21 Burst results for "Wildlife Conservation Society"

COVID-19: The Wildlife Trade and Human Disease

Science Talk

06:45 min | 5 months ago

COVID-19: The Wildlife Trade and Human Disease

"In early March. The Prime Minister of Vietnam directed the government there to draft a directive to prohibit wildlife trade and consumption to be submitted to him by April first in February China took similar actions to find out more about the wildlife trade and its relationship to the current corona virus outbreak. I called Christian Walser. He's the executive director of Global Health at the Wildlife Conservation Society. We both live in the Bronx but do to. The current situation spoke by phone. Tell me about The situation Vietnam where the wildlife Outdoor MARKETS OR WILDLIFE MARKETS FOR FOOD. Consumption are Apparently going to be banned. And what's the situation elsewhere? Where such markets have traditionally existed? Yes so these markets which really very unique even on a global scale just by sheer size and diversity of species which are traded. These markets have already been banned beginning of February In China so there's been opponent ban on any kind of wildlife trade be it for consumption medicine purposes Even for furs any any kind of wildlife product is prohibited that moment the movement trade sale and consumption is temporarily banned and China's moved on to now permanently banned any wildlife trade and related with consumption. So that was the big first step and The working on legislation right now to get that lockdown so to say and then Vietnam just followed on a few days ago with a statement that it will similarly close down markets and the trade wildlife related to consumption and we do assume that it will be a knock-on effect on on the bordering countries like Laos and Cambodia and what is the problem with these markets. Why are we so concerned about them? So these mark some just a quick picture so you can imagine what looked like. It is a Areas where A large number of different species from wraps different species of field. What they call field rats in Southeast Asia's Liza Lodger rat species Which they which they capture and breed on farms together with bats. Squirrels Porcupines You know now than illegal even pangolins illegal primates and then all that is mixed together with domestic livestock. So we have a lot of poultry. There you will have on pigs and then of course you have a lot of humans. And by putting all these species together and They're also additionally extremely stress. They've been captured. Many of them been captured in the wild are in terrible conditions holding conditions so very stressed in shutting viruses Able to excrete these viruses imaginaire stacked on top of each other. So you will have home. Let's say some squirrels excreting virus which will drop down onto a porcupine below them in porcupine may be above some chickens and so on so you have a great possibility for the exchange of virus Enviro components and then you have the whole process of preparing the food. So you're actually in the same place where you're basically creating the environment for new viruses. You're also going to be slaughtering. So you'll have blood being mixed you will be handing off to humans who will be in direct contact with the excrements with blood postgame. Then we'll take that product home so it is really really couldn't design a spillover interface in any better way this. So this is the main concern. Lodged diversity species is obviously unknown viruses. Which they naturally host being mixed together on the small tight area basically and you use the word spillover. That has a particular meaning in this context. Right right spillover event Have to I think the best way to imagine his. You know each animal. is a container and within that container it carries an hosts viruses and bacteria on fungi. Which are do not cause it any homes and similarly we. It's humans we host viruses bacteria. Which Cause Anyhow? And as we move about carries with us in. It's one niece containers are able to share these viruses. So basically you get a virus moving from one container. Let's say some wildlife species moving into the container of the human and then sometimes and it's a rare event is viruses can actually move. Let's say from something. That looks very different. Porcupine definitely different than human move across into a human and actually get into a human cell and start to replicate and then on a much much rarer occurrence thankfully then transmitted from human to human. So it's quite an achievement for a virus so to say to actually manage to jump from one species to the and then actually be able to transmit within this new species but it sort of a slot machine with a lot of dials and every once in a while they all come up and you do get this event exactly. It's really a numbers game. And I think the way I I would say. These markets are just increasing. Your chance of of of winning substitute over losing in this case just by having a lot of species on every day of the year. You're actually stressing them so that you'll get more viral shedding and then you put in the humans in as well because consumption of course increases the interface because you As I said you're in contact with the blood you're ingesting it It's is really just a numbers game as I said.

China Wildlife Conservation Society Vietnam Prime Minister Of Vietnam Bronx Christian Walser Executive Director Of Global H Southeast Asia Liza Lodger Laos Cambodia
Meet Two MacArthur 'Genius Grant' Scientists

