35 Burst results for "Wildlife Service"

"wildlife service" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:03 min | Last month

"wildlife service" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"S Fish and Wildlife Service would police greater weight on the economic benefits of development when deciding if land or water should be protected. It's also the latest move by the Trump administration in a years long overhaul of how the Endangered Species Act is used. It's 11 46 Time for sports. Here's Dave Kerner career against the Vikings. Mitch Travis Key has a foreign to record including a foreign. Oh, mark in his last four starts against them. Can Travis Key? Keep up the moment? Um, come Sunday in the Twin cities. Here's WBBM is Jeff Joanie action Whiskey is taking what the defense gives him the past game now a short 1/4 and completions of six yards or less than the league that moves change gives playmakers a chance to make plays. Big ones when they get the opportunity trying to really stress run after the catch the last few weeks, I think it's been gaining for us, and I think guys are starting to feel it A Zafar as Mitch and how he's playing. I mean, that is NFL quarterbacking. That's really what he's doing, You know, and so it Zalkind of what we expect him to do. And it's showing up right now. Defensive coordinator Bill Lazor also noticing Travis Keys, assertiveness showing up more than at any time speaking up about what works for him within the framework of the offense. Covering the Bears. Jeff Juniac News radio one of 5.9 I found not practicing at Halas Hall Thursday. Khalil Mack, Tian Bush, Jalen Johnson and Buster Screen who was still in concussion protocol. From the NFL Thursday night overtime in Las Vegas. The Raiders took a 27 24 lead on the L. A Chargers. Daniel Carlson kicked a field goal with 3 18 left, but L. A managed to come back just in Herberts one yard sneak with less than two minutes to play. And the Chargers when a 32 27 improving to five and nine, while the Raiders fault a seven and seven baseball the Cubs bring in another pitcher, right hander Jonathan Holder signs a non guaranteed 2021 deal. He has been with the Yankees since 2016. Bears Vikings coverage Sunday morning beginning at 9 A.m. on your home of the Bears. Dave Kerner, NewsRadio, 7 81, old 5.9 FM, WBBM news time 11 48 traffic.

Mitch Travis Key Vikings Dave Kerner Bears NFL Chargers Travis Keys Raiders Jeff Joanie Wildlife Service Jonathan Holder Halas Hall Jeff Juniac Defensive coordinator Yankees Las Vegas Bill Lazor Khalil Mack Daniel Carlson
"wildlife service" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:49 min | Last month

"wildlife service" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Fish and Wildlife Service would place greater weight on the economic benefits of development when deciding if land or water should be protected. It's the latest move by the Trump administration in a years long overhaul of how the Endangered Species Act is used. Boeing 7 37 Max aircraft is a step closer to returning to Canadian skies nearly two years after being grounded due to technical issues that resulted in two deadly crashes involving foreign airlines. Federal transport minister in Canada has approved design changes to the plane. It's 9 46 with sports Dave Kerner to the list of bears not practicing at Halas Hall today. You could add Khalil Mack, who did not practice it all because of a shoulder injury. Dion Bush, Jalen Johnson and Buster screen already out. So that would be too defensive starters in two key players on defense off the bench that could be missing at Minnesota on Sunday, a game whether it could put the Bears back in second in the NFC North with the wind. Thursday night NFL football and Las Vegas is just scored Marcus Mary Oh to running one in from two yards out. He replaces the injured Derek Carr in that game with the L. A Chargers now tied at 24. Was about six minutes to play in the fourth quarter. Cubs sign right handed pitcher Jonathan Holder to a non guaranteed 2021 deal. 18 relief appearances with the Yankees last season. The three an old record but of 4 98 e R. A college basketball Tonight first Southern Illinois over North Dakota 85 64. Bradley beats Jackson State 83 60 and Valpo over Purdue Northwest 89 to 71. Number five. Kansas beats number 14 Texas Tech. 58 to 57 number nine. Creighton is a 94 to 76 winner over ST John's..

Dion Bush Creighton Halas Hall Khalil Mack Wildlife Service Dave Kerner Boeing Yankees NFC Valpo Jalen Johnson Derek Carr NFL Bears Las Vegas Jonathan Holder Chargers Minnesota Canada
Feds to delay seeking legal protection for monarch butterfly

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Feds to delay seeking legal protection for monarch butterfly

"Despite its declining population the Associated Press has been told the monarch butterfly will have to wait several years more to receive protection under the Endangered Species Act the US fish and Wildlife Service will consider the monarch butterfly and candidate for designation as threatened or endangered but there are other species in line ahead of it Charlie Wooley who's the head of the agency's Great Lakes regional office says the monarch status will be reviewed each year a virgin see action could be taken earlier but plans now call for proposing to list the orange and black butterfly in twenty twenty four scientists estimate the monarch population in the eastern United States has fallen about eighty percent since the mid nineteen nineties while the drop off in the western part of the country has been even steeper I'm showing up there

Charlie Wooley Great Lakes Regional Office Us Fish And Wildlife Service The Associated Press United States
Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

KCBS Radio Weekend News

03:47 min | Last month

Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

"Ah, longstanding federal protection for the nation's birds is being gutted by the Trump administration, with former federal officials and scientists saying billions more birds will likely die because of this move. You hear more about it Case CBS News anchor Jennifer Hunt has spoke with Richard Frank, professor of environmental practice and director of the California Environmental Law and Policy Center at UC Davis. What protections were in place for these birds. And what does that have to do with the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act? Well. Congress passed that law in 1918 over a century ago, basically the implement treaties that the United States had initially with Canada and now Mexico, Japan and Russia to provide international protection and now domestic protection to migratory bird species. A wide variety and about 800 of such species are currently listed under federal law here in the United States. Some of the Trump administration says the action apply only to birds killed or harmed intentionally, and the Fish and Wildlife Service says the change would quote improve consistency and efficiency and enforcement. So what do they mean by this? Well, I think they're trying to reduce the scope of the traditional application of this statue, which is provided very important protection for a variety of migratory bird species. It would Reverse a policy that Republican and Democratic administrations have followed for at least a half century of including as violations of the statute industry activities whose practices have the effect of killing Wildlife and, uh, wildlife Biologist currently predict that this reduction in the scope of the law will will really cause about one half billion to over a billion birds. Additional bird deaths Per year. So is there any way of avoiding that? I mean, two opponents have the time any time at all in order to try and reverse it. Yes, sir. A three policy options that opponents of this regulatory initiative can pursue. They consume challenge the Trump Administration regulation. I understand that a number of organizations like the National Audubon Society Defenders of Wildlife. And perhaps joined by the state of California will suit to block the regulation. It's possible that Congress could intervene in January by invoking the Congressional Review Act and can nullify regulatory programs from the executive branch doesn't like and third and finally, of course, the incoming Brydon an administration could initiate its own rulemaking proceeding to reverse this new and in my view, ill advised policy of the Trump Administration, but that That is the alternative that would take the longest amount of time to implement. So tell our listeners in urine in your opinion, why it is ill advised. Well, the way it is well documented that the actions of a variety of regular regulatory industries like coal and gas industry, uh the electric utility line operators, telecommunication kennel communication towers, wind turbines cause devastate populations of these migratory. Bird populations, and there are a variety of existing well known technologies that can dramatically reduce or eliminate those those bird kills. And this regulation, of course, removes all incentives of members, the regulated community to adopt those needed and environmentally benign reforms. That's Richard Frank, professor of environmental practice and director of the California Environmental Law and Policy Center. At U C.

Trump Administration Richard Frank Jennifer Hunt California Environmental Law A Cbs News Uc Davis United States Congress Fish And Wildlife Service Russia Mexico Japan National Audubon Society Defenders Of Wildlife Canada Brydon California
Under Cover of Thanksgiving, Trump Administration Pushes to Relax Rules Protecting Birds

All Things Considered

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Under Cover of Thanksgiving, Trump Administration Pushes to Relax Rules Protecting Birds

"Step toward weakening legal protections for migrating birds. NPR's Martin cost reports, the administration says the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 has been interpreted to broadly. The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service now says that companies should be penalized on Lee when they're quote, purposeful in killing birds in hazards such as waste oil pits. Sarah Greenberger of the Conservation group Autobahn says the administration is trying to make its current hands off attitude permanent. The final rule change would remove any obligation but any industry to implement any best management practices. Some companies say they'd try to protect birds anyway. Without the threat of penalties. The Trump Administration rule could be published in a month. The incoming Biden administration could reverse it, but that would take time. Martin cost NPR NEWS Wall Street The Dow was up 37

Martin Cost U. S. Fish And Wildlife Servic Sarah Greenberger NPR LEE Trump Administration Biden Martin
Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

