35 Burst results for "Wilkins"

The Bonus Army

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:54 min | Last week

The Bonus Army

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host Kit crumb today the mystery of the Bonus Army July twenty eighth nineteen thirty two will mark the eighth anniversary of one of the most controversial protests in US history and yet it remains virtually unknown to most Americans. On, that day nineteen, thirty, two, five, hundred, US army infantrymen loaded rifles, fixed bayonets, gas grenades containing of vomited ingredient two, hundred cavalry, a machine gun squadron eight, hundred police and six M One, nine, thousand, nine, hundred seventeen army tanks prepared to attack seventeen hundred unarmed men plus thousands of their wives and children moments before the Assault General Douglas Smith Garth in charge of the operation turned. To police officers standing next to him and said, I will break the back of the enemy. The attack was ordered by President Herbert Hoover and commanded by General Macarthur Dwight D Eisenhower was MacArthur's aide and Major. General George. S, Patton led the tank unit after donning gas masks the tossed hundreds of tear-gas grenades into the encampment which started raging fires and the assault drove all but the. Occupants of the area in Kampman was then burned to the ground. This wasn't Cuba the Philippines or the Mexican border. But in Washington DC The camp nicknamed Hoover Ville occupied by World War One veterans who were living in tents and shanties across the country and they're also in their encampment in DC with crumbling buildings all around them along Pennsylvania Avenue near the capital if your education was anything like mine, there wasn't any mention of this event. In history class four, million vets had returned from the war. This is World War One was the war to end all wars and found that others had taken their jobs that are considerably higher wage than though one dollar per day soldiers pay an expected more help from the government in nineteen twenty four Congress promised World War One veterans a bonus payment. I'll dollar twenty five for each day of overseas service and a dollar for every day of. Home Service there would be a limit of six hundred, twenty five dollars for overseas service and five hundred for Home Service but the catch twenty two was that it could not be redeemed until nineteen forty five cash quickly dubbed at the tombstone bonus because many of them would be dead before collecting with the Great Depression deepening demands for making an immediate payment we're escalating finally bill was passed, but President Hoover vetoed it in response some three hundred. Veterans led by Ex Sergeant Walter waters boarded a freight train in Portland Oregon in early May nineteen, thirty, two and headed. For Washington DC. Soon, others began their pilgrimage the cat to the capital from across the country and dilapidated buses overcrowded pickup trucks by walking hitch-hiking the vets and their families were in desperate financial shape with overdue bills to pay hunger affections hanging over their heads. They demanded immediate payment of the bonus soon, known as a bonus. Between Seventeen Thousand and twenty five thousand trekkers began arriving on May twenty third nineteen, thirty, two, assuming their demands wouldn't be met anytime soon, they proceeded to set up a long-term presence in order fashion they mapped out streets named for states, Setup Library and post office, a barber shop and a military type sanitation approach appointed MP's to keep order publish their own cap newspaper and even organized evening. Vaudeville shows. Some ten thousand other vets occupied partially demolished government buildings that surrounded the main camp between the capital and the White House. Extremely Patriotic. That's insisted on American flag fly over every tent and Shanti further as Roy. Wilkins than a young reporter with a press pass road. There was only one absentee in the Cap James Crowe get it Jim Crow. The entire massive undertaking was one in which blacks applied shared everything. Together, during world, War One, the military was still segregated as was Anacostia Park when the marchers arrived the vets who had fought a war together deliberately decided to live side by side and set up in the black section of the park. This fact alone may have led some people to fear the movement General Macarthur's most trusted subordinate Brigadier General. George Van Horn Moseley portrayed black and white veterans living together. As proof that Negroes Jewish communist were planning a revolution in truth radicals and Communists were dismissed by the veterans and were never serious element in the movement. The veterans those were still alive didn't receive their bonuses until nineteen, forty five keep in mind that many. World War One vets had died by then and families were not eligible for the bonus. The ravages of the Great Depression continued until World War Two. Today. We have a confluence of factors including the federal government's failure to protect US citizens for the Cobra virus and pandemic machine fiscal austerity in the face of another great depression a newly transparent institutional racism that has provided an unparalleled opportunity to replicate the bonus army's action in the nation's capital this time on an unprecedented scale depth and breadth of

United States President Herbert Hoover General Macarthur Assault Washington Home Service General George George Van Horn Moseley Douglas Smith Garth General Macarthur Dwight D Eis White House Ex Sergeant Walter Waters Cuba Kampman Patton Oregon Congress DC
New AirPods firmware enables Spatial Audio, automatic switching

Mac OS Ken

02:28 min | Last week

New AirPods firmware enables Spatial Audio, automatic switching

"You didn't ask, but here's the story about which I am most excited today. I. Mean Stories that we know I'm most excited about today's event, but we don't know that story yet. Of the stories, we know I most excited about air pods to an air pods pro firmware version three, eight, two, eight, three. macrumors says that was released on Monday since apple doesn't put release notes for air pods firmware updates. Took Awhile to find out why we might get excited reports from later in the day like another one from macrumors say this week's update brings spatial audio to apple's top of the line stoppers. You know remember what spatial audio is. Let macrumors. Wow us all introduced at W. W. DC and coming and S. fourteen. The peace spatial audio brings movie theater like sound to the ear buds. Spatial audio uses dynamic head tracking to create immersive sound anywhere in space by applying directional audio filters and subtle frequency adjustments. Spatial audio uses the gyroscope and accelerometer an air pods pro and phone to track the motion of your head and your iphones position, comparing the motion data and then remapping the sound field so that it stays anchored to your device even as your head moves. While IOS fourteen isn't out yet Betas of the Os are and spatial audio appears to be a go for those users. The macrumors forms of the punctuality appears to be on for Apple, TV plus content. Exciting is that is to an audio nerd like myself. That's not the only feature that got turned on on Monday macrumors says the feature that allows for automatic switching between devices seems also to have gone live available for air pods and air pods pro. The peace says automatic switching Wilkin next the air pods to any apple device signed associated with your I cloud when you activate audio on that device and are actively using it. When the says available for air, pods, I assume they mean air pods to since. That's as far back as Mondays, update goes. Turning on spatial audio air pods. Bro also makes me wonder whether we'll get IOS fourteen soon-. Sooner I mean then we'll get the next phone. Maybe we'll hear something today.

Macrumors Apple BRO Wilkin W. W. Dc
Fear, language barriers hinder immigrant contact-tracing

All Things Considered

03:25 min | Last month

Fear, language barriers hinder immigrant contact-tracing

"For Disease Control and Prevention. Latinos in the US are hospitalized from covert 19 at four times the rate of white people. But in some cities like Nashville, Tennessee, many of them can't even receive basic pandemic services in their native language. Alexis Marshal of W. PLN reports. Construction sites have been one of the most common places to catch the Corona virus in Nashville. That's where Lenny Tenorio was working in mid April when he got sick by the 21st he was hospitalized and tested positive for Cove in 19. Do your thing, You know, a week later, his mother and father also had to be hospitalized even as more of his family members pot Covad, 19 Tenorio says he never heard from the Metro Health Department. There's the Nashville has boasted that it has plenty of contact tracers. The problem is of the 120 brought on early in the pandemic. None of them spoke Spanish. That's even the language barriers emerged in April, according to the National Health Department's own records. Dr. Consuelo Wilkins, who oversees health equity at Vanderbilt University, warned city officials then that many covert patients didn't speak much English. We saw Arabic speaking people and then this really big cluster of Nepali speaking people. And then all of a sudden that stopped and we saw this huge surge of Spanish speaking people. It took nearly three more months for Nashville's Health Department to recruit native Spanish speaking tracers. The 1st 4 started last month. In the meantime, traces have been dialing in an interpreter. The problem is, they usually don't know whether they'll need one until somebody picks up the phone. When nobody answers. They often have to leave a message in English. If that gets lost in translation, it can throw off. The entire search for who else might be exposed and contact tracing hasn't been the only issue. There have been a Siri's of other delays and implementing additional services that could have slowed the spread of the Corona virus. Thes stays in the Spanish language hotline launched just last month, five months into the pandemic, and the city still hasn't followed through on a plan that would help immigrant families isolate during their quarantine periods. Cities like New York, Miami and Chicago have provided hotel rooms so that patients who live in tighter quarters can isolate while recovering. Nashville was encouraged to do the same back in April and a program was announced in June. But so far, not a single family has been served. The Health Department's deputy director acknowledges the city's response to outbreaks and immigrant and Spanish speaking communities has been slow, but says it's become a top priority. However, immigrant advocates still sense a lack of urgency from the city's top leaders. Lisa Sherman Nicholas is the executive director of the Tennessee immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition. There's really no excuse for not having a response that's proportionate to the crisis in the immigrant and refugee community, she says. It could be a matter of life and death. Corona virus Patient, Linnington Audio and his father recovered, but his mother never came home from the hospital. She died and I lost my mom because of this, he says. I never thought this would happen for NPR

Nashville Lenny Tenorio Health Department Tennessee National Health Department United States Alexis Marshal Disease Control And Prevention Metro Health Department Dr. Consuelo Wilkins Covad Vanderbilt University Linnington Audio Siri Refugee Rights Coalition NPR Deputy Director Lisa Sherman Nicholas Executive Director New York
Why Twitter is a Severely Underrated Platform

Marketing School

04:33 min | Last month

Why Twitter is a Severely Underrated Platform

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about why twitter is a severely rated platform that I tell you what happened with twitter recently. What I did recently, where did you do? So I started running ads for like ten dollars a day or fifteen dollars a day and what happened was one of our big clients I think everyone knows the name they saw it and that led to a upscale conversation and let too much deeper conversations and not only that I'm running this ad right now basically like a blog post and more and more people are seeing it and people with like. Blue checkmark that are reputable investors or VC's or vendors there following me they're liking this is really good for branding her ten dollars fifteen dollars a day it's done so much for me right now and not only not ballers day without regaining growth winds, ten bucks a day growth wise negligible getting impressions. The most important thing is getting impressions on these both the reach my goal with these is the reach, and so you shouldn't be aiming for like. At least for me, I'm not aiming for conversions or anything like that I think if you're running ten dollars a day or maybe fifteen hundred dollars, the reason I started doing this was because I started seeing other people running these ads extra Wilkins in for example, from tiny capital, he just keeps running the same over fifty dollars a day but I remember him and that we talk about the rule fourteen, the rule seven, whatever I just think twitter. From ads perspective is very underrated but from a learning perspective I've also talked about how to me. It's the most important social network because I learned so much more from than other social networks. So when you're using your impressions beginning Yeah I mean let me just open it right now. So while we do that, why do you think is underrated platform? So twitter has a lot of smart high net worth people on there. It's not the sex. It's not like instagram. It's not like based. Youtube it's a place where you find the likes of like the e-leong must of the world when the Bill Gates in the role constantly communicate and they liked doing it themselves, it's not like having someone who works for them postings they themselves like going on twitter and tweeting, and conversely with others or that reason I think it's powerful because although they may not have the reach you can get access to really wealthy influential people on twitter in a much more easier way than you can on instagram or case Lincoln rainy their social. Yup. I have the numbers the so I guess I'm spending a little more I. Guess we wrapped up the budget a little bit so in the last seven days so it looks like about ninety five dollars spent I think we've wrapped up from ten dollars a day so six, hundred, seventy dollars in spend one, hundred, twenty, two, thousand impressions not the greatest CPM cost per thousand impressions but to Neal's point he hit the nail on the head the people that you're reaching our high net worth smart individuals that like to pontificate they like to act they want to show their wisdom. So that's why twitter is really underrated depends on what you're selling to. Out of the impression, how many did you get your site? Let's see well, but in general like there's a lot of channels like twitter Radha contrast, the lot of people don't talk about snapchat doll during its audiences. These underrated pop why we underrated platforms for civically. But the others as Wallace is not a lot of competition for advertising Baseba can google or instagram. Google would also be youtube based also the instrument, but they're all SACCHARIN. You look from the other channels they're much more affordable Lincoln that is thriving social network from ad standpoint. It is quite expensive is a lot of companies, zipper sales and recruiting people spend a lot of money on jobless other than that I found that the other networks much more affordable. Yeah. So here's the thing. Hey, it shows how am I at cloud formed the the second thing is it's actually not showing me clicks just because I'm focused on impressions cost result is giving me a CPM. So I am not seeing clicks right now on it, but I didn't tell you. Thousand. Yeah. So something impressions, dozen impressions it's not the best CPM's around five bucks or so but I can tell you based on the up sell, and then also the people that are engaging with me and the people that are falling me as well. It's worth its weight in gold. So use it. You don't have to use it for the ads side of things but