Short Wave

07:26 min | 10 months ago

Meet Two MacArthur 'Genius Grant' Scientists

"All right kwong scientists show and tell tell me about our geologists Andrea Dutton well we described Andrea as like a CSI investigator of sea level rise but I would also consider her a time traveler to she looked specifically for fossil coral goals from this period called the last interglacial one hundred twenty five thousand years ago Oh so bp what before the podcast gone it's terrible joke anyway last interglacial earth was a little warmer than it is now and her work suggests that oceans were twenty to thirty feet higher than they are today Whoa yeah and by gathering data from the last time Earth got the swarm the last interglacial win ice sheets melted and sea levels rose Andrea can offer insights into how it could all go down in our present day okay that that is very cool and seems relevant Is there anything interesting that she's learned so far okay well Andrew told me about this one trip to the Seychelles this island nation in the Indian Ocean where her team found fossil corals at a really high elevation really high and that freaked her out why's that that's because Andrea new in that moment that in order for the corals have been that high for the ocean who've risen to that point put them there the Antarctic ice sheet must have been melting at that time that's the the single biggest massive ice on earth so when we got this result in the Seychelles I did walk away from the outcrop and I sat down on the beach and I thought myself you know what people are not going to like this because I knew right away meant that in artists have contributed a lot of ice melted and that was not good news for our future because it means that we may be headed in the same direction meaning the Antarctic icesheet may melt and contribute to sea level rise in the same way in our time so we have some clarity on what the future could look like because Andrea is traveling back in time to gather this information from oceans in the ancient past I'm into it I'm nervous about it but I'm into it yeah okay so tell me about the other Macarthur winner tell me about Stacey Stacey Jupiter I'm forty three years old and I'm the Melania director with the Wildlife Conservation Society Melanesia is a region in the Pacific Ocean home to all these island nations Fiji where she's located Papua New Guinea the Solomon Islands just to name a few the water is just beyond her doorstep and I'm trying to get out as much as I can and take my three year old son out as well we love to go for puddle and just show him the crabs on the seawall and we'd go look for sea snakes or raise that might scoot off as we go over them so it's a nice place just to look out and be inspired by the Marine Environment Fiji is spread across three hundred islands stacey lives in the capital Suva where she thinks a lot about how to work with locals around conservation okay how does she do well she not only looks at the hard science of what's happening to say the fish the coral reefs but the environmental factors human activity to for her conservation means not only protecting the land but the people who live on continuing their need for sustainable jobs access to natural resources their physical health or mental health sometimes this looks like formal programs other times it looks like this Oh okay this is my favorite type of sites communication what you're watching is a youtube clip of one hundred twenty five people disco dancing in the streets of Suva organized this flash mob with the motto Moran eggs more fish like all flash they're calling on the government to protect areas where fish come together to reproduce they're kind of like discos okay this frenzy of fish movement as they release their eggs and that's why it was a disco inspired flash mob this is some solid science outreach right here so fun that's not all Stacey has done she's commissioned a comic book why is she having so much fun during science I did not have this much fun well it's because you didn't help commission back in the river so they have this epic journey they come across all these obstacles on the way and to explain this whole process to kids she created a comic book called the adventures of Joe Jacobi he's a little bit precocious he gets lost from the rest of his school and he ends up having to go back upstream with this kind of crazy inventor scientists crab and his sidekicks now and through the story of them trying to get upstream defined his home they encounter all of the different hazards of human impact all along the way like fishing and dams and river sediment and then the Wildlife Conservation Society's Fiji program which Stacey used to run turned the comic book into a puppet show routed to schools and kids loved it I was onboard until puppets got involved you would love this matty in the moment right after the DOJ Gobi puppet encounters Barracuda are you sure it's just not them screaming because there's nobody knows the mysteries of children all the kids were given river-monitoring kits afterwards with the idea of encouraging there virtue of the land one day as adults indigenous people have tenure over about eighty seven to ninety eight percent of all of the land in Melanesia until it re the is those kids when they grow up they're the ones who will be looking after the place because they they own the land and they have the rights to say whether or not they're going to sleep this is pretty amazing like the level of creativity here and engagement and fun I am all for this sands puppets yeah over the phone in before our interview Stacy said to me look I'm trained in science but what moves people is stories each creativity is a big part of how she approaches commercialisation and your field and try to stay within one field and say you are the expert on this one particular topic but for myself I always didn't rebelled against that I really wanted to be more of a generalist and able to look across disciplines across different habitats and I think that and that's what's needed stacy's to tackle these seemingly intractable global problems stacey and Andrea they work on opposite sides of the world but they know each other and Andrea actually works with another macarthur fellow in this cohort Jerry Metro Rica at Harvard he interprets her data about corals so that it can

Andrea Dutton Kwong Investigator One Hundred Twenty Five Thousa Ninety Eight Percent Forty Three Years Thirty Feet Three Year One Day
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"He's released three albums, and various singles. Here's a program from our archives along with many other wild animals. The fate of Africa's wild dogs depends upon the preservation of scarce, natural habitats. Jim Metzner, and this is the pulse of the planet African wild dogs require vast tracts of land to accommodate their migratory lifestyle, even two thousand square kilometers for each pack of roughly nine dogs as a result. They're constantly crossing the boundaries of the areas that have been reserved for them. And at the edges of the reserves close to the ever incr-. Coaching world of humans, the dogs encounter hazards such as roads, foreign diseases and traps. Josh Ginsburg is director of the Asia program at the wildlife Conservation Society because they move around at the edge, where all the threats are, they're much more likely to die, and therefore the indicate the habitats getting fragmented that they're smaller and smaller places for wildlife, and fewer and fewer wild lands. And while those will disappear before almost anything else they'll disappear before highness disappear before lions they'll certainly disappear before elephants and before rhino and so that there are good indicator of the first step towards fragmentation and loss of habitat, they're like a canary in coal mine. They're very good indicator of problems with the ecosystems in which they live. So that when you start losing your wild. It's an indication that you're gonna start losing all your other wildlife in the near future open to monitor the dwindling wild dog populations. Josh Ginsberg and his colleagues pudding radio. Collars on the animals. And they've even asked tourists to look out for the wild dogs and take pictures of any that they may see if enough space can be secured for African wild dogs..

wildlife Conservation Society Josh Ginsberg Josh Ginsburg Jim Metzner Africa Asia director two thousand square kilometers
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The fate of Africa's wild dogs depends upon the preservation of scarce, natural habitats, Jim that's near. And this is the pulse of the planet African wild dogs require vast tracts of land to accommodate their migratory lifestyle, even up to a thousand square kilometers for each pack of roughly nine dogs as a result there. Constantly crossing the boundaries of the areas that have been reserved for them and at the edges of the reserves close to the ever encroaching world of humans, the dogs encounter hazards such as roads, foreign diseases and traps. Gosh, Ginsburg is director of the Asia program at the wildlife Conservation Society because they move around at the age where all the threats are, they're much more likely to die, and therefore the indicate the habitats getting fragmented that they're smaller and smaller places for wildlife, and fewer and fewer wild lands. And while those will disappear before almost anything else they'll disappear before hyenas disappear before lions they'll certainly disappear before elephants and before rhino and so that there are good indicator of the first step towards fragmentation and loss of habitat, they're like a canary in the coal mine. They're very good indicator of problems with the ecosystems in which they live. So that when you start losing your wild dogs. It's an indication that you're gonna start losing all your other wildlife in the near future. Hoping to monitor the dwindling wild dog populations Josh Ginsberg and his colleagues and putting radio collars on the animals, and they've even asked tourists to look out for the wild dogs and take pictures of any that they may see if enough space can be secured for African wild dogs scientists know that they'll also be preserving the habitat for a whole spectrum of wild animals..

