35 Burst results for "Wilkins"

Why Minimalists Don't Chase Trends

Optimal Living Daily

01:00 min | Last month

Why Minimalists Don't Chase Trends

"You might think that minimalists are all about white. Walls and clutter free countertops. That's not the whole story. Minimalist know that having less stuff offers more space for focus gratitude pan meaningful work whether your own desk is clear or your bookshelves are overstuffed. Consider trying out these ten things that minimalists don't do number one. They don't lose sleep over keeping up with trends when it comes to stuff. Minimalist aimed own just enough. They might invest in fewer higher quality pieces but they're not spending a lot of time and energy shopping for those shoes and tote bags and coffee table baubles everyone else's after the ones that will be outdated into disposed of before season is over. That's not to say that minimalist. Don't pay attention to style. They just tend to invest more in their own personal style. Not the style dictated by consumer trends instead of trying to fit in minimalist focus on who they are and what's right for them

Confirmed: We Played a Lot More Video Games During Pandemic

Talking Tech

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Confirmed: We Played a Lot More Video Games During Pandemic

"After the show to learn about special financing for talking tech listeners listeners. It's mike schneider here and i'm proud. Molina wilkin back to talking tech. Mike i know we wrote stories during the pandemic about people playing video games as we were forced to adopt a stay at home lifestyle but now there are some actual survey findings support. This tried brett. The entertainment software association. And that's the trade group that puts on the annual electronic entertainment expo which we refer to fondly as e three That association just released its annual essential facts about the video game industry report and found that more than half of video game players fifty five percent so that played more games during the pandemic and most players ninety percent so they'll continue playing after the country opens up. This is based on a four on four thousand. Us adults surveyed by the market research. Firm ipsos For the usa now some other findings Respondents said that video games provided stress relief. That was from fifty five percent of them and forty eight percent. Said you'll games provided a distraction Parents also said that video games churches in escape in a break for the kids. That's seventy one percent of parents surveyed said and more than half a parents. Fifty nine percent said their children play educational games in two thirds of parents. Sixty six percent said video games made the transition to distance learning easier for their kids. Some other interesting fact survey overall two hundred twenty seven million americans say they play video games and that's up from two hundred and fourteen million the year before. I don't know what you think. The average age of video game players brett but they are thirty one years old. How many games identify as female. Forty five percents Eighty percent of the game players in the us are over. Eighteen

Mike Schneider Molina Wilkin Entertainment Software Associa Brett Mike United States
"wilkins" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:22 min | 4 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"You'll hear it but when i saw what happened to him in atlanta on friday i just felt like. There's no way we can do this without giving him the chance to talk about it and do you want to just walk us through what happened. Well you know. It was very unfortunate bryant. You know. I've been to a lot of restaurants in my my life great restaurants around the world and i've never experienced anything like that especially in my city of course but neither van fortune. That's going into a restaurant and getting sized up and looked up and down and and then you know after being asked accident emmy back up a little bit before. I asked him about sitting down and dining outside the arrest again. It was eerie. Phil has looked at me. Really funny up and down my lady friend and i and i remember astronauts. I would love to have reservations outside to headlines and they look me up and down again and they said we don't have lunch reservations We'll books now. Do about ten empty tables outside. Wow okay. this is less time around. One o'clock all these people were lied to. And i said well you know this seats available. And she said i'm looking at what you wearing. You went sweatpants. i'm like coming in now. i'm best. I'm dressed better than half the guys come into this restaurant that day. Now this is a kicker and this'll be the why it felt racist to me. Yes there were three white guys coming in with shorts t shirts and sneakers on they say. Give me a join a second so sorry dominate. And i'm like okay. And she said we try to keep a level of elegance in here so we can't see when we're not gonna teach so i walked out in my lady friend went back and he said now. What is your criteria of which will be dressed like. Mr wilkins was not in track. Fancy she should matter of fact he doesn't even own track man's. He said he was dress. Elegant it was stylish. And you guys don't realize what you what you've done and she said it's just really unfortunate walked away and so i just you know i went all day and i said you know. I can't just let this go. You know.

atlanta Phil One o'clock wilkins friday bryant ten empty tables three white guys half the guys emmy
"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

02:17 min | 4 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Or in person. Thank you very much next week. We'll be hearing from Actually it's my martin next week the next week and the one mall remote one and then we're going into ones. I think i might need a few more. Wants to get me through the next three to one. So we won't do the occasional regret ones but if you enjoy these remote ones there are three more to come. And if you listen to this podcast matters check out twitch dot tv slash hearing where i do all sorts of stuff like the puppet. Shower do caitlyn. When i came the idea of quite soon after losing in fact maybe before. I lost my testicle of having a puppet of my tested i talked to. You advise me to think very hard about it. Well yeah and seemed to think it was a bad idea now. I descend thinking okay. I didn't think through just did it. I think that's i think in some way that was the biggest a healthy way for me to process having a healthy ways. You've seen the purpose. I have seen it on the right good things interest. We haven't we haven't left yet all right. Thanks everyone see you next time on defer. You have been listening to step our with me. Which tearing my guest catherine wilkins. The music is by scant regard. Its new hope you like it. I'm indebted to my friend produced a direct and all round. Good egg chris evans not one. I'm also attitude and walker mop from british comedy guide. Everyone acoss at ian tunes. And all my friends and family I know lead moons as well. Why not. I'm dan to him as well. This is a skype Taito fuss.

catherine wilkins next week martin chris evans twitch dot tv skype caitlyn three one mall british Taito one remote one
"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

02:34 min | 4 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"It's ridiculous when we got married. I thought this will probably three or four years. I'll be fine. I will go wild. I'm rich that was a good nine years. We're gonna get ten years opening to buy you a special ring. Be married to move ten years. Okay we now see nothing What's the secret of our marriage..

three ten years nine years four years
"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"There was a pizza and then they start having sex with the people in the house. I mean if it can be the exact health assist more what happened. Did you ever not deliver your pizza minutes. Oh yeah so there. Was this thing that we had to deliver it in thirty minutes. This is preset naps just driving test. I was like seventeen. Eighteen and i was often late delivering get lost and then one time didn't arrive. I have a tool. I just gave up. Went back home back home back to the domino's pizza. Why not on my podcast. We'd be like let's be careful careful on this on but there was one yes so i just delivered pizzas late to really angry shouting at me. Daphne didn't want to have sex with me. But sometimes if i did deliver on time sometimes make to quit once nice good. That's the first job insurance broker. Yes probably nothing much in norwich where i've seen where your insurance broker driven stay. We probably have where it was bishop. Still we have shelf stotka. Yeah how did you get insurance brokers better than shelf soccer litter picker about photo developer interested in developing. So about this i was. This was my first job after each places like our first date. I should've asked this on. The first date wasn't one handy website russia's katie. What to do our jobs have you done upon from comedian comedian. Yeah so it was click. Twenty minute are the big selling point of my photography so by the way this is two thousand one and you can't just make your own at this. I mean maybe you can basically not that. Many people had one of selling points as we could put photos on digital thing where we're really trying to flog. Oh we're developing your vitamin d. Why because people would make porn and develop those going to ask you about that so So our big selling point was we do it in twenty minutes instead of an hour and we're very busy at lunch times and yeah people would come in..

norwich thirty minutes Daphne Twenty minute seventeen two thousand first date Eighteen domino one each places twenty minutes one time first job an hour katie russia bishop
"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Them you can watch them live online with a little bit of money or you can come to the theater and watch him. There is still tickets available so for all five shows. We've got johnny vegas. We've got Sarah kendall and we got robin asquith. From for the confession source. That might be more to come but talk if someone who definitely has been one hundred nineteen days without alcohol. She hasn't been one hundred eighteen seconds of their alcohol. And she's probably best known for appearance on standup hero. Will you please. Catherine wilkins lanes and gents. Katie wilkins. kathryn katie. Wilkins wilkins come in getting this. Actually here i can touch them. Allowed to touch because we're in a bubble. It's haven't thought that we did think about it. Briefly before having you as a guest on restivo when you in the house a lot easier than we generally paxton. Toby often to get him to the ipad. Up is no. I'm going to sound this. Just you come from downstairs. Next week could have phoebe to do it next week. Adore ernie the could do the dog. Could do of the capcom here. So you so lockdown. How you doing i'm good. Is this get messages this to the people a little bit. They're a little bit behind us. They hello katie says latch more so cow was what was the stand up. Show about the standard. Was that all about. That was a fun show gap and added five minutes of standup tv tv for the best the higher the number the the big one a sellout like the comedians that are on the mainstream channels. I think and it was officially competition. So i think each one comedian each week and then all the winners had episode at the end. I think just to come on. The whole thing is pretty good. I think he went on to be okay. He didn't win my emphasize unless it. I'm pretty sure yeah. I didn't know i didn't win. I can tell you that if you're even was a competition and competition i'm pretty sure it was a competition..

Katie wilkins Sarah kendall kathryn katie next week five minutes johnny vegas Catherine wilkins Next week Wilkins one hundred eighteen seconds ipad one hundred nineteen days five shows katie each week Adore ernie each one restivo robin asquith paxton
"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

03:25 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"An and i think they need to address a defensive presence. Maybe somebody with a defensive presence to offset you know the guy that no not as strong on defense and you got three guys that can score but how much effort are you going. Put into detention. Me and i think i think the they are they see that we see that and but again it goes back to what you said the culture they did have some good pieces lavar. I thought was the. Yeah coming.

