33 Burst results for "Wilkerson"

Interview With Penny Powers

Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

04:30 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Penny Powers

"Thank you very much penny for joining me and q. Barb in the rest of the special interest group for the invitation so we will have some general questions to begin with. How long have you been a therapist. I have practiced for forty five years. Wow that's quite a quite a career. At what point in your career did you become interested in assistive technology or in specialized wheelchair provisions after. I practiced a of years I received an invitation upon returning from china and adopting my second daughter Here at vanderbilt. I was offered the invitation to help out if you will in the wheelchair clinic and It afforded me the opportunity to move from a back in the day. They called it sub acute practice. So i was doing inpatient practice primarily with geriatrics medically complex patients in our sub acute unit. Which they've sort of gone away and gave me the opportunity to move to an outpatient setting so a single mom with two young children was attractive. But i have to tell you gave me great pause. I asked myself repeatedly. Could i learn a new area of practice and for me it. It really was a new area of practice and certainly I had to Get out my motivation. And i said yes for which there has been absolutely no looking back and although it's trite. I'm so glad. I jumped off that cliff great. So what is your current practice setting. Can you describe where you work. And what the setting is like sure I work at the within the vanderbilt bill wilkerson center which is Interesting are Hub for speech language and hearing sciences. And i work in the neuro rehab hub for the vanderbilt university medical center which is called the pie beta fai rehabilitation institute. And if it sounds like a sorority. It is because the pie fis gave the seed money to start this clinic and they are tremendous supporters of this clinic. The clinic did not start out just a little historical perspective. The clinic did not start out here. The clinic here at vanderbilt was part of rehabilitation services and started again. Hold onto your hat. In nineteen eighty five and so it really was on the forefront and so started in one thousand nine hundred eighty five but in two thousand five the department of rehab services which had Come under the umbrella of orthopedics divorced us and as part of the divorce agreement i brought the adult seating and mobility clinic And i say Pi beta phi. Me and jenny. Robertson took the pediatric component or division of the clinic to one hundred hoax. And of note. I think that really was a fait accompli. In that is everybody knows. A children's hospital wants everything pediatrics. So i think that part was a fait accompli. But i moved here to define two thousand five. We've been going pretty strong since then

Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Cent Barb Fai Rehabilitation Institute Vanderbilt University Medical China Department Of Rehab Services Umbrella Of Orthopedics Robertson Jenny
Iran’s president blames Israel for killing nuclear scientist and vows to respond at the ‘right time’

AM Joy

05:48 min | 8 months ago

Iran’s president blames Israel for killing nuclear scientist and vows to respond at the ‘right time’

"Joe biden could be facing a crisis in iran when he takes office the runs top. Nuclear scientists was killed. Daytime ambush friday. The scientists was considered the architect of iran's secret nuclear program that was halted in two thousand three while. Nbc news has not independently confirmed details surrounding his death. Iran's foreign minister has implicated israel in the attack but israel has not commented on the allegations. Join me now now. You're a hawk former state. Department senior adviser and host of sirius. Xm that global experience treat a policy of the quincy institute for responsibility in statecraft and author of losing it. Enemy and colonel lawrence wilkerson former chief of staff for secretary of state colin powell. So i'd like to start with you. Treat it what exactly is happening right now. What are we hearing. Well the latest is happening. Is that the iranian president. I've come out with a statement. Essentially saying that iran is not going to walk into what he called a trap by israelis to escalate and and create a war because that is in his assessment with the israelis wants But it is not clear if that is the view of other elements inside the country. Some of this debate is starting to be taking place in public in which the argument that is made by the other side is that these assassinations continued to take place precisely because in their view the iranians have not responded harshly enough to previous attacks and the only way of preventing future. Attacks is to respond harshly. This one if that happens however than there is a very significant risk for a major esscalation potentially war which according to ruhani is what the Always looking for curl wilkerson. How unusual would it be for the notes to have not been informed of this. Do you believe that the white house knew that this was going to happen. It would be extremely unusual. Maria theresa I have to believe that was informed Trump's whole effort now seems to be to be foul the recent election. So i don't think he's very attentive to but my peyot at sectors state is and i'll remind your viewers of what's up their defense robert gates Now my chancellor. William and mary that the saudis are willing to fight the iranians for the last dead american. And i would add bb netanyahu too much in yahoo in that. I think that's what we're looking at here. They want as a major outcome. A war as a middle ground outcomes they want a bombing campaign by the us against toronto nuclear facilities and as a minimum amount They want to foreclose any possibility of the new president. Joe biden reentering the joint comprehensive plan of action the nuclear agreement with iran and. It looks like they're well on that road to success to follow up on that. Because i think the what the colonel stating is quite implicates the perhaps the role of the white house in this we know that any who has been a very strong ally of donald trump donald trump has been very clear that he is an ally of israel but also want also was the one that was responsible for pulling us out of the nuclear deal with iran. And the idea that we're hearing possibly is that donald trump perhaps did this. No had israelis did this informing donald trump. But also is this netanyahu's attempt to do something under this current administration that he knows me not able to do with a biden administration will the binding administration has certainly picked up a where. The obama administration left off in terms of wanting to return to diplomacy and use the tools of diplomacy to box in bad actors. If we rewind we know. The iran nuclear deal was less about iran's as a terrorist nation and more about eliminating the ability for iran to get a nuclear weapon. That yahoo was opposed of the saudis. Were closed. But this was a coordinated effort between european countries including russia and the united states with the united states. Pulling out that really opened the door. Before is israel and the saudis to look to other avenues to influence the united states. You also had with trump national security adviser john bolton who was in iran war hawk and so some of that still remains netanyahu just last week was meeting and talking with mohammed bin salman the crown prince of saudi arabia. So they're looking at a ticking time clock of being able to behave in ways in which the international at least the united states will not be speaking up. An opposing their efforts so That's the key thing is how much can they. Box in. A biden's options By engaging the united states under a trump administration or while trump is still commander in chiefs treatise of the. Us has done officially commented on what occurred. What is your take when this idea that. Perhaps the trying to do is box in the president elect wyden. I think that's absolutely correct than i think it's also correct would counter wilkerson said that There was probably some sort of implicit green light from the trump administration for netanyahu. Go forward with this. However it's also important to recognize that. Netanyahu must also have calculated that biden. Probably does not have the political will to inflict impose a cost netanyahu if he does these things to box in biden and i think it is up to the biden administration to prove netanyahu wrong. Because i doubt that netanyahu would have gone down this path unless he felt that it was pretty much cost fee from him not just from trump but also from biden

Iran Quincy Institute For Responsib Lawrence Wilkerson Israel Joe Biden Ruhani Curl Wilkerson Netanyahu Colin Powell Donald Trump Donald Trump White House Donald Trump United States Biden Administration Maria Theresa NBC Obama Administration Robert Gates Yahoo
Not All Online Schooling is Homeschooling

The Wired Homeschool

06:34 min | 9 months ago

Not All Online Schooling is Homeschooling

"Despite what some parents doing school online is not the same as homeschooling. Hello and welcome to the wired home school. i'm your host. John wilkerson and before you turn this podcast off because you're a home schooler. That uses online curriculum. Let's clarify a few things. Because i have recommended online curriculum to you. If you've listened to this podcast. And i've recommended it in social media. So what exactly am i talking about. Well it's back up a little bit at the beginning of twenty. Twenty education suddenly got transformed because schools across the world. Were shut down. Because of this teeny tiny little single cell organism and i would say home schoolers for the most part were unaffected. Co-ops field trips and social activities. And probably some other enrichment experiences. Were put on hold or cancelled but the way we educated our kids. I don't think really was affected because why we decided to educate our children at home also hadn't changed. Nevertheless bomb bartered by memes online from celebrities and micro influencers about the realities of homeschooling moms holding. Glasses of wine joked about teaching algebra and teachers posted about lecturing to students in their pajamas. The teachers in pajamas and the students in pajamas. We're all home. Schoolers now was heard far and wide but was really true. Is it still true. Let's think about this right now. In the united states there are in person and online classes for public and private school students. Also some parents have opted for one hundred percent virtual classes and have declared themselves as homeschooling. There are some key differences between homeschooling. And what. I call online schooling and it probably isn't obvious to parents who were forced to do school at home. One of the first things you want to think about here is at home schoolers. Choose to educate their children at home for various reasons they could be religious reasons. Maybe the parents want to have a minimalist life style and move into an rv drive around the country here in the united states or in europe and home. Schooling is a better option. Maybe they're not happy with the way their culture is represented in the majority of the public school curricula. There could be a number of different reasons that they chose to home school. Maybe they have an aspiring actor or actress or musician. Choose to homeschool because it's more flexible and it's just the better option for them and going to public school. Here's the other thing about home. Schoolers is we have to pay for our online curriculum and usually we pay our school taxes on top of that apparent that's in public or private school. Maybe not so much a private school but certainly a public school. They don't have to pay an additional fee for that online component. It comes with a package if you will. How about this home schoolers. Don't take attendance. We're pretty much always home schooling and if we want to take a day off if we want to change our schedule because home schoolers aren't usually bound by schedule. There's a cat. There's a few caveats to that. We do what we need to do. We're kind of always homeschooling home schoolers choose their curriculum. And i think this is one of the big things here if i send my child to public school and by the way a have sent one of my children in public school this year. I don't get to choose his curriculum. The school district chooses at the teacher. Chooses that me if i want him to use one particular math curriculum another one. I don't get that choice if i want him. Taught science from one certain world view as opposed to another. I don't get that choice if my child goes to school and this whole schedule thing man. Is that something to get used to monday. Through friday to report the school this block of hours. And that's that's when school is done whereas a home schooler if you wanna wait until ten o'clock or do your schooling in the evening because that's more convenient for you. You can do that if you want to do school on the weekend over the summer over holidays while you're on vacation these are all choices that you get to make