wildlife Conservation Society director Josh Ginsberg Africa Jim Ginsburg Asia thousand square kilometers
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Dot com. Story. Trailers? Only members of the lost trailers, I met and started writing music in high school. Their first show was at Willie Nelson's annual fourth of July picnic. They've actually formed the following themselves playing two hundred per year, but where their name come from. Unfortunately, not once not twice, but three times the band's equipment trailer was stolen. Hence the lost trailers. Here's a program from our archives surrounded by one of the wildest natural regions on earth, that Robey Kenya is a thriving metropolis of over one million people. But how does the city of that size interact with its neighbors, namely the animals east Africa? I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the pulse of the planet, Nairobi shares at southern border with a national park filled with wildebeest zebras, and other wildlife cities close enough to the park that an office worker might look out his window and see elephant off in the distance Roby continues to develop animals, and humans are coming into conflict, more and more. According to Dr Helen show, he with the wildlife Conservation Society, the land just south of Nairobi national park is, historically, a prime migration side for hundreds of thousands of animals and this time of year wildlife pours into this area as the animals followed the rainy season and search for grazing lands but land here is constantly being sold to developers to build housing. And with houses convinces, and fences parcel off the land in unintentionally confined, the wildlife traditional migration routes are blocked animals are forced to find new more difficult pads, that wind their way around the barriers in an attempt to remedy this situation, Dr show, he's coordinating an effort to buy up land in this area with the hope of creating a permanent migration corridor for the animals such a route would not only benefit the wildlife, but would also help farmers. Had their crops raided by foraging. Herds. As modernization pushes into the wildlands of Africa. The hope is that humans will reach a compromise with nature born that allows us to live with wildlife rather than face the prospect of having to exist without it. I'm jim. That's nerd. And this is the pulse of the planet. This is the California's only twenty four hour local news, traffic station, Kingston, seventy radio. Good morning, Bob. Real top local story at twelve thirty. Amtrak train strikes kills with Austrian in Los Angeles. After seven.

Roby wildlife Conservation Society Dr show Africa Nairobi national park Robey Kenya Nairobi Jim Metzner Willie Nelson Los Angeles Bob California Kingston twenty four hour
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"That will be Kenya is a thriving metropolis over one million people. But how does a city of that size interact with its neighbors, namely the animals east Africa? Jim Metzner, and this is the pulse of the planet, Nairobi shares it southern border with a national park filled with wildebeest zebras, and other wildlife cities close enough to the park that an office worker might look out. His window and see elephant off in the distance Roby continues to develop animals, and humans are coming into conflict, more and more. According to Dr Helen get show, he with the wildlife Conservation Society, the land just south of Nairobi national park is, historically, a prime migration side for hundreds of thousands of animals and this time of year wildlife pours into this area as the animals followed the rainy season and search for grazing lands but land here is constantly being sold to developers to build housing. And with houses convinces and fences parcel off the land. Unintentionally confined, the wildlife traditional migration routes are blocked and animals are forced to find new more difficult pads, that wind their way around the barriers in an attempt to remedy this situation, Dr show, he's coordinating an effort to buy up land in this area with the hope of creating a permanent migration corridor for the animals such a route would not only benefit the wildlife, but would also help farmers with. Had their crops raided by foraging. Herds. As modernization pushes into the wild lands of Africa. The hope is that humans will reach a compromise.

Roby wildlife Conservation Society Nairobi national park Dr show Africa Nairobi Kenya Jim Metzner Dr Helen
In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World

Science Talk

06:38 min | 1 year ago

In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World

"This episode are human health, and our environmental health are deeply intertwined and each requires the other test to stay healthy. That's Lauren oaks. She's a scientist with the wildlife Conservation Society and Jordan professor in earth system science at Stanford University. He's also the author of the book in search of the canary Trie, the story of a scientist, the Cyprus and a changing world. Canary tree is the yellow cedar type of Cyprus that's native to coastal areas of north west North America. Another name for it is the Alaska Cyprus, it's being called the canary tree because it's the canary in the coal mine of an Alaska where oaks did her research in March Alaska, temperatures average, twenty degrees Fahrenheit above historical. Norms to talk about the book, I called oaks at our home in bozeman. Montana. Really enjoyed the book. I think you get into a lot of things that are really important that you don't see in a lot of scientific research. And so let's talk very briefly about how you decided to make this tree. Your study, focus, Sarah. So I say the puck it's true that I never thought I'd be someone spent your life studying a species and actually designed this pretty weird benign wanted them, and they were good reasons for it though. I generally was attracted to work in the north because warming there is a currying faster at faster rates than the averages across the planet. So in some ways, you can think about Alaska or the far far north as a looking last into the future in terms of what other of impacts we're going to see when it comes to climate change. So I spent a summer up there doing exploratory research where I really had no idea what the topic would be. I was interviewing scientists to were working in fisheries management or forest management, policymakers who were dressing things like coastal erosion on the far north coast were communities have to move inland and many other kinds of climate change impacts, whether it's watery sources or kinds of resources that we depend on anyways. I was hoping in that time that I would come across a topic at need really that was dented from the community where. Research could be relevant for current management. And where I could take a look at both the ecological in social impacts of of climate change. So I came from a program where we were trained scientists to bridge disciplines a lot of times in environmental problem solving were bringing together experts in in the room from different fields. So ecologists come together with the communists or policymakers, and we all kind of tend to speak different languages based on our training in disciplines. But the idea of this program is that if we train one person to speak, multiple languages into bridge across these disciplines that the new solutions could emerge. So from the beginning, I was always interested in you know, what are the ecological impacts of climate change in place. But then also how are people responding to those impacts? And I thought that you know, perhaps there could be lessons for myself in my own life for others other people in other parts of the planet by. I'm looking at those two factors and we'll get to the people part. But the decision to focus in on this one species was was really interesting. Yes out during that time, I came across Dr Paul Hennion who's a force pathologist at the United States forest service. He has since retired. But at the time we met he was about to publish a thirty year, synthesis, which was basically showing the link to climate change in terms of wire these trees dying, and it's kind of a complex pathway to death. But climate change plays a key role in that. And for me that was a really good jumping off point because I wasn't assigned this coming in trying to explain you know, why is climate change affecting the species how what are the vulnerabilities? You know, what's the likelihood of future events in in that kind of thing. I had a jumping off off point where we already know climate changes affecting the species, and that I could ask okay. Hey, what's what's happening to the rest of the forest community? And and how are people really affected by that as well? Looking at climate changes affect on the species as much as you are using the species as bellwether about what climate change will do everywhere. He actually I mean in some ways it's a story of loss. Right. We are losing this species in many places, but then there's also a story of re-growth, right it. So what comes in after the trees die in the same way? You know, how can people adopt alongside those ecological changes? And you do find that. As the yellow cedar goes away, the the western hemlock comes in. So there's there's loss there's gained there's a transition. It's happening. It's really interesting. But before we get to that. Let's talk about some of the realities of doing field research. It's incredibly strenuous and uncomfortable difficult. Yeah. It is a it. It was tough. It was tough. That's for sure I worked on the outer coast the southeast Alaska in the west coffee. Kobe wilderness and glacier bay national park, which are some of the most remote wilderness areas, we have in the country strikingly beautiful in also strikingly far from from civilization as you as you call it. But the forest where I work we're only acceptable by boat or plane, and I didn't wanna be. She schlepping back and forth. Both in terms of our time and the fossil fuels that we needed to get out to these sites. So basically figured out a way with a pretty awesome crew to set up a base camp. And we would spend two weeks at a time kayaking to random locations, and then hiking into forested sites where we would then measure the plants in the in