Twitter Wilkins Marketing School Bill Gates Instagram Google Radha Contrast Lincoln Eric Su Youtube Wallace Neil Patel Neal Baseba
LINK Is Back

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:07 min | Last month

LINK Is Back

"Why would you try crypto? Well, look at the end of the day it comes down to profitability liquidity. The volatility that we've got in this market is just insane. Now, what that means if you take ten tribes and you have six loses that six percent down if you're managing properly was to try to break even so you know you get stopped out the Europe percent loss the other to try that got go onto Mike one likes five percent. Which we nice very, very, very easy to do in this market, the other hit six percent. Now you go net Sarajevo gross eleven percent gained six, percent loss, yacht five percent. You don't tend to get numbers like that in traditional markets now that still gone on sixty percents, lose rights and the other twenty percent they is break even. So what I'm saying is if you work on the probabilities increasing in your five through these courses, you'll the potential is just. An. Almost so most guy. WHO In the market. Currently as way save but not a lot look. I. Wouldn't be surprised bitcoin continue on little to Saad wise run spoken of this quite a bit of liked and it is continuing not bad. It's not bad. It's holding around that eleven thousand mock eleven thousand be the new handle all night. It was still hovering around that Criollos I'm with these sought wise marketed one often does is it allows us to have opportunities to try for sats. Think. That's a worth much but I can tell you now the sats that I made when Bitcoin was at full thousand, five, hundred a now with more than double what they were of a bank two, thousand bucks them Oh it's now over two thousand. So as banking for the future profits, in Sats, is what I love. When I can get the mind with markets. saw that's where I'm looking at Bitcoin to the mom once I saw wise I'm just talking about the last few days rots in Sunday. A bitcoin at the moment eleven thousand, one, hundred, sixty, seven, standpoint, three today yesterday. It was also down point three so much movie Yes not much volatility not much to work with this Syrian. Now it did close the Dow up one percent. It's a three, hundred, ninety dollars and thirty full sentence down half a percent right now, a guy needs to push above the high that I'm looking at four a full. Coverage around around that four hundred, the last couple of days with exile play it did pull that yesterday two point nine on December list is keeping keeping on too much. Actually move it's had a booming move high. And You know a little pullback is it to be well, I'd sites to be fairly Wilkins it's at one point three percent now just under thirty cents twenty, nine, point seven and not much really. They've me to work with very similar on bitcoin cash. It was down yesterday three percent at six fifty is down point seven. Now, a guy, it just sort of slowly slipping off. And it's still holding to seven FAV old. Top Channel. Area, it has broken into these above walls does that all the continuing to kick off lungs? Like. Coins holding pretty well as well and we're looking at fifty seven dollars and forty cents down half of a percent wrought now at fifty seven, forty not macho guy and it's going to get above. Sixty dollars ready for me to have. The trend is explicitly backing. The gang may be interested once more. BITCOIN is vague is. Currently two, hundred, twenty, four, dollars sixty, it was down one point seven percent yesterday currently down point six the one in the top ten that's up right now in fact, these Donna. And look as much as it's not really that tradable for me at the minute I'll talk about you know. The contract to our does have a bit of a trend To something that would capture more attention it fourteen point four cents at the moment, and it has been sort of pretty comfortable consolidating over the last couple of weeks sort of between the high of fifteen five around thirteen or two cent range. I widened to save does have a big push hearts up point seven, three, all of a percent now. Bottlenecks also, yesterday it was up one percent, but it's looking really strong there on that daily kind of. The four hours consolidating at the moment not quota a level for breakout try just yet although very much trying it's hottest to do. So the resistance is around the rage twenty, full forty, five ish around that sort of region if a breaks above their them for sure, I'll be looking for opportunities where Bush is the pullbacks in the one hour and two hour. We my focus stand its down point three, twenty, two dollars and twenty four cents. AOL's holding above three bucks right now down point three, five, a percent yesterday it was pretty much flat on the Diet. and link yesterday had a great performance reading up six point, two, three percent which full it from the day before eleven percent at link Look as a watch list It's a fantastic looking trend and I'm waiting for pool bikes on that four hour as timeframe of choice, full cradles. So again, like I say there's opportunity at the. End of the market's getting normal bullish

Bitcoin Europe Sarajevo Bush Saad Wise Mike One Donna AOL Wilkins
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:47 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Dot. com. None <Speech_Male> of people <Speech_Male> use www <Speech_Male> anymore but <Speech_Male> I'm an old school <Speech_Male> not way. <Speech_Male> Yes. You can find <Speech_Male> me on my website has <Speech_Female> all my portfolio <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> it and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> more information <Speech_Female> about me and <Speech_Female> also feel free <Speech_Female> to add me on Lincoln <Speech_Female> I love connecting <Speech_Male> with folks <SpeakerChange> over. All <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right sounds <Speech_Male> good will. <Speech_Male> Carmella <Speech_Male> Wilkins, I have to tell <Speech_Male> you I was not <Speech_Male> I had no idea <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> wide <Speech_Male> ranging <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> talk with you would be <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> you've taken <Speech_Male> us from <Speech_Male> the US <Speech_Male> to abroad <Speech_Male> and back and <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> over all these different topics <Speech_Male> around <Speech_Male> environmental <Speech_Male> racism <Speech_Male> and Food Justice <Speech_Male> and everything <Speech_Male> I mean like <Speech_Male> I said earlier in the <Speech_Male> interview I mean <Speech_Male> just your own <Speech_Male> personal story <Speech_Male> and you're driving <Speech_Male> your fortitude <Speech_Male> to have. <Speech_Male> Gone through the challenges <Speech_Male> that you have to <Speech_Male> get to where you are. Now <Speech_Male> I feel like that's <Speech_Male> if that <Speech_Male> does not set <Speech_Male> you up for success in the <Speech_Male> future I don't know <Speech_Male> what is and I hope <Speech_Male> that folks that are listening <Speech_Male> to this <Speech_Male> really get a good <Speech_Male> sense of like your <Speech_Male> drive <Speech_Male> and passion <Speech_Male> for this work <Speech_Male> like it's it's very <Speech_Male> clear to me <Speech_Male> like you know you're <Speech_Male> coming from this <Speech_Male> this background that <Speech_Male> is. Part <Speech_Male> in Africa <Speech_Male> part here in the US <Speech_Male> but then also <Speech_Male> you studied <Speech_Male> and done work in Europe <Speech_Male> like you bring <Speech_Male> so much to the table <Speech_Male> that you're <Speech_Male> the kind of person <Speech_Male> that we need like <Speech_Male> to help <Speech_Male> us or us into <Speech_Male> the future just <Speech_Male> in terms of being able to. <Speech_Male> Take <Speech_Male> all the pieces and <Speech_Male> put them together in a way <Speech_Male> that makes sense. So <Speech_Male> I'm really <Speech_Male> glad we had this conversation <Speech_Male> I'm glad people are <Speech_Male> able to listen to this <Speech_Male> and thank <Speech_Male> you so much for coming on the show <Silence> I appreciate <SpeakerChange> it. <Speech_Male> Thank <Speech_Male> you so much. <Speech_Male> It's been an absolute <Speech_Music_Male> pleasure. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male>

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:32 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"The systems as it pertains to food and water nationally also internationally. And as a twenty, five year olds unlike I am I thinking my dreaming too big but I also don't want to know to downplay myself and for me I really want to give back to my home country the. That I've never been to before, I've never been to Liberia a minute something that I always think about like what can I do like? How can I do more for my community? How can I teach others more about my community? I do so through food but as a designer, how can I do more of that? And for me yes. Like working at amazing agency is a step in the right direction. But when I also WANNA do is I aspire to be a design engineer. That's a long term goal of mine I really want to be able to create an redesigned systems that have disadvantaged marginalized communities of all shapes and sizes, and for me I want to do so between the east coast of the US. And West Africa because there's so much going on there that my mom tells me about. All I can do is cry about it because it's like why isn't anything being done like why are people so poor wise infrastructure not they're like, why are we considered a country of the global south like why are we in the place that we currently are in like why can't we move up on up? Into my head and like for me like my purpose, my sole reason for existence is to do something about it because I can't sit here as a designer and. And make things that are pretty fat are perfect in some way and it's not helping someone. Yeah. Conveying. Message to someone, and that's why I do find being a designer really valuable because for me is the foundation of how to build myself and like where I see myself in the next five years. Yeah. It's important for me and a kind of like side note to this big dream of mine is. I've been learning Korean for the last year seems totally random but. Extent it makes sense. Yeah. Like all my roommates they speak. Many languages. I'm monolingual unfortunately and I complain about all the time because when my mom emigrates country, she knew I think like three or four languages, but she was so fixated like you know like some immigrant communities are on assimilation that she was like. English American this nothing else. Nothing else so I think I was. In, my early teens preteen and I had asked you like, Hey, mommy at the Tennessee learning French because I went to Catholic school. As a hey, mommy like do you know any language use and she's like oh? Yeah. I know a lot of languages house like what really like saying something and she's like I don't remember anything and I was like, what what do you mean? She's like, yeah, I don't remember anything and I was like why and she's like Oh because in America that just like had me so dumbfounded. And I was like, okay. But there are Americans who speak different languages. She's like you know like you getting union sister getting a good education is the most important thing and there's no one here that that really speaks the language is I speaks. What's defiant and funny enough my mom. Revisited Liberia for the first time I believe a year and a half ago. culture shock for her and I. Remember she called me from Monrovia, which is the capital of Liberia and she's like her mama it's things are so different here I'm happy and sad at the same time doing so many feelings and one thing that I regret the most is not being able to speak to some of my friends and that just like. Really sell to me so. Going back to Korean the reason why I'm learning it is because there is a lot of industrial development men also service development within west Africa, east Africa from East Asian countries. and. Like for me as a designer, the most important thing to designing is you're not designing for yourself from the point of design unless you are unless you're drawing like a butterfly on a piece of paper because you really enjoy putter flies like. NYC unless I'm doing that. Like I designed with the intention to fulfill someone else's narrative. Uh, you know making the invisible visible through my work currently what I WANNA do in the future silly for me learning. Korean. I want to be able to. Interact with know was Koreans who are working in West Africa East Asia. Developing. Not Just Koreans as a whole but east. Asian communities are redeveloping, which is a trigger word of my opinion redeveloping various African countries in the West in the east for mutual advancement, which has so many underlying notions of colonialism and I have so many problems with. So for me I want to do on. Hopefully within the next five, ten years of pan how the world looks on do our current state with no covert in everything I really want to be able to be a design engineer of sorts that able to move between the US and West Africa, and be able to speak these various language and be able to communicate the real stories and narratives of people who mayor not not willing not but who may not be able to speak to folks who are coming into their spaces and not seeking out the opinions and thoughts and ideas of the community that they are quote unquote creating things for redesigning things for because a relief for them it's for the people are. Creating making these inventions and that's something that doesn't sit well with me. That's how I hope I'm a big Jim Right. That's how I hope to contribute to black feature is known will just kind of wrap things up here where can our audience find out more about you about your work on line so folks and find out more about me on www www. Dot. com. None of people use www anymore but I'm an old school not way. Yes..