"Trump administration says it plans to move forward on a measure that would do away with protections for roughly a thousand different species of birds in the us move by the administration coming despite objections from federal officials in many scientists who say billions. More birds could perish in coming decades. Those restrictions are removed. Us fish and wildlife service posted its assessment of the rule the final stat. Meaning a rollback would become official within thirty days oil and gas industries of long-sought rollback that limits federal prosecution for industry practices to kill an estimated four hundred and fifty million to one billion birds a

Trump Administration Fish And Wildlife Service United States
Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

"The Trump Administration is moving forward on gutting a longstanding federal protection for roughly 1000 species of birds in the United States. Face move comes despite objections from former federal officials and many scientists that billions more birds will likely perish in coming decades. As a result, US Fish and Wildlife Service published its assessment of the rule of final steps. That means the Rollback could become official in 30 days or on gas and other industries had sought the rollback, which sharply limits federal prosecution for industry practices that killed migratory birds. Industry operations killed estimated 450 million to one the 10.1 billion birds every

Trump Administration Us Fish And Wildlife Service United States
World's last known white giraffe gets GPS tracking device

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

World's last known white giraffe gets GPS tracking device

"The only known white giraffe in the world of male has been tracked with the GPS device to protect it from poachers in Kenya, a conservation group in Kenya says. The white giraffe now stands alone after a female and her calf were killed by poachers. In March. A rare genetic code called Lucas, Um, causes the white color. He makes the one surviving giraffe standard dangerously for poachers in the arid savannah near the Somali border. Now the GPS tracking device attached to one of the drops horns will ping every hour to alert Wildlife rangers to its location. Conservations have thanked the Kenya Wildlife Service along with the Northern rangelands Trust. I'm Charles

Kenya Kenya Wildlife Service Northern Rangelands Trust Charles
Australia begins disposal of over 350 dead whales after mass stranding

WBZ Morning News

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Australia begins disposal of over 350 dead whales after mass stranding

"Biggest mass whale stranding will probably remain a mystery. But scientists say the social nature of the species may have played a part. 108 of about 470 pilot whales have been rescued from sandbars theme Parks and Wildlife service say there are no living whales remaining. In the harbor. The pod got into trouble earlier this week, with efforts now turning to the task of disposing 350 carcasses at sea experts. Say pilot whales to form strong family bonds and if one that gets in trouble, they put out a distress call and come together as a group.

"wildlife service" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:57 min | 5 months ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on AP News

"The trump administration's working to change environmental rules to allow the government to deny habitat protections for endangered species if they interfere with development critics say the changes proposed by the US fish and Wildlife Service to deny protections for endangered species in areas that would see greater economic benefits from being developed could open protected areas to more energy development and commercial activities like logging it's the latest move by the trump administration to change how the Endangered Species Act is U. sed wildlife advocates say the administration's approach has put natural resource extraction and commercial development over protecting sites that are home to dwindling populations of endangered species Jackie Quinn Washington

Wildlife Service Jackie Quinn Washington US
"wildlife service" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:57 min | 5 months ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on AP News

"The trump administration's working to change environmental rules to allow the government to deny habitat protections for endangered species if they interfere with development critics say the changes proposed by the US fish and Wildlife Service to deny protections for endangered species in areas that would see greater economic benefits from being developed could open protected areas to more energy development and commercial activities like logging it's the latest move by the trump administration to change how the Endangered Species Act is U. sed wildlife advocates say the administration's approach has put natural resource extraction and commercial development over protecting sites that are home to dwindling populations of endangered species Jackie Quinn Washington

Wildlife Service Jackie Quinn Washington US
US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

"The trump administration's working to change environmental rules to allow the government to deny habitat protections for endangered species if they interfere with development critics say the changes proposed by the US fish and Wildlife Service to deny protections for endangered species in areas that would see greater economic benefits from being developed could open protected areas to more energy development and commercial activities like logging it's the latest move by the trump administration to change how the Endangered Species Act is U. sed wildlife advocates say the administration's approach has put natural resource extraction and commercial development over protecting sites that are home to dwindling populations of endangered species Jackie Quinn Washington

Wildlife Service Jackie Quinn Washington United States
US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

"The trump administration's working to change environmental rules to allow the government to deny habitat protections for endangered species if they interfere with development critics say the changes proposed by the US fish and Wildlife Service to deny protections for endangered species in areas that would see greater economic benefits from being developed could open protected areas to more energy development and commercial activities like logging it's the latest move by the trump administration to change how the Endangered Species Act is U. sed wildlife advocates say the administration's approach has put natural resource extraction and commercial development over protecting sites that are home to dwindling populations of endangered species Jackie Quinn Washington

Wildlife Service Jackie Quinn Washington United States
Harris mentions Indigenous people in DNC speech

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 5 months ago

Harris mentions Indigenous people in DNC speech

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez. The Keystone Excel pipeline hit a snag earlier this year when it's water crossing permit from the US, Army Corps of Engineers was vacated by federal judge the core ask the US Supreme Court to lift that order but the high court declined the fast track permit was a problem because it did not require extensive environmental review. Now, TC energy has applied to the core as well as the fish and Wildlife Service for permits that will undergo public scrutiny Victoria. Wicks has more Transcanada or TC. Energy has applied for permits the keystone xl pipeline under the Clean Water Act t C. as requesting those permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers and from state regulatory. Agencies in South Dakota Montana and Nebraska TC has also applied to the US fish and Wildlife Service for what's called an incidental take permit under the Endangered Species Act that allows the pipeline company to harm or destroy endangered or threatened species. If the destruction is incidental to the construction operation and maintenance of the Keystone Excel pipeline the species at issue is the American burying beetle in tripp county in South Dakota and four counties in Nebraska. The other permit application to the corps of Engineers allows the pipeline to cross more than seven hundred locations that would affect wetlands and water bodies in its public announcement. The court says it will balance the benefit of the pipeline against reasonably foreseeable harm the application to. The core covers clean water act requirements under section four, zero four. Another section for a one is regulated by states, Montana is holding its own hearings but South Dakota's Nebraska's are incorporated with the federal process deadline for public comment efficient wildlife is September sixteenth and deadline to the course September thirteenth the course says, after receiving comments, it will conduct public hearings and issue its findings later for national native news I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city south. Dakota Senator Kamala Harris accepted the Democratic Party nomination for Vice President Wednesday night and her speech to the. Democratic. National Convention Harris Mentioned Indigenous People twice once when talking about how cove in nineteen has disproportionately impacted people of Color and when talking about unity. With the Joe Biden. Presidential. Administration this week the DNC native American caucus has been rallying around the party's ticket touting the candidates knowledge of Indian country issues among backers or native American congresswomen, deb Holland, and cherise. David's here's David's speaking at an event earlier this week saying the upcoming election depends on putting people in office who are strong partners for native communities be heard it already, this is going to start with as electing vice president, Joe Biden until the White House and I know when elected vice president going to continue his commitment he's already been demonstrating it during his campaign, his Minton, the communities and I know he's going to ensure that the federal government upholds promises and obligations. Treaty. Treaty, obligations to Indian country in that native voices are going to be at the table they're to be. Heard in the ice levels of our government and. That's right now native participants of the Convention have discussed a number of Indian country issues from climate change to youth empowerment, messing and murdered indigenous people cove nineteen and the native vote. Thursday's the final day of the Convention, the native American Caucus will me and bite him. We'll take the stage to deliver a speech. The Cherokee nation has lost a treasured linguist among contributions. Durban feeling wrote the Cherokee. Dictionary. Helped get Cherokee syllabi on smartphones and developed language teaching materials feeling passed away this week at age seventy four. I'm Antonio, Gonzalez.

South Dakota Army Corps Of Engineers Us Supreme Court Vice President Nebraska Joe Biden Antonio Gonzalez Tc Energy United States Senator Kamala Harris Wildlife Service Minton Montana Corps Of Engineers Wicks Democratic Party Durban Victoria
Trump signs bipartisan conservation legislation

Rush Limbaugh

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Trump signs bipartisan conservation legislation

"President Trump taking part in a signing ceremony today. The Great American Outdoors Act provides $900 million a year in guaranteed funding for the Land and Water Conservation fund so that all Americans can continue to enjoy our parks. Wildlife refuges. I mean, you look at this. You look at what we do with our wildlife. The bipartisan legislation will provide repairs to Park infrastructure permanently Fund, the Land and Water conservation fund and allocate $3 billion for other environmental conservation agencies. Such is the Fish and Wildlife Service. Trump Administration officials say the bill will also create an additional 100,000 direct and indirect

President Trump Fish And Wildlife Service Trump Administration
Why Does the Hellbender Salamander Need Our Help?

BrainStuff

03:42 min | 7 months ago

Why Does the Hellbender Salamander Need Our Help?