Alaska Scientist Canary Trie Lauren Oaks Bozeman Cyprus North America Wildlife Conservation Society Stanford University Montana Glacier Bay National Park Professor Sarah Dr Paul Hennion United States Twenty Degrees Fahrenheit Thirty Year Two Weeks
Different Humpback Whale Groups Meet To Jam

60-Second Science

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Different Humpback Whale Groups Meet To Jam

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman. Male humpback whales are the concert singers of the marine world these ocean giants belt out tunes that can be heard perhaps hundreds of miles away the songs attract, friends and lovers and maybe keep rivals at bay. And now we learned that humpbacks in different ocean basins, the south Atlantic and the Indian on opposite sides of the African continent. Share melodies that song that my lunch between individuals folk today, the best example of cars onto cultural transition from peer to peer rather than from parent offering Melinda rectal marine conservation, scientists with the wildlife. Conservation society's ocean giants program. The International Whaling Commission has identified seven distinct humpback whale breeding populations in the southern hemisphere. These are whales that meet up in the same warm tropical waters each year to mate and give birth. But when mating season is over. Whales migrate to Chile polar regions to gorge on krill using genetics and photographic surveys of migrating humpbacks, researchers know that males in these colder feeding areas interact with other males from different breeding populations. But scientists did not know this meet up provides the whales with the opportunity to have vocal jam sessions where they trade melodies and the amount of song overlap between the whales that breed off 'gabon in the Atlantic. And those that breed near Madagascar in the Indian Ocean varies year to year. That's according to a study of more than fifteen hundred individual sounds that were recorded between two thousand one and two thousand five the results are in the journal, Royal Society opened science that might sense that in some years that may be different Asian graphic conditions. Patchily distributed pry that my name populations individuals have to move the to find food and that might bring them into classic context with neighboring populations and Philip song exchange. The fundings present researchers with new opportunities to understand how culture is transmitted among animals, but it also allows even greater insight into the workings of populations of humpback whales it shines the connectivity potentially on the times go, which is what genetic information doesn't genetic data can show the different populations had historical interactions but songs can reveal how to populations interact on a much faster time scale. But combine. Ending song information from these populations with Wales. That breed off the Atlantic coast of Brazil rectal, says researchers can gain more comprehensive understanding the dynamics of global humpback whale culture back while it's an incredibly in a complex display. It quite amazing. How complex it is. And how it that shooting? Amazing example of culture in in animals. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Atlantic Indian Ocean International Whaling Commissi Gabon Royal Society Chile Melinda Brazil Madagascar Patchily Wales Philip Sixty Seconds
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on This Week in Science

"This is the study from WCS the wildlife Conservation Society who's been studying whale song for probably twenty years at this point university of Saint Andrews Stony Brook, university Madagascar, national parks, all these people work together to look at the whale songs at really synthesize them and figure out what was going on a transcribed more than fifteen hundred individuals sounds recorded between two thousand one and two thousand five they compared similar songs similarity using statistical methods. So somehow, you can boil music down to make sense you have the frequent. Yeah. No, it it does make sense. Yeah. They the wave form that you have there are you can note certain syllables in free end frequencies and birdsong they use statistics to analyze the song. All the time. I love that. So so they'll they'll boil the song down to. Song units made of moans cries or other vocalisations, and then the song units are put back together into larger phrases, which are called themes different themes are produced in sequence to make a song that is then repeated for hours to days and for the most part all males within the same population. Sing the same song. Type. There's a very strong similarity between a population of Wales, and this population wide, similarity is maintained despite the fact that members die new members are born there's kind of evolution and change in the song. It it moves with the group. So that they kind of considered hit songs. It's like the top ten right for the group. It's like having the same accent? Right. We're having that is. Yeah. Birds are or what have you is? Absolutely. And so we know that some song learning can occur between populations that are in close proximity. But this was interesting because these two animals are in completely different basins, and they're not in the same space for very long. Usually they when two sets to populations of whales will converge in their song type. It's when they share a meeting ground. So they're together for a while. But these guys they're pretty separate in. So in two thousand three they saw that the songs sung by one set of Wales in Gabon was more elaborate than those in Madagascar in two thousand and four they shared the same themes and then. Both whale groups in two thousand four head drop the same themes from their previous your song types that was like they were out of out of fashion. Like, oh, nobody's listening to that anymore. And then five songs being sung on both sides of Africa were very similar. They are individuals in both locations singing songs with the same themes and order. Well that case Israel. I will say that right? Don't complain. Yes, you're being. Fierce..