John Wilkerson United States Europe
The Great Migration and the Power of a Single Decision With Isabel Wilkerson

TED Talks Daily

04:14 min | 9 months ago

The Great Migration and the Power of a Single Decision With Isabel Wilkerson

"Imagine with me this scene. It's a scene that played out and nearly all of our families. It's the scene in which a young person. Somewhere in our family tree. Somewhere in our lineage had a heartbreaking decision to make. It was a decision to leave all that they had known. And all of the people they had loved and to set out for place far far away that they had never seen. In hopes that life might be better. Migration. Is usually a young person's endeavor? It's the kind of thing that you do when you're on the cusp of life. And so there is in all of our families this young person somewhere in our background. That person is standing at a dock about to board a ship that will cross the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean. That person is loading up a truck. That will cross the Rio Grande. Or that person is standing at a railroad platform. About to board a train. That will cross rivers and mountains out of Jim Crow South to what they hope will be freedom in the north. And they're with this young person. As they are about to board that ship. That boat. That truck. Bat Train. Are The people who raised them? Their mother, their father, their aunt, their uncle, their grandparents, whoever it might have been who had gotten them to this point. Those older people were not going to be able to make the crossing FAM-. And as they looked into the eyes of the people who had raised them. There was no guarantee. That they would ever see them alive again. Remember that no skype. No email. No cell phones. Not even reliable long distance telephone service. And even if there had been many of the people that they were leaving did not even have telephones. This was going to be a complete break from all that they knew and all of the people that they loved. And the very next time that they might hear anything about the people who had raised them. Might be a telegram. Saying. Your father has passed away. Or your mother is very, very ill. You must return home quickly. To see her alive again. That is the magnitude of the sacrifice. That had to have happened. In nearly all of our families just for us to be here. A single decision that changes the course of families and lineages and countries and history to the current day? One of his migration streams. Stands out in ways that we may not realize. It was called the great migration. It was the outpouring of six million African. Americans from the Jim. Crow South. To the cities of the north and west. From the time of World War One until the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Seventy S. It stands out because this was the first time in American history. That American citizens had to. Flee the land of their birth. Just to be recognized as the citizens that they had always been.

Jim Crow South Pacific Ocean Bat Train Rio Grande Skype
"wilkerson" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"And others were red lined out of it or restrictive covenants kept them from others were rewarded for moving. Out into the suburbs, more people who looked like them, even though they originally might not seeing themselves as similar to people who presumably look like number came from a different originating country. These were the same people and it's the society. It's caste system that separated people into castes based upon what they look like as opposed to what they really had in common. which was their basic humanity of people trying to make a go of it far far from home and that's one of the great tragedies of our country and we're still recovering from that still recovering. Yeah. Why really really recommend everyone read your book we interviewed Chelsea Handler last week and she's like loving it and singing its praises everywhere she goes. So Amy. Schumer. Yeah. Yeah. So I just started and I already love it. You're just a fantastic writer, all the wonderful information research. Aside, you're just a a beautiful storyteller. So it's such a easy read and it's really enjoyable and the message is so important. Thank you so much for having me. I, really enjoyed it. Yeah. I really enjoyed it. Yeah. I'll talk to you in ten years. Three. I. Just your ID. So we know we interviewed the right person that would be. Thank you. bye-bye..

Chelsea Handler Schumer Amy writer
"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:23 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I'm here to interview you and he said I'm sorry I'm GonNa have to ask you to leave she'll be here any minute on now I mean you handle that so generous Oh my God, the whole the last half year story in my head I was saying fuck you partner I'd be happy to report. The story wasn't about that. It was just a quiet little. You know like a routine story wasn't supposed to turn into something like that. I ended up leaving and I just was stunned by what was it that just happened and I'm still trying to figure out what how did that happen? I ended up writing the peace without him because it turned out it wasn't necessary for him to be in it. It would have been nice I would have liked didn't of course, he would have been a beneficiary of that and I ended up sending him. I, sent him the article with the business card. After I finished it Oh God I wish I would have been there when he opened that. So yeah. Yeah. So that was what I did but the reason I mentioned that is because this is an example of how everyone's really harmed by it in ways that we may not realize I mean if you multiply that times, you know thousands of transactions on a given day and hundreds of thousands of businesses. Then you can realize how miscommunication may be occurring. Missed opportunities are happening people are thrown. By the odd interactions of assumptions and stereotypes that are toxic and they are disruptive and they hurt everybody. This is a guy who wanted to be in it. He wanted to be so bad that he he told me to leave. Well, yeah, and I'M GONNA go further. You're already at the apex of everything you could have transcended right so you're you're already representing the New York Times I'm assuming you're dress smartly yes. You're speaking than the manner that they would desire you know everything's been done right and you can't shake that. You can't transcend that. And that's why I I make a distinction between class versus cast and race. So I will say that cast is the bones raises the skin and class is the accents, the diction education, the clothing, the kind of things that we can change about ourselves in order to move, operate, reposition ourselves, and so I often say to that if you can act your way out of it, it's class but if you cannot act your way out of it, it's cast. Oh interesting. So that's the distinction. Will you repeat that if you can act your way out of it, it's class. If you can knock actor way out of it, it's cast. There's nothing more than I can do. So then clearly African Americans are most obviously the ones that can codes which you can do all that, but you couldn't have done anything there. So that would demonstrate casts. Who else are we putting in that category? I would say females, right? Yes. Absolutely and that's why I used the word cast to focus in on the infrastructure that is underneath all of it because pass is not only about race about gender it's about immigrant status. It's about the physical manifestation that is a signal to the subconscious of anyone we might me as to where you belong what is expected of you where you presumably do not belong, and since I've been talking about this book, a lot of times if there is a Colin show I often will hear from someone who's Latin naps who will say that they went someplace and someone assumed that they were..

New York Times partner Colin
"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:58 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Possibly exist would be thinkable in addition to the idea that the food deserts tend to be in the areas where marginalized people are more likely to live. There may not be a supermarket, but there's a payday loan business there. So these are the ways that access to resources are very much front and center I mean you can see that in any any neighborhood you can yeah to could. You break down of examples of assumptions of competence because I think that's a really intriguing area to think about this is sort of related story that brings together benefit of the doubt and competence in assumptions about who belongs wear when I experienced when I was a national correspondent at the New York. Times in. CHICAGO. I had made arrangements to interview all these people for pretty routine story so. I call them on the phone and they they knew to expect me and all day I've been intervened these people and everything has been fine until I got to the last interview at the last interview I showed up at this tablist man it was a retail establishment small was a quiet hour of the day. So there weren't lots of people there actually was no one there except for. The store clerk who told me that the manager was not there yet but that he would be there any minute and this is a personality to be interviewing. So a few minutes later this man walks in and he's in a hurry he's clearly flustered he's running late and the clerk tells me that I should go up to him because this is the man that I'm there to interview. And so when I go up to him, he weighs me away. Oh, I, can't talk with you right now I'm getting ready for a very important a meeting, very important interview and I said, I think I'm that person I have an appointment with you. He said, no, you don't understand I'm Isabel Wilkerson with the New York Times I'm here he said, well, how do I know that how? How do I know that and I said, well, we had an appointment and it's you know it's supposed to be a few minutes ago we had an appointment. I'm here you'll have the notebook he's like this woman attacked poor Isabel. Her Day Calendar. Somehow absconded with their day calendar four Isabel is somewhere crying for help. So. So he says to me well. Do you have a business card and it does so happen that it was the end of the day and I mean people be used business cards now anymore at least I, I don't know but it has been all day that I've been interviewing people. He was the last day and so I said I'm sorry actually of business cards. But I'm here at the notebook ready to interview. There's no one else here I'm ready to interview and he said, well, I'll need to see some ID. And I said I shouldn't have to show you ID. We should be interviewing right now. This is a waste of time I shouldn't have to show you ID as I give him the idea giving my driver's license and he looks at me says, you don't have anything with the New York Times on it. and. I said we are supposed to be in the middle of an interview I..

Isabel Wilkerson New York Times New York CHICAGO
"wilkerson" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Are Willing to buy into it. That's how becomes real if they're incentivized to that gives them the proof of for which they received more than other people than they're very incentivized to believe in that. Yeah. So I think we all would maybe know that you know as Italians entered as Irish entered. They were lower than the Anglo Saxons and then they moved up right there was as you say, there's all these different variations within the to polars of black and white. What would you say is the modern day breakdown of what we have in the country. It changes over time because I looked too. What have the laws stated the laws stated that as you described people from eastern and southern Europe were viewed as outside the formal at original definition of who was white and let's country them as people who are actually Caucasian did not fit the definition of that nineteen twenty, four immigration act because they were not from. North Western. Europe. So. There are predations within the dominant cast, and then over time other people have enough from other parts of the world have made it into the United States of migrated into the United States and they are what I would consider to be the middle cast. If they do not fit either poll, this is all a social construct. It's all a creation, the fact that they came from a nation. State, which is only a hundred and fifty year old concept to begin with like it's all it's all brand new in the we're filing everyone into these rivers based on this new invention. Yeah. So the Middle Castes have changed over time because they would have been iris and the people who were outside of northern Europe would have been considered middle castes when the country have fewer. People from outside of Europe. Were Africa. But as people who've come from other parts of the world, they enter into this bipolar system and have to figure out how are they going to navigate in the Early Twentieth Century? The one thousand nine hundred, Immigration Act. There were people who were from hearts of as in particular who were petitioning for citizenship because they have been in this country for. For decades and then with the nineteen twenty, four immigration act suddenly also being excluded and they were appealing partly because many of them were close to the Caucasus mountains people talked about there was a Japanese man who petitioned the Supreme Court because he said, my skin is lighter than white people..