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

07:18 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"They have a lot of players. They could do a lot of players. And you know. I think it i think could He's gonna be a good one. I really believe that please. You'll be a good one get fit for new york and you'll have many years and like you said. He has had the career. Charlie ward in a great pick. If you don't mind. Can we talk about the team and the other borrow the nets very interesting very interesting team right now. You know you had the rant you had irving you waiting and then you got the team for hard and around. Everybody's like how's everybody going to get along. Are they gonna get together or are they gonna play together first of all i did not have they wanna play together so i don't have an issue with durant heart in irving them getting along them sharing the ball. Because it's going to happen but you being a role player on an nba team and ages gutted. Their t- their role players. Then they trade away. Their best rebound. They traded away their best defender. They traded away their backup point. Guard what can we expect from this team. Well what i see is you know. I like what james harden during his bachchan coming in and you know passing the ball well is two scores. A lot of points. Yeah the problem which you jersey as you say. They don't have the lunch pail guys thirty work. And that's what they're going to have to dress before the train. Some how to get a shot blocker I think they were talking about getting mcgee but they need a shot blocker and they need help on that defense so i think those are the things that are missing from them. That are that. Make them a championship team because they have the big three right but you can see you can score a hundred and forty five but the other team is going off four twenty six thirty seven and you hear me. I've been waiting for them to roll out the red white and blue eighty able with this team. The way they're playing defense is taking a back seat there. I mean come on but it you know what i mean. I and i look at the nets. Were they were and what they were building and ito that it's been escaping me all night but the word is culture you know and that place such a big no matter what sport is basketball football baseball you need that culture and it just see the nets were were finally doing it the right way you know they got hamstrung from the whole kevin garnett you know that whole trade and that's one thing in the nba with these big trades and you hamstring and you handcuff yourself with this salary cap. It's tough to get out of so they finally broke down the team and they seem to be doing it the right way and then you know. Hey look the culture is good here. We have a good head coach which is no longer with the team and bill bill build with bringing durant we bring an irving and then just a gut it for heart. You don't want to me. It was a desperate move. Just something wasn't and this was when i re- when a wall and it just seemed like desperation and i'm watching this team and i know the eastern conference is bad. I mean it. They're not going to a championship. This year not win even make it out of eastern conference files. This is a boss. An and i think they need to address a defensive presence. Maybe somebody with a defensive presence to offset you know the guy that no not as strong on defense and you got three guys that can score but how much effort are you going. Put into detention. Me and i think i think the they are they see that we see that and but again it goes back to what you said the culture they did have some good pieces lavar. I thought was the. Yeah coming out the I i love to watch them play and you know up there. I think that they took a chance. They took a chance. And it's no lady cannot win it all and i believe you're gonna they have to make some more yet because as of now i can't see them. You know you have to guards and durant. I can't see them beaten. Lebron and anthony davis with no body in the middle. Because those guys ain't playing defense and even covering just physically. He cannot match up on a defense on the defensive. End with Anthony davis lebron. He's just not gonna stop. Yeah yes and and and and that's gonna be. Let's keeley -til for for them. But at the same time. You have three of the most prolific scores in basketball right now and if they find the couple of pieces that can help him then they definitely have shop and have to create. They wanna have to recreate a culture and you say we go back to the culture. A scores a lot but has an assist on playing defense. And it's gotta come from the big three as well they gotta put up for the into and because they need stafa because if they by everybody'll buyer even even with that you still need east players able to do the job you know it's an and that's I feel where they're lacking so let me ask you something. What do you got going on in georgia. I understand you a camp youth camp down there that you started After he retired. I have been doing this for probably thirty two years. A youth association hometown I wanted to give back. And and then i got Got involved in and just happening you and it expanded. And i have a.

kevin garnett anthony davis james harden georgia Lebron thirty two years new york two scores a hundred and forty five three guys eighty Anthony davis lebron bill bill Charlie ward twenty six thirty seven one thing four This year thirty work couple of pieces
"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

03:53 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"You know. I think it i think could He's gonna be a good one. I really believe that please. You'll be a good one get fit for new york and you'll have many years and like you said. He has had the career. Charlie ward in a great pick. If you don't mind. Can we talk about the team and the other borrow the nets very interesting very interesting team right now. You know you had the rant you had irving you waiting and then you got the team for hard and around. Everybody's like how's everybody going to get along. Are they gonna get together or are they gonna play together first of all i did not have they wanna play together so i don't have an issue with durant heart in irving them getting along them sharing the ball. Because it's going to happen but you being a role player on an nba team and ages gutted. Their t- their role players. Then they trade away. Their best rebound. They traded away their best defender. They traded away their backup point. Guard what can we expect from this team. Well what i see is you know. I like what james harden during his bachchan coming in and you know passing the ball well is two scores. A lot of points. Yeah the problem which you jersey as you say. They don't have the lunch pail guys thirty work. And that's what they're going to have to dress before the train. Some how to get a shot blocker I think they were talking about getting mcgee but they need a shot blocker and they need help on that defense so i think those are the things that are missing from them. That are that. Make them a championship team because they have the big three right but you can see you can score a hundred and forty five but the other team is going off four twenty six thirty seven and you hear me. I've been waiting for them to roll out the red white and blue eighty able with this team. The way they're playing defense is taking a back seat there. I mean come on but it you know what i mean. I and i look at the nets. Were they were and what they were building and ito that it's been escaping me all night but the word is culture you know and that place such a big no matter what sport is basketball football baseball you need that culture and it just see the nets were were finally doing it the right way you know they got hamstrung from the whole kevin garnett you know that whole trade and that's one thing in the nba with these big trades and you hamstring and you handcuff yourself with this salary cap. It's tough to get out of so they finally broke down the team and they seem to be doing it the right way and then you know. Hey look the culture is good here. We have a good head coach which is no longer with the team and bill bill build with bringing durant we bring an irving and then just a gut it for heart. You don't want to me. It was a desperate move. Just something wasn't and this was when i re- when a wall and it just seemed like desperation and i'm watching this team and i know the eastern conference is bad. I mean it. They're not going to a championship. This year not win even make it out of eastern conference files. This is a boss..

kevin garnett james harden new york two scores This year eighty Charlie ward a hundred and bill bill one thing thirty work twenty six thirty seven four forty five first conference
"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

03:18 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"Because we let again and he knew how to motivate people and what we did was when huby with day we had a team was there. We had a much younger team and it was guys that were hungry. Okay i mean you guys. Notice approved themselves and he was he was as he put up a position to be successful and he gave guys the freedom to robots right. You know he gave them the freedom to express their game in. And i think that would help us help us to evolve into the team that we were and we had. We had a lot of fun. You got a lot of fun. You had a lotta fun. Because we played hard we played a lot of guys and it was It was we were winning so that made it. That made a better a very good situation and we got to go to break you. Stick around for.

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

08:44 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"It was just great situation. I mean i remember because this is. I'm not gonna date myself or myself. But this was around the time that i started following the knicks. You know and. I remember the posters up at the time and burr bird was in boston. You know magic. Johnson was in la you know. The sixers had dr j. and for new york it was you know benard. You know that was our guy you know and I remember that night that he went down. I mean how devastating was that to the team. When he tours acl devastate. It was devastating. And it it Put all season Because he was having a great season yeah he was. He was leading the league in scoring thirty two point. Yeah yeah and he was You know it. It really took a lot because he had a lot of the burden of scoring. It really put a lot of pressure on a lot of other guys and you know but the season season term when he got hurt you know it is definitely a big blow to the team. I mean you take out thirty two points. A game or score like has no matter who steps up. That's something that i mean. That's a whole that just can't be filled so like you were saying. So yes so. This was your rookie season. He sat out eighty five eighty six with a knee injury. You come back. Eighty six eighty seven. And that's when patrick ewing zehr. What were your first thoughts. I mean first of all. Just you're rear general with the knicks. You go from two of the grades you go from bernard king you're out ear and then you come back and you're playing with patrick ewing and patrick you in the second you. What was that like i mean. Did you see how good he was going to be right away. Absolutely am in my judgment owning now looking back. It was correct patrick with another person and i played against patrick impact so hard every practice. You didn't off practice. He didn't take you know take practices off. Rent came into what was a battle And i think that translated to game because he you know he started to Be the lead more. He was just he at one point on the picket abadie dollars. He was just done it. And he's but that he put a work and he was a great claire. was a great teammate. And he wanted to win. A lot of people can say a lot of things but country really lonely to win you all about winning and sixteen in any way to now you being the backup center. What was your jump in practice for him. I mean it must be you a better player. Considering every night. You're going to go out Facing something other centers a night. You're not gonna face even when you're coming in. You're not facing patrick. You're you know you're not facing kind of town every night so go in for you. How did that change your game or make you a better player. When he gave me the company. When i came in as a backup you know i would always known score. I could come in at school. Me a coupla bathrooms. Gift patrick in practice you know. I always felt like that. I had a vantage over anybody that was playing. Because i knew that if i could get my shots i says patrick. Then you wasn't a lot of people that could stop me right so it gave me a lot of confidence to coming in and do my job and in play hard when i got there and let me. What were you is so you know you saw you were part of this development. You know the seeds were kind of there and you saw the knicks. Were there and some of the bad years and you saw them starting to take off. What was the difference there when you first come in yet. The eighty four eighty five team. You know Benard goes down finished. Twenty four and fifty eight fifth in the atlantic division. And then you're last season. I believe with the knicks. Either you guys are in the playoffs. I mean what was that evolution like as a team. You know seeing this happen. I mean i saw it coming together When the week patino canes eighty seven eighty eight season we had we had. We had good chemistry. Charles oakley Mark jackson was there Who johnny newman patrick in the middle. So josh started coming in jail looking just started coming. Josh started coming together and accepting their roles and week was google about Given people to freedom said to play put us in a system that worked for us. I mean we were squad and we went. We knew that we want to be a playoff t that we started to to jail so going from the team that we had before we never had any nudity But we started to get that and you could just feel it coming together. Those those three years that we made the claus. I mean you can see that. The team headed ball into god's and understanding that their roles were and what it took to be a playoff team. Yeah go ahead of side just had hit up. I was When we paid When we played philadelphia and we swapped the on other famous famous sleep. The famous sweep with the broom out on the court against charles barkley. You guys took heat for that. Yup i remember that game. There is a lot of heat for that. And then you went down to the old in the next round yup. Yup we took a lot of heat for that but we were still in and it was not the bit thing for us to do immature things but we were having fun. We felt like we were having fallen and and Yes we did. We played against michael. Before we get to that. I gotta ask you. Who was the catalyst with the broom. Whose idea was that. I'm not sure. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna tell on anybody no because i think we've seen that once and we haven't seen that again from anyone i mean it didn't exactly take off like the giants Gatorade bucket there. But the i do remember that night the sweeping of the floor and you guys took a lot of heat but i wanna get to this. So how much okay. So you're at this time you've seen the team above. How much was it. The players and how much of it was rick pitino because you had him and his like we spoke about earlier. Eighty four eighty five assistant coach. These the next goes to providence. Takes that team to the final four. And then. The knicks hiram is the head coach. So how much of a you know now you've played for. Qb brown now. You're playing for rick pitino and you have patino as an assistant coach. Did you have any interest would be an nba coach and not only nba coach. A hall of famer.

patrick Josh rick pitino Charles oakley boston charles barkley Johnson josh Mark jackson two johnny newman thirty two points thirty two point Eighty six Benard three years Eighty four Twenty four sixteen second
"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

02:58 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"You can also follow me on twitter at rob's in. Wg be so we are talking tonight. To eddie lee wilkins and former new york knick center and mick fans right. Now you've gotta be happy. The fact of where the knicks are coming into this season the roster that they put together we had there is about three players that had any significance on this team and the fact that they are being competitive the fact that they could go to the playoffs in the extended playoff format. This year is a plus for the knicks Coming into the season what who mattered. Mitchell robinson overtop in julius randle in rj. Barry and the fact that you got emmanuel quigley might be the steal. The draft is a bonus for the next We don't have a mind not yet. So we'll continue talking new york knicks basketball. The fact that the new york knicks finally might have it together the fact that the management of this team. I finally have it together. The fact that the coaching staff that they put together with tom. Thibodeau leading this team. Playing defense playing an offensive system is something we have not seen in years and the fact that you know everybody says oh. It doesn't matter the Whatever you wanna call it The aura of this team the That they have something going there young team. They're playing well and they are building on something. This is something we haven't seen in the nixon about twenty years every game. They are in the fact that they are in every game. This they do not shoot the ball. Well they're not a good three point shooting team but they are playing defense and playing defense in the nba is going to keep you in every game. And that's what they are doing led by tom. Thibodeau so maybe finally. The knicks are on the right path. The knicks are where the new jersey nets were three years ago when the new jersey nets started breaking that team down bringing in young players starting with base starting with a quarter that they can build off of. That's when they started getting better. That's when they started making the playoffs and could make a play for the players that they have now. And that's what we're hoping for from the knicks. Continue their rise. They're playing well. Oh we have him. He's on the line now. Mr eddie lee wilkins. Eddie lee wilkins. Welcome to w. gb's sportstalk sunday night. How you doing. I'm doing well after the here. Thank you guys for having no now. I appreciate you taking the time you know. It is february fourteenth. It is valentine's day twenty. Twenty one and i appreciate you taking the time out of your romantic night to join.