Wales Saint Andrews Stony Brook university Madagascar wildlife Conservation Society Madagascar Israel Gabon Africa twenty years
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on WWL

"Jimmy Johnson massacre cheaper. You're listening to NBC sports radio. So I got to repel a ton bike, and I found it. He got me a peleton. She still has no idea fell obvious. Right. I mean, she may have dropped a hint or two she loves to your workouts. I just don't have time to get there. Just got all kinds of classes, endurance, rides thirty minute pop rides even country. His thing not mine. I'm definitely writing a to I guess he can write a tale. This holiday give the perfect gift for them. And you give the gift the peleton at one peleton dot com or visit your local showroom to try the bike. Attention all authors. Page Publishing is looking for authors. Have you written a book and wanna get it published? Page Publishing will get your book into bookstores and for sale online at Amazon, Apple itunes, and other outlets. They handle all aspects of the publishing process for you. Printing, cover art, publicity, copyright, and editing. Call eight hundred five zero one thirty six eighty nine now for your free author submission kit. That's eight hundred five zero one three thousand six eighty nine for your free author submission kit. Again, eight hundred five zero one thirty six eighty nine. I can't believe that we're playing four and four basketball with a barbershop quartet. Yes. Past. No, it can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars in my car insurance with Geico shoes. Leaving. Fifteen percent or more on car insurance. The following message is brought to you by the wildlife Conservation Society. I remember a time when we all had a home a time when earth's largest creature numbered in the millions moving freely throughout its range. But today the greed of our world brings violence to. There's ninety six elephants are killed in Africa every day for their ivory, you can make it. Stop. Join us to safeguard the last strongholds for the elephant protect their home. Go to ninety six elephants dot org. Okay, forest animals. Today's a new day kids are coming to the forest and it's up to us to make their visit a good one. Sparrow, have you practiced the most popular birdsongs for the year? Catchy. I like it. Okay. River. Did..

Page Publishing Jimmy Johnson NBC Geico wildlife Conservation Society basketball Sparrow Amazon Africa Apple ninety six elephants Fifteen percent thirty minute
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"So collects kind of all and we're talking about that early stage of monitoring of gathering data yet. And then also how you can take the data and tell story with it because you could tell story from some of the state and some interesting sort of ways part of the problem with that space of this low cost sensing was that the variation in quality and cost of the sensors is just it's huge. And so part of what field kits purpose and mission is is to create this open source library of different types of sensors. So anybody who wants to go measure, water quality or air quality or soil moisture sound level and all sorts of things they have these these sensors they can go, and they can they can either buy them if they want or they can learn about how they're made. And make them themselves in their backyard, or whatever, you know, it's just it. So the idea is to level the entire playing field, and it helps standard I said that when people do publish or at least they want to share this information. They can say, oh, this one is not as sensitive. So we need to calibrate it differently air bubble and capture all that information because there's people who are doing projects here and there about the source stuff. But if you go and read their documentation, online and blogs or wherever I mean, everyone's making the same mistakes, and they're so frustrating how much intense would just keep reinventing the wheel all the time because nobody publishes failures. Yeah. Right. The only publish successes, and they're always want to be like open sources, not very lake hip in the science community want to be like, oh, I did it my way. I'm not going to tell you how because then you're going to scoop me. Yeah. I mean, it's well fortunately seems like the new generation of scientists are getting a little bit when it comes to that sort of thing. But yeah, I mean, all that's incredibly frustrating. The methods opening all that and opening the data. Also, like the fact that people over protect things in the academic space is just incredibly frustrating. They're supposed to share data. But usually you literally have to call them on the phone. Can I like see your actual data set? And they're like, oh, it's all handwritten and we lost some of it. But yeah, this is what we have so far. And and if it's federally funded. I mean it belongs to Backley. Yeah. So so the idea was let's create field is this free and open source tool will sell different kits for the sensors. If people wanna buy them, or they can build their own whatever happens, and we've been developing it over the last year or so right and right now, we're funded by the Moore foundation to kind of take to public release. So next year it's going to be but anybody who wants to use. But during this development process, we have partners that we're working on in implementations one of those is around in Cameroon in the job reserve, so UCLA has this. Organization that there are part of. I think they started called the Congo basin institute. It's around rump studying the Congo basin. The rate grain force in that region. And there I kind of flagship research camp is in the jar reserve, and so we're putting sensors all over that entire reserve. You know, weather sensors camera traps all sorts of stuff that people want for that data. We're working with the researchers there to do that and bring that data back live the the bigger project that we have around field kit right now is one that we're doing with the wildlife Conservation Society across the tire Amazon basin. So it's actually going to be implemented in five of the seven countries that make up the Amazon rainforest, and that project is deeply deeply rooted in indigenous people, it's called the it's a citizen science for the Amazon project, and what the main goals are to understand how the Amazon basin changing. And so one of the ways they're doing that is with migratory fishes. And so they're trying to track. Migratory fishes through because as they add dams in the Amazon basin. It's it's removing this connectivity for these fishes, and the longest freshwater migration in the world happens in the Amazon, and so they're really interested in the sort of thing, and how that impacts these indigenous communities all across the way that have lived off of these fish as their one of their major food sources for generations. Right..