"Lauren Vogel here. A remote freshwater streams somewhere in the eastern United States the waters cool. There's a reasonably fast current, and the bottom is littered with big flat. Rocks sounds peaceful, doesn't it? What you're imagining is a perfect environment for trout, and for something else to every so often anglers who cast their lines in such places wind up catching North America's biggest salamander. This thing leaves an impression specimens measuring twenty nine inches long. That's seventy three centimeters have been documented and the beefy EST adults way forty five pounds. That's about two to two and a half kilos. These four legged amphibians have compressed heads and torsos, meaning that judging by outward appearance. It thinks someone had squished these critters flat with a rolling pin. Another key attribute is there brown to Greyish skin which hangs noticeably loose around their flanks. Early settlers didn't know what to make of. These guys baffled by their appearance. Some folks began calling them that offers devil dogs or mud devils. The species would receive. Scientific name crypto branches allegany intil eighteen. Oh! But nowadays most people know this strange salamander. The Hell Bender. Hell benders are divided into two sub species northern Arkansas and southern Missouri are the home of the endangered ozark. Hell Bender the eastern hell. Bender has a broader distribution having spread itself across the Great Appalachian region and parts of the Midwest. Though sadly, it also got conservationists worried. Some Amphibians are equally at home on land and in the water, but hell benders are more or less totally aquatic. Their skin absorbs oxygen, pulling it straight out of the water that leaves Hell Benders at the mercy of pollutants and excess silt runoff dumped into their streams by forest. Clearing projects sure doesn't help. One report published in two thousand seven by the US. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that the ozark hell bender will become functionally extinct by the year twenty, twenty six in less protective measures are taken. As Twenty nineteen. It was still classified as endangered by the US fish and Wildlife Service which said that in some good news, most populations of the hell bender. Endanger of extinction and therefore do not warrant listing under the endangered species, act. To help boost populations of the ozark hell bender. The Saint Louis Zoo teamed up with the Missouri Department of Conservation and established a successful breeding program in twenty eleven. And just last year Pennsylvania reading awareness about this wonderful species by naming the eastern Hell Bender it's official State Amphibian. Maybe such efforts will improve the Salamanders PR. There's a pervasive belief that the hell bender has venomous bite, but this is untrue. The Hell Bender wheeled no venom and spite rumors to the contrary. The Infineon's do not hurt game fish populations. crawfish make up over ninety percent of the hell. Benders Diet, other potential prey items include tadpoles, smaller, Salamanders and small fish. The creatures are most active at night. They spend their days taking refuge under submerged logs or stream bottom rocks,

Bender United States Wildlife Service Lauren Vogel North America Infineon Saint Louis Zoo Missouri Department Of Conserv Midwest Arkansas Great Appalachian Missouri Pennsylvania Official
Farallones

PODSHIP EARTH

08:39 min | 9 months ago

Farallones

"Happy Birthday Week. While we're all at home in the new normal feeling anything but normal the one thing worth celebrating life itself the pandemic has shown us just how fragile and beautiful life is the veneer of invincibility that we built up over. The last decades has been stripped away in an instant. We're now learning what we always have known but not acted upon which is the each day's precious and magical and that we can't take anything most especially health and the health of our planet for granted in that spirit of adventure. There's one place in San Francisco I've been trying to explore for nearly twenty years. The remote Farallon islands thirty miles off the Golden Gate Bridge on a clear day. You can see this. Cluster of three main islands from the shore. But here's the catch. They closed to the public. Because the farallones one of the largest seabird colonies in the nation the islands also hosts two seals great white sharks and many different species of whale. The farallon islands national wildlife refuge is one of sixty three such refugees around the country and the waters surrounding. The islands are protected as part of the great farallones National Marine Sanctuary for decades point Blue Conservation Science Petaluma based research organization whose mission is to conserve birds wildlife and ecosystems through innovative science partnerships and outreach his continuously had teams of scientists located on the Farallon's point blue has a formal research agreement with the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Every few weeks point blue works with local boat owners who volunteer to resupply the Farallon scientists with food. I was lucky enough to tag along for the ride. I get on the boat. The outer limits in Sao Salida and we begin our journey. I'm joined by Pete Wolsey Buck who's point blue's senior marine ecologist and spent more time on the islands than anyone else on the planet while still on the boat. I stopped by asking Pete. Exactly how long point blue has been conducting research on the Pharisees? Yeah point blue has been working out on the fare lawns for more than fifty years We've had people on the island every single day since April Third Ikin. Sixty eight which is crazy. And it's just hard to believe that this fat much data scientific data going all the way back to the sixties. It is pretty incredible. There are not very many Continuous long term data sets especially for seabird monitoring throughout the world and the have one in an area special is a fair launch is in an incredible opportunity. And if you know this pizza I've been trying to get to the farallones like twenty two. It's a big deal super foggy today at does it. I don't know hopefully the Fogle if you've been out here a long time once you once you bet I think most times the fog lists sometimes mid to late morning But we have a lot of very very few days out of the airlines. The combination of the cold ocean water and warmer temperatures on the mainland tends to lead to fog out at the highlands. And you could have days when you get out there to the islands can't even see it until he could get on land. I mean yeah we like now maybe half a mile and I'd just just saw and it's pretty mad. I mean it's magical. They just kind of jot. How of the Pacific do you remember? First time seeing the farallones I do. I was going out. This was in the spring of two thousand. I was going out as a volunteer research. Assistant and We were on a long slow boat ride on a very rough day and We started sailing at about midnight. We got to the island about seven. Am and shortly. After the Sun was rising I started to see the islands poking up over the horizon and it was just an incredibly magical site by still remember a Dan. I still have the image in my head. Yeah it's it does feel like the mist of Avalon where the knights of King Arthur would like see. The Misr is and it kind of reminds me of some magical place. How the hell do we get from this big bill up on the cliffs above us it? It looks like a treacherous. I mean what? What's the procedure? It is rather complicated So the islands themselves are very rocky. There's no safe place to land a boat Island just kind of jumped right out of the ocean as you were saying so what we do. Is we have a crane. That's on the east side of the island and we use that to lower small landing craft into the ocean and that will drive out our boat and then from there it will shuttle the people and gear back and forth between the island and the the vote. That's burning us out here. The boat look Mike Below as like his has made out of metal. I've never seen like such a small wise. The vote metal Yeah Orlando Craft is what's called a safe vote and it's a solid aluminum hull with the flotation of styrofoams flotation secured. Around the outside of it. So it's a very sturdy boat and you can imagine when you're lifting it up out of the water with your in it or people in it And and you're moving it back and forth in his rough environment. You want very sturdy boat. So we're we're very happy to have it for them but then it looks like we have to be light. Lifted like fifty feet in the air. Which I've I've presumed that we're going to be in the boat. When that happens. It looks terrifying. Oh It's definitely unique and You know if you're afraid of heights it could be terrifying but now you tell me I I will assure you. It's all very safe You know we've been doing it this way for a very long time going into a little cove. You're going to hook the vote onto this crane and then you're gonNA lifted about thirty feet up in the air and swinging it over landing so it is a very unique and interesting way to use a boat.

Farallon Islands Pete Wolsey Buck Farallon Boat Island Us Fish And Wildlife Service San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge Farallones National Marine San Blue Conservation Science Peta Sao Salida Fogle King Arthur
Man dies after being bitten by shark near Great Barrier Reef

Steve and Ted

00:21 sec | 10 months ago

Man dies after being bitten by shark near Great Barrier Reef

"S. shark fatally mauled a young Australian wildlife worker on the Great Barrier Reef queens and officials say the twenty three year old victim worked for the Queensland's parks and Wildlife Service police say the man was in the water returning to a vessel chartered by the service when he was attacked yesterday near northwest island suffered extensive injuries to his leg and arm and died at a hospital

Great Barrier Reef Queensland Northwest Island Wildlife Service
Oil pipeline route changed to save endangered Kenyan zebra with the help of AI and citizen scientists

The Science Show

09:38 min | 10 months ago

Oil pipeline route changed to save endangered Kenyan zebra with the help of AI and citizen scientists