Eddie lee wilkins eddie lee wilkins emmanuel quigley julius randle february fourteenth knicks new york knicks Mitchell robinson tonight twitter three years ago sunday night This year three point tom. Thibodeau rj. Barry nixon new york knick center Twenty about twenty years every game
Reflections On Atlanta Braves Legend Henry "Hank" Aaron

The Lead

05:43 min | 8 months ago

Reflections On Atlanta Braves Legend Henry "Hank" Aaron

"I could talk about the dignity in the class of hank. Aaron the man the you've been being for an hour easily but i'm a numbers guy and so let me tell you what i did. After hank aaron died i navigated over to his page on baseball reference. And i don't know. I just be held the majesty of this man's career and it literally gave me goosebumps. The more i looked the more. I realized he was beyond great. He was at some other level. He wound up with nearly thirty eight hundred hits. And that's a lot of freaking hits. It's a thousand more history chipper jones. It's two thousand more hits than mark. Maguire it's more hits than johnny bench and hank greenberg got combined and they're both in the hall of fame so i think about all those hints and i think about those seven hundred fifty five homeless because that's two hundred more homes than mickey mantle. Two hundred it's more homers than edgar martinez and duke snider hit combined. And they're both in the hall. But the more i dug i found other cool stuff to hank. Aaron had double digit home run seasons at age twenty and age. Forty here the only three players who did that. Willie mays ted williams hank aaron. That's a pretty good. Start on a mount rushmore. Would you say and all those home runs. He hit for all those years. This never struck out one hundred times. Then there's total basis crushes. Everyone who ever played in total bases six thousand eight hundred and fifty. Six total bases isn't just a record. It's seven hundred. Twenty two more than stan. Musial was the next closest player in history. If stan musial had hit another one hundred and eighty home runs. He still wouldn't catch i karen and total basis. That's a lot of total basis. That's incredible hitter hank. Aaron was for two decades. So is it possible to be one of the greatest players who ever lived and still the underrated. After looking over hank aaron's numbers. I think it is my name. Is david o'brien cover the braves for the athletic. And there's only two guys that i've ever felt this aura around them and that was mohammed ali and hank. Aaron and hank aaron. How's interviewed him. The first time at spring training. I remember approaching him and it was just You know i've done this for thirty years. And it was feeling. I've had unlike any other athlete that i've ever approached but then he immediately just he smiled and was so warm that that fear or intimidation just as melted away. And you could not believe that you were talking to this. Superstar is genuine icon living in atlanta for twenty years You can't overstate the importance of hank. Air to this city and this region the south. I grew up in the south and hank aaron being a black man being the greatest one of one of the two or three greatest players of all time and to do what he did in the south and then living in atlanta and seeing hank aaron you know mementos anchor and tributes and see his name on buildings and streets and that kind of thing. I would argue that. There is no athlete. That is more important to a city than hanker and wants to atlanta. He was such a huge part of how the culture of the south has changed. I mean this is a city where you feel fide of being so much black acceptance here. Thanks a huge huge part of that. He helped pave the way for all these other black athletes and entertainers wanna come here to be here. Brian jordan know it was an all star with atlanta. Bryant said that The reason that he chose atlanta was hank. Aaron and was a boy idle here. He said a black kid growing up playing baseball hank. Aaron was the guy but it was an opportunity for me to meet my hair. The hope the opportunity is given so many kids today. Amazing dominique wilkins. Said hank was a big reason. That he came here was one of the first people. It's probably one of the most instrumental guys into getting me here in atlanta. But one for god like hank. I wouldn't been here. Was hanker went to ted turner and said hey you need to get this kid by any means necessary. He said people should give the roses while they're alive and that he's glad to see him getting them now but he said hank should have been put on a pedestal decades ago and he was right What are the things that i remember him saying is that you gotta set example for people to come at you. And how do you do that. You do the right way you doing about being Have miltie you do it by just doing the right thing and the right thing a lot of times. It's hard and a lot of guys. Young guys don't know how to do the right thing. As far as how they present themselves to people and how they get back to people so to give back experts that i've learned over the years has become from erin trampling. We don't see that much of that anymore today. And he lived in the same house that he bought when he came here in. Nineteen sixty six from the

Hank Aaron Hank Aaron Atlanta Hank Greenberg Johnny Bench Chipper Jones Edgar Martinez Duke Snider Mickey Mantle Willie Mays Stan Musial Ted Williams Maguire Musial Baseball David O Mohammed Ali Brien Brian Jordan
Ball brothers Lonzo, LaMelo set to square off in NBA matchup

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

03:48 min | 9 months ago

Ball brothers Lonzo, LaMelo set to square off in NBA matchup

"We're talking about lonzo in the last segment. A little bit and brandon ingram coups mud cetera. But the whole point was that lamelo alonzo are playing. And you don't have a lot of brothers playing against each other. We know the wilkins brothers Played against each other. Obviously the soul brothers have played against each other so this is just another installation of that particular kind of cool fund rivalry that the nba tends to have but we you know we talked a lot about lonzo. What do you think of the mellows. Ceiling is wow. That's a great question Ever since i first saw him like what was it like three years ago now watching plane. Aau it was obvious he was really talented offensive player. So i would say. His silly is attached to his defense. Okay you know. The more he improved bronco on defense to hire his silly goes because even though i think he's a really talented offensive. Play at the reality is. There's not a whole lot of dudes who play his position in the back court. That can't get you them buckets. Right what else you got. And we're waiting to see him. Show us the other aspects of it tastes him from being a talented young player to someone who may be able to lead a team to a french tour championship. So at this point It's a wait and see i need to. I need to spend a liberal time playing ball getting better getting stronger. Before i can tell you where i think is ceiling is going to go because i need to see how strong and how defensive he's going to become yet. Defensively is a big problem. I think big problem right now but it's a big problem for young players especially rookies week or so. You know. it's time for all of them. So i'm not going to hold them to this. But after two seasons if dudes are still blown by him because he's too busy trying to leak out get buckets. Then we know what that is. Yeah look here's ofensive skill set. His passing is ridiculous. Like we already know that that very early on do you think. He has a higher ceiling than lonzo though no not inherently so right well of course. There's always a good defender. There's no question about really answer. Really good rebounder right. And he's equally as good as a passer. So you're asking yourself. We'll lonzo's offense developed faster than lamelo defense. Because that's gap right. There will lonzo's offense develop than I would say lonzo's offenses rounding to form much much better. These last eight months or whatever lamelo defense defense takes a while i feel like guy sometimes go years before they learn to play real. Good defense is that fair or it depends on the coach that should never have conversations with Jj radic over the years and bright before he was drafted. He and i were joking. I was like dude. I love you to be in phoenix. House wins nash. And amari and those guys were rolling. Sounds like do you just be straight buckets. Any overstaying strengthen gundy and you needed to lay defense to play. I needed to pay exactly to play defense for stand right and it was because of that. He's still in the league. I don't know if he was still being the league. If it wasn't for stan forced him to know how to play good defense and he did. He became a very capable defender Even though he's small right even though he you know he he's he's not he's strong for size but he's not like some overwhelming You know person when it comes to his strength but he's really smart. He plays the angles while he plays team defense. Because you're you're right. You're right

Lonzo Brandon Ingram Lamelo Alonzo Bronco NBA Jj Radic Amari Gundy Nash Phoenix Stan
No acknowledgement, no thanks for Rosalind Franklin who made the discovery of DNA structure possible

The Science Show

05:32 min | 9 months ago

No acknowledgement, no thanks for Rosalind Franklin who made the discovery of DNA structure possible

"It's the centenary of rosen. franklin's birth. This year she who made watson crick's revelation of the structure of dna possible. Her photograph of dna made all the difference and was featured in western. Play called photograph. fifty one with nicole. Kidman who else is franklin. But it was after dna. According to patricia farrer of clare college cambridge that her work on viruses and irony made work like this year's fast production of covid vaccine possible all that worth two nobel prices so far. Thank you think just portrait by malcolm. I'm watson i'm creek. Let us show. You are trick. We have found the seed of life sprang from. We believe we're stew of molecular goo with a period of thirty four angstrom. So just think this means to our respective genes that sakes did not be disgusting or you girls. Try that trick of watson and crick and achieved. Double helix lusting cheeky was recited by james watson and francis creek at a symposium in june nine hundred fifty three to celebrate the discovery of the double helix in nineteen sixty two. They received the nobel prize for this work. Along with morris wilkins. They've been basking in the glory of his saints but there was another crucial contribution to solving the puzzle of deny that of the dock lady of dna roslyn franklin. He's francis creek acknowledging homework on bbc radio in nineteen ninety nine. It was fairly fast. But you know we were lucky. You must remember. It was based off the x ray. Were done here in london. Started off by. Murray's wilkins and carried on by rosen in franklin and we wouldn't have got to the stage of least having a molecular model if it hadn't been for their work will the story is very bleak. She was naps. Brilliant x ray photographer and this was how the physical reality of the double helix model was first. Seen because wont watson and crick quarrel remodelers that that is they were abstract scientists. They were thera- titians so they were making the model as it were in their heads out of those bubbles and sticks that we all know so well which made the double helix model. What roslyn franklin's incredible achievement walls that she was a technically quite brilliant with this new and difficult apparatus of x ray photography and she showed this first image. Hilary rose from city university london. She's been a sociologist. of science. Since the mid seventy s and the image is referring to is the x ray picture taken by rosalind franklin niners photograph number fifty one. It displays a doc. Black spotty cross shape which confirmed for watson and creek. They hypothesise that. The structure of dna is in fact. A double helix. Hilary rose is passionate about rosine. Franklin's contribution and believed her story is one of appropriation and rasiah without her consent. These pictures were taken by the third noble prize winner. Wilkins and they were shown to watson and crick in cambridge and this is appropriation. I mean there are harder woods for it. A ratio of course was dramatic in the nobel prize acceptance speeches. Roslyn is by then dead. So little people forget those no question hoping for price. 'cause they not give them to the dead they given to the living so the three man. None of them acknowledged her work public. What she gets is a footnote in morris wilkin so that's the asia and you would have thought on the occasion art a such a thing as the nobel prize. The woman is dead that there would have been case for little generosity. Not a hint of a three man. Just carry on as if she hadn't existed as she hadn't done the pioneering extra work. It wasn't a pool in shabby story. And there's plenty in the history of science strong views from sociologist. Hilary rose no matter which way you look at it though. The mystery of this dark lady is intriguing author. Brinda medics was so fascinated by rosalind franklin. That she's recently completed a comprehensive biography. He she is with robin williams. Rosen franklin's family very well off for intellectual whether or not they're very wealthy anglo jewish bankers they also had a publishing firm for the sons in the family who actually were inclined to banking rutledge and keegan. Paul you're very distinguished people very proud of their heritage and they trace their ancestry back to king david the founder of jerusalem. So i mean this is a family takes its ancestry seriously and so one of the problems i think was not so much her gender but class. She sounded aristocratic to them. She spoke terribly well very clipped and some people just hated that. And it's one of the many ingredients which actually made her disoriented and not as happy as she might have made a very clever little girl. And i mean as she was growing up quite small. She wasn't very clever. Little girl and i discovered family letter from her aunt mamie. Anyway she noticed rosalyn has a six year old and she rosalind is alarmingly clever. She does her sums for pleasure and invariably gets them right and i thought that alarmingly was very significant because roseland had three brothers but the fact that the girls should be the cleverest really did

