teacher protests keep spreading around the country so what's this moment like for graduates who are about to become teachers i need to focus on a making a difference it's hard but it's always been hard and it will continue to be hard so just got to have tough skin i'm ari shapiro teacher demonstrations plus the us embassy moves to jerusalem this afternoon on all things considered from npr news.

associate professor wellesley college barbara us william barber michael jeffries ari shapiro jerusalem npr fifty years forty days
"william barber" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on AM Joy

"I think much is because you see what brian and his co hot and many of his co sinus the fall whales and the and of those the franklin graham's and those that like they actually kind of try to suggest the only moral issues being against gay people being for prayer in the school being against abortion being for tax cut and they really misrepresent the truth of the gospel there more than two thousand scripts that talk about in the public arena we should be politically involved not democrat or republican but the gospel is political more than two thousand scriptures say how we care about the poor and the least of the broken and the is really the manager of our moralities is really what we would be judged by and i really believe they know they're guilty that's why it is prayer bothered him so bad policies are wrong that discriminatory and they degrade the least bishop william barber thank you so much for being here this morning truly appreciate your joey thank you so much let people know we support you we love you we are standing with you against this hacking and all of us are praying for you mightily and we thank you for your voice god bless barb appreciate you thank you thank you more aimed after the break yeah we were honored it was a great report no collusion which i knew anyway no coordination no nothing the report was very powerful very strong there was no collusion between the trump campaign and the russian people i was very honored by the report it was totally conclusive strong powerful many things said that nobody knew about and set in a very strong way.

brian franklin graham william barber
"william barber" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"The term class more often um what william barber you the suit his program is third reconstruction which if you look back at w b two boys his his dream of first reconstruction he considered first reconstruction the dictatorship of the proletariat when african americans first won the blow in the south and those governments where they lost pre actually probably the most progress of state ruling aerobics certainly intro would 1930's and maybe even past so if you're trying to approach the issue of class not the issue of quest quick a fundamental politics of coops are gonna get approached cropper a bernis point of view in terms of math politics followed what you might call a left popu store as sort of democratic socialist kind of point of view an reverend barber it's gonna come out of the credibility of the african american experience in broadening out into a class wide rainbow tight sirte reconstruction perspective and it's up to the group polish nuri socialists 12 to try their uh mcfadden war selfconscious among the layers who are the most interested in burnt by putting out some of the you know the classical works nodded with dogmatic way and not it in a way good tussled rouse who navy us context we're not going back to the days of fraud large factories him the image of the worker suharto at white male worker and all that kind of saying well we need a concept of class that we're actually eight stitch true to the actual experience of today's prek perry a temporary workers soandso holdups so it's going to be it's you know we're not starting to look very good quaifier in terms of math politics fitter certainly your listenership people on the left who kept the faith of previous generation soon within the new generation this is great uh shulan resource for rebuilding no out but uh you know we're starting in a pretty deep poll clear and matching we have to look at what progress from where we are toward where we need to be not relative to some ideal notion which would be nice but uh it is just not the reality of american politics today you're listening to max elbahna if you have a question accommodate you join the conversation give us.

african americans suharto william barber popu fraud
"william barber" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The results are clear no other country has this number of mass shootings or this huge rate of gone violence it just seems like a that americans are paying an unnecessarily leaf price for the inaction and the cowardice of their legislators well rebecca peters wanna thank you so much for being with us international arms control advocates part of the international network on small arms who led the campaign to reform australia's gun laws after the port arthur massacre which saw thirty five people killed and score of people injured this is democracy now when we return we'll speak to bishop william barber stay with us aw two hello oh got a dan two just another so her by the staple singers here on democracy now democracy.

australia arthur bishop william barber
"william barber" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"The veggies is debt while he than jelica claimed the nafta was a brown's can palestinianju who i sarma was challenging the economic exploitation of reverend barber and endorsing heart world had been working together in a multiracial movement known as monday weekly protests held on grounds of the north carolina state capital in rally aimed at helping citizens understand their common interest aroused such issues as health care voting rights and immigration also how they are affected by these and other governmental policies regardless of race or class when we went into the first mall bundit emma virtual as clergy investment i some people laugh they said we were nuisance but then they started seem more people come and they look diverse this that's my teacher get arrested that's my doctor that's a black man in a white man walk into got that's a jew and a rabbi at a christian what's going all so people began because even though they didn't get arrested they would com the more on monday movement is the foundation for reverend barbara's latest project that he intends to take to some twentyfive states what can be learned from our experience is that white people need to talk about race honestly we need to say of course we're racist this is a country that's built on white supremacy you know it's it's not like a personal failing i inherited this racism is about structures that pass on what we inherited right inequalities that we inherited are written into these structures and and when we help white people think about that i think we're we're making it possible to form alliances that we haven't been able black people can't be afraid that we look back in history when black and white people came together right after the civil war we fundamental changes country with black and white brown people jews and christians came together the civil rights movement it was transformative are you at all optimistic that the kinds of things that you're doing.

jelica nafta reverend barber voting rights reverend barbara civil war north carolina civil rights
"william barber" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"This legislature just cut denied medicaid expands beth thousand people in his county that we get health care and they can't be black because no black people up here the cut funding for public educating you are losing teaches here you've been more and they have to be white now you voted for some of the people because what it tell you they stood on printers schooled than abortion and homosexuality what less look at what they're doing and how was hurting you so basically what you did was to talk to them about the things that they had in common and it and it registered it if permeated their consciousness you talk to people honestly you talked to him about what it means to be a human being and you show them the hypocrisy you know you show them how they're being fooled if you will that people are saying i care about your best interest but those people are actually putting in place policies that are hurting everybody what strategy did you use to reach people who had been brought up like jonathan what did you do to convince them that this was not right i know that many of my wide evangelical france or many african americans who about into this connell a public engagement type faith really have been introduced to an i say this with a sorrowfully a form of heresy and a form of theological malpractice uh to try to suggest that jesus was just about a little prayer and little preaching and a little worship and a little charity.

france african americans medicaid jonathan
"william barber" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"william barber" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Poor black people and black people in general so obvious was in the southern baptist church in a son downtown until 1980 three there was a sign of our town the told black people they weren't welcome there after the sun went down i've read that you call yourself a racist i didn't know obvious racist but riven barbara helped me see that i was racist and more importantly that my racism was getting in the way of loving jesus which is what i really wanted to do we'll send heart growth i heard reverend barbary some twenty years ago at a meeting called by the north carolina governor reverend barber delivered a motivational speech to a gathering of young people wilson heart grove was moved back what barbara said and begin to understand how racism had been used as a tool to divide growing up poor wilson heart growth had never before realized what he had in common with poor black people we were taught to believe that there were people who were poor because they chose to be poor and and that narrative kept us from seeing the way that our religion was being used to pit us against other people reverend barbara has even taken his message into appalachia and up to mitchell county north carolina governor cao north of our is a place where nineteen twenty all the black people were run out over the accusation of a black man raping a white one is ninety seven percent white seventy seven percent republican wary but undeterred reverend barbara seized on the invitation of this oral heights church in winning and talk to ma'am as for about an hour and i said listen.

southern baptist church reverend barber barbara appalachia north carolina mitchell county seventy seven percent ninety seven percent twenty years