"And finally also the triple. As A. I. TO RESCUE Zemmiri's Dan Rubenstein is a professor of biology at Princeton. Ai Comes in two forms. One is supervised machine learning and the others unsupervised machine learning and we use the supervised version in the sense that we can train algorithms to identify zebras by their stripes by the natural bar codes. And once we do that we're able to take photographs that scientists get or citizens get as they drive around on safari or school kids. Get as they come out to the national parks and we're able to say is this animal and seen before and because most cameras will have A. Gps or at least a time stamp will know where it was seeing and when it was seen so they I can start to tell us who went and wear an animal is on the landscape and then we can start to put together. Descriptions and visualizations of its movements. We can look at where it's home ranges are this because particularly important because in one example. We've always been troubled. Why WANTS PEACE? Zebra gravy Zebra with the long thin stripes in the white belly in the Big Round. Mickey Mouse years are much less Paris than the Common Zebra. The planes eve which had big fat stripes that touch under the belly and it turns out. It's because the plains Zebra drink every day and they go to water and around waters lots of Deng and Deng have parasitic eggs from nematodes that then mature into questing larvae and the larvae. Then wait on the grass to be ingested and so by going to the water every day they reinfecting themselves frequently but the gravy zebra are arid adapted. They only have to come to water. Abouts every three to five days and so we thought Maybe they're so far from water whether very few dung piles whether it's very few questing larvae. They don't get infected as much. Maybe they're healthier because of that test that with you take pictures of animals at waterholes. You don't know how often they come there but if you measure their home range and make the assumption that if the home rages close to water. They use water a lot in the central. Did the home ranges far from water. Then they won't use that waterhole very often and hence they'll be grazing where there are may being larvae. We were able to prove this. Isn't that wonderful now? What if you had no air? What if you had no pictures? How long would it take you to get to that point to understand what's going on you know? In the old days in the old days I used to hand draw every zebra stripes and I would go through and look at my pictures. Then we have one hundred animals. That's easy but when you've got thousands of animals and thousands of new drawings to be processed. You'd be there all year just looking at pictures not doing the science so over time. I worked with different types of technologies all of which sped up the work a little. But it's the machine learning and it's in what we call wild book. We've created facebook for animals where we have images for whale sharks and leopards and Cheetahs and zebras we can process tens of thousands of images so the AI. Naturally speeds up the work. It changes the scale at which you can operate on no longer. You restricted studying a few animals that you put. Gps collars on you can study the majority of the individuals in a population and therefore make inferences. That are probably going to be more biologically accurate and to get all these pictures from even kids in the field on holiday. Whatever is the public willing to hand these other limb to you the gravy Zebra which is very endangered species. No one actually knew how many there were. Everyone's said about two thousand. Maybe twenty five hundred and with numbers that have high variability. No government is going to invest very heavily in projects to try to conserve the species. If they're not really sure if they're at risk and so how. Do you get really good numbers. Will you help blitz? And we do it on a Saturday and Sunday two days in a row but we don't have to invasive Lee touch these animals because they naturally bar coded but how do you get all the images around twenty five thousand square kilometers. Well you work with the many publics and Kenya you work on the conservancies up north by giving cameras with GPS recording ability to the people in the communities that share the landscape with the zebras and their livestock then you can also close Konare. Ob still five hours away. You can engage the public to come up for a weekend. We get discounts from the hotel's people bring their kids and go camping. The kids get to use their parents cameras. For the first time we bring school kids up from the slums of Nairobi. And blend them with the kids. From the landscapes. We work out in the immortal bushy areas so they get to see kids from different lifestyles so becomes a social experiment. Social Novelty Fun weekend and we get about forty or fifty thousand images from this and we do it. What animals are seeing on Day One? What animals are seen on Day? Two and then we very simple question. What fraction of animals that were seen on Day Two? We're seeing on day one and this allows us to estimate the population size using simple statistics. Let me ask you a slightly political question. Let's say you've found an endangered species in small numbers and there's a major development happening and you go to the people who in charge of this major development with millions. And you say there's a problem. What kind of response do you get? That's happened in the real world with us in Kenya. So we noticed on one particular. The Zebra numbers were going down and we knew that the lions were adapting to the very predictable movements of the prey. The zebras we also know it was a conservancy that had eco-tourism so the people wanted to both see endangered grabby Zebra and they want the sea. Lions so lion numbers are very high and they were just picking off the gravy Zebra and we went to the Kenya. Wildlife Service and said. Could we do some adoptive management and experiment with reproductive control not to eliminate the lines but the slow the line growth rate so that both species could coexist and their initial response was well in nature this predators and prey and they have to learn to live with each other and so our request was denied? We weren't asking for any money. We're just asking permission to use this contraceptive technique after the great gravity's rally when we shared the data for the number of Grevy Zebras by county and most counties had about thirty percent recruits. That's Vince one. Year olds in two year olds are mathematical models say that a population will sustain itself. Bits bits about thirty percent made of these juveniles and infants. They saw the population on the part of Mary. County as being the only one way out of line when they saw that we now can use birth control and that comes because when we talked to the cabinet secretary said I believe your numbers and I believe your analysis because you didn't get the data. The public got the data. My citizens got the data from the pastoral people to the school kids to the urbanites middle-class in Nairobi. It was a national effort and by making sure that everybody got involved. Those numbers become real. In the minds of policymakers and sways them to change their behavior. Sure but what? If it's pipeline motivates with millions millions of dollars and examples that indeed Kenya discovered oil and its northwest corner and move that oil to Lamu on the coast. A NEW PIPELINE NEEDS TO BE BUILT. Pipelines caused lots of problems in the US issues everywhere. This pipeline this fears that it's going to disrupt animal movements because corridors are going to be blocked that animals views. And if you don't know where the cars are and you don't know where the hot spots are where the animals breed and where they get their resources. There's really no way you're going to be able to try to attenuate these negative consequences so all our data showing where the animals are and where the babies were and where the moms were and where their home ranges were and how they move by season. We were able to demonstrate that the route of the pipeline has it was proposed would not only go right through the nursery area where the MOMS take the babies to fatten quickly but it also blocked a lot of the carters that allowed them to get to the dry season. Refuge is where the food was that they needed when the rain stopped. We then wrote up a report. As part of the environmental impact statement assessment and the government and the Pipeline Committee realized that with the iconic historic species the gravy Zebra being only two thousand eight hundred left on in Kenya and the basically three thousand left on the planet. Because they have a few hundred Ethiopia. They decided to change the pipeline. And that cost many. Millions of dollars weld Yeah that's where science matters but again it's science not done by the Shamans wearing the white coat in the experts at science. That's a partnership between the muddy booty colleges the technologists that have Ai. That make the day to get gathered at a different scale. In both time and space we can get it quickly and we can get it wide ranging and to get that they that we need the public and so by blending those three partners. That's what makes government's move professor. Dan Rubenstein at Princeton and AAA S. The public that's you make government's move. He said

Kenya AI Nairobi Dan Rubenstein Professor Princeton Grevy Zebras A. Gps Lions Deng Pipeline Committee Ethiopia Facebook Zemmiri Wildlife Service United States LEE
Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