West Africa Liberia design engineer US Jim Right Tennessee east Africa NYC Monrovia America Dot. Catholic school
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

09:02 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"And one thing that I've noticed my entire life is, why is there an ethnic food section is? Food section. But then for example, when you go into the aisle of that is for like pastry and like baking goods like maple, Syrup and stuff, and then you walk by and light you see the pancake boxes waffle boxes and there's like aunt Jemima like slap in the box like why isn't she in the ethnic I'll? Like I had all these questions about like why's Uncle Ben's in the rice I'll but not like in the ethnic I'll wiser ethnic like what just ethnic and always questions popping up in my head and experiences that I had when it comes to my momma can Liberian food she wouldn't go to stop and shop in shops very much at east. Clothing I don't know if it's anywhere else but shop like I grew up going there all the time like she wouldn't go to dislike super commercial grocery store to buy ingredients to make Liberian would know she'd go to the mom and Pop Liberian store and buy imported ingredients from there. So it just that relationship between going to the grocery store where you`re Buying the ants then prepare into making your dish. There's always a break in that process for me growing up because we always had to Detroit another other grocery store to complete that to complete that circle of you know going to grocery store you buy your ingredients you go home, prepare you eat the meal like. More than one grocery store so That was something that just release stuck with me and in the making of black. Magic? I was like it's really interesting. How literal for me like the project was electoral take on the white man's consumption of of blackness with no intention or recognition of what it means to be black. It's just like, Oh, I'm going to ongoing consume these products unconsumed this culture for my own curiosity and then once. Is fulfilled like, okay. Let's continue being a white person. That's that's always bothered me because it makes it seem as though it's just dislike temporary show. An experienced to be black and that's something though white people want to experience like a look I'm paying for this. It's so different still unique. It's so exotic. Mike? Day Living. And that was something that I was like this is really I mean obviously it's messed up. But like how is it messed up and yes. So like when I was working on this project, I really wanted to embody like how I think that white people think about consuming blackness sometimes. And something that I wrote on when you look at the projects, I roy at the bottom of the poster have you secretly admired are envied the physical characteristics of Negroes and harbour desire to enhance your own features? Look no further white America, quaker managed lack oats are your one stop shop to fulfillment in every bite discovering new you with bodybuilding dare expanding skin browning vitamins and minerals with a sprinkle of society's most socially acceptable negroes. Each grain looks tastes exactly alike with no differentiating qualities. You won't be able to tell one grain from another and neither will the Mrs. Then almost sounds like it could be a skit on like the Chris rock show or Chapelle show or something I mean one year you're playing kind of the nostalgia that comes from like mid-century advertising, but also taking on the concept of consumption. But then also like over processing because what ends up happening even with that consumption is that it's not it's not a one to one transference like you know why people tend to take it a little bit too far, and then you're like, okay, that's too much. Yeah. When do you feel the happiest is? have a big smile. You just asking that. You mean like today or in the past exit just like in general I mean, this is a time when I think you know especially as black people, we have to snatch enjoy where it comes. So like what makes you the happiest? These days. I would have to say. It sounds so cliche with everything the neck spoken about. Say cooking cooking makes me really happy like roommates that I live with are very different. We are queer households we have Korean. Polish we have Jewish. So the food and the experiences in the stories in the holidays are so different and so beautiful and everyone. I love living with my roommate so much because it's the best New York experience that I've had living in New York, a one of the best your experiences that have had living in New York, and that definitely brings me so much joy being able to just share a part of myself with my culture and heritage with them, and they're not judgmental in any way shape or form. They're very opening to how I exists as a black we're female and that is. Yeah it like housing feeling very emotional right now because. It means so much to me to have to have people that can just exist with really who don't look like me. And that that's a need like basil desire that I have to the fact that it just happened that I'm able to live in an apartment that. We just we just like catered each other in such a wholesome ways it just means so much not making so so happy. That's like one I'm surprised. They got so emotional about that. But yeah, that's that's one big thing. Being to talk to my mom and my sister knowing that they are okay unlike like we've gone through a lot as a family since the beginning of the of the pandemic quarantine like my mom has been Shubra worried about me as she always is even when it wasn't in quarantine just like me leaving my apartment to go to work should be. Like. Please be careful but I'd be like Mommy and just taking the subway it's forty five minutes I'll you know I'll be fine. So yeah that brings me lots of joy. My partner brings me lots of joy. I love talking like we talked literally every single day and he doesn't text me back I text him and I'm like I'm starved of attention. Should I know you're working? But who cares? So yeah, those little things also a super nerd I love playing video games I love watching anime I have that bonding time with my sister we like have a whole night. It's usually Saturday night action that I work a lot and we'll have I, don't know usually like four five hours we'll be playing video games together remote, of course because she's in Rhode. Island's my mom or will be watching animating either would just be talking on the phone about random things like Internet culture like her friends, my friends like her being a junior and college seeking advice or me being part time adult and seeking her advice as a new twenty year old. For her age she's argue is. All. Those things definitely. Bring me joy. One kind of general theme that I've had for the show. This show that I've asked every guests is the round black futures black future. Ism I went to the blackened design conference which I mentioned before I went in two thousand, nineteen pre coverted, and that was like a huge thing that they were discussing like of course, black people. are in the future but how like where are we like? Yes, granted if you look in media, you probably don't see us to pick particularly science fiction, but black people are not only in the future, but from the future in some ways. So the question I have is, how are you using your skills in designed to help build a more equitable future? It's such a big question and something that I have thought about. So many times especially as someone who is of this country not from this country. Spiritually in a way and search emotionally I have so many feelings. Abou- about what it means to be. American especially as yeah being Liberian being in American and growing up the family that I have one thing that is a big thing. One thing that I really want to achieve in a how I see myself giving to cuter an present blackness and it's like the black existence is being able to create a sustainable relationship between marginalized communities and..

New York Uncle Ben Detroit Rhode America Chris rock Mike partner Shubra Island Chapelle
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:43 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"To meet my UK family for the first time and it was this magical magical experience remember meeting, my aunt, my answer Gerald -An, and she just made this massive feasts for me this like Liberian British fusion cuisine that I was so taken aback by so comforted by because, she really took the time to welcome to the UK while welcome back to the UK and. It was the Cleveland a massive hug and I. Love it so much. Nice. So with all of this kind of not only just you know growing up in the states but then also kind of you know going back and forth between Europe and United States like was designed kind of a big part of your world I mean going to school and everything like how did you I kind of know that this was what you wanted to do when I was six. When I was six years old my mom purchase my i. It was a yellow easel from Raila terrible design now that I think about it. If you're old I. Loved that thing to death I had all my little paints my little pain set in to that were poor quality. But they were my paints and I made what I considered masterpiece after masterpiece dislike threw up everything around the house and I'm calling my mom mommy when I get older I'm going to be an artist and she was like, okay, I, believe in you and that was. Written. And Yeah we knew that I was going to be an artist of some. Sore. At one point I thought I was going to be a fashion designer like that I was like hell bent on becoming a fashion designer. What changed for me was is a lot of police brutality happening in Providence on Providence, Rhode Island, and not just police brutality just all these other social and economic environmental hindrances. Specifically happening within marginalized communities know being a black person that that really impacted me on an emotional and mental level and I was like I can't sit here and you know Sunday have my fashion design degree and fifteen, maybe ten fifteen. Years down the line. Sit with my fashion degree be like, wow, I've done something really meaningful with my life like I didn't think I would have made the right decision I feel like I would have had regrets I've just pivoted completely and I was like, okay. Well, I want to do something that is really mission driven. That is really giving back to the community that isn't just you know making things pretty. which sounds contradicting since graphic designer but. Hoping so Some people I've heard this unfortunately, I have strong opinions that that isn't the case at all and yeah, like I'm I'm really glad that I took that changed for the better because I'm so happy with where I'm at right now and I'm not bashing fashion designers all because there's so much powerful dashing textiles, related work coming down the line that have been really powerful and have just like moved social issues in the right direction. So for me, it wasn't i. knew that wasn't a place for me even though at one point I, thought it was. Now even though you you went to school for a time in the UK, you also went to Parsons in New York City. What was your time like their? Love hate relationship with Parsons the love comes from the many amount opportunities that I received from being horses and just going in for type of interview and having my resume Rudd and people gas like Oh you got to Parsons and. Ends like know it's all right. How you must have worked really hard to get into that school and like literally to nail blood sweat and tears and unmanned don yet, and that's where the the hate comes in because I had a lot of hurdles, my first year and a half living in New York and having tab. Moved to New, York on my own I didn't have any support in that way because I mentioned earlier, my mom had an accident on the job. So because of that accident she is now disabled. And that I mean has definitely impact not only her life and my sister's also my lifestyle during the year and a half. A hatchet adjust living New York and final place in moving I learned everything by myself. So I don't that's we're kind of like the. A hate but like the like resentment of like having to be maybe like an adult almost too quickly. Boston. Now that I was doing it with the right intention in right purpose in mind Sargodha overnight very quickly but for Parsons. I had one black teacher who was also clear that I was like, wow, this is ray like I think this might be a really good chance for me to see what? Parsons is really a bow. But then just like being in that one class, which is a terrible experience the teacher really catered to the white students in the class and like oh No like when you see another black person, you're like, yeah, you're another black person. AIA to in black and acknowledging unspoken connection we have between one another. The teacher and the teacher's is like not like I'm not the one. God without saying explicitly in words and I was just like, okay, well that was. Unfortunate what could have been wasn't That was one part of it. That was. Those really unfortunate and one other sticks out for my experience at Parsons was dealing with the financial aid department that was such a strenuous experience up until two months ago when I finally finished paying off my last semester Parsons to be given my diploma which I received in the mail last Friday. I had graduated about a year ago. So that just to me speaks volumes to the an the. Lack of communication and commitment that I personally have experienced unbelievable that Parsons has when it comes to their black and Brown students that cannot afford to maintain their whole time Saudis fulltime Madison as you in part time status..

Parsons UK New York Europe Cleveland United States Providence York Rhode Island New York City Gerald Raila Sargodha Boston AIA Rudd Brown
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:40 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Don't really go towards the nonprofit sector. It's more towards the for profit sector for a the prestige in also because. Usually the branding is already they're both in the nonprofit sector. I have a deep connection and admiration for most nonprofits for what nonprofit stand for, and I really wanted to be able to elevate their their visual narrative in their mission and I'm involved in the nonprofit sector first place. So minds matter I really enjoyed their mission and what they stand for like helping low income high school students achieve. That is my childhood story. Just really pulled on my heartstrings throughout the entire time that I was there. But one thing that I noticed was as a design, there were some inconsistencies with how they portray themselves in person and online, and I really wanted to marry those two things they're more cohesive and for me, that is the biggest difference with working having had worked at a nonprofit verses in agency where at an agency I'm not just working with one with one client with one entity I'm working with multiple clients from various backgrounds and the needs are. Always different and specific to the client and what an agency setting having other creatives to collaborate with and share ideas with also report to is a completely different experience than working nonprofit where the only person I had reported to was the minds matter New York Chapter Director Eric Halston and she had some experience with working with designers, but she is in her design herself. So it's a different experience something that I saw straightaway within my I like three months working at AB compared to entire time I worked at mines matter. Yeah. It's interesting when I first started. Back in cow what was Lehto eight earlier nine I started off doing work with nonprofits and then eventually ended up kind of migrating towards being able to do more out of more lucrative work. I mean I liked the idea of working with nonprofit. Especially, if they have a really strong caused that you can get behind I just find that really for me help the work better because you know it's not just an service of like Oh. We have to fulfil this for the client but like no, this is like something that could actually really help somebody like save a life in some instances depending on. The type A nonprofit that you're working with. So what would you say working at media matters really taught you. Would have to say that just being able to meet the students minds matter didn't really have the opportunity to do. So all the time, the Hugh Times I did get to meet them. It just really made the work more meaningful and that for me dislike just really like reassured my position as someone who wants to create things out just for aesthetic consumption but that can have an impact in the work in length through their mission when I student to see themselves. On print or line something that I treated in getting feedback from that student was really refreshing and could also be quite comical at times to you know to hear their responses. So for me, that was the joy that had came from that experience and is the reason why I'm more drawn towards organizations that have some type of socially driven mission. Gotcha and I misspoke acid media matters. Mad as followed is about that. Let's switch gears here a little bit. You know you mentioned earlier your family, where did you grow up? So I am currently located in Brooklyn new. York. I am not and your native and from pawtucket Rhode Island like the town in Family Guy, which is the only connection folks off to. Oh. Yeah. Like it's not worth family guy was based off of I'm like actually Yeah Seth Macfarlane he went to wristy who would've thought sh. Thought Thought yes. I grew up and talk at Rhode. Island. Spent most of my life there and then went through a bit of a rebellious phase unexpectedly on my mom's accounts. When I was in my late teens and I was like, okay, I don't think I. Don't think that this place is meant for me anymore like I need to be somewhere else I don't know where that place is what it looks like but. I really want to see what is outside of the four corners of the state. So unexpectedly, just ended up going to Germany out of all places because I found out that I had an aunt who lives in very small village between I believe The Netherlands and Germany and stayed with her for for some time. Originally my plan was to live and seventy there. So learn German go to university there because my greatest fear was Going to college in the US and ending in a ridiculous amount of debt from all the horror stories that relatives telling me on as they were fortunate enough to be college graduates from various institutions in the US. But then leaving with crippling debt and matches instilled this fear I mean like I want to have these invisible chains on me when it comes to my financial readiness being in an adult. So I had the experience of being in Germany for a bit but it was short lived because unexpectedly my mom she had an accident on the job in the US and biggest concern was okay like who is going to? Take care of her like my sister is too young the only person united six and time to myself and I was like, okay. Let's while my mom to carry littering my entire life until I left the house, it's my turn to do the same thing. So I ended up leaving Germany and going back home in basically was a stay at home nurse for my mom for about like eight months. So I like took time off school and took care of her which I knew. She really appreciated glad that I was in a position to do that for her and long story short I ended up going back to school. Actually in the UK for about a year and a half I applied for the scholarship I knew I didn't want to pursue higher education us because once again you're crippling debt and I was like anywhere but here anywhere. But here and was fortunate enough to get a scholarship at found university in the south of the UK in Cornwall where I was. Where I was the only black person in the small Cornish town and it was actually a really pleasant experience except for a few instances. But yeah, it really shaped my world plea. is also these yeah. The second time that had left the country. So it really impacted the way. The I view things as a designer like in contrast to my environment is even like things like being able to get hair care products like for my hair type with town was impossible like I had to order stuff from London and have it shipped to the south. So that was quite the the interesting experience you have lived a life. I there's a lot of just mention here that I want to just kind of like briefly touch on I. Guess. I'm curious about this rebellious phase because I know Rhode Island is like these smallest state. So there's not a whole lot to. Do and see I would imagine just because it's so small. But like what did this rebellious phase look.