Amazon basin Amazon Congo basin institute Congo basin Cameroon wildlife Conservation Society Backley Moore foundation UCLA
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Science Friday

"Told us about his project with cocktails cocktail umbrellas, Katie tell us your science unless leisure, Dan, academy and kahlua Hawaii. Tell us about your project. Sure my project is actually based on climate change. So interesting that we're on today to talk about that. But what I have is a resource for students to develop disaster relief structures that can be used after fire flood it actually was inspired after the kilowatt volcano eruption out here. But what the students do in my project is they they basically research structural engineering and architecture and talk about the sheep's that make building strong, and then they build a prototype disaster relief structure that can fold completely flat for transport, and then be popped up into place wherever it's needed. So they basically build this prototype that they can, you know, store on the back of a flatbed truck or on a pallet. And then they have five minutes to put it into place, and it has to hold enough weight for a family, and it has to be strong and have ventilation and be raised. Off the ground to prevent future flooding, and then what they do is they use their math skills to scale it up and be, you know, figure out what it would look like if it was full size. Wow. That's terrific. The aerial. We've got just a couple examples here you've got a whole bunch more in the projects, right? We do it. Definitely wonderful. So we teachers from all across the country. And you know, as I mentioned, it's not diversity. That's really extrordinary. So Molly Adams, he's a Decatur with the wildlife Conservation Society developed the virtual coral reef health assessment. So that students can virtually dive into different curl restore on the world establish whether they're saying, and how that influences by diversity Jeff grant, some downers grove high school, very type school in Illinois, downers grove, Illinois. He made a resource that was inspired by one of our videos about maybe not choosy quints, and he had a student goes through. I don't know if years not x-ray should establish whether the digits within a vertebrate hand conform to seven Naci equals a ratio. And if that is is whether they can grasp objects, so if you're if you're thinking as you hear these things that like, wow, this are really belong totally cool ways of getting it scientific concepts. You're right. You know, and when we work with teachers to make sure that. Their standards, align. They're hitting really core concepts in the curriculum. Even though they sound kind of weird like like totally urgent on different. There's still building really essential science literacy in science engineering hearing practicing teachers get involved if they want to get part of of this project. Please apply. It is an awesome program. So you visit science Friday dot com slash educator..

Jeff grant Illinois downers grove downers grove high school Katie Decatur Dan wildlife Conservation Society Molly Adams five minutes
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Tippin. Nanteuil peace of mind schedule. A complementary meeting with a trusted money matters financial advisor today to talk about your unique questions and concerns. Don't miss the five day sale going on now through November twenty seventh. At your local O'Reilly auto parts store. Stop by for a twin pack up. So Vania, silver star Oprah headlights and get a fifteen dollar or Riley giftcard after mail-in rebate. See farther and more clearly with silver star headlights at O. Reilly auto parts, better parts, better prices every day. Restrictions apply. See store for details. Auto parts. The following message is brought to you by the wildlife Conservation Society. I remember a time when we all had a home a time when earth's largest creature numbered in the millions moving freely throughout its range. But today the greed of our world brings violence to. There's ninety six elephants are killed in Africa every day for their ivory, you can make it. Stop. Join us to safeguard the last strongholds for the elephant protect their home. Go to ninety six elephants dot org. Did forty podcast. Musicians worked hard to craft an image for their fans who when their actions conflict with who they claim to be we'll have to wonder who they really were especially when they're death is still a mystery to this day, the real life. Story of two bucks. You core dies. It'd be no noise. People screaming. The gangster and the poet..

Tippin. Nanteuil wildlife Conservation Society advisor O. Reilly Oprah Riley Vania Africa ninety six elephants fifteen dollar five day
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on WEEI

"Renowned medical correspondent and endurance race champion. Pop are not MD people. Ask me, how do you keep competing at the age of seventy healthy living is important, which so his pain. If you have pain, you can't train so thrilled. I discovered salonpas Joaquin plus this unique topical pain reliever. Contains two safe and effective. Anesthetics? Nothing has worked better for salonpas pain, plus cream or wrong. The following message is brought to you by the wildlife Conservation Society. I remember a time when we all had a home a time when earth's largest creature numbered in the millions moving freely throughout its range. But today the greed of our world brings violence to. There's ninety six elephants are killed in Africa every day for their ivory, you can make it. Stop. Join us to safeguard the last strongholds for the elephants. Protect their home. Go to ninety six elephants dot org. This is John Greenhut, and if your teeth are stained from coffee, tea, or smoking, Power Swabs is the answer in five minutes, you'll see two shades whiter teeth and in seven days, six shades. Even better, there's no messy strips or trays that you have to leave in your mouth for an hour. Just your teeth for five minutes and you're done to try Power Swabs, call one eight hundred six seven nine nine six nine your bright, white smile will have your friends talking about how great you look try it risk free one eight hundred six seven nine nine six nine that's one eight hundred six seven nine nine. Nine six nine an official message for Medicare. Open enrollment ends soon. So now's the time to be open minded look at everything like prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage plans from private insurers because plans change so can your health meets I found lower cost and extra benefits and saved money. Open to something better visit Medicare dot gov or call one eight hundred Medicare today. Open enrollment ends December seventh paid for by the US department of health and human services. Hello. I'm Ed Begley junior and wherever you call home. The sounds of wildlife connect you with a greater family of life. That's why you shudder. Each time. You see woods marshes meadows grasslands being destroyed. You know, the countless birds and other wild animals are losing their homes the greatest threat to their survival among the growing number of threats to wildlife. Habitat loss is most devastating the humane society wildlife land trust offers, a humane solution working with private landowners to protect habitat as permanent safe havens for wildlife. When you hear the familiar wild voices you love. Remember, your voice is one that can speak for wildlife and for the land, they call home ensuring that it stays forever wild. To learn more to work with the humane society wildlife land trust, visit wildlifelandtrust dot cork. There is how's it going? I'm having a stroke. Are you gonna shake my hand or what I'm having a stroke? Wow. You're not even moving your arm. I'm having a stroke. Are you? Okay. I'm having a stroke your face looks weird too. I'm having stroke. Are you having a seizure or something? I'm having a stroke when someone is having a stroke. They may not be able to say it with words, but their body language will.