Short Wave

08:50 min | 11 months ago

Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

"TALKING FRESHWATER MUSSELS. And the fact that they're dying off. Where should we start so I actually want to take you to South West Virginia right near the border with Tennessee? Mattie put on your waiters done okay because we're about to get into the waters of the clinch river so the clinch river flows at the feet of the southern Appalachian Mountains. The water is cold very clear and that is good news because freshwater mussels live on the bottom of rivers. They're kind of like sorta like the less edible version of their saltwater cousin they don't get the same love but they bury themselves in the sediment and among the rocks on the bottoms of rivers and I went out to find some of these muscles with Jordan Richard a biologist with the US fish and wildlife service who is obsessed with freshwater mussels and it did not take him long waiting out into the water for him to find what he did not want to see how long this is a matter of like. How long does it take until we see something that died very recently won? Shell was just laying there even say it's not buried. That's its footing Jordan. There he'd reached into the water and pulled out that muscle a pheasant shell. That's the species but should be buried in food. Not that's dead and this show is about the size of his palm. It's this beautiful. Golden Brown color But the Muslim side is usually a smooth. Pink is turning Greyish Brown and frayed around Sedgwick's Basically it's rotting in place. I saw that one took a few steps out and by the time I stopped right there at like five expecting not a good way which I'm pretty I'm pretty used to like coming out of your thing and I'm GonNa see just getting completely like bombed with the muscles but it's obsolete lousy you out there finding like dead muscle after dead muscle. Yeah I mean they were everywhere and you heard Jordan say but this is really not what he was expecting. It was not the time of year that they typically see a bunch of mortality You know he was just being nice and taking a reporter but biologists have been going at different sections of the clinch river since it was first noted in two thousand sixteen and in just one section of that river the US Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that the number of pheasant shell muscles that have died is in the hundreds of thousands knee. It sounded like I don't know just hearing his voice on the tape that he was super upset. Yeah I mean he was on the verge of tears when we were talking and then he tried to apologize about later. Which I didn't think was obviously not necessary but it was upset because he's so frustrated by what's happening they don't know what's causing this and there's this kind of feeling of helplessness. This guy is so passionate about freshwater ego systems. It's his entire life. I mean he actually said that he had three fish tanks house one by his bed one by the foot of his bed and one in the living room so yeah very understanding wife. Okay but let's talk a little bit more about why people are trying so hard to save these muscles. They play a really important role in freshwater ecosystems. Right totally so. They don't often get the attention they deserve. Here's someone who knows that all too well. People don't tend to get quite as excited about things that lack burns. Unfortunately that was emily blevins. She's a conservation biologist with Versi Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Which you know besides having a really cool name is a nonprofit that focuses on some of the world's more under loved Chrisny. I'LL SAY AT ONCE. I'LL SAY THOUSAND TIMES INVERTEBRATES. Don't get enough credit. I know I mean I think as vertebrates are a little biased but these muscles do deserve a ton of credit. There are filter feeders so that means that they filter water through them. While they're down they're just chilling on River Bottoms. There's research that shown they can remove pharmaceuticals from the water and pesticides and flame retardants and they remove E. coli from the water. They're like our little water filters exactly so a few of the biologists. I talked to really did say you can think of them. As nature's equivalent to a BRITTA filter cleaning up the water that we drink implant but they all sorts of cool stuff like reducing the size and impacts of dead zones. Those big nasty you know fishing life killing phenomena to keep occurring in the Gulf. They do that by filtering out. Sediment and agricultural runoff They sequester carbon phosphorus heavy metals in their shells. They reduce fecal bacteria from water. And you know like what's not to love about Madonna got it thank God. A single freshwater. Mussel can filter more than fifteen gallons of water in a day and besides that they provide habitat to tons of other species. One biologist described them as like the fresh water equivalent to a coral reef. So these muscles are clearly out here doing a lot of work. We don't have any idea what's causing these die-offs so no I mean we have some hunches but you know Jordan. The biologists set it could be a million different things that is causing this There's a bunch of folks working on this from around. The country. University was constant is doing a lot of work and they've recently identified a virus and bacteria that they say are statistically associated with the dial keywords being you know statistically associated so not enough to say hey dingaling we found it but they're highly suspicious of a pathogenic cause and that is where their research is focused right now. What about the stuff like we? Humans are doing on climate. Change for example. Does that seem to be a contributor at all? Well I mean there's no doubt. The climate change is stressing river ecosystems as it is just about every system everywhere but it does not seem to be the driver of what's going on here as far as scientists can tell But I think it's important to note that there are other human components it sort of brought us to this place as I mentioned freshwater mussels or already on the brink and that is because of human activity fun fact before the Aplastic Freshwater Mussels were actually collected in cultivated by the millions to satisfy a commercial demand for buttons. Their shells were pearly white inside right. Thanks for Buttons Fresh Harman's But even more damaging was just you know the general destruction that was brought along by Human Development. So there was pollution from coal mining in the southern Appalachia Rivers dammed for power streams diverted for agriculture wetlands pay for housing and all of those things have brought freshwater mussels to the point where a mysterious die off can happen and it becomes so crucial to find out why fast because there's so little wiggle room left in the system all right eight. Your bumming me out. What's the plan? So there is a contingency plan all right and there always needs to be a contingency plan But like most contingency plans. It's one that nobody wants to use in this case it's a hatchery or nursery more or less for freshwater mussels one of our living screams So pheasant shells in here. That's the one that really dial so basically this place is like a last line of defense for some of these species they're going to breed them in captivity so at least they're not totally gone from planet earth. Exactly so tim and the other. Biologists are reproducing muscles. Here keeping them safe until they're mature enough to be brought back into the wild they're basically stock and when the recent die off started on the clinch river. They brought a bunch of muscles here from part of the river that wasn't affected And those muscles could not just be used as stock but they could also use a baseline a healthy sample to us as they search for the die-offs 'cause Worst case scenario they have to take some of those muscles and try to repopulate parts of the Clinch River. Where the muscles of Dino are going to stand idly by watching the way we're GonNa do the best we can to help them produce progeny. So of the species isn't going for Jordan Richard. The biologist remitted beginning also is helping with this effort and he says it you know he knows. That muscles aren't as photogenic as a rhinoceros or polar bears but freshwater mussels are crucial to the health of other species. So if they go. We're going to have a lot of problems is not sexy to care about the foundation of Your House and you could renovate your kitchen but he says if that foundation is crumbling and you ignore it by the time you notice a problem because you fall through the floor. It's too late to do anything about it. And then everything else including your fancy. New Kitchen is going to fall through to

Clinch River Jordan Richard Us Fish And Wildlife Service Tennessee River Bottoms Shell South West Virginia Appalachian Mountains Mattie Versi Society For Invertebrate Gulf Britta Reporter Emily Blevins Appalachia Rivers Dino Human Development
The Comeback Bird: Meet the Ko'Ko'

Short Wave

05:49 min | 1 year ago

The Comeback Bird: Meet the Ko'Ko'

"Hey everybody I have shortwave reporter. Emily Kwong in the studio with me. Hey Mattie hey you you so today we are turning a spotlight on Guam which is a US island territory in the Pacific Ocean. That's right Guam. Is An eight hour plane ride from Hawaii Wii but a quick phone call for us to reach Suzanne Medina. She's a wildlife biologist with the Guam Department of Agriculture. We spoke with her at five fifteen in the morning. Her Time Eight. I naturally get up early. I enjoy the quiet. In the morning on Guam assists a little too quiet because there are no birds that are are waking up with us. Why is it so oh quiet? I feel like it's a tropical island so it should be bustling with some birdsongs. You would think but sometime. In the Mid Twentieth Century Guam's biodiversity diversity began to take a nosedive because of one slithering stowaway. Yeah in the late. Nineteen forties the island was being rebuilt. This was after World War. Two and some military cargo ships arrived with Brown tree. Snakes on board be snakes are venomous. Prolific tree climbers and most significantly. They have no natural predators on Guam. So they're eating all kinds of stuff but nobody's really eating them. Essentially yeah the Brown tree. Snakes invaded the island gobbling up eggs and birds at a rate that was really shocking. It profoundly alter the ecosystem in Guam and the forests grew for more and more silent with every passing year because of this one snake. Yeah and biologists. They felt totally helpless because they didn't have money to bring these preyed upon John Bird populations into captivity and no one in the scientific community including fish and Wildlife Service believed that a snake or what invasive Predator could take an entire population. It had never been documented before. So that's why it wasn't until the late nineteen eighties that we were able the start to receive funding on recovering birds and by that point multiple forest dwelling bird species had disappeared. Some of them only found on Guam. They became totally extinct in the wild meaning. They aren't in nature anymore but there are a few of them in captivity. Yes and there were two species headed in that direction. The Micronesian Kingfisher Fisher which is called the Sea Hake in tomorrow the indigenous language of Guam and the Guam rail which is called the cocoa military personnel assisted in creating these human human chains to scoop up the remaining birds including twenty-one cocoa and from this founder population of captive birds almost forty years since the cocoa go vanished from the wild in Guam. There are now more cocoa in the wild then in captivity. The cocoa is back back again again. No cocoa okay. All right tell a friend today on the show. We cocoa the second bird in history that we know love to come back from extinction in the wild. How biologists did it with a little matchmaking and a lot of patients are emily? You've brought us the recovery story of the Guam rail the second bird in history to be brought back from extinction in the wild. What do they look like? Okay so Guam. Rails which are called Coco in. Guam are about a foot tall brown with a grey stripe above their eyes. And they don't fly so when Coco's were thriving in Guam rancher scattering chickenfeed would often see them Creep in out of the forest. There's wonderful stories of families leaving their doors open to their houses. which is what we do and you would find? A Family Coco in in your house. Just kind of like hanging out in there and maybe foraging in the kitchen or whatever you just have to push them out the door they slugs snails seeds flowers out there getting food they can get it. Aren't we all right and they have what's called a territorial call and it's a very long one minute Data data data data that that that the data in it just goes on and on. Suzanne Medina loves these birds. She came to Guam in nine hundred ninety seven and by that time the forest had grown pretty quiet. The trees had been a native birds weren't around to disperse their seeds in. You mean like disperse them with their poop. That's right poop doesn't and get enough credit. It's important no. It's true and in the absence of these native birds. The spiders they preyed upon totally surged. Suzanne actually carries a stick. Dick as she walks around the forest knockoff spiderweb so the forests are just all out of whack so clearly. The situation is pretty bad. How did Suzanne and her colleagues bring back Sococo well? One of their first allies in his effort. Zoos on the American mainland so in the late nineteen eighties. Zoologist at the Guam Department of Agriculture named Bob Beck championed a major recovery effort. This founding group of twenty-one Coco's that were captured were split up. Some were sent to zoos zoos including the Smithsonian Zoo here in DC that was Guam's insurance population like a bird savings account shirk. The other birds were kept in Guam to to be the production population so to be bred in captivity and eventually released but there was a big problem. What was that well? The offspring the first generation born in captivity did not want to make babies. There's a lot of aggression issues with them. Some perspective mates would actually fight each other instead. I mean captivity is pretty stressful. It's definitely not a mood setter uh-huh and these biologists did not know what to do. It's not like there's an instruction manual for raising cocoa's the birds went extinct in the wild so quickly that there was nothing known on natural history so a lot of what was done in the early years was just trial and error. Uh

Guam Guam Department Of Agriculture Mid Twentieth Century Guam Suzanne Medina Coco Emily Kwong Brown Tree United States Reporter Pacific Ocean Mattie Wildlife Service Bob Beck Sea Hake Dick Smithsonian Zoo
U.S. National Aerobatic Champion Patty Wagstaff Recounts a Cessna 185 Flilght

There I Was...