Germany US Rhode Island Rhode UK pawtucket Rhode Island Seth Macfarlane London New York Hugh Eric Halston Director Brooklyn York Cornwall wristy The Netherlands
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

09:06 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else it's interesting. How in this time you're seeing the companies that are exhibiting grace and saying you know we understand this is an unprecedented time we're gonNA care. For you as the employee as a person, and then there are the companies that are just like, nope full steam ahead keep going. So it's good that you're working for a place that is is allowing the circumstances to kind of shape sort of what your current reality is like they're helping out with money. They're saying if you need to take a mental health day or something take it. That's great. That's really Great what do your work days look like now my workdays can be unpredictable. We recently had I say recent like what from the last two months? We had a really awesome happy hour and during happy are we have this? We have go around basically one person usually a new person asked question any question they want to everyone that everyone has to answer and someone had asked what makes an ABC and ABC? And it was just like this perfectly crafted question that was so unexpected at the same time that really mean everyone thinks like, what makes someone an abeer like why?.

New York City US Japan Paul Right Carmel Wilkens Carmelo Wilkins East Asia Rhode Island New York ABC Asia York Europe Atlanta Tokyo
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:59 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Now for this week's interview. . I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. . Let's start the show. . Paul Right. . So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. . My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, , which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely . want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, , we are recording this now it's in the middle of. . Even to say, , it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? ? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for <unk> existing in the same space in which I work and also live. . Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, , go to the office and then be able to come back home. . You know my retreat my safe haven. . But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. . It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. . Men. . Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. . So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, , my family that live in Rhode Island, , and during the beginning of the pandemic, , the beginning of quarantine, , I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. . While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. . Yeah. . It was. . It was really intense. . My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. . Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. . Although I think now, , countries, , WANNA keep us out like I. . Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. . It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. . Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. . <hes> right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, , okay. . We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. . Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. . Work remotely for like over ten years now I, , live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, , like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. . I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. . So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. . Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. . But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. . So you're like Oh. . What should I do? ? You know what's the right choice to make? ? So I understand that that was it been in New York? ? Has Been, , very, , interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. . From all the stays outside of New, , York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. . How am I eating how my paying my rent? ? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, , I'm okay. . Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, , I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. . We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. . On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. . So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. . It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not ? all's. . When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. . If we're cautious about, , say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. . One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, , and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. . If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including <unk> came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. . So. . What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, , okay. . We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. . That is both confusing and scary. . Yes exactly. . I mean to take the test. . I mean, , of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, , the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. . I. . Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. . Than, , just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. . Well, , let's talk about a be partners. . You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, , it's black owned. . How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. . AM So. . To be working where I work book, , we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. . The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, , and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. . So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, , our our mental wellbeing, , our overall wellbeing in mind, , and at any point during the last, , I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. . Like. . If at any point, , we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. . It's okay to do so and they completely understand. . So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. . Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, , Hey, , folks. So . we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. . Home. . Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, , and I was really I was really kind. . They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. . So did everyone else

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

Revision Path

07:59 min | Last month

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

"Now for this week's interview. I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else

New York City Paul Right Japan United States Carmel Wilkens Carmelo Wilkins East Asia Rhode Island New York Asia York Europe Atlanta Tokyo
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:20 min | Last month

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring, but struggling to find diverse talented candidates. The have something that can help our job board. HEAD ON OVER TO REVISION PATH DOT COM forward slash jobs to browse listings, Orchard Place Your Own. This week on the job board insider INC is looking for a graphic designer in New York. City. Gansler is looking for a cat technician in Lacrosse Wisconsin. DECKS COM is looking for a senior designer in San, Diego? California. And Foundation medicine is looking for an associate director of design for their experience design team. If you're looking for remote work, then check out these listings. PS Group is looking for and designed Superhero. Mk G. Design is looking for a digital slash print production designer. And tomorrow is looking for a director of product design as well as a senior product designer. Companies. Stop. Making excuses on your deny efforts in post job listings with us. Just ninety nine dollars or listening will be on our job board for thirty days and will spread the word for you about your job to our diverse audience of listeners. Make sure to head over to provision path dot com forward slash jobs for more info on these listings. Apply today and tell them you heard about the job to revision path. Get, started with us and expand your job search today. REVISION PATH DOT COM FORWARD SLASH JOBS You're listening to the revision Pan podcast, a weekly showcase of the world's graphic designers, web designers, and web developers. Through in depth interviews, you'll learn about their work, their goals, and what inspires the most creative individuals. Here's your host Maurice Cherry. Hello, everybody. Welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in this week. I'm your host Mariz Cherry amd, before we get into this week's interview, I just want to talk about our sponsor really quickly for this episode facebook designed. To learn more about how the facebook design community is designing for human needs it unprecedented scale. Please visit facebook dot design. Now for this week's interview..

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | Last month

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
"wilkins" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:07 min | 2 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"By Wilkins Hyundai In Elmhurst, choose the Hyundai You want from their huge inventory in the price you see is the price you get. Visit Wilkins cars dot com in Tinley Park, the Delta Sonic on 159th and Oak Park is selling gas for 2 28 a gallon and Elsa the speedway at 127 That Lasky has gas for 2 29 a gallon. If you see a great price, please give us a call at 312409 g A. S s w BBM news time fivethirtyeight traffic and weather together on the eights here. A lot of the accidents have cleared up on the tolls and the expressways. However, an Archer Park's North bound Cicero's heavy before Garfield to past Archer due to an accident. At sister on Archer and reports of a vehicle split in half, and the passenger was ejected in terms of the express ways that Eden just good. The Kennedy is not bad at all. Eisenhower. Moving posted speed the Stevenson inbound. You've got the ramp to the inbound Ryan still down to just one lane, and that goes on through September Outbound. You got the ramp to the inbound Dan Ryan s O. That's causing a lot of delays. There. 55 you will count is cleared up tremendously and Dan Ryan. And bound it slowing down around Stevenson to the Roosevelt Do the road work? Outbound is delay free. Ah, 57 inbound. It's cleared up from an earlier crash on 119 outbound. You're looking good. Bishop forward is looking better, but it's still heavy 111 to 103rd on that's due to earlier crashes as well. Outbound your incident free lecture Dr still will tight through Grand Park, especially South bound. Monroe to Balboa. And that's due to an earlier crash and north bound, You're 1/2 capers delay. Tri state is good and the tolls looking wonderful, except for I 80 still on the brakes eastbound solid past 55 2 before Brick Street The next track Report 5 48 on NewsRadio, 78 and one of 5.9 of them w BBMak, you weather Partly cloudy 40 below 68 degrees tomorrow have a blend of sunshine in some clouds. That'll be comfortably warm day as it will be.

Dan Ryan Wilkins Hyundai Archer Park Archer Tinley Park Hyundai Oak Park Wilkins Grand Park Elmhurst Balboa Stevenson Eisenhower Lasky Kennedy Monroe Cicero Bishop Garfield Roosevelt
"wilkins" Discussed on The Free Agents

The Free Agents

07:08 min | 2 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on The Free Agents

"Wilkins course we talked about. He's incredible battles Larry Bird over the years why? Wouldn't speak to nick for nine. How years and who dominates teammate was on the All star all style team. I. Bet you hadn't heard about that one before. So here it is sit back and enjoy the next half an hour of me Dominique Wilkins. Dominique Wilkins. Let's see let's see this one with. Connecting. Anyway finally we got we got it. Man Good, how you buy thanks. Thanks very much for joining me today. No problem, no problem. How's it going well? You know what it's like. Inner Atlanta it's always hot so not it's. Got! My shirt ready to go. This should keep me cool. There you go. Here got special on here. I so the way these guys Nike's. Evolve basketball coach from ninety one ninety two season that sky box. And what I'll do is I'll give you some clues. And hopefully you can guess the player is and right. We can tell us the story to about them. We'll see what happens. Okay now just before we get thought I want to say congratulations because I saw a couple of months ago. You were part of a world record a Guinness World record it. which was at the continue jumping jogging and running for oh? Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, for for Culture City yet And, as for great cause for autism, people dealing with sensory needs so so so wonderful, it's a wonderful thing. Yeah congratulations. That's A. that's a great lengthy productive here in this crazy quarantine situation that we're all world dealing with right now. Okay, so the first one. I monitoring is a guy. Who I remember him mostly for his time at the Indiana Pacers, a big guys like six ten sort of a forward center, I think he was drafted in the same draft as you actually. It was a accompanist. Now Thomas Oh yeah they. Yeah What do you know about Lasalle Thompson or he's a? Funny Guy He's a great friend of mine. We go back a long way like you said. We all came out of college together. He was drafted same year. He's He was a brewing boy. Strong Guy Yeah Yeah. He played in Kansas City's in his early days I believe here. In Kansas City right I could start. He had this next guy here. I remember him mainly. He was kind of a backup point guard in Seattle, and then he played some good for the Lakers. As point got off the magic. Johnson retired was after the Showtime Lakers? He He's actually from Atlanta. I believe he's from Marietta destroyed. When the Sedillo three pool there you. Local boy. Yeah. Sedale and I you know. We played a lot of together in Atlanta and a lot of summer leagues play on some of the same teams together play against each other. He was a solid point guard yet I think he's actually add in Australia right now. Where I'm from in Melbourne I think he lived here right now. Long from home. Yeah, a long way for him. He's coaching these kids I think. This next guy well, this is a this is a good cat to get. Because this guy was a great shot, a great defender Hall of fame champion Mvp. He's Donald all in the NBA and he played for one thing, but actually when he got drafted, it took him threes. I think before you actually played in the NBA because he was finishing his education. In the Navy! Yeah I've. got. I play with David to end my career. You know beside the basketball player David Robs the one guy. That's A. Hell of a human human being and glad to been you know friends with them all these years, and had a chance to play with short time at the end of my career, but there was a fun time in San. Antonio, you know. When I was when I was looking back over. Some of your thoughts on youtube is like there's like compilations over ten minutes long of dunking on guys and you've got David one Tom. I remember here in Atlanta because. This is a bit of a trendy because I saw. You got guys like marketing seven four a double pump on Route Sampson and traffic seven four goal. I! These are two dogs I mean. Did you see those guys like challenges or or You what? You love docking on big guys. That was that was the thrill. That's what really got you going. And when you doc on a seven footer man, you know what I. It was something that changes changed the game. It would get you guys ready to go. You know. Bring that energy so remain. It was a to intimidation and wasn't. The end all be all with me, but it was a way to back. Big is up. Keep come. Won The challenge shot? Yeah, I also noticed as well like when you've done. You really try to smash the ball. was that also trying to send a message to defend as like? If you want to try to block these, you might lose a finger or two here. Yeah, that's exactly what it was. This is acne. One was harder. You doc own guys and went to the rack with reckless abandon. Deterred a Lotta guys a lot of times not to challenge your shot. Yeah, that's basically what it was for. Me was the one I mean again. I know there's a lot at the that we that famous Doctor No. But. It's one that people have forgotten about. That's one of your old time. It's been a lot I. think the one I. We kid about in and Bob Lanier and I killed about the time. It was one against him that for nine years after that not speak to me to retire. Editor. Conic moment you know so that was that was an interesting time. That's the baseline you kind catch him and then throw. Thing was I when I went to the middle and got cut off I came back base on jump. and Bob Lanier covered the room with both hands. And as he was coming down I was still going up so I turned into air. Trump my body back around when downtown. I was still going. Through it down at the game, we won the game and. Yeah he did. He didn't like me for a very long. I hope you still continue now that. We brace growth. Unbelievable Spectacle Bob near wonderful great great player Hall of Fame Type, player and He was fun to play against because he's with another guy that was. Yeah I this next guy. This is another athletic God. Big Jump a big Donka used to dunk a lot with his left hand, even though he was a right handed Playa. You. Remember it mostly for the Charlotte Hornets. He fights the Sonics. He plays the New Jersey Nets. Yet beaks, guy out of Chicago. That's okay and I know who this is to do. Dung Conquest. Dunk contest I think maybe he's rookie season in Charlotte. He's still in great shape. I'll say that if. Know if you can see him on Instagram, but he's still in great shape. He's in his early fifties. Very Athletic Guy Six I..