Power Swabs Medicare wildlife Conservation Society pain salonpas Joaquin MD Ed Begley John Greenhut Africa US department of health official ninety six elephants five minutes seven days
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"I guess depends on what they're doing a volt. Whether so then if they're in flight there a kennel thank heard that one young. And if they're feeding a group is because the best one it's called awake. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. But what's volt of gender? Interchangeable a group of ultras can either a committee in you or volt? Do you know what a group of ravens is called? It's a an unkindness. Yes. And unkindness of ravens. So this vulture vomit explanation may not be -particularly enjoyable or I don't know. It's it can be pretty disgusting, especially when consider those two guys eight it. But it does give us the ability to conjecture a little bit about how the Volkers came to vomit over bath county. I of vultures don't tend to fly of their own free will after they eat because they are digesting. So this means that something must have startled the Volkers. We don't know what it was was it a sheep on a mission of revenge. Was it a farmer discovering, the sheep and shooting the voters, and this is coming from a great article from motherboard called the mystery of? The Kentucky meat shower by Kaley Rogers, and she actually speaks to the vice president for field programs at the wildlife Conservation Society who says his name is Joe Walston. He says if you wanna take off quickly with a huge amount of weight. The first thing you're going to do is vomit which I think applies to everyone, you know. So I I also pulled some vulture facts from this. Excellent book I wanna recommend if you're ready for deep dive into human vulture relationships called carrying dreams. It's written by a guy named Benjamin Joel Wilkinson, and as far as I can tell man he is just super into the history of vultures, and he describes vultures in folklore mythology is well, you know, if you go back to the ancient days of history, and one of the interesting things is that when and where Volker vomits is also considered significant in certain cultures or folklore. Rick events. It's a sign which is neat. You know, for instance, here in Georgia it used to be a common folk tale belief that if you deeply desire something all you have to do is wish for it. As you throw a kiss at a Volker in your wish will come true. But you had to be careful not to speak to Volker while it was flying overhead because if you did in heard you punish you by vomiting on, you know. So maybe I really really that's really think. Yeah. I'm tell you carry dreams is great. But it's also very weird book. But so if that's true, perhaps somebody spoke to a vulture while it was flying over Kentucky. We'll here's the thing too. It's like this would have had to be a multiple a group Hugues option. Like a kettle hole kettle. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. The whole the whole kennel puking on mass and in this motherboard article they also speaks got him Kirk goad who's our professor at Transylvania university..

Volker Joe Walston Kentucky Benjamin Joel Wilkinson Kaley Rogers wildlife Conservation Society Transylvania university vice president Rick Georgia Kirk goad professor
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Alliance city households with cars earn twice the amount of those that don't have cars and while four only four percent of outer borough commuters drive into Manhattan only two percent of Attleboro poor commuters. Drive into Manhattan, the group, which is using the hashtag fix the subways transit issues affect low income New Yorkers the most they cannot afford to miss a job interview or be late for work because of subway delays in union square. Marla diamond WCBS NewsRadio eight eighty. Bronx where an animal welfare group named the non human rights project is apparently not convinced an elephant named happy is really happy, especially after happy's mate died after being hurt at the Bronx zoo. So the non human rights filed a legal petition on Tuesday, arguing that happy the elephant similar rights to a human being unlawfully imprisoned by the zoo, and they want happy to be relocated to a larger private sanctuary to be happy. When no comment from the wildlife Conservation Society, which runs to the Bronx zoo. But zoo officials have said before that happy is happy is not isolated and may suffer if transferred to a new place. Well, the non human rights project. They father's petition in upstate western New York because judges downstate of already rejected similar court cases. It's ten twenty three. Wrangler performance series a collection of jeans and pants, featuring a comfort flex waistband and denim that flexes for comfort. It's the flexibility that you need to get more out of every day and allow you to tap into your unrealized potential see where more range of motion can take you Wrangler performance series denim. That's made to move with you. I'm.

Bronx zoo Manhattan Bronx Attleboro union square wildlife Conservation Society four percent two percent
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Slaughter. There's something parallel between the resilience of squirrels and resilience of Yorkers New York's really hard place to live people. Get a big kick out of it. They don't take the squirrel census seriously at first. But then they see the work in the data and Alan says, they get into it. They're still looking for volunteers. Ears. Sonia. Rincon ten ten wins. News wins news time, five forty nine. And animal welfare group says happy the elephant is anything, but and they want the Bronx due to release happy. So she can go live in a larger private sanctuary. The group called the non human rights project has filed a legal petition against the zoo, arguing that the elephant has rights similar to humans, and is being unlawfully imprisoned by the Bronx zoo, they say happy was separated from the zoos to other elephants after they fatally injured her mate, the wildlife Conservation Society, which runs the zoo did not immediately comment. Zoo officials have said previously that happy is content is not isolated and might suffer from a transfer to an unfamiliar facility wins. News time five fifty if you worked for Amazon whole foods or any Amazon subsidiary for minimum wage, you're getting a raise Amazon is boosting. It's minimum pay to fifteen dollars an hour. The change takes effect November first and applies to full time part time and temporary workers. The company will also had to Washington to lobby the federal government to raise the federal minimum wage, which has been seven twenty five an hour since two thousand nine wins. News time five fifty one.

Bronx zoo Amazon Bronx federal government New York Alan wildlife Conservation Society Washington fifteen dollars
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Ologies