09:37 min | 1 year ago

U.S. National Aerobatic Champion Patty Wagstaff Recounts a Cessna 185 Flilght

"Welcome to another edition of there. I was a podcast where we put you in the cockpit with pilots in interesting situations and we learn learn how they flew out of them. I'm your host Richard McFadden today. We're delighted to welcome back our inaugural guest on there was podcast three time. US aerobatic robotic national champion. Paddy waxed how do you thank you for joining us again. And we're delighted to have you back on the podcast ace. Richard is great to be back. You're doing a great Javale this podcast. So I'm thrilled to be back. Thank you well great and thanks to people like you. They're so willing to share your circumstances in your situation with all all of us so that we can learn from you had a recent incident on your birthday of all days and you reached out to us to want to share the story about about what happened in the lessons learned. That came out of that. So do you mind sharing that with us today exactly. Yeah it was. My birthday was nine eleven and it was my birthday so all in all not such a great day. Hi It's it's a tough birthday anymore. It's kind of an emotional day anyway so So this was when my bonanza was wrecked in. Had An accident. Might Bonanza of all things I've never had an airplane accident before I've had a few promptings and things like that that for sure but Alone up to everything that I've never had a real accident and just to back it up very very slightly before I started flying i. I was in an accident in assessment to six in Alaska when I first started flying small airplanes up there. Flying in smaller planes in the airplane had Flipped upside down at the end of the runway. We didn't get off the runway and the pilot didn't use the full length of a muddy runway. And so so on so forth so I had been upside down on the ground in an airplane before you and of course those kinds of things really stick with you and so that actually comes into play in this incident. Yeah and people should know they. Probably don't know you for Bonanza flying but you fly one thousand nine hundred fifty eight K.. Model Bonanza that you have flown for a while now Inbetween your aerobatic events which are not so well for right. It's a great little plane to get around in As he says Kay model It was I bought it in nineteen in two thousand twelve and before that I'd had serious in in barons and this was the first detail that I'd had and I re- I really liked it Great little airplane. It was fast and comfortable double and so we miss it yet now. Is the airplane going to be repairable or might be cutting to the chase hurt. No airplanes total. Sorry now aw it was sixty years old so there was a lot. Got A lot out of it. You know for many years later a lot of people enjoyed it and I understand you were flying with an old friend of mine. China Jeff. Rochelle of former Air Force thunderbird pilot is that right. Yeah exactly. He's one of our instructors in good friend and So you were on different front years I think you were you. Were quite a bit later right and the meaning a much younger than he is. I think. That's okay yeah so He's an instructor in your school down there and Saint Augustine. He as instructs for us both in airbags in an upset that training and he also went with us to Kenya this year to give training to Kenya Wildlife Service. Wow fantastic and so you guys were were you coming back where you out on a training sortie Jordy or can you set the stage where it's what kind of flight was this. Sure so this was a we were at a meeting in Titusville about upset training and the weather is nice. Nice no problems in we as we got on the plane to leave. Jeff said Hey What an I fly and I said well you know it's left seats a little tricky to know plane there some little things things I want to show you? And I said it's it's getting laid out the slide this time next time. I'll put you in the left seat because he hadn't actually flown this airplane before and also there's no brakes on the right. Let's see the rudder pedals but they were stowed. I just didn't want to deal with with all that. And he goes okay so I jumped in the legacy but my seatbelt and and we took off and flew back. Who's better forty minute flight back to Saint Augustine? Yeah so important for people to know that. bonanza in this model of detail. Bonanza it has the throw over yoke doc and it also has the rudder pedals that you can stow so the idea. Was the person in the right seat. If you don't want them to has no ability to control the airplane whatsoever you take the okay the rudder pedals and it's just a nice comfortable seat for them. And that's how you had it configured for this Flight Right Act and I certainly wasn't worried about jeff flying the airplane plane. I just didn't want to have to deal with the checkout. It's got a it's got. These older details have The Piano Keys. And that's what controls the flaps APPs in the gear and the reverse from the newer airplanes so even a highly experienced pilot like jeff need to check out on how that works and it's a little awkward to operate. Operate those from the right seat upshur so till two different airplane for sure these these older planes And you have to be very careful not to go go back muscle memory with a new plan so I jumped in the left seat. We flew back Everything was eventful was nice weather. The traffic pattern was uh-huh nobody in the patrimony. Got Back to Saint Augustine and we were cleared to land landed. I landed a little bit long because my hangers down at the far end of runway. One the three To the South we touched down. The centerline Everything is very relaxed and fine and I was rolling out ahead about half flaps on and we were rolling out. I hadn't applied brakes yet. I was very careful with that airplane. It's an older plane and I never haunt on the brakes or you know applied the milliard sure. Yeah does it. Have the old goodyear breaks or or had it been upgraded to Cleveland Breaks. Has Cleveland breaks but I never want to put a lot of side load on the gear so so so just rolling out and all of a sudden the plane sort of ears right into the grass and jeff and I looked at each other. I grabbed the yoke can pulled it back and looked at. He said it's going into the grass. Like I said. Check the power because I have my hands full holding the outback and he checked the his hand on this model to make sure because it idle and meanwhile I tried to steer it with the brakes or the absurd with the rudder pedals and got nothing. I couldn't move them I thought I was just about to slow down and it hit a berm. The small firm. You wouldn't one of those in the grass that you would know is there and the plane started to go over over and we looked at each other and he said it's going over sh and it did it just went straight over tail over nose and ended up upside down on the graphs. Sounds like it just happened so quickly it was quick and It was really surprising. And just you know I mean you just just you in disbelief for a few moments. Just can't believe this actually happened. That's aviation sometimes right there. You are typical normal landing. Everything's fine then. You're slowing down to exit the runway and next thing you know the airplanes starts veer to the right. You run off the runway. You're upside down in a matter of probably less than a minute or two. When all that happened I don't know it's probably just you know thirty seconds? I'm guessing twenty seconds or something like that and I remember somebody saying to me longtime ago you know when accidents happen. They happen very very quickly. It's not something you can prepare for ahead of time. Yeah of course you can prepare everything you can for the you know the worst but when it actually happens you're not can have time to organize things And so as the plane was in. You guys realize we're going over. Did you have time to do anything. They're canaries for impact. Do anything you just have to brace so couple of things that were interesting won. The seat belts are older and the shoulder shoulder. Harnesses are a later addition to the plane. They didn't come shoulder harnesses in the initially and our shoulder harnesses where the kind of Chris cost kind that weren't on an inertial real. We had been wanting to change it but we had the older kind so that when they were on they were a little tight and it was awkward to reach Ford and Change Few uh uh switch fuel tanks and do some other things so what I normally would do is take off with the shoulder harness on and Then take it off in the air when I get up to altitude so I could switch tanks and things like that and then fly without the shoulder harness and a lot of times I have to say. I didn't put it on for landing. Even though I know a lot of times I did but there were times. I didn't in this case because it was a really short flight from Titusville and I knew I didn't have to switch tanks. Thanks consider some Feel management in these older planes. I left my shoulder harness on which was a little unusual for me if I hadn't left. mysolar harness ars on. I probably would have gotten hurt. And Jeff had a shoulder harness on too so we were really lucky with that so we had our differences on. Were upside down and I looked over and said are you okay and I remember being upside down on that Cessna six in nineteen eighty. Maybe to No earlier than that is probably Nineteen seventy-nine in remembered the pilot saying be careful. Be careful her yourself when you get out because there's been a lot of. I think there's been a lot of injuries for people when they upside down. They rip off their seat building. They hit their head and said okay be careful and I remembered it. So it's amazing. How these things are they stay with

Jeff Saint Augustine Richard Mcfadden Titusville United States Instructor Alaska Paddy Kenya Cleveland Breaks Kenya Wildlife Service Cleveland Rochelle Air Force Ford Chris
"wildlife service" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on KGO 810