Atlanta Dominique Wilkins basketball David Robs Lakers NBA Bob Lanier Kansas City Larry Bird nick Nike Indiana Pacers Sonics Charlotte New Jersey Nets Melbourne Thomas Oh Lasalle Thompson
Summerwind Mansion

Haunted Places

06:59 min | 3 months ago

Summerwind Mansion

"Inland Lakes Wisconsin just south of the state's border with Michigan there was once a house on West Bay Lake a Victorian built in the nineteen tents, surrounded by Scrub Oak, and then northern Pines, it once held twenty rooms. The property was initially used as a rustic resort before it was renovated into a stately mansion by civil engineer and businessman Robert Lamont in nineteen sixteen. Lamont his wife Helen Gertrude would vacation there during the nineteen twenty s, and through his tenure as President Herbert hoovers secretary of Commerce during the Great Depression. The Lamont's called their home summer wind. Lamont left the President Service in nineteen, thirty, two likely withdrawing to the mansion to recuperate after an exhausting and in many ways fruitless effort to pull the United States out of its economic spiral. According to a frequently repeated legend, the couple was having dinner in the houses kitchen one night when the door to the basement shook itself. Revealing the spectral form of a man. Lamont panicked in fired two shots as the door swung shot leaving two bullet holes in the door. Perhaps it was this experience that caused the couple to flee the house. The details of when and why the Lamont sold their property are unclear. What is now is that by the time Lamont died in nineteen, forty eight summer win belong to the Keefer family who also used it as a vacation getaway. Unfortunately the Kiefer's experienced many misfortunes in summer wind, according to one story Mr Keefer passed away in less than a year after they purchased the house, leaving his wife in despair and dire financial trouble. Across the three decades, the Kiefer's haunted. The house deteriorated with neglect, and its land was eventually subdivided and offered up for sale. However many of the buyers were allegedly forced to back out the last minute because of sudden financial disasters. The unlucky house kept returning to the Kiefer's. In the early nineteen seventies, a family of eight moved into the home with the promise of renovating it. The darkness of summer wind would terrorize arnold ginger, hinshaw and their six children. Fracturing their bonds and their sense of safety forever A. Birdie was almost seven years old. She knew she was too old to be sneaking door. Parents bed anymore, even if this house was old and weird. The door's stuck so hard that she was sure that one of her older brothers must have glued them shut Bryan probably. A few hours. It would open on its own. The curtains disappeared off the walls. Windows flew open and slammed shut in the middle of the night. But she was growing up. She could deal with all this. Until, it wasn't just the House that was acting strangely. Their Father Arnold had been angrier than usual. She tried to give her allowance to see if that would cheer him up. But he only side and gone back to his organ. She hated the organ. It was big and it sounded like there was an owl, stuck inside crying out for someone to save him from the hollow tubes. Every song her father played was dark and sad. It made her think of thunderstorms and the boogie man that her brother Brian had tried to convince her was the real cause of all the trouble. But birdie new Brian, was wrong. She took Brian's dare to look under the bed, but she didn't see the monstrous. You'll allies a long toothed man with a dusty top hat. No. When she looked under the bed. She was met by the soft gaze of a woman. Her name was Mathilde and she only wanted to sit with the family at dinner because her family had gone away. birdies parents didn't like when Birdie said this, but it was true. It was important for them to know that Matilda didn't mean to impose. Birdie was glad to have mathilde with her that night. When the radiator shrieked to the wind held the sometimes invisible woman held the little girl's hand, she pushed against the heavy door that led to Birdie's parents fromm. Six lumps protruded from the sheets like old covered furniture. It was her family all safely nestled together in the same bed. Aside from her father of course, who was banging away at the Oregon downstairs. birdie crawled in alongside her siblings, asking Mathilde to watch out for them. Matilda gave a small not. Birdie closed her eyes and tried to sleep. But the organ wouldn't let her it. Screech didn't squawked and couldn't help but picture the owl with gaping wound, flapping its wings and trying to escape. Her mother ginger pulled her in tight. birdie filter is grow heavy as the tears started to dry her cheeks. She didn't want to sleep. She needed to know what would happen with the Oregon. But Matilda held her hand and sleep took her in the end. Two hands grabbed onto birdie shelters her I shot open and she screamed. In the darkness, the whites of her father's eyes glow. Is Features look bigger rounder almost like the ghost. She'd been for Halloween. Huge wide is antic keeping mouth. Birdie rubbed her eyes. He shook her a little harder than before. Ginger woke up beside her and asked what was going on. Arnold, let go birdie and clapped his hands with excitement. He found something he said. Birdie pulled the covers over her head. She wasn't interested in show and tell right now they could do that later. A rush of cold air grasp at birdies skin as her father pulled away the top sheet. But till the stood behind shelter, Birdie asked her if things would be all right, but till the sugar head gently. Birdie wasn't sure what she meant. Birdie climbed out of the big bed. Her feet clenched as they touch the floor. Everything, in the house was so cold. She turned to watch your mom. Wake up all the other kids. She didn't get why her data Wilkin her up. I. He should have gone an order then she could have slept more.

Birdie Lamont Arnold Ginger Matilda Robert Lamont Kiefer Mathilde Oregon United States Brian President Herbert Hoovers Mr Keefer Engineer Inland Lakes Wisconsin Michigan President Service Scrub Oak Northern Pines West Bay Lake
Exploring the galaxy with radio astronomy

Talk Python To Me

08:12 min | 6 months ago

Exploring the galaxy with radio astronomy

"What do you guys do day to day? Are you both doing Strana me basically day-to-day or code for astronomy me. Pretty much I mean. Most of my work is helping. Mohawk or storm is do things faster so every time for a group who were doing some multiple web it was taking full t two days to do something they then pasta over to us. We go down to eighteen hours. That's awesome that means you can do so much more science right. But as a classic divide and conquer problem at paralyzed line matt talks embarrassingly parallel and we Scott Shaw. We don't really do gathering till the very end Bassett. I see so. It's almost like you can almost do individual computation on a per pixel basis maybe the equivalent of a per pixel basis. We tench Wilkin Frequency Channel. Molden GAY but yes so. We would just purchase one particular or one of frequencies on one machine depend on another number on another world. Do quite a bit of machine learning. What Tech Team are affi- application wage doing corrections actually now moving? Some of our struggle me work into oceanwave investigations and transit or whether we can correct the swell so there's no way there's going to be a good idea right. Okay now. That would be a really unexpected consequence or outcome or capability from studying. Gravitational waves is better surf. Predictions obligation state has different quicken small. Yeah I guess so. Yeah the whole gravitational wave detection stuff is some pretty cutting edge science and it's really interesting and it's cool that you're using machine learning to try to understand that we have a smoke group working on it. We've got ten inches in the pump detectors. This is a very active area of research. There's a lot of groups around the world working on. Yeah I think it's kind of amazing. There's a Lotta stuff with gravity oriented things in astronomy right now. We have the gravitational wave detection for the Clintons Black Holes. We have the first picture of black holes in the last year and a half or so whenever that was going on around their medical field teaching. Sure I guess. If you're already university eventually you might end up. Interacting with a student or two very cool. All right Rodriguez. What about you got kind of similar? I on personal rights became evolving stormy. So I help a summer through the software in different languages for different purposes. Sunil only for me but also for Analysts form we also am theoretical group so people who simulations formation such so all over the place on we only me about all the people in the group we specialize comes kind of in this area of killing. Romans? Lloyd's mice also. On how much do you end up helping them with? Standard Software Engineering. Things like Hey. I need to teach you source control. This is get hub. Let spend an hour talking about that or are they pretty much. Good to go. The generation older durations. Aw It'd be harder to kind of move to sign a newer people like Jonker people come with all those concepts. Serie Computing Rights. They never give ray there so do help to push that. Far East most multi on their Meghan this offer the same side of thanks Entitled Opportune Opponent. How you organize it. Codes optimize things for the particular architecture on someone Okay cool and you're also working on this S. K. A. Construction the square kilometer array. Just this whole topic. I guess we'll talk more audits later. By one of the main institutions that are working on the square kilometer array yet. So it's interesting. I don't know if it's works for light. But it does for radio that if you put multiple detectors and sort of densely but not actually connected at one giant and tanner something you can put that together like a bigger detector right bigger lens in the radio world. So that's the idea right. Just that's exactly Gaskell interferometry you basically if you got three on tennis. Abc Do you do. Is You take measurements in the from from BSE. And then you correlate every repair so to correlate the from be from being from Do that correlates are. Which is the one voice doing all this mixing signals and out goes one correlated thing though which is as if you have one big content. So that's what happens in Vegas for me. I think I'm not sure by up to college. You can also from A to B. But I'm not sure how the kind of work in the science cool so this. Esca project is the square kilometer array which is International Project. That you all are working. On involving thirteen countries that are full members of the project in the Or others who are just participating right. Yeah that's right is the collecting. Because you know we're we're starting to run out of things off the screen. Where do we generally collecting area system is now missing in spite of the fun telescope which means belting countries so the life frequency components coming up to Western Australia and the Frequencies Gang South Africa? So they'll be speaking meat dishes in South Africa. I'm one hundred. One hundred and seventy two and ten is Western Australia so called Com fifty million euros just for the the first one. I don't know a hundred and thirty one thousand antennas bringing all this data. That is a huge amount of antennas. And it's your Joe decombis second five hundred fifty gigabytes a second. I don't really have a great way to understand that number. Honestly like you gotTa think of large cloud services like youtube or Netflix. Or something like that right and we say no orange them. Visualize it if you take your you know your how drives your five hundred heart ripe under throw it and you throw one of those second right. Yeah that's a lot of data also takes a lot of power right. Yeah that's one of the the the key things because we we would like Green as possible but we go cap on the moment to make a wall system on the planet. So that's still a challenge. We have to address. Yeah you almost need your own power plant. Tell me how much somebody call the ready down. Okay is it the blades that generate? Rfi Or is it the generators that generate. Yeah yeah

South Africa Wilkin Frequency Channel Scott Shaw Bassett Matt Sunil Rodriguez Australia Meghan Lloyd International Project Tennis Western Australia Vegas RAY Joe Decombis ABC Youtube
Senate Fails To Move Forward With Coronavirus Stimulus Bill

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

Senate Fails To Move Forward With Coronavirus Stimulus Bill

"Stimulus bill has failed a second time to pass a procedural vote Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says all Americans need to be included we're very close to reaching a deal very close and our goal is to reach a deal today but Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the deal is almost done eleventh hour demanded democratic beside or more important than Americans paychecks and the personal safety of doctors and nurses now the Democrats say a deal very close Bloomberg's Emily Wilkins says despite some very heated debate things are moving very quickly right now things are very much still up in the air to go she Asians are on growth so there is still hope that things can get

Chuck Schumer Mitch Mcconnell Bloomberg Emily Wilkins
Australian TV editor suspects Hanks' wife gave him virus

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Australian TV editor suspects Hanks' wife gave him virus