Watson Roslyn Franklin Hilary Rose Crick Franklin Watson Crick Patricia Farrer Clare College Cambridge Rosen Francis Creek Morris Wilkins James Watson Rosalind Franklin Kidman Rosine Malcolm Nicole London
Week 10 fantasy football rankings: Running Backs

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

04:13 min | 11 months ago

Week 10 fantasy football rankings: Running Backs

"I running backs schedule running backs derrick henry. It's actually pretty terrible for the next. three weeks. colts ravens colts. They are top for against fantasy running backs. Then it is unbelievable. And this is the time of year. We're derrick henry gets going anyway His last three his fantasy playoffs are jacksonville. Detroit and green bay. So i i'm recommending. My dalvin cook sell high. And we're going to wait until this primetime game against the colts and hope derrick henry struggles a little bit. And then we're going to sell dalvin cook for derrick henry and very good wide receiver. Okay i because he's going to destroy jacksonville detroit and green bay and the fantasy playoffs. Jonathan taylor is. I have a tough time. Buy into this. But has four matchups against teams. That are twenty nine. Th or worse against running backs this week against tennessee. I don't think it's that great of a match up. They've been really good. The last five games against running backs these per carry giving up some points. But they're giving up touchdown they are giving up touchdown touchdown every game tennessee this year. But you know he's got houston he's got vegas. He's got houston again in week. Sixteen might be tough against pittsburgh but the match ups are great. Does it matter. I don't know what jonathan taylor. We'll see what his role is he's got to just he's got to start playing freely and i think that's what the colts are waiting for. I think the colts are going to give him every opportunity to to get there but he. He's splitting the russian downs. Work with jordan wilkins in the hemans. The hurry up back the passing downs back. David montgomery talked about best remaining schedule. And then two teams. That probably doesn't matter but the foul. I guess i shouldn't say that all that. You guys determine that via broncos and the patriots like damian harris is is locked in. He could be pretty good down the stretch but obviously we don't know if that's going to be the case but yeah patriots and broncos have good schedules now. You go running backs with bad schedules. This one i think is very very important. Kenyan drake. I don't know if anybody is really into kenyan drake but terrific low. You think so yes. Because he's got some very good run. Defenses coming up very good. Maybe he's not such a good bye. I hate the schedule. Buffalo's not good. That's this week. if he's back. Seattle is a good run defense. Their twelve against running backs new england's of matchup. But then after that. So we're talking. That's week ten eleven weeks thirteen and on the rams the giants the eagles the forty niners. That's weeks fourteen. Thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen. Those are four really good run defenses. And that's kenyan drake who only runs and doesn't have any involvement in the passing game so the whole point is to trade firm at the lowest possible price and it's because chase edmonds isn't gonna take his job when he comes back at it sir feels like he'll still have that role that rundown role maybe drake as the guy to go target. If you're desperate for a running back in the next three games not so much for the rest of the season you think this week. He might not even play this week. That's the problem is today. It feels like those games that you're referencing in the playoffs. Are more chase edmonds games than kenyan drake games like. Drake could play all four of those games against her. Three of those games against a good wendy fences and for edmonds might just be better. I think it's four good run. Event is the rams giants eagles niners and the giants thing. They're just about like fourteenth about as close to average as you can be but that's because they're really bad against pass catching running backs. They're not fourteenth in run. Vincent fourteenth and fantasy points allowed to running backs so that does feel more like a chase edmonds game like you. Just look at antonio gives they give us some touchdowns. Mckissic was a lot better than gibson. Even though gives another touchdown i dunno. I dunno school. Fantasy points because of the touchdown. But that's my point like these are good run defenses. So for a guy who's not involved in the passing game at all too scary schedule. I think down the stretch for kenyan drake.

Derrick Henry Colts Dalvin Cook Jonathan Taylor Green Bay Jacksonville Jordan Wilkins Hemans Tennessee Damian Harris Houston Broncos Kenyan Drake Patriots Ravens David Montgomery Chase Edmonds
Halloween Special

Walking the Shadowlands

04:32 min | 11 months ago

Halloween Special

"Those cultures who celebrate Halloween is more commonly known as a night when kids and kids-at-heart dress up in costumes in the kids go trick-or-treating Gorge themselves on Molly's in the adults have parties booked it falls on October 31st, because the ancient Garlic Festival of San home considered the earliest known route of Halloween occurred on this day. It marked a pivotal time of year when the seasons changed but more importantly observers also believe that the boundary between this word and the needs to be came especially thin at this time in a black seem to connect with the did this belief is shared by some other cultures. It's a night where it's become tradition to hear or tell ghost stories watch horror movies and generally skyros. And his son doing it here in the southern hemisphere. We haven't really had Halloween is such a huge thing. Like it is in parts of the northern hemisphere particularly the USA but some just celebrated here. So in honor of the season and the fact that there are two Halloween Yves in the world one in each hemisphere, I'm having special episodes of the book in the shadowlands podcast wage one today for our Halloween's Eve and 1 tomorrow for the northern hemisphere is Halloween Eve two nights of January and ghost stories and paranormal experiences. So get comfortable turn down the lights but not too low you want to be able to see what is Luke in in the corner of your room or out in your car door or on your stairs get you a nice warm cup of tea or coffee or favorite Tipple and your rug if it's cold where you are all you want what? Did you hear that? Was it my imagination? That must have just been my imagination. Are you ready to walk with me into this part of the shadowlands and see what awaits us there. Are you brave enough? In let's began. This is the second year that Wilkins should events happen able to have Halloween episodes which are a lot of fun to create invoice. But this year though. It's a little different because I've had some wonderful gifts on I'm going to re share some of them a paranormal experiences that our new listeners and welcomed you all this wonderful evening may not have heard before. I'll start this episode offers an incident that happened to me recently when I lived in the United States and the early to mid-2000s with my v and husband off. At that time I was living in a small town called wax off about 30 minutes out of Charlotte North Carolina beautiful little town. It was mid-morning. It was Daylight broad daylight. I was sitting in our sun room resting because I just hurt my back. I could be remove it was a bit of a mission for me to get on and off the chair but like being in late pregnancy, it took me a few minutes. I definitely couldn't just sleep off by she like I would have family. So I was just sitting there feeling rather. Sorry for myself reading and just resting when out of the corner of my left eye. I see this large blonde Vaguely Familiar woman standing on the other side of our Deacon. I saw her from the waist up which actually was impossible but I didn't even consider this at the time because of the height of the digging from the ground and birth It's made her about twelve feet tall. I did a double-take when I realized she was smiling broadly at me and waving to get my attention. I smiled and waved back at her and called out to Jail the next room. I told him there was someone on our property who was wanting our attention. Could he plz cheak and at the same time? I turned to look at him in the other room when I turned back to look at her if she'd gone.

United States Luke Wilkins Molly San Home Late Pregnancy Charlotte North Carolina
What Stops Western States From Intentional Burning As A Way To Prevent Wildfires?

Environment: NPR

04:01 min | 11 months ago

What Stops Western States From Intentional Burning As A Way To Prevent Wildfires?

"A historically destructive wildfire season across much of the western US has renewed debate over intentional burns. Those managed wildfires would help clear forests and grasslands of dangerous levels of vegetation built up over decades of fire suppression. But experts say we will need to intentionally burn many more acres to get the West's wildfire problem check NPR's Eric Westervelt reports in Colorado three of the state's five largest wildfires in history have burned this year in California. Five of the biggest on record have occurred just since August fire colleges say that while people right now might not WanNa hear it. The most effective prevention strategy is to use. More, fire to fix the region's wildfire problem people might say that you know they're scared of doing for stripe fire but you know I'm scared what will happen in the next ten years if we don't prescribe fire, let's Kate Wilkin a fire a columnist with the Wildfire Interdisciplinary Research Center at San Jose state she recognizes how awful it's been for many in recent years people who've lost loved ones and homes the fear stress in smoke-filled air drifting hundreds of miles. But in terms of forest health will says California is supposed to burn. So in the state top four, million acres burned earlier this month Wilkin. Thought Wow. We're actually getting into the ballpark how many acres used to bring California just shortly remembers me four, point, four, million and twelve million acres to burn every year contrast. California in the last few years has intentionally burned just over fifty thousand acres on public lands federal and California officials recently signed an agreement to try to boost that significantly to treat about a million acres a year with combined thinning and controlled. Burns but critics say that's nowhere near enough to meet this moment Malcolm North is a research scientist with the US Forest Service. He says a major. To expanding controlled Burns is institutional inertia in these large risk, averse state and federal agencies like the one he works for it's not something in which incremental cautious decisions are going to solve the problem. So you need to have a cultural shift in the public's understanding about the inevitability of fire, but you also need a cultural shift within the agencies to be more supportive of the. USA Fire if historically flawed forest management is half the problem here battling most fire. The other half is the world's warming climate with hotter drier conditions igniting a century of built up fuel says Michael Warren with Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. The problem has kind of turned from this thing that we can manage to a monster and taming that monster through intentional fire war says. is vital yet costly. It's estimated that thinning and prescribed burns can cost up to two thousand dollars per acre coming up with the money to do this at scale has always been a major obstacle we need to stained federal and state financial support. If we're going to have any hope of moving the needle other barriers to doing more intentional burns, include tough environmental rules and liability. Laws and then their safety. The vast majority of these fires are done without harm to people or property, but they're not risk free. For example, a Park Service controlled burn twenty years ago near Los Alamos New Mexico got out of control when high winds picked up some four hundred homes burned the federal nuclear lab. There was threatened withering criticism and congressional hearings followed the plan was flawed. The higher ups rubber-stamped it. The burn boss was not qualified to do fire this big that Los Alamos fire became the Enron of controlled Burns a rare but spectacularly, botched event whose effect is still felt today across federal agencies despite the long bitter fights in Washington over how to manage the nation's forests they're currently several bills in the US Senate would significantly boost federal funding for intentional fires. One of them even has some bipartisan support. Eric. Westervelt NPR news.