Europe United States Supreme Court Africa
"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:15 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"All right. Here we go. People are super interested in cavs. How does reaction from cast differ from the warmth of other suns? Is it comparable or is this seem different? It's obviously a different contexts from ten years ago. Yeah. That's for sure. I. Would say covid nineteen changes everything. Obviously I would be out on the road and instead you know I'm. Just. In one spot. Yeah. I'd normally be out meeting with lots of people and you know there's that of course in the largest game of things. This is nothing compared to the people are suffering from it. So I don't want to even compare when it comes to that. It's also two thousand ten they're not mass blm demonstrations the topic of. Racism is not every third interview. So I just imagined the the timing of this is much different. Oh, for sure it feels like it was a different country. It was the quiet time by comparison it was before Trayvon Martin it was before Tamir Rice and Eric Garner before black lives matter before meet to before Ahmad Armory and George Floyd I mean it's before so many things that was two, thousand, ten, Right House two, thousand ten. mind-blowing different decade makes. Yeah, it should go without saying, but maybe it doesn't I would imagine how do I say this? All that was happening. It's not like we've gotten more racist as a society in the last ten years it just we were not seen it as much and we weren't aware of it as much. You know we're about to elect. Barack Obama. So I think there was some optimism and stuff but it was all still there right because this is what your book explores the infrastructure the system was. Built, we're just weren't paying attention to it. Well. So twenty ten was the middle of Barack Obama's first term twenty, ten, he was legend in two, thousand eight. And it was kind of like the lull but the beginnings of the push back that he was experiencing as well. All right with the birther movement was happening around the Yes. Yeah. The Tea Party, all of that was bubbling for. So it was this calm. Storm was brewing yes. That was the era. Yeah. Yeah. I think for all of us may be in my bubble. We were all feeling very optimistic and this is all going in the right direction i. think it was also then terrifying for people who are afraid of that future, but maybe they want vocal or we couldn't hear them at that time. I think they were operating at the margins when you think about the tea party and the birther movement and a lot of people might not have been taking them that seriously because it seemed to be at the margins but. It ended up being far more significant a part of the country then people might have realized at the time. Yeah, and we now know so I just have a couple questions because I have not ever gotten to speak to you and this is a great honour. But the warmth of other suns, which was your book from two thousand ten we keep referencing the epic story of America's Great Migration this is just personal stuff. I'm interested you research that book for fifteen years and I cannot imagine me harnessing drive for fifteen years I wanNA say your ten if I had even made it there be like I'm just never gonNA finish this thing how did you keep your commitments of you know finishing map? You interviewed thousand people yeah. The people I interviewed was the casting call auditioning people for the role of being protagonist in..

Barack Obama Tea Party suns cavs Ahmad Armory George Floyd Storm Trayvon Martin America Eric Garner Tamir Rice
"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Walkin. Welcome. Welcome to armchair expert. I'm Dan Sheppard joined by miniature mouse MUS maximus mouse inist. We're all things you're maximus minimus and middlemiss night. He. Rare that we record the intro immediately after we've recorded the guests, I kinda like it I do too because I'm so passionate about her right now and when we hung up with her you and I just get out on how awesome she was S. she's phenomenal. Her name is Isabel Wilkerson. Isabel is an American journalist and the author of the warmth of other suns the epic story of America's Great Migration and her new book, which is phenomenal cast the origins of our discontent. She was the first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize in journalists. Wow. I didn't know that you didn't know that when we were talking. I'm glad I didn't know that I would have felt Yuna filing and threatened. I. Didn't even mention that she also taught at Princeton. She lectured at northwestern that would also had you on dry. Big Time too much. You wouldn't have been able to keep your cool enough but good news arm cherries she kept her cool because she didn't know any of that shit stupid. Please, enjoy Isabel Wilkerson. Now, we get to do our favorite thing us our extra ad space for some businesses. We hope you will support Monica tell me about a black home business you believe in. So there is a L. A. Based Women's at Leisure Label called REC room co founded by drake, Taylor, Lindsey, and launch last year with sort of the simple concept of making everyday. Wear out of the same fabric as workout wear now I love this because you can be comfy. Am Profession Oh what a dream rarely do those things meet almost never you're always so uncomfortable when you have to wear professional where I am. So this is so great. They have like these really soft t shirts, shorts, turtlenecks, and dresses with the four way stretch anti microbial properties. This is what we want. They recently announced that it would channel one percent of gross sales into a racial justice initiative benefiting organizations working to radically it systems of racial injustice across the country,.

Isabel Wilkerson Pulitzer Prize Dan Sheppard Yuna Isabel Princeton Monica America Leisure Label L. A. Based Women drake Lindsey Taylor
"wilkerson" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Walkin welcome. Welcome to armchair expert. I'm Dan Sheppard joined by miniature mouse Mus maximus. Mousa. Honest. We're all things. You're maximus minimus and middlemiss night. He rare that we record the intro immediately after we've recorded the guests I kinda like it I do too because I'm so passionate about her right now and when we hung up with her you and I, just get out on how awesome she was S. she's phenomenal. Her name is Isabel Wilkerson Isabel is an American journalist and the author of the warmth of other suns the epic story of America's Great Migration and her new book, which is phenomenal cast the origins of our discontent. She was the first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize in journalists. Wow. I. Didn't know that you didn't know that when we were talking. I'm glad I didn't know that I would have felt Yuna filing and threatened I didn't even mention that she also taught at. Princeton she lectured at northwestern that would also had you on dry. Big Time too much. You wouldn't have been able to keep your cool enough but good news arm cherries. She kept her cool because she didn't know any of that shit stupid. Please enjoy Isabel Wilkerson. Now, we get to do our favorite thing us our extra ad space for some businesses. We hope you will support Monica tell me about a black home business you believe in. So there is a L. A. Women's at Leisure Label called REC room co founded by Drake Taylor Lindsey and launch last year with sort of the simple concept of making everyday. Wear out of the same fabric as workout wear now I love this because you can be comfy. Am Profession what a dream rarely do those things meet almost never you're always so uncomfortable when you have to wear professional where I am. So this is so great. They have like these really soft t shirts, shorts, turtlenecks, and dresses with the four way stretch anti microbial properties. This is what we want. They recently announced that it would channel one percent of gross sales into a racial justice initiative benefiting or..

Isabel Wilkerson Isabel Isabel Wilkerson Pulitzer Prize Dan Sheppard Yuna Monica Drake Taylor Lindsey Princeton Leisure Label America L. A. Women
"wilkerson" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Ideas

"I watched John Kerry. And Barack Obama. Yet ready to go, to, war, in Syria. All of a sudden. The American. People lit up the Senate the house in the white. House. With emails with phone calls with constituent visits over two hundred thousand Americans in forty eight hours came to the two houses of Congress. Barack Obama John Kerry, they all backed off. War. With, Syria. That's the power of the American people. Thank you very much look for being here. Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson is a distinguished adjunct professor of government and Public Policy at William, and Mary. University in Williamsburg Virginia. Colonel Wilkerson served more than thirty years in the US army and later served as the chief of staff for former. Secretary, of State Colin Powell. Audio excerpts from this episode are from a keynote speech Colonel Wilkerson gave at the Peace Action Mainspring gathering in twenty nineteen. This episode was produced by Danielle do val the technical producer for ideas with Greg Kelly. Lisa. A USO is our web producer, the senior producer Nicola. The executive producer of ideas is Greg Kelly.

Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson Barack Obama John Kerry Greg Kelly Syria producer web producer executive producer Williamsburg Virginia Colin Powell Senate adjunct professor Congress US army Danielle Lisa Secretary Nicola chief of staff
"wilkerson" Discussed on Oprah’s Book Club

Oprah’s Book Club

03:40 min | 11 months ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Oprah’s Book Club

"Ourselves what we would do, but what they would do given that we now can better understand the position like to also say that the passage that you read. So powerful to me personally, you asked about my writing process that passage was written as I was watching the real of that tape that that that image of the crowd responding to Hitler in that moment, I sat in that museum listening and watching I couldn't remove myself from it. It was just so powerful and so sickening to watch the euphoria. Yes. was. It was renting and sickening gut wrenching to able to see it, and that passage was written. It just poured out of me. It was it what you read there is pretty much what I wrote while sitting there. I, could not stop. Processing in that moment, I was so stricken by. So stunned by what I saw it invalid keeps you with the euphoria of ordinary people. When you know that this is a horror that is happening and you wonder, what could it be? How could people be programmed to begin to believe in what we now not a horror when they know what has happened yeah and and and and they know. That moment that they're doing that and do have a high alling and celebrating him, they know the atrocities they know what happened to the Jewish people they have seen them removed from their neighborhoods and put into the camps and they they know what has happened and they still are there and what I love that you were able to show us is that it was just ordinary people there were mothers. Pharmacists in teachers and people who went about their ordinary lives the same way we do. Yeah and so the the message of that is that if we want to. Make a difference in reaching beneath what is lurking beneath all of our divisions. It means doing the work and it means recognizing that there's no one single person that you point to and say this is this is the person that it's part of the human DNA, the potential to be swayed, and in some ways cast under a spell. That's what it seemed to me. I think it's a reminder that what does evil look like we think that we would know It when we see it and maybe it's not even a thing it. It's something that can surface when the circumstances arise because these were ordinary people who found themselves susceptible to what we now know to be a horror, and of course, we always say that this should never ever ever happen again, it should never ever happen again in any form anywhere within our society within our species ever again in any form. Well, thank you. Isabel, Wilkerson for your brilliance. Thank you. For writing what I believe is the most important book for our time to do exactly what you said to help us understand the origins of our discontent. And more importantly why we are where we are and the ability to look at ourselves and be able to move forward with radical empathy. Thank you so much. If you want to dive deeper into this remarkable book, Isabel and I are hosting a multi part conversation on cast the origins of our discontents and you can find it on apple podcasts and I hope you'll join us. Then if you haven't already head to apple books to get your copy of cast, you can get the audio book to in instant. If you'd rather listen, you can get the audible by everybody..