"An Australian TV entertainment editor who tested positive for coronavirus believes he came down with it after meeting Tom Hanks wife in Sydney Richard Wilkins says he was tested because he met Rita Wilson at the Sydney Opera House on March seventh and again at the Sydney studios on March the ninth Wilson and Hanks have been in isolation in Australian hospitals since they were both diagnosed on March twelfth

Editor Coronavirus Richard Wilkins Rita Wilson Sydney Opera House Tom Hanks Sydney
Washington, D.C.: Bill would help small businesses losing revenue due to Purple Line construction

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 7 months ago

Washington, D.C.: Bill would help small businesses losing revenue due to Purple Line construction

"A line construction continues from new Carrollton to Bethesda and while the end of product may be beneficial to small businesses along the light rail systems path some owners say they're really taken a hit right now the purple I will transform our neighborhoods but Maryland delegate you know Wilkins says right now many small businesses are seeing a severe decrease in their revenue as a result of construction she's asking her colleagues in an apples to approve a five million dollar grant program running between now and twenty twenty four to give businesses a one time jolt of revenue in construction keeps customers away when the electricity gets cut off on and off we've had to replace to fans for coolers ana Rivera owns all Gabby long restaurant in Silver Spring the expenses are still there Iran is going up a program like this would be unprecedented but some lawmakers say the sheer size of the purple line project makes this a different

Carrollton Bethesda Wilkins Ana Rivera Iran Maryland Gabby
"wilkins" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

14:08 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"That's the league's highest local increase. Their basketball is not the same as baseball baseball with their local. Tv revenue is pretty impressive but You know those are. That's a pretty wide range of Ratings there from really good to really bad I'M GONNA Guess Golden State will be back in In the plus percentage next year yes mclovin. You know I talked to a guy in my basketball run on Saturday and I said are you watching a Lotta Mba. These days. I wake up in the morning. I watch ten minutes highlights on Youtube. You know it's gotta be that's has to be a big part of the way we consume it but I think we do that with everything the the late night TV show. When's the last time you stayed up to watch Jimmy Fallon or Colbert? I mean I watched the clips. You know Carpool Karaoke. Or Jimmy. Fallon does something funny. Colbert has some kind of stinging. Commentary Jimmy Kimmel. Same thing. I'm not staying up to watch it but I'm aware of the clips that come from those shows wise. Nfl different. I think there are reasons but NFL ratings are up. Well there's gambling and there's fantasy is it on the day during the day. I think. That's a huge plant. I mean you got Thursday night and you got Monday night but all those games during the day. That's not interfering with anything. Yes I think. The shortened season to you only have a certain a small window to Kansas these games whereas the NBA basically have nine months. Start to finish. There's no real urgency to watch anything. What's poll question? We're GONNA go with mclovin? Have of this question if you could only watch one team except for your home team. We're taking them out in the NBA. For the second half of the season. Who would be okay? I give you the box. The Lakers the Pelicans then. I'm not sure who else goes on there. Do you put the rockets. Because their experiment on there to put the sixers on there because everyone Sitcom I'm the wrong guy to ask because I'm fascinated with all of these things I mean. I will try to sample as many games as possible in the course of an evening but his area like a team where. You're very curious to see. Lebron how he does Milwaukee can for seventy wins. Or you're just GONNA GO ACROSS I. I'm curious about the rockets during the regular season. I'm not curious about the Lakers. And the Clippers unless Paul George is going to have that nagging hamstring injury. I'm curious about my Memphis Grizzlies. And also the Pelicans of the growth of those two teams because they might not be playoff teams this year. But they'll be knocking on the door here in the next two years. I really think that they're that's a fun exciting team. Those teams are fun. Fun To Watch. Dominique Wilkins Hall of Famer. The Atlanta Hawks Vice President of basketball and special advisor to the CEO. Nick joins US on the program. Neak thanks for joining us. When's the last time you dunked? Well let's see You know people ask me all the time. Kinda still document. Of course I can but only problem is only on Friday. The need a week When you got that nickname the human highlight film. You were in high school. I was in eleventh grade. And then the guy named Howard Garfinkel gave me that nickname at five star basketball camp up in home sell Pennsylvania. And what did you think about that nickname? Well you know. It was funny because I got nickname. Athen also game. I scored forty two in the All Star game and my game was kind of unorthodox and so they couldn't tell high scoring so make a long story short. They say you know that's GonNa call him. The human highlight film and I hated the name but as I got older. I like wait a minute. Hold on I can make a little money off. This name Hook you won the slam dunk contest twice right. And then you. You lost your famously. Lost out to Michael Jordan in nineteen eighty five. Does that does that bother? You still bother you know. It doesn't You know I look at it like this. You know the fact they talking about thirty two years later and let's knows the greatest dunk contracts ever. You know we are forever joined at the hip but no matter who won the fans got their money's worth but knew that I think I want. I absolutely do monique. It's always in Atlanta. Who would've won that dunk contest? You're Jordan or I don't want I don't enjoy it now. This is the first time in thirty. Two years he and I even mentioned a dunk contest. Each we've never talked about it. When did you talk to him this weekend? So what did you say? Does he acknowledge that you won. That nick did but you know we were. We were at lunch. We're sitting at the hotel. And and he's been Niki One. You know I said okay. No that's cool. I give me the check that they call it. You don't want to trophy you don't care about that. You wanted to check check man. And then you lost to your teammates. Spud Webb and the following year in Dallas You know it was a real sentimental thing. Doubt spoke was great. He was great he really was. But you know I probably one four but I got credit for all good. What advice would you give? Aaron Judge Gordon. You know it's tough when you lose two contests that probably should have one. And I think he should have won both of those It's hard for him to come back on. I know it is you know may cause he's taking his mind. Okay what else I gotTa do to win. And saw for him and he just his comments. He's kind of only deter him for wanting to do it again. Who Do you think won the dunk contest? I would say he definitely want. Yeah I like how people say well. He didn't really jump over TACO fall. He's still jumped over. Let's say talk. Oh seven five seven five are you kidding me and I stood next to Taco the other night yet and I'm my whole. This kid is long and the fact you went over this guy and grabbed the man and that's almost impossible to imagine dunking over Mark Eaton. I wouldn't have tried. I'm not I mean you know first of all you know. I looked at the accident waiting to happen. And so in fact that attempted it and and and he was successful and complete dunk. It's pretty amazing. I I don't know what they were looking. Every time I have doc rivers on. I always make him tell me. A Larry Bird Story. You Got Larry. Bird story few some. I can't tell like. Can you know Larry Larry was a unbelievable competitor? And I remember I remember. I told my players and in the Boston Garden. I'm a rookie. And I go shake his hand. He takes his hands and put behind his back. No I I like. Oh okay well. Maybe he just getting to the game. I play the game. We take you long and his legs and he hits hits three and all right. Oh Okay and again on the second time now. So this is how I'm pissed off and so I'm coming out with a wing. He's back and no sense the ball to me and I jumped. He jumped and I'll say I got him dumped it on the foul men. I'm pointing their though. I'm talking crap and he's looking at what you sound like you got at heart. He didn't say that was once you got balls right. That's what you're saying but I'm still getting forty I still. I still love that. You were on the court. I think nick when when bird went off in New Orleans against you guys when Cliff Levingston and Antoine Carr got scolded by Mike Fratello. Still one of my favorite videos. Those guys were. It felt like they were rooting for bird again team. You know what I made. Sure those guys older guys got fat. Fine three thousand dollars for that really. I Oh yeah oh I was mad. You know I mean because we both had a great game super game and He was so hot. Do shooting threes with his left. Your employer the trash talk. That went on back then. I like we never heard it. But now we hear about it Who is the best trash talker? Berta talk transplant. You know he wasn't one of them talked all the time he tried to get into your head but the guy who talk the most trash was chuck person who the rifleman never showed up. What would he say but shut up? Let me just be talking. Random stuff you know one game. We played each other and I had like I think had forty two I think in in the third and he says to me. You Ain't going no more tonight. I'm locking down. You Ain't all that I like son. I got four. I'm trying to kick your ass. I still think you're one of the best in game dunkers of all time. John camp is up there too Who else would you put in that category? Actually doing it in competition. You know it starts with the granddaddy of on. That's DR J. Now how man he was he was something and I think guys that nobody ever talks about talks about David Thompson. Yeah we just didn't get his. He missed the TV era. You know he did. He did he did and he might have had the best vertical I ever saw when I was in high school. When you've been North Carolina state I used to go to the practice up at NC STATE. And he's just seem comfortable with his left and jump up and punch it through the basket his writing. I never forget that he's incredible leaper I've ever seen. Yeah of course you got Michael Jordan. You Got Vince Carter. I mean the greatest endgame doctors that I've seen if I said you could create your ultimate slam dunk contest. You and three others. Who Do you want of course Michael? The doctor that's pretty good content. Yes it would. Now you were a great tude standstill. Jumper How good were you at Dr? J. Take off from the foul line. You know Michael was one of those guys now and granted you guys all jump off to two legs but that seemed to be where you were. Mo- most explosive. I was always a you. You're always more explosive going off the too because you have more control even if you get hit in the air you're still able to finish the plate a Lotta time you call for one. I mean you're still explosive but if you get hit. Us Little Roy throws you off but I started out as a one for jumper in on my may I could go from the free throw and all that stuff but I started jumping off to Kinda and happened by accident in a game. It was against Milwaukee Against Bob Lanier longer baseline and start using you know. Go off of two feet more you know as my career went on. What's the best poster you ever created with one of your dunks? Oh man that's a good one Probably one against Robert Payers you know At the pitch from spurt and my thing was going to the rack haw and that was trying to throw them apart is that could on big guy so I think that Bob Lanier along the baseline double pump turn backwards and come back around. He's going down. I'm still going up and you know so you know it's quite a few. It's hard to say one was better than the other But it was some great moments. What advice you give Zion Williamson? You know what it is a free Catholic and he really has mandated guy his science to do some stuff he does is pretty amazing The thing I would tell him his desk continue to grow as a as a as an individual as far as developing your game inside and how to make his game more well rounded. But you know you guys got about twenty years old. You got all the time in the world to develop but I wonder what kind of player you would be today. Would you have to develop a three point shot nick? I had a good. That's the thing that people don't realize When you asked me about my game with the first thing they looked at donkey yeah My average two games. I had forty plus game only have one or two dunks and whole game I've always shoot the ball from the perimeter. Me No not shot to three. I made more five hundred. Three's in my career But the three point shot wasn't important. Mail used it if I needed it. But Yeah I I. I was admitting rain nightmare for guy they I mean they couldn't garden mid-range. You know but I I could always shoot a three. He asked me. What would I do in this era? Yeah I don't know but it would be over thirty five but I wonder though some of these like how many threes would bird shot per game because back then like your first half of his career. You know these guys are shooting. Maybe two or three at the most because it wasn't considered good basketball. Well you know what if you took three? It was fine if you took two threes. It was fine. But if you miss your third or fourth. Three coach was somebody else in the game. You know because we consider you know bad shot and if you're GONNA continue take bad shots you know..

basketball Nick Michael Jordan Pelicans Jimmy Fallon Nfl Milwaukee Jimmy Kimmel Youtube Lakers NBA Colbert Larry Larry Jimmy Larry Bird Lotta Mba baseball Memphis Grizzlies Boston Garden Clippers
"wilkins" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:44 min | 7 months ago

"wilkins" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"And we'll certainly learn if the league carries that momentum in the second half of the season the problems with the TV ratings have been well documented. Some numbers came out the Golden State Warriors. Local ratings are down sixty six percent. Clippers are the big winners here with the addition of Paul George and Kawhi Leonard. There are plenty of storylines though the bucks. Have a chance to get to seventy wins. Lakers and clippers seemed to be on a collision course. Zion is healthy intriguing storylines to watch a lot of great young players. Of course. There's a chance that everyone is waiting until the playoff to really focus on basketball and even though the NFL season is over. Tom Brady becomes a free agent. Football will probably take the headlines in the news cycle lot positives though about the NBA. And I think the all star weekend a perfect display of all the creative and talented players. We'll see if that excitement continues for the remainder of the season. Did you see those numbers mclovin with local ratings? Not good now. Does that mean the Golden State's fans are fair weather? Fans of the you know they're not watching on. Tv they're down sixty six percent on NBC Sports Bay area. Yeah Paulie I think that's unfair. I think Golden State fans are taking the year off like the team. Is Nick in the year off not unintentionally. They lost one of their best players. The other two good player very good players are hurt. It's like we'll take the year off and do other things because this season is irrelevant. If you look at some of the other team the nuggets are down seventy two percent on altitude and they have some carriage issues there. So some cable issues No teams averaging a four point rating in their local market. Just seven of the team. Spurs buck seventy. Sixers Thunder Lakers Blazers..