California Eric Westervelt Kate Wilkin Wildfire Interdisciplinary Res San Jose State Malcolm North Us Forest Service Wilkin NPR Michael Warren Stanford Woods Institute For T Colorado USA Burns Los Alamos New Mexico
Sloths Slowly Cavort By Day Now

60-Second Science

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Sloths Slowly Cavort By Day Now

"Somewhere in this forest do here there are slumps. Those slots live in Brazil's Atlantic forest. If you're a tourist watching slots isn't that exciting but if you're a scientist, well, it's also not that exciting, but there's a big upside. and. So they actually great study animal. For the wild because you can click on a daydream giles field a biologist at the university. Of Notre, Dame who studies Circadian Rhythms I mean the the ecology work that I I used to do several years back in Bolivia was was focused on bird. Conservation voted? Cola Jian. You'd see some parrots and you make some notes and then they will go on even see them again for another twenty four hours but Duffield and colleagues now collect data on the Brown throated three toed sloth in the Atlantic Forest Duffield says, the slots can stay incite or even in the same tree for nearly twenty four hours. The animals are at rest anywhere from seventy five to ninety percent of the time. But they're coping with a damaged ecosystem. The suggestion is ninety eight percents of that. Forest is being depleted a lot of human disturbance as obviously roads cutting through these areas of the forest in and it means the population of Florida Florida's depleted according to New Research published in the journal Mammalian biology by Duffield and colleagues sloths are responding to that Habitat Disturbance by altering their biological rhythms. We started to say that the the SLAW SPA try merrily day active and that's encountering chew to from some of the literature on the species that we came across before. The suggested they showed Kacem neural activity, which is kind of neither day nor night just kind of across the whole board and a few studies It was totally nocturnal behavior. So this was kind of the opposite to to what we'd expected Duffield says there are few if any studies where researchers monitored slots over a full twenty, four hour period, this study did exactly that for twenty nine days because a lot of. Literature that we reviewed that associated with slow had examined only a partial twenty, four hours, and so there was some inferences about their activity profiles. The course of the time twenty, four hour period. So there was a bit of guests would duffield believes that because predators in the Atlantic forest are extinct and Slavs don't have to compete with other species for resources, they simply taken on a daytime or diurnal schedule the the. Light Doc Sonko with primary Q. and that's Kinda surprising that an animal could be nocturnal conditions. Dino. The other organisms may come along for the slow ride from the algae that live on S- laws for to the insects that live alongside the unhurried mammals. Duffield says it's not clear if the new schedule adopted by Sloughs in the Atlantic forests also affects these creatures not something. We'd love to examine the you know the. The locally system and the Associated Wilkins Winds Sloth APPs that changes readily changed that day tonight to the teenage, the survival strategies based to on the other, and so it may will be that that change or that association daytime is supposed to nine time Casa. Morality does change some of the Yoga. Assumes that associated with it Duffield's most important piece of equipment for this research may be a comfortable chair.

Duffield Atlantic Forest Atlantic Forest Duffield Brazil Scientist Brown Throated Doc Sonko Florida Florida Bolivia Journal Mammalian Biology New Research
The Bonus Army

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:54 min | 1 year ago

The Bonus Army

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host Kit crumb today the mystery of the Bonus Army July twenty eighth nineteen thirty two will mark the eighth anniversary of one of the most controversial protests in US history and yet it remains virtually unknown to most Americans. On, that day nineteen, thirty, two, five, hundred, US army infantrymen loaded rifles, fixed bayonets, gas grenades containing of vomited ingredient two, hundred cavalry, a machine gun squadron eight, hundred police and six M One, nine, thousand, nine, hundred seventeen army tanks prepared to attack seventeen hundred unarmed men plus thousands of their wives and children moments before the Assault General Douglas Smith Garth in charge of the operation turned. To police officers standing next to him and said, I will break the back of the enemy. The attack was ordered by President Herbert Hoover and commanded by General Macarthur Dwight D Eisenhower was MacArthur's aide and Major. General George. S, Patton led the tank unit after donning gas masks the tossed hundreds of tear-gas grenades into the encampment which started raging fires and the assault drove all but the. Occupants of the area in Kampman was then burned to the ground. This wasn't Cuba the Philippines or the Mexican border. But in Washington DC The camp nicknamed Hoover Ville occupied by World War One veterans who were living in tents and shanties across the country and they're also in their encampment in DC with crumbling buildings all around them along Pennsylvania Avenue near the capital if your education was anything like mine, there wasn't any mention of this event. In history class four, million vets had returned from the war. This is World War One was the war to end all wars and found that others had taken their jobs that are considerably higher wage than though one dollar per day soldiers pay an expected more help from the government in nineteen twenty four Congress promised World War One veterans a bonus payment. I'll dollar twenty five for each day of overseas service and a dollar for every day of. Home Service there would be a limit of six hundred, twenty five dollars for overseas service and five hundred for Home Service but the catch twenty two was that it could not be redeemed until nineteen forty five cash quickly dubbed at the tombstone bonus because many of them would be dead before collecting with the Great Depression deepening demands for making an immediate payment we're escalating finally bill was passed, but President Hoover vetoed it in response some three hundred. Veterans led by Ex Sergeant Walter waters boarded a freight train in Portland Oregon in early May nineteen, thirty, two and headed. For Washington DC. Soon, others began their pilgrimage the cat to the capital from across the country and dilapidated buses overcrowded pickup trucks by walking hitch-hiking the vets and their families were in desperate financial shape with overdue bills to pay hunger affections hanging over their heads. They demanded immediate payment of the bonus soon, known as a bonus. Between Seventeen Thousand and twenty five thousand trekkers began arriving on May twenty third nineteen, thirty, two, assuming their demands wouldn't be met anytime soon, they proceeded to set up a long-term presence in order fashion they mapped out streets named for states, Setup Library and post office, a barber shop and a military type sanitation approach appointed MP's to keep order publish their own cap newspaper and even organized evening. Vaudeville shows. Some ten thousand other vets occupied partially demolished government buildings that surrounded the main camp between the capital and the White House. Extremely Patriotic. That's insisted on American flag fly over every tent and Shanti further as Roy. Wilkins than a young reporter with a press pass road. There was only one absentee in the Cap James Crowe get it Jim Crow. The entire massive undertaking was one in which blacks applied shared everything. Together, during world, War One, the military was still segregated as was Anacostia Park when the marchers arrived the vets who had fought a war together deliberately decided to live side by side and set up in the black section of the park. This fact alone may have led some people to fear the movement General Macarthur's most trusted subordinate Brigadier General. George Van Horn Moseley portrayed black and white veterans living together. As proof that Negroes Jewish communist were planning a revolution in truth radicals and Communists were dismissed by the veterans and were never serious element in the movement. The veterans those were still alive didn't receive their bonuses until nineteen, forty five keep in mind that many. World War One vets had died by then and families were not eligible for the bonus. The ravages of the Great Depression continued until World War Two. Today. We have a confluence of factors including the federal government's failure to protect US citizens for the Cobra virus and pandemic machine fiscal austerity in the face of another great depression a newly transparent institutional racism that has provided an unparalleled opportunity to replicate the bonus army's action in the nation's capital this time on an unprecedented scale depth and breadth of

United States President Herbert Hoover General Macarthur Assault Washington Home Service General George George Van Horn Moseley Douglas Smith Garth General Macarthur Dwight D Eis White House Ex Sergeant Walter Waters Cuba Kampman Patton Oregon Congress DC
New AirPods firmware enables Spatial Audio, automatic switching

Mac OS Ken

02:28 min | 1 year ago

New AirPods firmware enables Spatial Audio, automatic switching

"You didn't ask, but here's the story about which I am most excited today. I. Mean Stories that we know I'm most excited about today's event, but we don't know that story yet. Of the stories, we know I most excited about air pods to an air pods pro firmware version three, eight, two, eight, three. macrumors says that was released on Monday since apple doesn't put release notes for air pods firmware updates. Took Awhile to find out why we might get excited reports from later in the day like another one from macrumors say this week's update brings spatial audio to apple's top of the line stoppers. You know remember what spatial audio is. Let macrumors. Wow us all introduced at W. W. DC and coming and S. fourteen. The peace spatial audio brings movie theater like sound to the ear buds. Spatial audio uses dynamic head tracking to create immersive sound anywhere in space by applying directional audio filters and subtle frequency adjustments. Spatial audio uses the gyroscope and accelerometer an air pods pro and phone to track the motion of your head and your iphones position, comparing the motion data and then remapping the sound field so that it stays anchored to your device even as your head moves. While IOS fourteen isn't out yet Betas of the Os are and spatial audio appears to be a go for those users. The macrumors forms of the punctuality appears to be on for Apple, TV plus content. Exciting is that is to an audio nerd like myself. That's not the only feature that got turned on on Monday macrumors says the feature that allows for automatic switching between devices seems also to have gone live available for air pods and air pods pro. The peace says automatic switching Wilkin next the air pods to any apple device signed associated with your I cloud when you activate audio on that device and are actively using it. When the says available for air, pods, I assume they mean air pods to since. That's as far back as Mondays, update goes. Turning on spatial audio air pods. Bro also makes me wonder whether we'll get IOS fourteen soon-. Sooner I mean then we'll get the next phone. Maybe we'll hear something today.

Macrumors Apple BRO Wilkin W. W. Dc
Fear, language barriers hinder immigrant contact-tracing

All Things Considered

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Fear, language barriers hinder immigrant contact-tracing

"For Disease Control and Prevention. Latinos in the US are hospitalized from covert 19 at four times the rate of white people. But in some cities like Nashville, Tennessee, many of them can't even receive basic pandemic services in their native language. Alexis Marshal of W. PLN reports. Construction sites have been one of the most common places to catch the Corona virus in Nashville. That's where Lenny Tenorio was working in mid April when he got sick by the 21st he was hospitalized and tested positive for Cove in 19. Do your thing, You know, a week later, his mother and father also had to be hospitalized even as more of his family members pot Covad, 19 Tenorio says he never heard from the Metro Health Department. There's the Nashville has boasted that it has plenty of contact tracers. The problem is of the 120 brought on early in the pandemic. None of them spoke Spanish. That's even the language barriers emerged in April, according to the National Health Department's own records. Dr. Consuelo Wilkins, who oversees health equity at Vanderbilt University, warned city officials then that many covert patients didn't speak much English. We saw Arabic speaking people and then this really big cluster of Nepali speaking people. And then all of a sudden that stopped and we saw this huge surge of Spanish speaking people. It took nearly three more months for Nashville's Health Department to recruit native Spanish speaking tracers. The 1st 4 started last month. In the meantime, traces have been dialing in an interpreter. The problem is, they usually don't know whether they'll need one until somebody picks up the phone. When nobody answers. They often have to leave a message in English. If that gets lost in translation, it can throw off. The entire search for who else might be exposed and contact tracing hasn't been the only issue. There have been a Siri's of other delays and implementing additional services that could have slowed the spread of the Corona virus. Thes stays in the Spanish language hotline launched just last month, five months into the pandemic, and the city still hasn't followed through on a plan that would help immigrant families isolate during their quarantine periods. Cities like New York, Miami and Chicago have provided hotel rooms so that patients who live in tighter quarters can isolate while recovering. Nashville was encouraged to do the same back in April and a program was announced in June. But so far, not a single family has been served. The Health Department's deputy director acknowledges the city's response to outbreaks and immigrant and Spanish speaking communities has been slow, but says it's become a top priority. However, immigrant advocates still sense a lack of urgency from the city's top leaders. Lisa Sherman Nicholas is the executive director of the Tennessee immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition. There's really no excuse for not having a response that's proportionate to the crisis in the immigrant and refugee community, she says. It could be a matter of life and death. Corona virus Patient, Linnington Audio and his father recovered, but his mother never came home from the hospital. She died and I lost my mom because of this, he says. I never thought this would happen for NPR