Isabel Hitler apple Wilkerson
"wilkerson" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"This is the politics and more podcast I'm David Ramnik. Since the killing of George Floyd. We've seen not just a protest movement with something like a historical reckoning. A lot of white Americans seem willing at least more willing to address the reality of systemic racism in the present day. We're learning terms like tone policing white fragility, an anti-racism. Isabel Wilkerson would like to introduce another term to our lexicon and that's the term cast. Wilkerson argues that what we have in the United States is a rigid social hierarchy akin to the caste system in India. She writes we cannot fully understand the current upheavals were most any turning point in American history without accounting for the human pyramid encrypted into us. All Wilkerson new book is called cast the origins of our discontents. It's just out this week and she's previously the winner of a Pulitzer. Prize and many other awards. Now. Your first book was a masterpiece on the great migration and it was both history and personal stories of families who made that essential journey. This book is personal to in many ways put in some ways. It's a book about the search for a metaphor search for a better more accurate description of American racism is why is racism somehow insufficient as description of the way? We've lived in this country for centuries. Really. Well, it's it's interesting that you put it that way because that you mention the warmth assigns because that book as you now is about the people who are fleeing Jim crow repression and in writing that book, you know I was having to discover the many ways that the Jim Crow South repressed this entire group of people, and in fact, all people were repressed under they just weren't aware of it. You know it was a world as you know in which was against the. Law for a black person and a white person to merely play checkers together it was a world in which African Americans could not pass a white motorist on the road. No matter how slowly that person was going every aspect of life was so tightly controlled and scripted and restricted and emerging from the research and to that era I realized that race was an insufficient term to capture the depth and organized repression that people were living under that the only word that was sufficient was cast. And I find it at this moment that of upheaval that we're currently and that we need new language, you know we need a new framework for understanding the divisions in the of and how we got to where we are in some ways still held captive to the hierarchies that were created many centuries ago before any of us were here. Why is cast specifically the right language why? Why is that distributor? Apt to the American experience. CAST is essentially an artificial hierarchy graded ranking human value on a society determines standing and respect and. Benefit of the doubt access to resources through no fault or active anyone. Own. It's just it's what you're born into..

Isabel Wilkerson George Floyd Jim crow David Ramnik United States India
"wilkerson" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Take these categories in push on them in our brains, smash them together, crack them apart so that we destabilize what feels obvious and stable like for instance, like Oh, that's a black person and that's white person and those are just categories that I know don't you know you're black Isabel Wilkerson I'm white and that that's just those are true things about the world. Those categories are like completely invented. And their invented with their invent their products, their invention is. Inseparable from oppression and higher key right the the the there's no way to talk about their invention without understanding that as as as part of what they do and then the question becomes how unmake them. How to break cast apart. Know part of the problem is that those are not those would normally be benign observations about what a person looks like but in the. Hierarchy, artificial hierarchy of great ranking than they carry. They carry meaning beyond just the words themselves and that's that's where it gets to be divisive. It gets to be the you know the policing of boundaries. The the expectations and assumptions and stereotypes that then the unconscious bias sees that then have an impact on who gets hired for what positions that the famous Princeton study that showed that employers were. To hire a white felon than a black person with no. Criminal Record, and so these distinctions, these labels these categories have actual meaning in the lives of people, and in the ways that society operates and one of the great losses in in in any caste system is that you are you are assigning roles to people irrespective of their individual talents whatever might be with inside him when think about those cotton fields and rice plantations and and tobacco feels and sugar plantations were opera singers and jazz musicians and playwrights, and novelists and. Attorneys and all kinds of people who never ever had the chance for twelve generations did not have the opportunity to become who they actually were inside and then followed by you know eighty or ninety more years of restrictions legal restrictions that only opened up in the nineteen sixties. So the idea of African Americans even being able to choose to be what they actually might be as very, very, very new in our country's history and the so you think about the loss. To our country, the loss to society and the loss to the world. Really this is a tremendous loss for humanity to have so many people millions upon millions of people not in a position by the by the restrictions placed on them, often legally in our country for so long, and then now through the the warned grooves of of habit and assumptions to not really be fully mainstreamed into society in the ways that they could be. So the question of me becomes like. Something I've been wrestling with a lot in this moment particularly because I think that the notion you know there's a kind of reactionary appropriation of the famous King's speech about the not to be judged by the color of their skin but the content of their character, there's kind of reactionary appropriation of color blindness. Race blindness as a solution to cast. It clearly is not I. Think I know that the sort of the John Roberts invocation of it in in desegregation cases and voting rights cases I think shows just how empty indeed pernicious it is. But then on the other side like I've been falling that, you know there's been a copy editing date about the capitalization of of Kaplan black. which has been interesting and I was not someone who felt like I had a strong stake in it either way of of A lot of.

Isabel Wilkerson Princeton Kaplan John Roberts King
"wilkerson" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"They're absolutely right. Is American culture. And popular culture in so many ways is black culture and yet we have this. Huge powerful strain of racism north, and south, how to reconcile that, how to think that in terms of your book. Well, I have to go back to the history of how we got here. I, mean literally how we as different groups arrived to this country and? People who arrived and were ultimately enslaved for two, hundred, forty, six years the one. Area that or role that they were permitted to perform was to be as entertainers to be as people who were there at the behest of the people who were deemed above them to to entertain. But more importantly to be the the butt of entertainment, meaning the the MINSTREL. CD of the nineteenth century that however the brilliance though of the people who were in the the subordinate, a cast was that they turned that in to their own advantage. They found this one narrow pathway that had been created at actually made the most of it by excelling in the area that had been sort of carved out for them. CAST in the Indian says, comes from religion. It's it's inscribed in Hindu religion, and when something like that is inscribed in religion, it's suggest certain immutability, it can't change. Can cast in in the in the Indian in the American sense that you're describing it change. The essential framework of a dominant group. And a subordinated group and of the middle groups that move between the two. essentially the enduring framework for our society though we may not see it. the that do change our who may qualify to be in the dominant group and who might move in between the middle cast. But what often remains the same is the existence of the upper, the dominant group and the existence of the bottom group that suggest that a caste system. has to be thrown off psychologically legalistically. There have been. So many efforts. In this country noble and important efforts to address this the essential injustices, and so it's my view that it takes more than legislation. Although legislation is essential. It also takes a recognition of why the legislation was necessary to begin with. Isabelle, you've been working on this book for years with just a tremendous amount of research and reporting, but now it's being published unexpectedly into the teeth of a political. Thing I wonder what effect that's head on, you're thinking about the book. I. I take the longer view essentially of history I had no say obviously, in the timing of this, I had no wish to be in the middle of any particular moment I, view this in a transcendent way of trying to illuminate our division so that we can find a way to transcend them because we keep reliving the same movie as long as we continue to ignore what's gone before us, and so I view this as part of a continuum. But I am, of course, hopeful that if this opens people's hearts and minds more readily to what I've written than that, that hopefully would be good. Bill Wilkerson. New Book. The origins of our discontents is out.

Bill Wilkerson Isabelle
Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

The Book Review

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

"Isabel Wilkerson joins us. Now she is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of the warmth of other suns which she came on the podcast to talk about a little bit when she reviewed Michelle Obama's becoming. She is back now to talk about her new book cast the origins of our discontent Isabel. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me. So as I alluded in my intro, the last time you came on this podcast, you did come extensively to talk about one book in particular, which was Michelle Obama's becoming which I used as an excuse to talk about book of Your Own the other sons, and I don't have to have that excuse to talk about a book of your this time because you have a new book, let's talk about how you got from the warmth of other suns to this new book cast because you wrote in your book something sort. Sort of intriguing, which is that you didn't seek to write this book, but you felt like you had to write it and I'm curious what you meant by that. Well, with the warmth of other suns, had spent fifteen years looking into trying to understand the great migration and and why that happened, and so that meant that I spent a lot of time looking at and having to investigate and understand wife as it was during that era from the end of reconstruction until the nineteen seventies essentially and what I discovered was that the word. Racism, which is the word that often is applied to descriptions of the warmth. Sons did not actually apply. It was not sufficient. It was not the precise or comprehensive word to describe the structure of repression that was in place from the end of reconstruction. Until till essentially the civil rights legislation of the nineteen sixties, and so I found that I was using the word cast. Cast was the word that anthropologists until geologists and others of the era who had gone into the South during the time of the depth of Jim Crow. They had emerged from that era and that region and that time using the term cast in. It intrigued me when I came across it in the research for the one of the sons and decided that that was really the only way to describe it, and so the word racism does. Does, not, appear in the warmth of other suns and in the intervening years especially with events such as Charlottesville, I have been in a forced to have to think about the language and think about how we remember our history, and so it's as a result of that that I felt I sort of felt, I had no choice, but to dig deeper into what I had begun with the warmth of other signs and it led to this. So in those intervening years. Did you start to think about another book, but you kept coming back to this idea of cast and sort of switched gears or was this the project you went into immediately as a natural outgrowth of the warmth of other suns was the former. You're exactly right I actually had other things that I was working on and was very excited about and very deeply wanting to get into and this this phenomenon helped rearing itself in the news kept prodding me and poking me to look further at what I had already begun. Would not let me go essentially. And an I, at every turn, I was seeing things that were manifestations of what I had written about. But no one was using the language. We we actually need new language to better understand the era in which we live. The old language may not be as efficient as it might have been. Say You know during the Early Twentieth Century? Such words, it's racism, which is a very fraught word means many different things to many different people and is often conflated with personal animus hostility, hate What we're dealing with now goes beyond that because actually it's the underlying infrastructure that we've all inherited that, and that has been here all along since the since the founding of the country actually since before the founding of the country and so this, the the recent events kept drawing me back to what I was not wanting to do, I was not wanting to write this. I really hasn't. And yet, it kept pulling at me