Clippers Golden State Warriors Lakers Tom Brady nuggets Spurs NBC Kawhi Leonard NFL basketball NBA Paul George Sixers Nick Football Blazers
How the NBA All-Star Game honored Kobe Bryant

The Movement with Dr. F Keith Slaughter

01:28 min | 7 months ago

How the NBA All-Star Game honored Kobe Bryant

"Did anyone watch the NBA all star game yesterday now I must admit I have not washed in NBA all star game for probably ten years maybe fifteen but I watched much of the NBA all star game last night I saw some of the slam dunk competition I remember when the all star game and the slam dunk competition it was almost like as big as the Superbowl I mean that was the thing to do if you went back to school on Monday and you had not watched the slam dunk competition you were in trouble you could have a conversation with anybody but then the slam dunk competition stop being all that could be because a lot of the superstar players that we really wanted to see in the slam dunk competition they decided not to participate and while you still have great talent you did have name credibility with the slam dunk competition because some of the more concerned about injury and all those were concerned about ego they do not want to get beat by somebody that no one really knows in the slam dunk competition I remember when Michael Jordan Dominique Wilkins but well when cast like that ran

NBA Michael Jordan Dominique Wilki
New Hampshire hopes to clarify unsettled Democratic contest

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

New Hampshire hopes to clarify unsettled Democratic contest

"At this polling site in Manchester people lined up before the doors opened at six AM says poll worker Darlene Wilkins everyone filing and they're all excited because were first in the nation primary New Hampshire is a political power house no Democrat in modern history has ever become the party's presidential nominee without finishing first or second in the state it's a great experience were so lucky Manchester New Hampshire is on the masses the chaotic Iowa caucuses it now falls to New Hampshire to begin narrowing the democratic field would still features almost a dozen candidates I'm Julie Walker

Manchester New Hampshire Iowa Julie Walker Manchester Darlene Wilkins
6 dead, 13 injured in Las Vegas apartment fire

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 9 months ago

6 dead, 13 injured in Las Vegas apartment fire

"Taken to a hospital where she was pronounced dead her passengers both in their early twenties makayla Powell and che shook Wilma died at the scene all three women were from Somerset New Jersey the crash is under investigation six people were killed thirteen injured this morning in a three story apartment complex fire in downtown Las Vegas Dominique Wilkins witness the fire describe how people try to escape before then they just are jumping unless they start doing that in a panic I just started trying to help them guide them down you know what I mean like their job listings second floor

CHE Wilma Makayla Powell Somerset New Jersey Las Vegas Dominique Wilkins
6 dead, 13 injured in Las Vegas apartment fire

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 9 months ago

6 dead, 13 injured in Las Vegas apartment fire

"Six people were killed thirteen injured this morning in a three story apartment complex fire in downtown Las Vegas Dominique Wilkins witness the fire describes how people try to skate for them they just are jumping on once they start doing that in a panic I just started trying to help them guide them down you know I mean like their job of his second floor third floor lady I think she was pregnant she had a pretty bad her and her husband took her to

Las Vegas Dominique Wilkins
A Blanket Full of Bacon

Knowing Faith

15:12 min | 10 months ago

A Blanket Full of Bacon

"This is Shirley. I'm joined by my co host. Jim Wilkin JT English. I wish we should just give you everything off the it was just a repository Eh. One day we will put that on. Today's episode we are an ax to look at a blanket. Full of Bacon in acts chapter. Ten hope you enjoyed the discussion hey. Jt why did did you immediately come in here and make fun of my Mug. There's this problem like we have these huge coffee mugs in here right now and I can't fit my coffee Mug in my ears. Looks like it in your mind ends Jenas but it's big like that's like a gallon or so over there we had a microphone in there. The microphone with your your Coffee Mug. It's a to hold it with both hands. Yes driving a small bucket. uh-huh drive and your yeah. This is interesting Well we are back. And today we're talking about acts chapter ten and a blanket full of Bacon And so just figuring out what's happening in acts chapter ten and well you know what. Let me tell you something. You're you're never going to indict me for not having an interesting episode title. Just I'm like I'm free from that. Ah Chan what would you call this episode pigs in a blanket. That happened off air. We were very proud of that. We brought it back on here. You know we we're GONNA leave people without pigs in a blanket so then I had a weird moment after that hit me when we actually my daughter I want to give her credit. She's the one who was like Mama teaching pigs in a blanket. And then I took everything in me to resist googling to see if there was actual a tie between the tidal title pigs in a blanket and this chapter really like I thought maybe the International House of pancakes red x ten and then named it back. Wow Oh oh wait. Wait wait so so you thought that it was possible that the idea because of the head coach for a viable. Wow you're so. Yeah Bible rival literary you're like the beautiful mind person maybe where you're just like though subject to further discussion. Well today. We're talking about about pigs in a blanket or a blanket full of Bacon. We're an act SHEPPERTON. Let's just do a quick recap so far jen. How did we tax ten? I mean wh where have we been at before we got here. Well Kyle. It's been a long haul. No actually it's been really good we've gone through So the first half of is focusing mainly on the the emergence of the Ministry of Peter Within the narrative and So the first half of the book wraps up at the around the end of chapter twelve. And so. When you're in chapter ten you would know? Then we're really getting disordered. The the main point of what's happening in Peter's Ministry and interestingly right before you get to chapter ten ten you see the conversion of Saul so the Texas has spent a lot of time talking about Sol And we actually did on an earlier podcast and so you can kind of get get the sense that oh well I guess. Now we're gonNA talk about Saul Slash Paul and Saul Slash. Paul is commonly thought of as The one who takes the Gospel to the gentlemen tiles and said it's a little bit of a surprising. Turn when we flash back to Peter and find that actually. This is a story about Peter Taking the Gospel to the Gentile Anti. And he's GonNa he definitely gets kicked their right. It's not like he's not looking for the opportunity right. He wasn't. He wasn't out vision-casting for the Gospel. Going forward right Paul right with the Lord Kinda seized him into it right. Hold them into it. And that's the story Enact Shepperton focusing on Peter Cornelius and so I and also what's brought us to this point is like this expansion. This sort of ratcheting out of the Vision for who the Gospel is going to go to. And so I it comes to the Jew and then you start seeing you know like. Oh there's the Ethiopian Eunuch you know it's like each each vignette that's in here of WHO Receives The Gospel. Is this this this picture of the Gospel going as Jesus said in acts one eight from Jerusalem to Judea to Samaria and so this week is the ends of the earth and so and this is a fascinating story right right Oh man it's fantastic. I mean it's just it's really interesting just from like a history of redemption perspective. It's really interesting from a Kosh the spirit moving and Peter Peter and Cornelius perspective. It's interesting from what our visions and dreams perspective. It's interesting from a just like the pictures that are are interesting. They agers so it's just a fascinating story so we're not going to be able to read the whole story of petering to Cornelius. Because it's it's long it would take we're trusting when we cover these chapters. You're maybe reading along with us or you're familiar with the story. So the broad kind of contour here just to give us like a big arc of acts chapter. Tim Is that Pete. There's this guy named Cornelius Milius And Cornelius is a centurion of what was known as the Italian cohort and it says that he was a devout man who feared God with all his household he gave generously to the people and he prayed continually to God and that he is going to have a vision and that vision is going to be the Lord speaking to him And that around the same time Peter seems to be having having a vision and that is a vision that involves pigs in blankets. Hallelujah yes and so oh I think one of the questions that we immediately ask ourselves here is. What's the big deal between gentiles and Jews like? Why is this even talking point of significance at all like y casual reader of the Bible? And you get to this story. Why did Peter have to be kicked so to speak into bringing the good news to Cornelius? He is why wasn't that. Just a factor like hey I mean Jesus has come. This is good news. Why not bring it to everybody? Yeah I mean I think one of the main themes that we're going to see probably throughout this. This episode is the significance of promise that God made to Abraham in Genesis chapter. Twelve verse three Specifically that that That Abraham or Abram Room at the time was this man who was going to be elected for the purpose of his family than blessing the nations events he subsequently in Genesis. Fifteen and. Seventeen this this Promise promise of the good news. Of God's favor and blessing being given to Abraham and going through Abraham there is a sign given to this covenant specifically the sign of circumcision which is now the Jewish people. It's the Israelites and but over. The course of time I think they began to to forget that the purpose of their election of the Gospel the good news being given to them was actually not just for them but elections for the purpose of others of blessing the nations corporately and they begin developing a spiritual superiority based based upon this sign of circumcision. And it could not see how God would bless or or make somebody clean. who was in their mind unclean unless they they had been circumcised so really when you come to the New Testament one of the primary questions that is being asked like their their theological conversation is around this question? Do you have to be Jewish right in order to be a Christian. We're GONNA see this later in acts chapter fifteen at the Jerusalem Council. But that's really what's happening. Luke is doing. He's giving us a theological narrative errative to show us that the primary question that that that that God is trying to show his church is that by intentions. The whole time has been to bless everybody to bus the gentiles. Not just Jews but gentiles through the Jews yeah Because obviously the Messiah comes through Abraham's family right well and one of the reasons that we wouldn't read through this on the on the podcast Is because it repeats itself. So God's right and and and one of the things that we have to ask then is like the R- the repetition is like we get all the details over. I mean the the number of times that Simon the tanner who lives by the sea is mentioned. In these in these retailing's you're like stop and and it's repeated three times. The story is repeated three times. And they're actually a number of threes in the story Or multiples of three. That are are trying to tell us something They're we're going to be three men who accompany that. Go to get Peter. They're going to be six men that come with Peter Back to Cornelius House because they are bearing witness. It's the idea of on on the on the testimony. The money of two or three is the truth is something established. So that's all going on. The story is given to US three times. It itself is bearing witness and what we have to ask is why so much over and over again the same thing and it's because I think we we're looking back on something in and most of us are gentiles. We don't have a Jewish heritage and and we have to recall That this level of repetition and this much care taken around communicating this particular message about clean versus unclean about is is Christianity Eh Something that is placed within Judaism and grows out from it like. Do you have to observe Jewish custom that to the original audience. This is mind mind-blowing at the point that it is being given to them like it is like that cannot possibly be and yet it's in here three times because his. Jt said it it's the fulfillment is a fulfillment fulfillment passage for the promise. To Abraham that through him. All the families of the Earth would be blessed and I think it is easy for us to to to be dismissive of some of the tensions between the Jewish people. And somebody like Cornelius. Like it's not like the Israelite people were had no the reason to have a little bit of certainly hesitancy but if not if not just hesitancy but outright resistance to the idea idea of gentiles being heirs of the promises why because they had a history of being enslaved exiled and oppress by these groups of people right. That's right so like Cornelius when we kind of turn to the question of who is Cornelius with Cornelius. Is He's a leader. He's a soldier of an oppressing army occupying hang army exactly. So it's like the idea of Peter Going to Cornelius. And saying there's good news for you. Cornelius would be to bring the good news of Christ the Lord and this better kingdom to an oppressive enemy. That's exactly right and so it can feel a little bit like if you're reading this you're like well why the hesitation well not only were. There are strict tradit religious traditions that separated from cleanliness perspective Jews from gentiles engine towels from the inner presence of the Lord or the holiest places around the presence of Galway But there were also very big cultural and political realities that that kept division alive among Jews and gentiles so cornelius is a centurion It was What was known as the Italian cohort but he has described arrived as a devout man? Feared God with all his household gave generously to the people and pray continually to God. Now I wanted to pause here And just ask a little bit so coriolis just describe somebody who fears God and yet. He hasn't heard the good news of the Gospel. What's going on here right? Is this like the is this the sometimes. I read this passage. I feel like this is where people would go when they're like well you know there's somebody out there who maybe has never heard about the name of Jesus but it is like but does fear the Lord right so who. What does this mean? Why is this significant? I think this is a classic example of why we can't take the book of access prescriptive given everything that it's saying because what we're seeing as you're right at the hinge point right you're right at that place in between The way that we see faith demonstrated rated and credited his righteousness in the Old Testament and the way that we're going to see Belief in credit credited as faith and salvation in the New Testament I meant and Cornelius is right at the center of it. He's going to help us. Answer the question of how to salvation come by grace through faith alone has always been the answer but we would speak of like those is who are listed in Hebrews eleven as having looked forward to the promise of salvation and then New Testament believers is having looked back. He's right at Ground Zero and and so I think that what we see here. Well so just strictly in terms of what the text wants to communicate. He is a Jewish pro slight right so he is he. He is probably on the verge of conversion to Judaism so he's he's probably attending synagogue but he's not circumcised He someone who in the past would have been like if you think. Think about Rahab. She converts to Judaism or or or ruth is brought into the community. He's not yet in the community but it's interesting that he is already demonstrating. He has works to accompany his faith. So so I think what we're seeing here is a simple obedience to a forward-looking looking faith that is only forward looking in so far as no one has come to preach the Gospel to him yet. There there is a completeness to Gospel but he hasn't heard it yes. I actually don't think this is my hot. Take that when Peter Shares the Gospel with him. I'm not sure that that's the moment of salvation for him because we already see the Lord appearing to him and saying prayers MOMS have ascended as a memorial before God But I do think what we're seeing is. The connection of the idea of what is what has been salvation. An and now what is celebration. Yeah and we do see throughout acts. I don't know that we we've hit another one of these yet. But we do see these moments where there's essentially a group of Characters Jersey have a part of the story and that one of the apostles you gotta bring it to bring the other part of the story right so you see this with typically The receiving of the Holy Spirit or the baptism of the Holy Spirit. where it's like? You have a part of the story people like. Yeah I've been baptized by John. The baptist. Well there's there's more you know that like the the Christ price came that he died that he rose again and that he has sent the spirit right and so there are these kinds of points. I think it's important. You said that about Cornelius that there are so many scenes and acts where we need to fight. Maybe the the temptation to go okay. This is how salvation works As supposed to go okay. This is a very specific. Overlap moment in the history of redemption and this is one kind of cut away scene right of that very unique back once in a history redemption. Kind of moment. Yeah right that's right. Also just find a lot of comfort in the fact. That God was wasn't his providential ential over all of it in other words. This doesn't work if God isn't clearly. Directing writers clearly directing directing the men who were with them like God is moving moving all of these tectonic continental plates and there's there's just movement in redemptive history happening we get. We get this great confidence or assurance in this narrative narrative God ultimately is the one doing. Yes Yep that's good guy gets his people he doesn't have to be more anxious about God's mission than he is and Edberg. Yeah you're right Let's go. I needed to hear that today.