Nashville Lenny Tenorio Health Department Tennessee National Health Department United States Alexis Marshal Disease Control And Prevention Metro Health Department Dr. Consuelo Wilkins Covad Vanderbilt University Linnington Audio Siri Refugee Rights Coalition NPR Deputy Director Lisa Sherman Nicholas Executive Director New York
Why Twitter is a Severely Underrated Platform

Marketing School

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Why Twitter is a Severely Underrated Platform

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about why twitter is a severely rated platform that I tell you what happened with twitter recently. What I did recently, where did you do? So I started running ads for like ten dollars a day or fifteen dollars a day and what happened was one of our big clients I think everyone knows the name they saw it and that led to a upscale conversation and let too much deeper conversations and not only that I'm running this ad right now basically like a blog post and more and more people are seeing it and people with like. Blue checkmark that are reputable investors or VC's or vendors there following me they're liking this is really good for branding her ten dollars fifteen dollars a day it's done so much for me right now and not only not ballers day without regaining growth winds, ten bucks a day growth wise negligible getting impressions. The most important thing is getting impressions on these both the reach my goal with these is the reach, and so you shouldn't be aiming for like. At least for me, I'm not aiming for conversions or anything like that I think if you're running ten dollars a day or maybe fifteen hundred dollars, the reason I started doing this was because I started seeing other people running these ads extra Wilkins in for example, from tiny capital, he just keeps running the same over fifty dollars a day but I remember him and that we talk about the rule fourteen, the rule seven, whatever I just think twitter. From ads perspective is very underrated but from a learning perspective I've also talked about how to me. It's the most important social network because I learned so much more from than other social networks. So when you're using your impressions beginning Yeah I mean let me just open it right now. So while we do that, why do you think is underrated platform? So twitter has a lot of smart high net worth people on there. It's not the sex. It's not like instagram. It's not like based. Youtube it's a place where you find the likes of like the e-leong must of the world when the Bill Gates in the role constantly communicate and they liked doing it themselves, it's not like having someone who works for them postings they themselves like going on twitter and tweeting, and conversely with others or that reason I think it's powerful because although they may not have the reach you can get access to really wealthy influential people on twitter in a much more easier way than you can on instagram or case Lincoln rainy their social. Yup. I have the numbers the so I guess I'm spending a little more I. Guess we wrapped up the budget a little bit so in the last seven days so it looks like about ninety five dollars spent I think we've wrapped up from ten dollars a day so six, hundred, seventy dollars in spend one, hundred, twenty, two, thousand impressions not the greatest CPM cost per thousand impressions but to Neal's point he hit the nail on the head the people that you're reaching our high net worth smart individuals that like to pontificate they like to act they want to show their wisdom. So that's why twitter is really underrated depends on what you're selling to. Out of the impression, how many did you get your site? Let's see well, but in general like there's a lot of channels like twitter Radha contrast, the lot of people don't talk about snapchat doll during its audiences. These underrated pop why we underrated platforms for civically. But the others as Wallace is not a lot of competition for advertising Baseba can google or instagram. Google would also be youtube based also the instrument, but they're all SACCHARIN. You look from the other channels they're much more affordable Lincoln that is thriving social network from ad standpoint. It is quite expensive is a lot of companies, zipper sales and recruiting people spend a lot of money on jobless other than that I found that the other networks much more affordable. Yeah. So here's the thing. Hey, it shows how am I at cloud formed the the second thing is it's actually not showing me clicks just because I'm focused on impressions cost result is giving me a CPM. So I am not seeing clicks right now on it, but I didn't tell you. Thousand. Yeah. So something impressions, dozen impressions it's not the best CPM's around five bucks or so but I can tell you based on the up sell, and then also the people that are engaging with me and the people that are falling me as well. It's worth its weight in gold. So use it. You don't have to use it for the ads side of things but

Twitter Wilkins Marketing School Bill Gates Instagram Google Radha Contrast Lincoln Eric Su Youtube Wallace Neil Patel Neal Baseba
LINK Is Back

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:07 min | 1 year ago

LINK Is Back

"Why would you try crypto? Well, look at the end of the day it comes down to profitability liquidity. The volatility that we've got in this market is just insane. Now, what that means if you take ten tribes and you have six loses that six percent down if you're managing properly was to try to break even so you know you get stopped out the Europe percent loss the other to try that got go onto Mike one likes five percent. Which we nice very, very, very easy to do in this market, the other hit six percent. Now you go net Sarajevo gross eleven percent gained six, percent loss, yacht five percent. You don't tend to get numbers like that in traditional markets now that still gone on sixty percents, lose rights and the other twenty percent they is break even. So what I'm saying is if you work on the probabilities increasing in your five through these courses, you'll the potential is just. An. Almost so most guy. WHO In the market. Currently as way save but not a lot look. I. Wouldn't be surprised bitcoin continue on little to Saad wise run spoken of this quite a bit of liked and it is continuing not bad. It's not bad. It's holding around that eleven thousand mock eleven thousand be the new handle all night. It was still hovering around that Criollos I'm with these sought wise marketed one often does is it allows us to have opportunities to try for sats. Think. That's a worth much but I can tell you now the sats that I made when Bitcoin was at full thousand, five, hundred a now with more than double what they were of a bank two, thousand bucks them Oh it's now over two thousand. So as banking for the future profits, in Sats, is what I love. When I can get the mind with markets. saw that's where I'm looking at Bitcoin to the mom once I saw wise I'm just talking about the last few days rots in Sunday. A bitcoin at the moment eleven thousand, one, hundred, sixty, seven, standpoint, three today yesterday. It was also down point three so much movie Yes not much volatility not much to work with this Syrian. Now it did close the Dow up one percent. It's a three, hundred, ninety dollars and thirty full sentence down half a percent right now, a guy needs to push above the high that I'm looking at four a full. Coverage around around that four hundred, the last couple of days with exile play it did pull that yesterday two point nine on December list is keeping keeping on too much. Actually move it's had a booming move high. And You know a little pullback is it to be well, I'd sites to be fairly Wilkins it's at one point three percent now just under thirty cents twenty, nine, point seven and not much really. They've me to work with very similar on bitcoin cash. It was down yesterday three percent at six fifty is down point seven. Now, a guy, it just sort of slowly slipping off. And it's still holding to seven FAV old. Top Channel. Area, it has broken into these above walls does that all the continuing to kick off lungs? Like. Coins holding pretty well as well and we're looking at fifty seven dollars and forty cents down half of a percent wrought now at fifty seven, forty not macho guy and it's going to get above. Sixty dollars ready for me to have. The trend is explicitly backing. The gang may be interested once more. BITCOIN is vague is. Currently two, hundred, twenty, four, dollars sixty, it was down one point seven percent yesterday currently down point six the one in the top ten that's up right now in fact, these Donna. And look as much as it's not really that tradable for me at the minute I'll talk about you know. The contract to our does have a bit of a trend To something that would capture more attention it fourteen point four cents at the moment, and it has been sort of pretty comfortable consolidating over the last couple of weeks sort of between the high of fifteen five around thirteen or two cent range. I widened to save does have a big push hearts up point seven, three, all of a percent now. Bottlenecks also, yesterday it was up one percent, but it's looking really strong there on that daily kind of. The four hours consolidating at the moment not quota a level for breakout try just yet although very much trying it's hottest to do. So the resistance is around the rage twenty, full forty, five ish around that sort of region if a breaks above their them for sure, I'll be looking for opportunities where Bush is the pullbacks in the one hour and two hour. We my focus stand its down point three, twenty, two dollars and twenty four cents. AOL's holding above three bucks right now down point three, five, a percent yesterday it was pretty much flat on the Diet. and link yesterday had a great performance reading up six point, two, three percent which full it from the day before eleven percent at link Look as a watch list It's a fantastic looking trend and I'm waiting for pool bikes on that four hour as timeframe of choice, full cradles. So again, like I say there's opportunity at the. End of the market's getting normal bullish

Bitcoin Europe Sarajevo Bush Saad Wise Mike One Donna AOL Wilkins
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Dot. com. None <Speech_Male> of people <Speech_Male> use www <Speech_Male> anymore but <Speech_Male> I'm an old school <Speech_Male> not way. <Speech_Male> Yes. You can find <Speech_Male> me on my website has <Speech_Female> all my portfolio <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> it and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> more information <Speech_Female> about me and <Speech_Female> also feel free <Speech_Female> to add me on Lincoln <Speech_Female> I love connecting <Speech_Male> with folks <SpeakerChange> over. All <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right sounds <Speech_Male> good will. <Speech_Male> Carmella <Speech_Male> Wilkins, I have to tell <Speech_Male> you I was not <Speech_Male> I had no idea <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> wide <Speech_Male> ranging <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> talk with you would be <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> you've taken <Speech_Male> us from <Speech_Male> the US <Speech_Male> to abroad <Speech_Male> and back and <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> over all these different topics <Speech_Male> around <Speech_Male> environmental <Speech_Male> racism <Speech_Male> and Food Justice <Speech_Male> and everything <Speech_Male> I mean like <Speech_Male> I said earlier in the <Speech_Male> interview I mean <Speech_Male> just your own <Speech_Male> personal story <Speech_Male> and you're driving <Speech_Male> your fortitude <Speech_Male> to have. <Speech_Male> Gone through the challenges <Speech_Male> that you have to <Speech_Male> get to where you are. Now <Speech_Male> I feel like that's <Speech_Male> if that <Speech_Male> does not set <Speech_Male> you up for success in the <Speech_Male> future I don't know <Speech_Male> what is and I hope <Speech_Male> that folks that are listening <Speech_Male> to this <Speech_Male> really get a good <Speech_Male> sense of like your <Speech_Male> drive <Speech_Male> and passion <Speech_Male> for this work <Speech_Male> like it's it's very <Speech_Male> clear to me <Speech_Male> like you know you're <Speech_Male> coming from this <Speech_Male> this background that <Speech_Male> is. Part <Speech_Male> in Africa <Speech_Male> part here in the US <Speech_Male> but then also <Speech_Male> you studied <Speech_Male> and done work in Europe <Speech_Male> like you bring <Speech_Male> so much to the table <Speech_Male> that you're <Speech_Male> the kind of person <Speech_Male> that we need like <Speech_Male> to help <Speech_Male> us or us into <Speech_Male> the future just <Speech_Male> in terms of being able to. <Speech_Male> Take <Speech_Male> all the pieces and <Speech_Male> put them together in a way <Speech_Male> that makes sense. So <Speech_Male> I'm really <Speech_Male> glad we had this conversation <Speech_Male> I'm glad people are <Speech_Male> able to listen to this <Speech_Male> and thank <Speech_Male> you so much for coming on the show <Silence> I appreciate <SpeakerChange> it. <Speech_Male> Thank <Speech_Male> you so much. <Speech_Male> It's been an absolute <Speech_Music_Male> pleasure. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male>