Suns Michelle Obama Sons Isabel Wilkerson Jim Crow Cast Charlottesville
"wilkerson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"North in America, and now you have a new book So like you have I think by anyone's standards like you're very successful. So how do you reconcile that with thinking of yourself as being on the lowest rung in caste system and caste systems by definition don't allow you to move up higher. Well that that's where the issue of class comes in. So if cast is the bones and raises the skin, then class is the the you know the close, the diction, the accent, the education, and the external successes that one might achieve. But that does not protect the person from the intrusion of cast intrusion of boundaries because cast is essentially. It's an effort to control and restrict and to tell people where they belong. It's IT'S A it's a focus on. This ought onomic impulse to keep people in their place. No matter what and it's you know and that is fueled by you know unconscious biases that kick in before a person can even think and so people like myself can might move about the world as you know as objectively successful people. But that does not protect against the intrusion from others who might try to put someone in there placed by setting boundaries suggesting or responding as if they actually don't belong where they are I mean I had this. Experience in Chicago years ago when I was reporting a story that was was fairly routine I made arrangements to interview all these people I made the arrangements over the phone to interview a number of people for the story and all the interviews a gone. Well until I got to the last one, it was the last interview of the day. I was very much looking forward to it the person that I was speaking with or going to speak with a had been very excited to. Talk with me over the phone. But when I got there he happened not to have been there at the time and the place that I went it was an establishment retail establishment happened not to have other people in it and I was waiting for him to get there the door opens and this man comes in he's very hairy. Got This co- his overcoat on his he he's he's late for an appointment with ultimately with me but he's harried he's he's frazzled he's anxious and. The clerk would help me earlier. told me to go up to him and that this was the man I was there to interview and I went up to him and he said Oh no no no, no I I can't talk with you right now and I was flummoxed by that I mean why here we're here for the interview why why are? You why are we? Why are you saying you don't have time to talk and he said no, no I can't talk with you right now I'm getting ready for a very, very important interview. I cannot talk with you right now and I said, well, well I think I'm the person interviewing you I'm Isabel Wilkerson with the New York Times instead he said. Well how how would I know that? How how do I know that you're Isabel, Wilkerson and I said I am here this is the time it's four thirty. We're here for the for the interview and he said, well, do you have a business card and I said, I actually happened not to have had any because I. It was the end of the day and I've been interviewing people all day, and this was the last interview which was very much looking forward to and I said I'm sorry out of business cards right now he said Whoa Whoa you have something that you have some id because I see some ID and I thought I shouldn't have to show you ID. We're already into the time that we were to have interview we. Should be talking right now..

Isabel Wilkerson America Chicago New York Times
"wilkerson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Says, they're artisans are proud to sign every sank they make as each crossman finishes think he's GonNa stomp the stand his name, and he places that on the back of the same car underneath the base of the sink and that's crossman. Say This sinks to show is quality I'm happy that it meets my expectations. And I wouldn't put my name to it to learn more visit house of role dot com. Let's get back to my interview. A journalist Isabel Wilkerson her new book cast suggests that we look at America as having created a caste system to keep down African Americans. In the comparisons that you make between the Nazi regime. And the caste system, in America, you scribe like what qualified in each country as being white like how much called blood non white blood did you need to have in your system in order to disqualify as being white? Would you compare the two countries in defining that? That was a a source of tremendous debate. I came to discover I had no idea how they had arrived at their delineation of people and They sent people to study the United States and how it had defined and codified categorized and subjugated African Americans and delineated who could be what in the United States they studied the also studied the marriage laws, intermarriage laws, and in doing so they debated as to. Who should qualify to be considered? Aryan in Germany at that time and in studying the United States they were they, themselves were stunned to have discovered the one drop rule that was the common distinction in the United States for determining whether a person could be identified as black or African American. At that time, they would have been called colored or Negro that idea of the one drop rule was that was viewed as too extreme. To them that the Nazis. Stunning to hear that stunning to see that stunning to discover that. The Nazis in trying to create their own caste system what could be considered a caste system went to great lengths to really think hard about who should qualify as Aryan because they felt that they wanted to include as many people as they possibly could ironically enough in in trying to define who could qualify to be Aryan. The Nazis were more concerned about making sure that those who had. Aryan blood would be protected that..

crossman United States America Isabel Wilkerson Germany
"wilkerson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Wilkerson author of the new book cast. She started thinking about this while writing her book about the Great Migration of African Americans from the Jim Crow South to the north. Wilkerson compares America with India's caste system and writes about how Nazi Germany borrowed from American laws and practices. She says, many people say I have nothing to do with the sins of the past. My ancestors never owned slaves but Wilkerson ads. Here we are and it's our responsibility to fix it. Later John Powers reviews novel causing a stir in literary circles about a black woman in her twenties caught between high artistic dreams and a messy personal life. When my guest Isabel Wilkerson was writing her book, the warmth of other suns about the great migration of African Americans from the south to the north looking to escape the Lynchings, the cross burnings the terrorism and the lack of opportunity in the south. She says, she realized she wasn't writing about geography and relocation she was writing about the American caste system. Now she's written a new book called cast that explains why she thinks America can be described as having a caste system and how we use that expression. It deepens our understanding of what black people have been up against in America she compares. AMERICA WITH A- caste system in India, and writes about how the Nazi leadership borrowed from. American racist. And the American eugenics movement. Looker said won a national book critics, Circle Award for her book about the Great Migration pull the warmth of other suns. And she went up Pulitzer Prize when she was a reporter at the New York Times. Isabel Wilkerson welcome back to fresh air is really a pleasure to have you on again and congratulations on the book. Ten years ago, you wrote the warmth of other suns you use the word caste system to refer to the segregated south, and you wrote in the decades between reconstruction and the enforcement of civil rights laws. Nearly every black family in the American south had a decision to make the decision was to stay in the south segregated caste system or make the pilgrimage north or west in the hope of escaping racism and having more access to jobs housing and other opportunities what made you think of using the word caste system. To describe, America as a whole in that paragraph, you used to describe the American south..

Isabel Wilkerson America India John Powers reporter Pulitzer Prize New York Times Circle Award Germany
Everybody Do Less

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

03:17 min | 1 year ago

Everybody Do Less

"Rachel Wilkerson Miller, welcome to the struggle bus. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here I am so thrilled You are a friend of the show. You are one of my best friends in Hawaii. World and you're here to guest co host. Catherine has the week off. And so before we get into it I'm GonNa tell our audience a little bit about you. You know her. You love her Rachel Carson Miller is the deputy editor vice life and the author of two books, DOT journaling a practical guide, which was published in twenty, seventeen and her most recent book, the art of showing up how to be there for yourself and your people which came out in May. And, a big Fan. I'm a big Fan of your writing big Fan of the art of showing up I feel like I've learned a lot about what what it even means to show up. and. We're GonNa talk about that today. but Rachel before we get into the show and I didn't tell you I was going to do this. I didn't know I was going to some very sorry about but. Can you just like talk for a second about like what what is showing up like? How? How do you think about it? How do you define it? and just like. Maybe you're a quick like elevator pitch for like why it's important to think about. Yeah, definitely so I. Say this right mantra that it's one of those things that can be a little bit hard to describe you know when you see it. to me, it starts. Starts really with the active Barron witness to something, and this applies to showing up for other people are showing up for yourself so being an active observer to what's happening around you and like really taking it in, and then naming what you're saying, so running it through the lens of your past experiences in your own life with this person everything you know naming it kind of giving it a sort of starting to make sense of it I think naming his really powerful, and and then reacting accordingly, so if it's a friend, it might means sang them Oh my gosh. I'm so sorry that happened to you. or how are you feeling? If it's something you're going through, it might be a little bit more of like. How am I feeling about this thing that just happened. Which I've now realize wasn't great so some kind of response and the response sometimes is just the. The naming it's realizing a bad thing happened, I just need to sit with that other times. The response is going to be doing some kind of self care or taking action in some way. spent kind of the basics, but I think we kind of recognizing people are showing up for us when they're fully present fully there and I think we know when we're showing up for ourselves to and and when we're not showing up for ourselves. Okay? Well I think that was the episode. Anyone for tuning in. That was awesome. That was such a beautiful elegant, like explanation of what it means to show up, and also like I gotta say man like I. Feel like the struggle bus. Is You know we describe it? As like mental health shown advice show we, we sometimes like struggle with like exactly how to describe it, but I think that like what you just described about talking about how to show for yourself and other people is like kind of the mission of the show and Sal I, Yeah, so I'm. Very excited that you're here. I'm very excited to I. Feel like you get showing up on a deep level. You always have that I. Think is why we're so close in large part so this show the show gets it. The audience gets it. I'm excited.