Peter Cornelius Peter Abraham Cornelius Shepperton Peter Peter JT Peter Going Cornelius Milius Paul Bacon Saul Slash Cornelius House Ministry Of Peter Jim Wilkin Jenas Peter Back United States International House Jesus
Toys R Us Reopens 2 Stores Under New Ownership After Painful Bankruptcy

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 10 months ago

Toys R Us Reopens 2 Stores Under New Ownership After Painful Bankruptcy

"Jeffrey the giraffe be back in business for decades of visit to toys R. us was an indispensable part of holiday shopping for kids that is until last year when the company announced it would be closing its doors for good NPR's dari is Rafi on paid a visit to its new flagship store like many people Jennifer Bain has fond memories of running around at toys R. us store when I was younger make sure that that was part of my daughter's life and I was really sad to see I midvein here at the new toys R. us flagship store in Paramus New Jersey it's part of a plan to open ten new stores over the next year a five year old daughter Charlotte is standing inside a plexi glass enclosure trying out the latest nerf blaster this nerf target range is part of what toys R. us is calling experience driven retail the idea is to encourage kids to actually pick up the toys and play with them the company doesn't have hundreds of stores like Walmart or same day delivery like Amazon so it's trying to compete on fun that strategy is the brain child of Richard berry a former toys R. us executive in the current CEO of true kids France which now owns the toys R. us name I'm a thirty four year it's always a supply so hearing that the company was going through the troubles I was extremely distressing the original toys R. us filed for bankruptcy back in twenty seventeen and was ultimately forced to close all of its stores some seven hundred of them that company had been slow to adapt to online shopping and its struggle to manage a sprawling real estate portfolio of hundreds of underperforming stores and all of that was made worse by a disastrous private equity buyout the left the company billions of dollars in debt there is hoping that the smaller more immersive retail concept will help the new company avoid some of those pitfalls this is a very different stole from those of the past it's extremely experience only got a tree house we have a the answer in the still every different spots in the store has a place where you can engage with toys and products Liz done retail analyst a pro forma is skeptical she says many brick and mortar retailers are trying to reinvent the shopping experience delivering something that actually gets people to put down their phones and come into a store can be easier said than done just calling it experience is not enough you have to really really well consumers the new store has its fans so for Stacey Wilkins who spoke to me as her seven year old ran around the tree house this new toys R. us is a godsend we needed a twister like this especially my son is autistic so being able to play and build the make things and let them be able to use their creativity is a wonderful thing but if the company wants to avoid the fate of its predecessor it still needs to show can turn all that fun into actual

Jeffrey Thirty Four Year Seven Year Five Year
"wilkins" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"wilkins" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Lenny Wilkins. Number four, Brett farve. Number three emit Smith. Number two, Colorado junior. Number two. One zero will Chamberlain. Still. Chris, you gotta look some of this stuff up. Look up. Just look up some Emmett Smith stats for me, so I can tell you guys how disrespectful you're being Mike top five compiler spent much of the break on looking for Jack white photo with Greg Cody. So this is a bit of a rush list, and it's just all Texas Tech, quarterbacks number five, cliff Kingsbury. Number four gram Herrell. Number three, BJ Simon. Number two, sunny cumby. And this is weird. Number one is Emmett Smith. All right, Stu gods, you ready Cody. You got one or you got all right now, Matt, Greg Cote. He's top five list of sports compilers, number five, Greg, Greg, gore. Number four Bill negro. Number three, Gary Player. Number two, Yar Mary younger. Good, good. He's just playing to them Lila's. They're yours. Spent a lot of time in Europe. Number one, Dave Bing. Thing was Hank Aaron, a compiler. I mean, he seven on my list so it doesn't crack the top number five to God's Phil Niekro. Number four, God Peyton Manning. What do you mean? No. Number three, Nolan Ryan number two drew Brees. And the number one compiler of all time according to the mighty Stu gods is I tried not to write his name down, but my pen Mon allow it and it Smith. Mitch Albom is neck donlevatar Gregor you going to say anything or are you just gonna sit there checking the internet when when I have something to say, I say it what I was thinking of as you said that was that I think black history month is also split into two half months, which is terrible. That's not true. The first half in the second half of February stugatz. No, it's February into March Don't let me yard. step yard good contribution though. When you decided to talk that was good months, your Greg. I'm I'm like a dog with a bone on this. I'm wrong. Okay. This is live at our show.

Emmett Smith Greg Greg Cody Lila Greg Cote Hank Aaron Lenny Wilkins Brett farve Stu gods Chris Gary Player Peyton Manning Dave Bing Texas Tech Mitch Albom Colorado BJ Simon Yar Mary Bill negro cliff Kingsbury
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Out just give me a call let me know when you coming so i was in la i called him quote flight up to two san francisco right after the conference and my tension was to circulate to various at agencies and show my portfolio and so i got there and i was in a in san francisco i went to a couple of agencies and most of the agencies you go in you leave your portfolio you come back later because the portfolio goes off back into the back offices in all the art directives look at your work and then you come back later on you pick up your portfolio you never really meet the art directors face to face you'll you didn't then and then i got to go meet the brother tracy lock and went in i met him it was this was a face to face sat down with him we talked he asked me what i wanted to do what i was you know what my intentions were and all and i told him while trying to get in to the design world advertising of some aspect of design and he said okay he got on the phone and he called about five agencies and that clicked at my head i said all these people know each other just and so fraternity up here you know it just dawned on me i said everybody knows each other so he's calling around to the various agencies asking them i'm sitting right there he says a a build you have uh any junior designer positions open and all the answers came back no they didn't have anything at the time but one thing he told me was uh he said well i'll tell you what what you should do is start in la because everything is there you got your tv film krant music everything i said okay and i flew back to la then flew back to east coast back to dc and three months later i have packed up all my clothes packed of all my belongings rather.

san francisco la tracy three months
"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"wilkins" Discussed on Revision Path

"Your listening to the revision path podcast a weekly showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers and web developer through indepth interviews you'll learn about their work their goals and what inspires the mets creative individuals here's your host maariv cherry welcome to the revision path podcast my name is murray's terry and before we get to this week's interview i want to talk about our sponsors glitch google design and mail chang good the from the community where you'll build the web of your dreams you can make anything from on landscape in vr to ask yard it's even put your portfolio on glitch and if you get stuck on something just raise your hand and get help from the glitch community get started on making something awesome today a glitch dot com whether it's the finding a branding style and vr we're creating a voice user interface that actually feels human google design is committed to sharing the best design thicky from google antion sign it today for great stories events in the latest updates a material design at design dot cubal forward slash newsletter again that's designed article google forward slash newsletter could also follow google design on facebook twitter and kuka close it's a new year which means the great time to work on your email marketing efforts let male chimps pre build marketing automation help you out automation's work like a second brain for your business so they can do all the heavy lifting for your email marketing effort so you can focus on what's really important your business sign up a male chimp dot com today for free accounts maleter sent better email.

mets murray google twitter web developer facebook
"wilkins" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"wilkins" Discussed on WWL

"In coverage whether it's part retire some of those guys have that ability to do so but you know you talk about johnson even talk about a our run a backup in omiss yes uh because he came in late in the what won his fall due because of some kind of flow on the air behind starting late but here you'll he's projected to be amid early like i'm gonna say second third round by now he's probably later probably you'll probably be a fourth round guy and he's gonna kill me because i can't they know the older wilkins yet jordan wilkins um i mean jordan jordan is going to have to learn how to run run behind his pay it he's a big guy so he's going to have to get a shoulder pass now you can't take shots but the one thing that i saw from him this year was billy run away from people and then to be able to catch the ball i mean because early in his career he he didn't have to catch i mean he wasn't a receiver so i think that is something that's definitely gonna help him as well but i wouldn't be surprised to see at least you know just the sec will you talking about first three rounds first four rounds for the sec the half four or five of those tailbacks take it you know dues one guard at eddie injury leg injury shoulderblade injury that was just i mean i saw one of his best performance as you and i both did not the issue but in in sixteen up at oxford was came in pet way but the guy because of injuries in summit question is character as whole is it what what what really went on in offense at the end of the year and so forth he had a few starts in an accord didn't play some of saying that you know tunnel rut right is old ship but he somebody reduce it when you think about what he did and where he's at it's gotta be is is something amiss and because a guy like dead who was sacked only only all the back in auburn hills your rush for for video the factory gains was was bo jackson is in these are considered a priority free agent some in mixing up there so he's gonna be a guided some i'll i'll county like the chancellery army and so anytime i mean because.

johnson wilkins jordan jordan sec oxford auburn hills bo jackson chancellery army billy
"wilkins" Discussed on The Fifth Column

The Fifth Column

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"wilkins" Discussed on The Fifth Column

"Chinese person but say that no immigrant an black america wouldn't have done that in nineteen twenty or 1950 would have been unheard of to say we're going to withdraw our cells from learning the math because the math is white that's very post 1966 and so it's separatist in that anybody would be open to the idea that part of being a black american person is to not cherish quantitative reasoning when it's ever more central to ever more disciplines nobody would even think of that until now roy wilkins turning in his grave and then it's antiintellectual in that frankly if you're not doing the numbers than in many cases you're not doing what today is considered the most precise work so if the idea is that the proper thing for a black person to do is to write articulately about their impressions that's the black fun well what you get then is frankly tana halsey coats being celebrated as an intellectual and frankly i think that there are some bridal jesus argue the gene it's amazing he's it's like motzer and what where that evacuation comes from frankly is partly the idea that for black people the bar is set much lower for what is considered the highest achievement than for others that comes from this sense of separatism that separate sense comes from the idea that we suffer so much that the history has been so unpleasant and has such a a a truly definitive impact on our prison that we can't be expected to do what other people can do so all of.

roy wilkins