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"The systems as it pertains to food and water nationally also internationally. And as a twenty, five year olds unlike I am I thinking my dreaming too big but I also don't want to know to downplay myself and for me I really want to give back to my home country the. That I've never been to before, I've never been to Liberia a minute something that I always think about like what can I do like? How can I do more for my community? How can I teach others more about my community? I do so through food but as a designer, how can I do more of that? And for me yes. Like working at amazing agency is a step in the right direction. But when I also WANNA do is I aspire to be a design engineer. That's a long term goal of mine I really want to be able to create an redesigned systems that have disadvantaged marginalized communities of all shapes and sizes, and for me I want to do so between the east coast of the US. And West Africa because there's so much going on there that my mom tells me about. All I can do is cry about it because it's like why isn't anything being done like why are people so poor wise infrastructure not they're like, why are we considered a country of the global south like why are we in the place that we currently are in like why can't we move up on up? Into my head and like for me like my purpose, my sole reason for existence is to do something about it because I can't sit here as a designer and. And make things that are pretty fat are perfect in some way and it's not helping someone. Yeah. Conveying. Message to someone, and that's why I do find being a designer really valuable because for me is the foundation of how to build myself and like where I see myself in the next five years. Yeah. It's important for me and a kind of like side note to this big dream of mine is. I've been learning Korean for the last year seems totally random but. Extent it makes sense. Yeah. Like all my roommates they speak. Many languages. I'm monolingual unfortunately and I complain about all the time because when my mom emigrates country, she knew I think like three or four languages, but she was so fixated like you know like some immigrant communities are on assimilation that she was like. English American this nothing else. Nothing else so I think I was. In, my early teens preteen and I had asked you like, Hey, mommy at the Tennessee learning French because I went to Catholic school. As a hey, mommy like do you know any language use and she's like oh? Yeah. I know a lot of languages house like what really like saying something and she's like I don't remember anything and I was like, what what do you mean? She's like, yeah, I don't remember anything and I was like why and she's like Oh because in America that just like had me so dumbfounded. And I was like, okay. But there are Americans who speak different languages. She's like you know like you getting union sister getting a good education is the most important thing and there's no one here that that really speaks the language is I speaks. What's defiant and funny enough my mom. Revisited Liberia for the first time I believe a year and a half ago. culture shock for her and I. Remember she called me from Monrovia, which is the capital of Liberia and she's like her mama it's things are so different here I'm happy and sad at the same time doing so many feelings and one thing that I regret the most is not being able to speak to some of my friends and that just like. Really sell to me so. Going back to Korean the reason why I'm learning it is because there is a lot of industrial development men also service development within west Africa, east Africa from East Asian countries. and. Like for me as a designer, the most important thing to designing is you're not designing for yourself from the point of design unless you are unless you're drawing like a butterfly on a piece of paper because you really enjoy putter flies like. NYC unless I'm doing that. Like I designed with the intention to fulfill someone else's narrative. Uh, you know making the invisible visible through my work currently what I WANNA do in the future silly for me learning. Korean. I want to be able to. Interact with know was Koreans who are working in West Africa East Asia. Developing. Not Just Koreans as a whole but east. Asian communities are redeveloping, which is a trigger word of my opinion redeveloping various African countries in the West in the east for mutual advancement, which has so many underlying notions of colonialism and I have so many problems with. So for me I want to do on. Hopefully within the next five, ten years of pan how the world looks on do our current state with no covert in everything I really want to be able to be a design engineer of sorts that able to move between the US and West Africa, and be able to speak these various language and be able to communicate the real stories and narratives of people who mayor not not willing not but who may not be able to speak to folks who are coming into their spaces and not seeking out the opinions and thoughts and ideas of the community that they are quote unquote creating things for redesigning things for because a relief for them it's for the people are. Creating making these inventions and that's something that doesn't sit well with me. That's how I hope I'm a big Jim Right. That's how I hope to contribute to black feature is known will just kind of wrap things up here where can our audience find out more about you about your work on line so folks and find out more about me on www www. Dot. com. None of people use www anymore but I'm an old school not way. Yes..

West Africa Liberia design engineer US Jim Right Tennessee east Africa NYC Monrovia America Dot. Catholic school
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"To meet my UK family for the first time and it was this magical magical experience remember meeting, my aunt, my answer Gerald -An, and she just made this massive feasts for me this like Liberian British fusion cuisine that I was so taken aback by so comforted by because, she really took the time to welcome to the UK while welcome back to the UK and. It was the Cleveland a massive hug and I. Love it so much. Nice. So with all of this kind of not only just you know growing up in the states but then also kind of you know going back and forth between Europe and United States like was designed kind of a big part of your world I mean going to school and everything like how did you I kind of know that this was what you wanted to do when I was six. When I was six years old my mom purchase my i. It was a yellow easel from Raila terrible design now that I think about it. If you're old I. Loved that thing to death I had all my little paints my little pain set in to that were poor quality. But they were my paints and I made what I considered masterpiece after masterpiece dislike threw up everything around the house and I'm calling my mom mommy when I get older I'm going to be an artist and she was like, okay, I, believe in you and that was. Written. And Yeah we knew that I was going to be an artist of some. Sore. At one point I thought I was going to be a fashion designer like that I was like hell bent on becoming a fashion designer. What changed for me was is a lot of police brutality happening in Providence on Providence, Rhode Island, and not just police brutality just all these other social and economic environmental hindrances. Specifically happening within marginalized communities know being a black person that that really impacted me on an emotional and mental level and I was like I can't sit here and you know Sunday have my fashion design degree and fifteen, maybe ten fifteen. Years down the line. Sit with my fashion degree be like, wow, I've done something really meaningful with my life like I didn't think I would have made the right decision I feel like I would have had regrets I've just pivoted completely and I was like, okay. Well, I want to do something that is really mission driven. That is really giving back to the community that isn't just you know making things pretty. which sounds contradicting since graphic designer but. Hoping so Some people I've heard this unfortunately, I have strong opinions that that isn't the case at all and yeah, like I'm I'm really glad that I took that changed for the better because I'm so happy with where I'm at right now and I'm not bashing fashion designers all because there's so much powerful dashing textiles, related work coming down the line that have been really powerful and have just like moved social issues in the right direction. So for me, it wasn't i. knew that wasn't a place for me even though at one point I, thought it was. Now even though you you went to school for a time in the UK, you also went to Parsons in New York City. What was your time like their? Love hate relationship with Parsons the love comes from the many amount opportunities that I received from being horses and just going in for type of interview and having my resume Rudd and people gas like Oh you got to Parsons and. Ends like know it's all right. How you must have worked really hard to get into that school and like literally to nail blood sweat and tears and unmanned don yet, and that's where the the hate comes in because I had a lot of hurdles, my first year and a half living in New York and having tab. Moved to New, York on my own I didn't have any support in that way because I mentioned earlier, my mom had an accident on the job. So because of that accident she is now disabled. And that I mean has definitely impact not only her life and my sister's also my lifestyle during the year and a half. A hatchet adjust living New York and final place in moving I learned everything by myself. So I don't that's we're kind of like the. A hate but like the like resentment of like having to be maybe like an adult almost too quickly. Boston. Now that I was doing it with the right intention in right purpose in mind Sargodha overnight very quickly but for Parsons. I had one black teacher who was also clear that I was like, wow, this is ray like I think this might be a really good chance for me to see what? Parsons is really a bow. But then just like being in that one class, which is a terrible experience the teacher really catered to the white students in the class and like oh No like when you see another black person, you're like, yeah, you're another black person. AIA to in black and acknowledging unspoken connection we have between one another. The teacher and the teacher's is like not like I'm not the one. God without saying explicitly in words and I was just like, okay, well that was. Unfortunate what could have been wasn't That was one part of it. That was. Those really unfortunate and one other sticks out for my experience at Parsons was dealing with the financial aid department that was such a strenuous experience up until two months ago when I finally finished paying off my last semester Parsons to be given my diploma which I received in the mail last Friday. I had graduated about a year ago. So that just to me speaks volumes to the an the. Lack of communication and commitment that I personally have experienced unbelievable that Parsons has when it comes to their black and Brown students that cannot afford to maintain their whole time Saudis fulltime Madison as you in part time status..

Parsons UK New York Europe Cleveland United States Providence York Rhode Island New York City Gerald Raila Sargodha Boston AIA Rudd Brown
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else it's interesting. How in this time you're seeing the companies that are exhibiting grace and saying you know we understand this is an unprecedented time we're gonNA care. For you as the employee as a person, and then there are the companies that are just like, nope full steam ahead keep going. So it's good that you're working for a place that is is allowing the circumstances to kind of shape sort of what your current reality is like they're helping out with money. They're saying if you need to take a mental health day or something take it. That's great. That's really Great what do your work days look like now my workdays can be unpredictable. We recently had I say recent like what from the last two months? We had a really awesome happy hour and during happy are we have this? We have go around basically one person usually a new person asked question any question they want to everyone that everyone has to answer and someone had asked what makes an ABC and ABC? And it was just like this perfectly crafted question that was so unexpected at the same time that really mean everyone thinks like, what makes someone an abeer like why?.

New York City US Japan Paul Right Carmel Wilkens Carmelo Wilkins East Asia Rhode Island New York ABC Asia York Europe Atlanta Tokyo
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Now for this week's interview. . I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. . Let's start the show. . Paul Right. . So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. . My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, , which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely . want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, , we are recording this now it's in the middle of. . Even to say, , it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? ? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for <unk> existing in the same space in which I work and also live. . Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, , go to the office and then be able to come back home. . You know my retreat my safe haven. . But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. . It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. . Men. . Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. . So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, , my family that live in Rhode Island, , and during the beginning of the pandemic, , the beginning of quarantine, , I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. . While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. . Yeah. . It was. . It was really intense. . My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. . Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. . Although I think now, , countries, , WANNA keep us out like I. . Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. . It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. . Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. . <hes> right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, , okay. . We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. . Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. . Work remotely for like over ten years now I, , live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, , like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. . I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. . So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. . Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. . But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. . So you're like Oh. . What should I do? ? You know what's the right choice to make? ? So I understand that that was it been in New York? ? Has Been, , very, , interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. . From all the stays outside of New, , York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. . How am I eating how my paying my rent? ? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, , I'm okay. . Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, , I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. . We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. . On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. . So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. . It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not ? all's. . When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. . If we're cautious about, , say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. . One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, , and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. . If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including <unk> came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. . So. . What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, , okay. . We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. . That is both confusing and scary. . Yes exactly. . I mean to take the test. . I mean, , of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, , the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. . I. . Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. . Than, , just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. . Well, , let's talk about a be partners. . You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, , it's black owned. . How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. . AM So. . To be working where I work book, , we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. . The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, , and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. . So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, , our our mental wellbeing, , our overall wellbeing in mind, , and at any point during the last, , I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. . Like. . If at any point, , we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. . It's okay to do so and they completely understand. . So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. . Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, , Hey, , folks. So . we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. . Home. . Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, , and I was really I was really kind. . They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. . So did everyone else

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

Revision Path

07:59 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

"Now for this week's interview. I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else

New York City Paul Right Japan United States Carmel Wilkens Carmelo Wilkins East Asia Rhode Island New York Asia York Europe Atlanta Tokyo
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring, but struggling to find diverse talented candidates. The have something that can help our job board. HEAD ON OVER TO REVISION PATH DOT COM forward slash jobs to browse listings, Orchard Place Your Own. This week on the job board insider INC is looking for a graphic designer in New York. City. Gansler is looking for a cat technician in Lacrosse Wisconsin. DECKS COM is looking for a senior designer in San, Diego? California. And Foundation medicine is looking for an associate director of design for their experience design team. If you're looking for remote work, then check out these listings. PS Group is looking for and designed Superhero. Mk G. Design is looking for a digital slash print production designer. And tomorrow is looking for a director of product design as well as a senior product designer. Companies. Stop. Making excuses on your deny efforts in post job listings with us. Just ninety nine dollars or listening will be on our job board for thirty days and will spread the word for you about your job to our diverse audience of listeners. Make sure to head over to provision path dot com forward slash jobs for more info on these listings. Apply today and tell them you heard about the job to revision path. Get, started with us and expand your job search today. REVISION PATH DOT COM FORWARD SLASH JOBS You're listening to the revision Pan podcast, a weekly showcase of the world's graphic designers, web designers, and web developers. Through in depth interviews, you'll learn about their work, their goals, and what inspires the most creative individuals. Here's your host Maurice Cherry. Hello, everybody. Welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in this week. I'm your host Mariz Cherry amd, before we get into this week's interview, I just want to talk about our sponsor really quickly for this episode facebook designed. To learn more about how the facebook design community is designing for human needs it unprecedented scale. Please visit facebook dot design. Now for this week's interview..