Rachel Wilkerson Miller Rachel Catherine Rachel Carson Miller Sal I Hawaii Deputy Editor Barron
"wilkerson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Journalist. Isabel Wilkerson the author of the warmth of other suns. I WanNa read actually the last paragraph of the book. And! and. Just destroy flecked with you a little bit on that. Over the decades, perhaps they're wrong. Questions have been asked about the great migration. Perhaps it is not a question of whether the migrants brought good or will so the city's they fled to or were pushed or pulled to their destinations, but a question of how they summoned the courage to leave in the first place, or how they found the will to press beyond the forces against them and the faith in a country that had rejected them for so long. By their actions, they did not dream the American dream they will it into being by it definition of their own choosing. They did not ask to be accepted, but declared themselves the Americans that perhaps few others recognized, but they had always been deep within their hearts. So you trace these stories of these individuals. These, particular stories of this universal drama. And you really as you said. What did you say you channel these people in her brain? And, heart and heart, and so, what did you learn? What do you carry around with you about what it means to be human through these lives that you carry with you now? Well I I, really have came to believe into no I that we all have so much more in common than we've been led to believe and that we've been sadly tragically assigned roles as if we're in a play, and this is. This is what these people do this. What these people do what these people do! And the tragedy. Is that regardless of which assignment you had been put into? That might not have in your strength at all and I just have gained in such. This has been out for six years I spent fifteen years on it. researching and writing it I have never grown weary of talking about it every time I talk about it I gave new appreciation and gratitude and amazement at what they were able to do. One of the things that I hope to do was to bring the invisible people into the light. Light they never were being written about. We just skip from in a civil war to civil rights in this entire part of our country's history and their lives, generations actually of people skipped over, and not recognized and I felt that it deserved its own place and recognition. I believed that you know the sort of bringing invisible people into the light would help all. All of us to understand and see ourselves better, because we've been so affected by what they did, and what these people did, I mean by sheer force of will, they were able to make the emancipation proclamation live up to its name in their individual lives to the degree that they could and means that they were able to do what you know. What the? The, you know what a President Abraham. Lincoln was not fully able to do, and they were able to do what the powers of north and south were not really fully able to do and they it was about their agency, and they're making a decision for themselves and declaring themselves to be citizens which they had always been, but it never been really truly recognized. And I wanted tell you that we I was talking about these people from other different backgrounds who feel such a connection to them, but to the people I women who's she said? I may reminded her was exactly like her Norwegian grandmother. I mean so. But one of the very unusual things that that has happened. That seems appropriate for the conversation that we're having is that. So many children or grandchildren children primarily of the great migration have come up to me and told me with the sense of healing and completion that this book was the last book that their parent read before. They're they died. And you would think that it would be incredibly tragic and sad, but it's the exact opposite. The children were grateful that their parents had had the chance to read this before it was too late. Remember these are people who didn't talk about their experiences that it's also it's not i. mean these three here. You show how people continue to create lives full lives. Even with these circumstances and through these circumstances. And he don't out a react when someone says. This is the last book that you know. My mother or father read before they died But they said was such joy and gratitude, and they say that it allowed them to come to terms with all that they had endured, and to and to give their suffering some meaning, and to recognize that they had not been alone, but that they had been part of something bigger, some connection to you know immigrants around the world other people who'd come up from the south as they had, and and and others who had. been able to. Express their freedom and their individuality, and the and the way they had chosen the that it was a peaceful and their view, fulfilling and healing way to have left this planet. There's something new said Oh. You talked about how. Part of what drives you as an aspiration to find strength in the discovery of what is true. and. I think what you're describing is. How ever hard the truth is! It does complete us. It isn't a necessary path to. Not the first to say, but it seems to set some people free. That's great lasted. About workers and thank you so much and what did.

Isabel Wilkerson President Lincoln
George T. Wilkerson on Crimson Letters: Voices from Death Row

PEN America Works of Justice

04:49 min | 1 year ago

George T. Wilkerson on Crimson Letters: Voices from Death Row

"Hi torch. Thanks for joining us today. I wanted to start by just asking you how you are I know the conditions are really fraud in a lot of prisons during the pandemics. I'll have things ben for you. That's a good question I've actually been asking myself that question since the pandemic began so as a writer. You know that's a poem to China. Capture is all these different little pieces and maybe try to bring it together If you'd like to hear it would love to. You don't mind sharing okay. I call this Imprison during Tova Nineteen Myself. Isolating family. No longer visits me. We must keep everyone arms flat in the curve of yearning for connection with strap on masks before exiting fill many of US shelter in place. Instead we switch away from those who call for sneeze the consequences of getting sick as a constant topic of conversation. Everybody knows the terms. Medical inattention only had it or sentences and prison. It's like a love marriage. We disguised a few cleaning chemicals. Get feeling mellow yellow steady green bottles with blue window cleaner pink four so clear incitement. They become contraband. If inside ourselves camouflaged amid our sodas we try not to accidentally drink again. We stockpile wronging coffee batteries. Soap and fantasy money from our families drives up last. Perhaps two months meal takes longer and longer to reach is week. Sometimes if press most of us would admit the feeling increasingly lonely abandoned forgotten nevertheless we check the news all day praying to recognize the names of people victimized while buying toilet paper and then the pandemic began and change some things. I approve. The prison prohibited all visitors. Now my family couldn't visit even if they try next to prison. Clothes ARE BARSHOP. So many of us would like mangy savages. Then the prison issued uniform math. The All of US flimsy black fabric on which we can relax veneers of indifference. We had kittens flexed on our faces to reward for not writing. The prison started playing movies from Netflix. Every day then posted a memo to warn us any non compliance with corona virus restrictions. We'll be punished. That is to get too close to anyone now. It's pay ten dollar five. Plus weeks and the whole the prison is enforcing not just encouraging the social isolation to gauge the mandate spacing. We may stand apart extending our arms toward each other. Fingers may not touch that succeed. The right distance is long Gravy de. That was beautiful. Thank you so much for sharing I really resonated a bad thing just like you know the isolation and the sphere and that constant want to check the news I think is really overwhelming you also I really love the line about. They're trying to reward you not writing and playing net flicks to keep you distracted so glad. You're still finding time to write like that. Think it's important that your documented for sure. 'cause you know one thing. I've seen out there. It's like all this emphasis on the Consequences of all the social isolation. And I've heard a lot of specialists women news on NPR describing just the detrimental effects of just `isolation. And I was like. That's what prisoners go to all the time Even before this pandemic so I wanted to like you know. Create this sympathy between two reader outside of prison than like personnel out of prison and just show like all these things that people can resonate with actually just the everyday way of life in prison and the pandemic just made

Social Isolation United States Fraud Writer China Netflix NPR
What's new in the China virus outbreak

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

What's new in the China virus outbreak

"The we know first the new person virus in the US reported with the new in China and potentially has killed deadly dozens virus of people is a Washington what state about resident the U. S. originally from the China first person and in just the US back with from a the trip new and there potentially he's in deadly good condition virus is not a Washington considered a threat state to resident the public say health originally officials from China but they are and monitoring just back from sixteen a trip there people who he's came in into good close condition contact not with him considered Sarah a threat Wilkerson to the public of say the Providence health officials regional Medical but Center they are in monitoring Everett Washington sixteen says people having who came that into close the very contact first patient with them in our Sarah hospital Wilkerson it of the is Providence regional a little Medical you Center know scary in Everett it's Washington something new says early having symptoms the the can very seem like first a cold patient in or our the flu hospital it a cough is a fever little trouble you breathing know scary but it it's can develop something into new pneumonia early symptoms I'm can Rita seem fall like a cold les or the flu a cough fever trouble breathing but it can develop into pneumonia the CDC says on average flu kills about twenty four thousand Americans every year I'm Rita fall les

United States China Washington Sarah Wilkerson Everett Washington Everett Cough Fever Pneumonia Rita CDC Medical But Center Sarah Hospital Wilkerson Medical You Center FLU
Chicago woman becomes 2nd US case of new virus from China

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago woman becomes 2nd US case of new virus from China

"The first person in the US with the new and potentially deadly virus is a Washington state resident originally from China and just back from a trip there he's in good condition not considered a threat to the public say health officials but they are monitoring sixteen people who came into close contact with him Sarah Wilkerson of the Providence regional Medical Center in Everett Washington says having that the very first patient in our hospital it is a little you know scary it's something new early symptoms can seem like a cold or the flu a cough fever trouble breathing but it can develop into pneumonia I'm Rita fall les

United States China Sarah Wilkerson Providence Regional Medical Ce Everett Washington Pneumonia Washington Fever
Why won't NFL teams hire minority coaches?

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

11:19 min | 1 year ago

Why won't NFL teams hire minority coaches?