"And Wildlife Service assistant director Gary Frasier says lifting the blanket protection for newly deem threatened species is a good idea we can regulate the things that are important to not regulate those things that aren't so in the future we will be doing the species specific forty rules for all the speech hello this is right conservation groups say the charges disregard the impacts from climate change one of the largest threats to habitation thousands of bureau a census bureau workers will fan out across the US next week to verify and update residents addresses it's the most labor intensive component of the bureau's preparation this year for the twenty twenty count which starts next spring the workers are known as a listers they'll cover about one third of the nation's physical area and Hines is offering to help reform a catch up thief here's correspondent and Donahue the thief took a bottle of Heinz from a restaurant in New Jersey but they got into a car accident and went through some other misfortunes so here she returned to bottles to the restaurant with a note of apology saying stealing the ketchup was the worst thing they had ever done the person said they are as square as they come and was trying to do something risky when it all went wrong Hines says it found the person and offered on Twitter to pay for the damage from the car crash the company says Heinz makes you do crazy things I'm a Donahue let's have a disco must to seize as the San Francisco Chronicle bill with spoofs of your favorite pop culture characters big hats big hair and big laughs closing December thirty first for tickets visit beach blanket Babylon dot com today and the other will check the roads including.

assistant director Gary Frasier US Hines Donahue New Jersey Twitter Heinz Wildlife Service twenty twenty San Francisco Chronicle
"wildlife service" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Slivers of light appear a postage stamp in the vast Pacific. As soon as we landed it felt like we tumbled down the rabbit hole into a curious wonderland. There are so many birds on the atoll's we can only get here after dark once they settled down for the night as we made our way inland. The albatross chicks were oblivious tour caravan. But by daybreak it seemed like we'd found paradise tiny atoll surrounded by turquoise waters. Spinner dolphins patrol the coastline. Endanger monk seals and giant sea. Turtles best gun. It's white beaches. And of course, the birds. So many birds over million flapping snappy. Chattering liaison, albatross, the largest colony anywhere. They just don't get out of the way. Summer friendlier than others just like people. Amanda Boyd works with the US fish and Wildlife Service which oversees mid one. Every day. It's beaches are the scene of small acts of courage and clumsy. Crash and burn. Once they're off the albatross can spend months at sea venturing thousands of miles the returning to the same spot in the same.

Amanda Boyd US Wildlife Service
"wildlife service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Walruses are among the most striking marine mammals in appearance. They also make some of the most extraordinary sounds heard underwater, I'm to Michener, and this is the pulse of the planet. What's really interesting about walrus? Localize Asians is that they emit these Knox and taps in very specific sequences, and these sequences are then repeated over and over similar to the way Robin would sit up in a tree and sing it song several times throughout the day. Well, similar with the meal walrus he repeats the same song over and over everyday for the duration of the breeding season. Jars with the Canadian Wildlife Service, she's been studying the sounds made by walrus notes that while they're are both short and long vocalisations. A common song has emerged. It's quite amazing to think that the classic pattern of each of the two songs has remained consistent since about nineteen eighty two. There are minor variations, but it's not like the humpback whale song where you see quite substantial changes from one year to the net. Walking along on the sea ice and be able to hear walruses vocalizing right beneath your feet and having the sound sort of transmit up through the ice. It's a very eerie feeling to be out sort of in the middle of nowhere. And yet here all these sounds coming at you from all sorts of directions and not being able to pinpoint what's going on. This archival programs part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Want to hear more? Check out our podcast,.

Michener Robin Canadian Wildlife Service one year
"wildlife service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The sound. We're listening to were being produced by walruses recorded onto the ice in the Canadian Arctic. But how the warriors makes these sound is unknown Jim Mitzner, and this is the pulse of the planet. Actually produce. These very strange sounding knocks temps in green is still pretty much a mystery. I'm Becky jars with the Canadian Wildlife Service are known to crack. Although on Lander on. Tapping you knocking sound. Clattering teeth. Looking at the patterns on the country indicates that the type of pattern that we see is not consistent with what you'd expect. Teeth were the main source of the sound. Right now, we have no other. Knock from top serve. If I had to specially suggest that. Ability to create very strong. Searching powers me something to do with their sound. Wondering the walruses are quitting their tongue on the roof of their mouth similar to the way. A human can make caulking their tongue. Idea of how formidable suction power of a walruses. They can literally suck the fleshy part of a clam right out of its shell like a huge vacuum cleaner..

Becky jars Jim Mitzner Canadian Wildlife Service
"wildlife service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Walruses are among the most striking marine mammals in appearance. They also make some of the most extraordinary sounds heard underwater to Michener, and this is the pulse of the planet. What's really interesting about walrus localization is that the emit these Knox and taps in very specific sequences, and these sequences are then repeated over and over similar to the way Robin would sit up in a tree and sing it song several times throughout the day. Well, similar with the meal walrus he repeats the same song over and over everyday for the duration of the breeding season. Mickey jars with the Canadian Wildlife Service, she's been studying the sounds made by walrus notes that while they're both short and long vocalisations a common song as emerged. It's quite amazing to think that the classic pattern of each of the two songs has remained consistent since about nineteen eighty two. There are minor variations, but it's not like dump back whale song where you see quite substantial changes from one year to the net. Walking along on C ice and be able to hear walruses vocalizing right beneath your feet and having the sound sort of transmit up through the ice. It's a very eerie feeling to be out sort of in the middle of nowhere. And yet here all these sounds coming at you from all sorts of directions and not being able to pinpoint what's going.

Robin Mickey jars Michener Canadian Wildlife Service one year
"wildlife service" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"About this. And I looked at the job on my story right now that I read earlier, and it's not there. So hold on. Let me give you the details. What happened was it was about the? The habitat of a frog. But see now, it's. A little difficult for me to give you all the details because my print did not work. All right here, we go get this out before audio cut of the day. The court. Limited the reach of the Endangered Species Act, again, they did this eight to nothing there are these dusky gopher frogs that live pond in wooded area nearby in Mississippi, and this is what this was all about. Actually, it was about a wooded area Louisiana, but the wooded area Mississippi is where they were trying to protect because they thought that the frogs if they were kind of blown out of their natural habitat in that pond that they would move to the wooded area. They wanted protection the person who owns that would area said, we don't think that that's right because you're telling us that this frog could potentially I'm kind of dumbing this down just for the sake of expediency here. But judge cabinet did not take part in this. Because the case was heard a week before he won confirmation in the Senate. The more liberal justices spoke in defense of the fish and Wildlife Service. The conservatives question how critical habitat could include an area where the endangered frog did not live and could not live unless changes were made in the end. The chief Justice found a way to bring both sides together. They. They did kind of kick it back to the lower court, but it was an eight to nothing unanimous decision..

Mississippi fish and Wildlife Service Senate Louisiana
"wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ago had begun to restore the fishing Wildlife Service to a position of stature it comes back to the thing. We talk about so frequently here in Illinois professional leadership department of natural resources had. As you all know, experienced years of neglect and lack of professional leadership, which is now trying to be rebuilt, but it takes a while to overcome many years of of not employing true professionals in the leadership positions in the fish and Wildlife Service has has gone through that as well. And so today we have an opportunity for three through. I hope it's going to be a one of the great successes of the fish and Wildlife Service on paper. The individual appointed to be the new director is not have the qualifications that one would look for in the director of the fish and Wildlife Service, however in personality and inabilities she has she has in spades. What it takes to lead an organization. So we'll see we'll see what happens. But it is. It is paramount. That's the new director. The fish and Wildlife Service look to the professionals in the field to understand how the service needs to be run. Because if it gets away from triumph groups, and if it gets away from its mission of managing, America's fish and wildlife resources, then the fish and Wildlife Service is no longer going to have the respect of constituents for whom it is supposed to serve and and most importantly, one of the roles of the Fisher Wildlife Service is to administer the federal program which. Provides much of the funding for wetlands conservation and waterfowl conservation in America. And it's a foreign that can make huge differences to the sale of federal duck stamps for the propagation of waterfowl a wetland dependent birds by securing the habitats they need and the curry breeding grounds. It's also fun that congress in recent years has decided they'd like to see scattered all over the country to to benefit their congressional districts or their states that was never the intention of the federal duck stamps fun. And so hopefully, the new director the fish and Wildlife Service will will re focus the federal duck stamp fund.

fish and Wildlife Service fishing Wildlife Service Fisher Wildlife Service director Illinois America congress
"wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Potter, your host here on WGN radio. Thank you for joining this morning. I'm going to start off by talking about some interesting changes and department of interior and the fish and Wildlife Service in Washington, which I think have what could have long term impacts. If they work out. Well, and if they don't we'll be a sad chapter for the future of of the outdoors and hunting and fishing in America. So for the first time. Ever the US fish and Wildlife Service is going to be led by a wonderful lady. Who is of African American descent, which is a first for the fish and Wildlife Service, and I think signals and historic moment in our country that we have taken an entity that was the ultimate old boys club and and move forward in a way that. Oh, really shows that America is truly colorblind. It's a watershed moment for for America. And the. The key is that the director of the fishermen Wildlife Service really understand the heritage. And the history of of what may the US fish and Wildlife Service was today, and they can relate to the frankly, the constituent face. And so while it's a bold move by the Trump administration. I am very hopeful that the individuals who was appointed. Lewd.