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 1 year ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Summerwind Mansion

Haunted Places

06:59 min | 1 year ago

Summerwind Mansion

"Inland Lakes Wisconsin just south of the state's border with Michigan there was once a house on West Bay Lake a Victorian built in the nineteen tents, surrounded by Scrub Oak, and then northern Pines, it once held twenty rooms. The property was initially used as a rustic resort before it was renovated into a stately mansion by civil engineer and businessman Robert Lamont in nineteen sixteen. Lamont his wife Helen Gertrude would vacation there during the nineteen twenty s, and through his tenure as President Herbert hoovers secretary of Commerce during the Great Depression. The Lamont's called their home summer wind. Lamont left the President Service in nineteen, thirty, two likely withdrawing to the mansion to recuperate after an exhausting and in many ways fruitless effort to pull the United States out of its economic spiral. According to a frequently repeated legend, the couple was having dinner in the houses kitchen one night when the door to the basement shook itself. Revealing the spectral form of a man. Lamont panicked in fired two shots as the door swung shot leaving two bullet holes in the door. Perhaps it was this experience that caused the couple to flee the house. The details of when and why the Lamont sold their property are unclear. What is now is that by the time Lamont died in nineteen, forty eight summer win belong to the Keefer family who also used it as a vacation getaway. Unfortunately the Kiefer's experienced many misfortunes in summer wind, according to one story Mr Keefer passed away in less than a year after they purchased the house, leaving his wife in despair and dire financial trouble. Across the three decades, the Kiefer's haunted. The house deteriorated with neglect, and its land was eventually subdivided and offered up for sale. However many of the buyers were allegedly forced to back out the last minute because of sudden financial disasters. The unlucky house kept returning to the Kiefer's. In the early nineteen seventies, a family of eight moved into the home with the promise of renovating it. The darkness of summer wind would terrorize arnold ginger, hinshaw and their six children. Fracturing their bonds and their sense of safety forever A. Birdie was almost seven years old. She knew she was too old to be sneaking door. Parents bed anymore, even if this house was old and weird. The door's stuck so hard that she was sure that one of her older brothers must have glued them shut Bryan probably. A few hours. It would open on its own. The curtains disappeared off the walls. Windows flew open and slammed shut in the middle of the night. But she was growing up. She could deal with all this. Until, it wasn't just the House that was acting strangely. Their Father Arnold had been angrier than usual. She tried to give her allowance to see if that would cheer him up. But he only side and gone back to his organ. She hated the organ. It was big and it sounded like there was an owl, stuck inside crying out for someone to save him from the hollow tubes. Every song her father played was dark and sad. It made her think of thunderstorms and the boogie man that her brother Brian had tried to convince her was the real cause of all the trouble. But birdie new Brian, was wrong. She took Brian's dare to look under the bed, but she didn't see the monstrous. You'll allies a long toothed man with a dusty top hat. No. When she looked under the bed. She was met by the soft gaze of a woman. Her name was Mathilde and she only wanted to sit with the family at dinner because her family had gone away. birdies parents didn't like when Birdie said this, but it was true. It was important for them to know that Matilda didn't mean to impose. Birdie was glad to have mathilde with her that night. When the radiator shrieked to the wind held the sometimes invisible woman held the little girl's hand, she pushed against the heavy door that led to Birdie's parents fromm. Six lumps protruded from the sheets like old covered furniture. It was her family all safely nestled together in the same bed. Aside from her father of course, who was banging away at the Oregon downstairs. birdie crawled in alongside her siblings, asking Mathilde to watch out for them. Matilda gave a small not. Birdie closed her eyes and tried to sleep. But the organ wouldn't let her it. Screech didn't squawked and couldn't help but picture the owl with gaping wound, flapping its wings and trying to escape. Her mother ginger pulled her in tight. birdie filter is grow heavy as the tears started to dry her cheeks. She didn't want to sleep. She needed to know what would happen with the Oregon. But Matilda held her hand and sleep took her in the end. Two hands grabbed onto birdie shelters her I shot open and she screamed. In the darkness, the whites of her father's eyes glow. Is Features look bigger rounder almost like the ghost. She'd been for Halloween. Huge wide is antic keeping mouth. Birdie rubbed her eyes. He shook her a little harder than before. Ginger woke up beside her and asked what was going on. Arnold, let go birdie and clapped his hands with excitement. He found something he said. Birdie pulled the covers over her head. She wasn't interested in show and tell right now they could do that later. A rush of cold air grasp at birdies skin as her father pulled away the top sheet. But till the stood behind shelter, Birdie asked her if things would be all right, but till the sugar head gently. Birdie wasn't sure what she meant. Birdie climbed out of the big bed. Her feet clenched as they touch the floor. Everything, in the house was so cold. She turned to watch your mom. Wake up all the other kids. She didn't get why her data Wilkin her up. I. He should have gone an order then she could have slept more.

Birdie Lamont Arnold Ginger Matilda Robert Lamont Kiefer Mathilde Oregon United States Brian President Herbert Hoovers Mr Keefer Engineer Inland Lakes Wisconsin Michigan President Service Scrub Oak Northern Pines West Bay Lake
Exploring the galaxy with radio astronomy

Talk Python To Me

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the galaxy with radio astronomy

"What do you guys do day to day? Are you both doing Strana me basically day-to-day or code for astronomy me. Pretty much I mean. Most of my work is helping. Mohawk or storm is do things faster so every time for a group who were doing some multiple web it was taking full t two days to do something they then pasta over to us. We go down to eighteen hours. That's awesome that means you can do so much more science right. But as a classic divide and conquer problem at paralyzed line matt talks embarrassingly parallel and we Scott Shaw. We don't really do gathering till the very end Bassett. I see so. It's almost like you can almost do individual computation on a per pixel basis maybe the equivalent of a per pixel basis. We tench Wilkin Frequency Channel. Molden GAY but yes so. We would just purchase one particular or one of frequencies on one machine depend on another number on another world. Do quite a bit of machine learning. What Tech Team are affi- application wage doing corrections actually now moving? Some of our struggle me work into oceanwave investigations and transit or whether we can correct the swell so there's no way there's going to be a good idea right. Okay now. That would be a really unexpected consequence or outcome or capability from studying. Gravitational waves is better surf. Predictions obligation state has different quicken small. Yeah I guess so. Yeah the whole gravitational wave detection stuff is some pretty cutting edge science and it's really interesting and it's cool that you're using machine learning to try to understand that we have a smoke group working on it. We've got ten inches in the pump detectors. This is a very active area of research. There's a lot of groups around the world working on. Yeah I think it's kind of amazing. There's a Lotta stuff with gravity oriented things in astronomy right now. We have the gravitational wave detection for the Clintons Black Holes. We have the first picture of black holes in the last year and a half or so whenever that was going on around their medical field teaching. Sure I guess. If you're already university eventually you might end up. Interacting with a student or two very cool. All right Rodriguez. What about you got kind of similar? I on personal rights became evolving stormy. So I help a summer through the software in different languages for different purposes. Sunil only for me but also for Analysts form we also am theoretical group so people who simulations formation such so all over the place on we only me about all the people in the group we specialize comes kind of in this area of killing. Romans? Lloyd's mice also. On how much do you end up helping them with? Standard Software Engineering. Things like Hey. I need to teach you source control. This is get hub. Let spend an hour talking about that or are they pretty much. Good to go. The generation older durations. Aw It'd be harder to kind of move to sign a newer people like Jonker people come with all those concepts. Serie Computing Rights. They never give ray there so do help to push that. Far East most multi on their Meghan this offer the same side of thanks Entitled Opportune Opponent. How you organize it. Codes optimize things for the particular architecture on someone Okay cool and you're also working on this S. K. A. Construction the square kilometer array. Just this whole topic. I guess we'll talk more audits later. By one of the main institutions that are working on the square kilometer array yet. So it's interesting. I don't know if it's works for light. But it does for radio that if you put multiple detectors and sort of densely but not actually connected at one giant and tanner something you can put that together like a bigger detector right bigger lens in the radio world. So that's the idea right. Just that's exactly Gaskell interferometry you basically if you got three on tennis. Abc Do you do. Is You take measurements in the from from BSE. And then you correlate every repair so to correlate the from be from being from Do that correlates are. Which is the one voice doing all this mixing signals and out goes one correlated thing though which is as if you have one big content. So that's what happens in Vegas for me. I think I'm not sure by up to college. You can also from A to B. But I'm not sure how the kind of work in the science cool so this. Esca project is the square kilometer array which is International Project. That you all are working. On involving thirteen countries that are full members of the project in the Or others who are just participating right. Yeah that's right is the collecting. Because you know we're we're starting to run out of things off the screen. Where do we generally collecting area system is now missing in spite of the fun telescope which means belting countries so the life frequency components coming up to Western Australia and the Frequencies Gang South Africa? So they'll be speaking meat dishes in South Africa. I'm one hundred. One hundred and seventy two and ten is Western Australia so called Com fifty million euros just for the the first one. I don't know a hundred and thirty one thousand antennas bringing all this data. That is a huge amount of antennas. And it's your Joe decombis second five hundred fifty gigabytes a second. I don't really have a great way to understand that number. Honestly like you gotTa think of large cloud services like youtube or Netflix. Or something like that right and we say no orange them. Visualize it if you take your you know your how drives your five hundred heart ripe under throw it and you throw one of those second right. Yeah that's a lot of data also takes a lot of power right. Yeah that's one of the the the key things because we we would like Green as possible but we go cap on the moment to make a wall system on the planet. So that's still a challenge. We have to address. Yeah you almost need your own power plant. Tell me how much somebody call the ready down. Okay is it the blades that generate? Rfi Or is it the generators that generate. Yeah yeah

South Africa Wilkin Frequency Channel Scott Shaw Bassett Matt Sunil Rodriguez Australia Meghan Lloyd International Project Tennis Western Australia Vegas RAY Joe Decombis ABC Youtube