"Three head. Coaching spots have been filled this week. But none of those. Three coaches were minorities while the Rooney rule has been followed. Some are beginning to believe that minority forty candidates are not being taken seriously for the open jobs and anonymous African American. NFL Assistant Coach said that the League has quote finally shown. It's not the place as for black men to advance. It's ridiculous it's disgusting. We can sell tickets and make plays but we can't lead Shannon. Why isn't the Rooney rule role working? Well I think until skip this diversity thing yeah. Diversity is a great great to talk about but until you get someone the leadership position that says you know what. I don't just want to talk about it. I want to be about it so until you get older ships that actually wants to put some substance to this and this is what that you're GonNa get now if the general manager there's one general manager that's what minority and that's CR- Chris greer in Miami. There's zero owners that are it shouldn't say minorities. I guess because shot con radically a minority. But when you get the gist of what I what. I'm trying to say until leadership gets more diverse. You're I'm not gonNA have a more diverse hiring background skills. This was puzzling to be. Is that Eric. Enemy has the exact Zac job that Matt Nagy had negative and call plays any recall. Please man they can get the job. Doug Peterson sedinko plays true. Recall to play around Rivera's on but Ron Rivera was not the defensive coordinator in Philly. He he became a D. coordinator what's he got to the D. Coordinator in Chicago. You are you in San Diego. Yeah but he got his getting these enter coaching tree. Eric B enemy has the exact same job. That Matt Nagy Doug Peterson has and he's not getting opportunity is spirit but this. I don't really think that they go into it. Unless you incentivize this. Okay if you how minorities kill we maybe you have an extra three to five five dollars and cap space. That's the only thing that resonates with these owners because I get it skipped if I spent three billion. Let's just say I spent three billion dollars for a restaurant run. You Go tell me what the hell I need to cook. Cook whatever I WanNa Cook it there. And that's how they look at it. Jerry Jones spent money for this. This this mind you oh tell me why should get killed but but this notion that Oh and they brought Muhiba Marvin Marvin Lewis. He brought him in to to do that. Situation wasted the same with the giants the giants they had irebi enemy. They what Joe Judge Chris Rashard Rashard. Excuse me Chris Restoring. Yeah so now. Now we're down to one. Vacant Cleveland Reunion. I'm talking about how good already know. Angle get no frills JAYCO network skill. He already interviewed there. So you would now now the take my name off the leader and solid rubber solid. Take my name off the list. Because he's GonNa get Mad Max two and a half years if you're lucky that seems to instead that's all Jimmy can stomach now if you look at it they keep these. You look at Mike Patton. You look at all the guys they've had and these guys have had I think. Hugh Jackson stayed the longest at two and a half years. But everybody's been two years the list huge only two and a half two and a half long but you get you get these other guys you get pretty kitchens and you look at patent and you look at a I forget. Just give all these one year jazz. WE ACHE AAC CLEVELAND. That in Cleveland of the North this skill ruining rules a joke. I get it. You know minorities Cadillac. An affirmative action thanksgiving. Yeah but in -firmative action. I guess it's federal dollars. You'RE NOT GONNA get the money if you don't do this. The NFL is a is a private entity. So what can you do. What Ki- what can you give? Nfl Do not the so. I have been tracking this for a long time because one of my best friends is John. Wooten who is now the retired leader of the Fritz Pollard. Alliance and he was the driving force behind instituting the Rooney rule as I hiring practice in the national shirow all league and John's point from the start was I just need interviews because if a young assistant coach gets interviewed a couple of times times it gets reported in his name gets out there and if another owner sees that name enough over maybe a couple of years hiring cycles else maybe an owner says chee that guy. He's getting a lot of interviews. Maybe I should bring in. Maybe I should be more open minded to him. But if you're GONNA curse because if I get a a lot of interviews and I'm not getting hired was wrong why here the me getting hired cave liability with that. But John's point in the end was I'd rather have interviews than not have interests. Okay okay so let's go back to the stat that I use last week. The Institute of Diversity and Ethics In sports twenty nine thousand nine racial and gender report card for the National Football Bali. The League got actually an a plus for hiring of color. Assistant coaches right a sit a plot. Oh that's progress right. It got a deep loss for hiring head coach of Color White eight-plus assistance d-plus head head coaches. There's a big disconnect there and it shows you. That owners are fine. Oh hire two or three black assistant fine with that but nope nope. I don't want to head coach to be black. Right gives quite to the restaurant you can cook. You'll be in the bank but Michelle not the bridge. I roll up now okay so when I texted back and forth last we can use this last week of John Wooten just beside himself now. He is devastated by this this development his point was that only one. GM Chris Grin Miami. Point out is use. John's word heartbreaking because it could start with the GM right a black GM of or of color could be more open minded to say to the owner. Hey listen this guy is really bring him in. Let me let me introduce him to you right. The conduit to the owner can be stronger. Iran have I don't know six or eight black. GM right right. We've had them around the league four or but all of a sudden there's a dearth to rape Barma with Barma within Cleveland. He'd Gone Rick Smith who I know very well be in Denver. He interviewed for The Washington. Ashington John Daniel Snyder said head coach could be a head coach. Basically general manager after the Washington like who are the head coaching after the draft. The General Mattis. Okay so sometimes there is group think or shink sheep among the owners because in the end they do want to win right. And if they're looking around the League league and that black head coaches really successful they say well I want one of those. I want to go that direction right well. There was one black head coach who started to have success late in the year ear and he happened to be allied with Chris. Clear in Miami and Brian Floors off the Patriots. Well they started out all time badge for about what seven seven games fifty. Nine seven opening renders and then they basically it felt like they turned the whole roster iside down which they needed to do and then all of a sudden the last nine games they go five and four they upset the eagles and then they went to foxborough and just basically ended the season. I thought for the new New England Patriots playoff teams right. Okay so all the sudden Brian floor floor with the help of Chris greer. They're having big success. It looks like it's headed in the right drug us us but it wasn't enough of a splash to create momentum through the hiring process and right because John Wooden again texted me back with so many names he said we have so many in the pipeline. Who already started with Eric? B Enemy and Chris Rock. I think Chris Shaw Bad Year on defense but when I watch him interviewed when I watch his body language. It's a stunt man he's he's got. CEO Written all over him. He looks like a commanding officer to me. There's not enough black head coaches skip. Because because you look you look at Mike McCarthy guest job he hires the guy that gave him his opportunity coordinator fifteen years ago so you see the circle. We'll skip once you become a head coach. What do you do you go to the combine? You go to say elbow you got your drake. He goes to the coaches meeting and Yada Yada Yada and to connect with the boom boom boom right right. So if I'm not in that Lou. How do I get into loops? Because a rid of staff they said eighty percent of the jobs are never posted so in other worth people get hired somebody a friend or family member is not what you know who you know There in live the roof. It does house so to finish John. Bruton's list of pipeline candidates being AMEE. Chris Rashard Robert Sala. He threw Jim Caldwell on his list. Is Jim Colwell was highly successful zestful. Jim called wheel lost his jaw. Going nine and seven in two years Matt Patricia has nine total win and he's still got a job now he goldwell still doesn't have another job he in four years. He went to the playoffs twice in the last year he went nine and seven and they said well you know we need to move in a different direction. uh-huh and the guy that's replaced has yet to win nine total games in two years. Do you still own a still on the clock. Okay Steve wilks got one shot in time. I'm one year in Arizona and he was gone. He's now the defensive coordinator in Cleveland which probably didn't help his cause this year that much but I don't hear his name no in Cleveland right right on the list. And then there's Terrel Austin who's young stripes potential star coach and John Wootton into his list with Marvin Lewis who he thinks deserves a second shy right. Okay so Jerry. Jones did observe in qualified for the Rooney rule by bringing in. I Marvin Lewis. I think Jerry was shrewd operating waiting there. Because he didn't pick a young like like Chris Rashard type interview him because of Jerry had interviewed a young potential upcoming head. Black coach right. There's more pressure on Jerry. What was wrong with right? What's the problem exactly? He went to Marvin Lewis because he thinks Marvin Lewis is kind of old news right right. He got his longtime time shot in Cincinnati. Listen I still think Marvin did a good job job seriously. Yes okay he went. Oh and seven in the playoffs but still it was Andy Dalton Alton you re you with covering the NFL and you remember what Cincinnati before. Marlene got there was John. Carter number one overall. You Got David Cleland with the fourth. The fourth picket. You got big day to day and Wilkerson purse around the second pick in the draft year after year after a year people. Forget what I know. Marvin didn't win a playoff game. But they weren't even getting close to the playoffs for Marvin got there. No so I was disappointed in Jerry because you know my heart Hartz. I'd love to see Jerry Jones higher black head coach and I think I probably won't live long enough or Jerry will live long enough to know.

Muhiba Marvin Marvin Lewis Jerry Jones Cleveland Rooney John NFL League Joe Judge Chris Rashard Rashar Miami Chris Greer John Wooten GM Eric B General Manager Defensive Coordinator Patriots Marvin Lewis Matt Nagy Doug Peterson Chris Restoring
"wilkerson" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"wilkerson" Discussed on Forever35

"Well hello forever. thirty-five Orders Self Cardigan self. Kerrigan's self care and self Cardigan care. Bears Hello Keeton Dory I I we are on a break this week. We are taken that vacation time And we are rearing of our favorite APPs. And we've got a real bill goodwin for you this week. Yeah it's an early one First aired in July of two thousand eighteen. It's with Rachel. Wilkerson Miller and one of the amazing thing she talks about is having a uniform. Oh that's right now. Her pastel uniform and her white gene So good and we got into bullet journaling and did the best way possible as we're recording this Sammy's been journaling at the table. So true you. How appropriate is always a factor? So we love getting to talk to Rachel and we hope you enjoy giving it a listen hello.

Rachel bill goodwin Kerrigan Wilkerson Miller Sammy
How a 1988 Dodge Challenger Reunited These High School Sweethearts