Wildlife Service America fishermen Wildlife Service WGN Trump administration Potter Washington director
"wildlife service" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"Of the natural lands management to the US fish and Wildlife Service who created mayor Don national wildlife refuge, and then a little bit later on the northern part of the property was actually management with C to never national seashore as well. So we actually have a wildlife refuge and a national seashore that overlay Kennedy Space Center. Another interesting aspect of it is NASA wants a security perimeter showground their launch infrastructure, which makes sense so early on a establish this primitive, which there's no public access around these launch pads, and while the purpose was public, safety and security. They sort of coincidentally created what we call a defacto marine reserve and marine reserves. They're being used more and more for marine management where basically set areas off limits and let the ecosystem sort of persistent its natural state and in some areas are controversial at the space center there not because it wasn't really designed as a marine. Reserve was designed for. For security fish don't know that. So the fish here have been basically unmolested now since nineteen sixty two and there's been several studies that have shown that water within the security zone of Kennedy Space Center, they harbor higher densities of sport fish, those Fisher, generally larger, and we have higher overall fisheries diversity within the space center than adjacent public areas that have been developed over the you know, the past few decades. And so it's basically a gem here in east Florida, the fisheries habitat here is the best. We have really on the east coast United States anymore on the fishery side, we've got red drum Blackcomb spotted sea trout, Tarpon snook, all these really important sport fish and the a large percentage of the rest of that is actually managed in a fairly natural state. So you've got a tremendous amount of habitat and wildlife issues that you have to tend to the lagoon has a very high density of humanity's green and loggerhead sea. Turtles that use the Lagunas. Basically nursery as well bull sharks is the common fish in the lagoon. Our folks treasury work on scrub Jays bald eagles gopher tortoises invasive hogs most dense population of alligators left in in your of lagoons here at Cassie much of the space enters actually co manage either as mayor Don national wildlife, refuge or can ever national seashore and so- NASA as as a federal agency has to their held is sort of a high standard on how they maintain their their land and wildlife than land, and that's sort of where we come in cool. And so what's your what is your day job? Like, what do you do on a daily basis? Would we find you in office are you outside like halfway through the Bush like what's going on? So that is the best part of my job is that it's the diversity. I'm in the field quite a bay probably about two to three days a week. But we also do a fair bit of lab work, and like not only do we have to catch fish. But we have to write about it as well, you know, permits and reports and whatnot. But all in all it's it's a super diverse product. You don't know what you're going to get into on any given day because issues PA. Up all the time. And there hasn't been a single day. Where I roll a bad didn't want to come to work. That's awesome. That's so obviously, it's probably no mystery. Now this point like it is factual that on Sundays we pay you to fish. Advertising. In a way, it's cheating because we get the permits to fish with interesting gear, longlines and gillnets where you can catch a lot of fish, really fast for scientific purposes. But you also we don't take things home. Yeah. Exactly. You know, we generally most of the fisheries research, we do we can talk a little bit about this indepth later on is is nonlethal. We catch fish. We we measure them record identify him and let him go. Yeah. Wanna make sure that we are clear to say that it's not like you're out here like just sitting back just chilling in the boat fishing like you're out doing research, you're doing site. So give us some examples of the research that is going on both amongst your team as well. As that we bring other folks to research. So, you know, big picture if you look at the landscape in space center, it's about sixty five percent water..

Kennedy Space Center Jays United States NASA Wildlife Service east Florida Bush sixty five percent three days
"wildlife service" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"It hatched last man And now. This Perez actually rearing another Paris check do they know it's not there's. I don't think so so stark foster parents you probably. Thought they just deliver the babies Your, program, to create this. Genetic diversity requires an enormous amount of cooperation and I was under the impression that. Sues compete they compete for the panda they compete for exotic animals, zoos, not competing anymore, twos are still competing zoos compete for audience or publicity. For all kinds of things the gave me a. Good example that their day of baseball teams obviously baseball. Teams compete but a, single baseball team on its own is pointless You can't do anything. To lead zoos if zoos, were, all independently operating. At not willing to work together we would also make our populations would out on. Us they would become highly inbred so we do compete in a, sense, but we recognized, that we will succeed in cuts evasion together or not Zoos are. Now working on conservation with wildlife agencies as well to rescue wild species in distress like the Mexican gray wolf these wolves once lived across the south west but we're viewed as predators and killed. Off so by one thousand nine hundred eighty they were gone from the wild, I mean seriously gone gone the US fish and Wildlife Service brought the last remaining wolves. To zoos to see? If, they. Could. Pull off a. Miracle and bring the, species back from just seven what biologists call founding animals so we use the computer analyses to decide exactly which animals should be. Ready cheer money to breed so we. Didn't lose any of those seven.

baseball Perez US Wildlife Service Paris
"wildlife service" Discussed on Nightline

Nightline

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on Nightline

"Close fireball who has fathered many of the ranch's kangaroos lives here to critics will say, look, they have a breeding program They're there. just breeding these animals so they can hunt more of them. But what do you say would be responsible would be irresponsible is getting something that's rare, endangered animals and then just turning them loose in, not taking care of them is not endangered, but many others here are in require a federal permit to hunt scimitar rid ledge way Arabian orch bears seeing danger. Danger, all endangered the all animals that have to have a permit from US fish oil, all off. They still need calling. Yes, without a monetary value. Only animals they would cease to exist. What is the ranch's argument for why? What you guys do here is actually a good thing. We are expanding the population of these animals, and he have too many males of a particular species. They'll start to fight kill each other anyway, in order to hunt these endangered species. The US fish and Wildlife Service tells Nightline that they issue hunting permits on the condition that a percentage of the income derived from the hunting must then be donated for conservation of the species and or its habitat. But over the years hunters have experienced backlash for killing exotic species both in the US and overseas during a two thousand fifteen trip to symboblic Minnesota dentist. Walter Palmer sparked international outrage after shooting a.

US Walter Palmer Wildlife Service Minnesota
"wildlife service" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on AP News

"The idea that mccain gave up information during the vietnam war when he was taken prisoner was judged false years ago by political but fox business network guest tim macaroni spread that story as a guest on thursday foxholes charles payne later apologized for not correcting them on air a fox spokeswoman said friday that mcenaney will no longer be allowed on the network residents of a tiny village on the alaska peninsula were surprised to find two hundred walruses packed a beach just outside the community residents of port heiden see the occasional walrus in bering sea waters but over a two week period the walrus numbers grew at one point reaching one thousand the us fish and wildlife service that it's not sure why they're gathering on the alaska peninsula but it may be related to food availability male and female walruses spend winters in the bering sea but separate when recedes with warmer temperatures achieve concern for fish and wildlife is keeping walruses safe in the resting areas noisy approaches by people can startle hurts sending walruses stampeding into the water which can crush and kill vulnerable animals frequent disturbances can also drive walruses away from preferred resting areas causing them to expend more energy foraging and affecting their overall body conditions the grammys are working on a voiding bias in its annual music awards by setting up a new task force on inclusion and diversity the recording academy which gives out the awards announced the initiative after it ceo drew criticism for saying women need to step up when asked about the lack of female winners backstage at the last awards show the teams made up of sixteen members thirteen of whom are women sheryl crowe and common are among the artists on the team the task force's chair is tina's hsien former chief of staff to michelle obama the academy says the task force is intended to uncover unconscious bias this and other barriers that impede women's success in the music industry welcome to total wine and more i challenge you to wine tasting showdown maybe we should just explore some warning if you come blow.

mccain tim macaroni alaska peninsula bering sea sheryl crowe tina charles payne fox ceo chief of staff michelle obama two week
"wildlife service" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"wildlife service" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"I've got friends who were falconers and i have a lot of southeastern readers including some of the the the big shots of the what the california hawking club which is kind of the premier governing body of the sports in the united states that is mentioned here and in fact one aspect of this too many spoilers is that the us fish and wildlife service gets involved in the sport to the extent that they issue permits for thing i was unaware of that and i've been litigating with us fish and wildlife service for for thirty years who runs that division you know what i don't know who runs it right now i just came up the other day i was talking to a journalist who had read the book and wanted to know more about you know who makes these decisions and i realized i don't know who makes these decisions on the ground here the few falconers that there are out there that have eagle permits are the ones that are most affected eagle permits i had never known that eagles could actually be trained yes they can in fact in asia there's youtube videos of eagles taking down dear you know big animals and there i met a couple thousand dollars who were rehabilitating eagles but have never actually hunted with one myself i also is reading the disappeared concurrent with david mammoth new novel chicago and there's a reporter who doesn't take notes and david mammoths stand as a reporter who doesn't take notes in your book and the one case it's a trick in the other case it's incompetence it's a fascinating little detail do you read when you're writing check box.

california united states eagles asia chicago reporter david thousand dollars thirty years