Talking Mopars

05:25 min | 1 year ago

How a 1988 Dodge Challenger Reunited These High School Sweethearts

"This next story from Jan Wilkerson. Hello Chris I thought I would share my story so when I was a young kid probably about ten or eleven. My Dad had a nineteen seventy eight dodge Aspen four-door four-door it had a three sixty police. Engine I thought for some reason it was the coolest thing in the world. I think that is what started me on the car thing I was more in obeys as Balden cars at the time and I played many years and my life at that time looked like baseball was my future not anything to do with cars but that car did something a and cars were almost as important to me as baseball almost will anyway. This is about cars not baseball then. My Dad decided to sell that car. In by a Chrysler Laser. My heart was crushed that card in last long any traded it in on a bright red nineteen eighty eight dodge shadow. Es Turbo both five speed. That car was super cool. Well that same year is when I bought my car. I was currently driving somewhat a Mo- par but not really. It was in nineteen. Eighty the two Plymouth Champ on okay first car but the car bug was about to bite and fight hard. I was at work at our local Ford dealer. Bob Chapman Ford and and a Guy Dave lamb in the body shop drove in the car. That changed my life. I was a junior in high school and saw this awesome. Nineteen seventy-one Dodge Dodge Challenger. I instantly fell in love with the car. The funny thing is the thing that made me really think the car was awesome was the consul. Yeah the council. I know how crazy but I just had to have this car so I sold my champ two days later in convinced my dad that this car was better for me than the Plymouth. He hesitated take in hesitated but I think he thought the car was super cool too but would never admit that was September of nineteen eighty eight. When I bought my first muscle car the the first thing I did to the car was I added the side stripes and restored all the interior still has the same interior to this day except the carpet? So this was the start of an obsession and bathing this car for the next thirty years. There's been so many stories involving the Challenger cruising around with the love of my life. Jenny Gasson even though she never knew that at the time her and I were great friends and I had such a crush and she had no idea life. Got In the way and we didn't see each other again. Another story is. The car was in building that caught fire about seven or so years later. All the cars in the building including the building were completely destroyed. But somehow some way the challenger didn't even get a scratch on it during the fire. The firefighters saw the car while the place was on fire. They pushed the car car out. There was another crazy thing that happened. I found a nineteen sixty seven Mustang that I thought was super cool and the guy that owned it loved my challenger so we decided added to do a trade. I know why right so the deal was done. I was to meet him the next day so I had everything ready and was about to leave. I called him His son answered and said he had bad news. His father had passed away that morning. I was shocked so like I said so. Many crazy stories another time. How am I lost control in the car and went off? The road came within two inches from hitting a poll. Once again not a single scratch. I did have so many fun times in this car. Also also there are so many more stories that will make your head spin but probably the story that touches me. The most is that after twenty five years of not seeing or even talking to Jenny any the love of my life. She messaged me on facebook because she saw a picture of the Challenger and ask. Is that the car we cruised around when we were kids. I was shocked that she not only contact me but remembered the car. That was why I can say the car brought me to the love of my life again. We are currently engaged gauge and have been together for the past five years. So if you want to hear more I've owned this car almost thirty two years and I have several other MO- parts including shelby dodge. CSX CSX prototype owned by Carroll Shelby himself so please contact me. Thank you Jan Wilkerson. PS sorry it was so long may run on on but thought you may like some of my stories January absolutely right. I love your stories. I think they're awesome It's good to see that not only. Do you have some muscle muscle car in there. But you also have some of the Turbo Mo par stuff that I really enjoy as well I'm a really big fan of Turbo Mo- pars and hand any of the eighties. Mo- pars I think are pretty cool. And they deserve respect in their own right Alongside the muscle cars. So I aw said it before. I don't discriminate when it comes to Mow Pars I love them all so your story was really awesome Jan.. I really enjoyed reading it. It is amazing that you know some people they have the cars that get away and they end up. Reuniting with those cars several years later in your case you had a human that you you know lost contact with and ended up. Reuniting with several years down the road you know twenty five years is a long time you know after twenty five years of not seeing each other. The car brought you back together. That is a great story. I love hearing stories like that. How Fun

Jan Wilkerson Baseball Jenny Gasson Dodge Shadow Challenger Chrysler Laser Balden Aspen Ford Chris Csx Csx Bob Chapman Ford Dave Lamb Carroll Shelby Plymouth Facebook
Walmart, Josh Wilkerson And Virginia discussed on Bucket Strategy Investing

Bucket Strategy Investing

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Walmart, Josh Wilkerson And Virginia discussed on Bucket Strategy Investing

"Did you know the insulin over the counter Walmart sells insulin some inexpensive insulin over the counter wage I mean I command you know the shopping center for trying to help with these rising drug prices unfortunately Josh Wilkerson for Virginia I believe it was only twenty find out his age was in his twenties unfortunately he died after choosing over the counter insulin verses regular insulin it was apparently found a diabetic coma and it was in the sleeping quarters where he worked as blood sugar levels were seventeen times higher then what's normal and he fell into a diabetic coma all you know what he was only seventeen years old I apologize no twenty seven I'm sorry twenty seven and so what happened is he was twenty seven years old so he could be on the obamacare twenty six year old allowance to be on his

Walmart Josh Wilkerson Virginia Diabetic Coma Twenty Seven Years Seventeen Years Twenty Six Year
Randall Bridget, Yankees And Stevie Wilkerson discussed on Purity Products

Purity Products

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Randall Bridget, Yankees And Stevie Wilkerson discussed on Purity Products

"Well that's all right for time Wally Hines baseball this afternoon Toronto center fielder Randall Bridget made a diving catch the bases loaded and hit a two run single is the blue jays held off the Yankees to the one Stevie Wilkerson hit a two run Homer in the seventh the Orioles beat the rays two to one of the opener of a split double header after that game the red Sox announcing a trade with the Orioles obtaining right handed pitcher Andrew Cashner will setting a pair of seventeen year old prospects to the owes Jon Lester homered tied on career high with three RBIs and pitched effectively in the seventh inning to lead the Chicago Cubs past the Pittsburgh Pirates tender for all star catcher Wilson contraris three run Homer in Lester's two run single off the left field wall where the big hits of the cubs seventh raw seven run first inning

Randall Bridget Yankees Stevie Wilkerson Orioles Red Sox Andrew Cashner Jon Lester Chicago Cubs Wally Hines Toronto Pittsburgh Pirates Wilson Contraris Seventeen Year
Apple's accessibility; and Gimlet's not changing anything

podnews

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Apple's accessibility; and Gimlet's not changing anything

"John Wilkerson suspect. He knows what's behind apple podcasts. Recent attempts to clean up meta data the ADA the Americans with Disabilities Act. He points out that apple received a class action last year because it's website was quote inaccessible to visually impaired users others points out that episode number tagging would enable for example, Siri listen to episode one hundred and twenty five of the daily which is currently hard to achieve while we linked to our FAQ from our show notes. And from our newsletter would still recommend doing the tags. Even apple isn't threatening. You these days everything is continuing as it was says Matt Lieber of Gimblett still trying to come nerves that the Spotify acquisition of the company will stop us all listening to reply all he was speaking of the hot pod summit of the festival in New York. We had lots more about the hot pod summit have dinner last night. But a cone of silence prevents us from telling you more. Meanwhile. Well, these Spotify anchor Gimblett deal is validation for the industry says Rene Wang who c- of Cass box. Mash Ables, Marcus gilmer is quote giving up podcasts. He says I could listen to podcasts on double speed for every waking minute of my week and still not come close to chipping away at the stack of all of the episodes piling up in my queue Pullman, the Rhody consta- pros multi track recording firmware came last Friday, but some disappointed that the system only allows you to record this fire USB not on the ST cart. Pod. Pratt says it is a quote dead. Sparrow, which is quite literal. Translation, from the Dutch and podcast brunch. Clubs playlist. This month is language in feature podcasts today, we look at obsession which delves deep into the history culture science and often deadly consequences of unrequited love. It's from focus features the times and art nineteen.

Apple Spotify Gimblett Marcus Gilmer John Wilkerson Mash Ables Rene Wang Matt Lieber Sparrow Pratt New York
Trump speaks on illegal immigration, crime

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 3 years ago

Trump speaks on illegal immigration, crime

"From npr news it's all things considered i'm mary louise kelley audie cornish this was the week that president trump back down on his policy of separating families accused of crossing the us border illegally and today he tried to shift the focus by returning to f ameliorate message on immigration gathered today to hear directly from the american victims of illegal immigration you know you hear the other side you'd never hear this you don't know what's going on president trump made those comments during an event at the white house meant to highlight victims of crimes committed by people in the country illegally npr sarah mccamman joins us now from the white house and sarah tell us a little more about what happened today and what the president's message was well he's going back to one of his regional campaign talking points here i think we all remember in his twenty fifteen announcement speech how he raised the specter of crime and drugs coming over the border describes some mexican immigrants as rapists that comment that remains really controversial and divisive today he was surrounded by family members holding pictures of their murdered loved ones and he claimed that the media has overlooked these families and said he wanted to bring them to the white house to tell their stories here's laura wilkerson from texas whose son josh was murdered in two thousand ten as and everyone's standing up here none of our kids had a minute to say goodbye we were lucky enough to be separated for five days or ten days were separated permanently in the time we want to see or be closed our kids we go to the cemetery and we heard that theme over and over from these families at the white house today and the president so this was pretty clearly a response to the debate over family separation at the border which of course was triggered by the trump administration zero tolerance policy for illegal border crossings and the president also read off some statistics listing off the numbers of crimes committed by undocumented immigrants what does the data say about crimes committed by people in the country illegally.

President Trump Donald Trump White House Sarah Mccamman Laura Wilkerson Texas Josh NPR Mary Louise Five Days Ten Days
Muhammad Wilkerson, Green Bay Packers reach agreement on deal

Izzy and Spain

01:37 min | 3 years ago

Muhammad Wilkerson, Green Bay Packers reach agreement on deal

"Yeah the bears are getting better they're doing all this work and they still got no chance of competing with the packers and the vikings now right i would think though and matthew stafford's not going anywhere in detroit forgot about the lions i'm fascinated by the packers because this is a brand new era for how long green bay never spend money in free agency with ted thompson now they would dabble every so often julius peppers as one veteran that they did sign a more high profile guy but now you're talking about jimmy graham robbed a mosque you covers the packers for us just reports them muhammad wilkerson is gonna sign with green in bay my opinion is they're feeling the pressure now because aaron rodgers is too great to walk away from this game with only one super bowl title so i think that plays into there is more pressure letting jordy nelson go probably because he doesn't run very well anymore but there's a new gm and a new philosophy in green bay and kirk cousins people debate that contract look the vikings are giving him a fully guaranteed deal because they think they can win the super bowl right now not next year the year after that signing kirk cousins is about winning a championship in two thousand eighteen so jeff who's under more pressure at this point the packers to maximize whatever the opportunity is for aaron rodgers or kirk cousins maximize whatever the opportunity is for the vicario jason i i would say it's vikings management rick spielman is actually under more pressure than kirk cousins because cousins has got his money he played the system per.

Packers Vikings Ted Thompson Julius Peppers Jimmy Graham Muhammad Wilkerson Aaron Rodgers Jordy Nelson GM Kirk Cousins Jeff Rick Spielman Matthew Stafford Detroit