"What's the hardest part about your job? That's a, that's a good question. I absolutely love my job, but but it's the hardest part of my job is is just being able to do as much as we wanted to do. It seems like there's never enough time or there's never enough money to to really fix the problems at a fundamental level. Now that that being said, we've also very recently in the last couple of years seen this amazing change in terms of people who are excited about kind of funding and getting behind the sort of work. So I think you know now there's never been a more exciting time in conservation or in conservation technology. So I'm super excited about it and I think we can really, we don't have to be the generation that ruined everything could be the generation if they could. That's so up dimissed. What's your favorite part of your job? Do you have a moment that was just like, oh, yeah, I would say my on. I mean, my favorite part of the job is without question the field. I love love just being in a place that is a completely new to me entirely different for my life in Los Angeles. I'm surrounded by things like wild animals and mosquitoes, and I'm trying to figure out some technological solution or how to fix some bug without having any of the resources that I have here in my lap. I love that that puzzle I love being stuck in those situations and trying to figure out a way out of it. That's like extreme camping. Hard core camping? What's your next trip? We have a couple trips were going to Cameroon with UCLA, and so we're, we're deploying a bunch of sensors around some of the the research stations that UCLA has in in that part of the Congo basin. We're also going back to the Amazon where were deploying sensors with the wildlife Conservation Society across all the countries that make up the Amazon. So this is a longer project. And later on this year will be going to Sri Lanka where we're going to be using drones to try and monitor the very aggressive well, watching industry that's happening there, which is impacting this unique type of blue whale. That only lives near sure Lanka. So it's like they've got the paps following them, like whale watching. Just a snake, super aggressive, like what are they going to have to be like, hey alone. Yeah, and if we can document it, we could talk for government about it and we can. We can make some changes there and then so we'll be going to believe to tag sharks and we'll be going. Antarctica to to tag whales, which will be pretty fun. Oh my God. Is that all coming up this year? Yeah, it's this year into next year. God. So you've got some packing today, right? It's a lot and I've, I've got a lot of building and testing to do to. Vastly different wardrobes for those expeditions vastly. And so now where can people find you working? They learn more about it and you're nonprofit. So conceivably people wanted to donate. They could help. Yeah, of course. Yeah. So the organizations called conservative fi CONSER v. I f y, you can find us on Twitter and Instagram at that. And then I, I tweet a lot and post a lot on Instagram by Twitter as at Schloss Sobe. And my Instagram's at s. s. e. l. b. so they'll be links in the show notes as well as up on Allie war dot com slash all Ajay's because maybe you're listening to this while operating a forklift or doing kidney surgery, brushing your cats teeth..

Twitter Sri Lanka Amazon UCLA Los Angeles wildlife Conservation Society Schloss Sobe Cameroon Congo basin Antarctica Ajay s. s. e. l. b.
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Ologies

"And my question here, what's gonna bone. The ocean more is gonna be the acidification, the plastics, or the rising temperatures. I can kind of cheat just say, climate change because the civic -ation and the more rising temperatures are both. Effects of climate change as sea-level rise, which is doing some crazy stuff to coastal ecosystems too. So not to mention to our our homes in our infrastructure. So yeah, I think climate change is the number one. Plastic is pretty insidious and the rate at which were just like taking things out of the ocean through overfishing. It's pretty wild, but the ocean can is incredibly resilient. So it will be fine without us. Like if we really screw this up and kill the ocean, which means we're claiming the planet, which means we're killing ourselves when you men's go. Extinct usual, be fine. It'll be different, but it'll be fine. So. It's really like our survival that we should be worried about. Right. And and so for those who need a more self centered motivation who should conservation there you go, save those deserve yourself. Paula Herrera asked where the boys in my middle school, right? How much of the ocean is actually whale sperm, I don't think that's quantifiable correct. That is not a number that I have heard, and then although they do have enormous penis hate mom, dad, fast-forward like thirty seconds. Okay. So writing this in a coffee shop, I made sure to angle my screen before hesitantly typing Google bigger wailed Dick's and in huge funt the answer popped up, twelve inches. I was like, oh, okay. Then I realized that was the diameter. The length is ten feet. Also Wales can p up to two hundred fifty gallons day. Sometimes floating on their backs and just becoming tinkling guy. Ars ion a- delightfully topped that fact with this barnacles Bernal's have the largest peanuts body size ratio of anything because they have to have sex without moving their like stuck on rocks. And they literally have to like peanuts comes out of one goal like fines. Another article like knocks on the door. They like open their cell, like glut this peanuts. And can you even imagine you're in like a long distance relationship? Yeah. The only. That's like Senator dick over. It's like a dick agreem- basically. Maybe Krista haven't Pado Jenny Columba and and Sophie, Karen, all pretty much asked about your job home, like, where would someone begin becoming a marine biologist or someone who works on like science policy? Like how do people become you? Don't vise becoming me exactly, but I would love for more people to join t. motion because there's really exciting work to do, and it's a wonderful community folks. I don't know if that my personal story is super instructive. I think there's a lot of different paths to get to this type of work. I took the science path towards policy because at the time it seemed like there are a lot of lawyers going towards ocean policy, but not a lot of scientists sort of meeting him halfway. So that's the direction I took, but you can go straight into law and policy. You can do communications. We ought to save a lot. We can do to better tell the story and engage people. There's a lot of really amazing art happening around community gauge -ment for oceans and this organization that I mentioned TB Twenty-one and their academies supporting a lot of really amazing ocean art places like pioneer work for. We are now that are integrating the science studio with the arts exhibitions here are really important to to changing cultural narrative. So I guess I would say, depends like, what are you passionate about? What are you good at? If you want to end, then how can you do that in service of the ocean. So whether that's art or science, or law or communications writing, I think there's an opportunity to to rewrite our relationship with the ocean. I've done more doing more and more writing now because I feel like there's just not enough literature out there about our changing planet and how we relate to it. Not unlike a depressing, but just in a like, what does it mean to be a human in this day and age? That was probably not super helpful, but not there's lots of different, like fellowships and inter. Chips and positions in all these organizations. So an organization like vocation conservancy needs, it's big NGO or Chiena or World Wildlife Fund or wildlife Conservation Society. They all have major conservancy conservation international. They have global ocean conservation efforts and to run an organization like that, you need, you need secretaries in janitors to who are committed to keeping that.

Senator dick Google Paula Herrera wildlife Conservation Society World Wildlife Fund Wales Bernal Krista Jenny Columba Karen Sophie two hundred fifty gallons thirty seconds twelve inches ten feet
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on Science for the People

"As well so hammer to compare conservation international to the work of other large environmentallyfocussed ngos hottest competition international complement were of other ngos like wwf the nature conservancy or the wildlife conservation society i thought that our mission is so so ambitious that we can't do it alone but each abok each big ngo has it's all reached its own expertise its own approach on that worse contacts partnerships that are distinct and knee and and draw upon the experience of each a distant organization opt for conservation international i think our our presence uh are are bottle of a partnership and grant making on distinguishes loss odd end and gives us the opportunity to work on to have the flexibility to work on differently other large ngos by on i also think that are uh presence our country present on gives us the case steady the example the demonstrations and the knowledge to normal end end recommend how these programmes can be mainstreamed unskilled up around the world phil i'm sure conservation international has its own unique side of benefits in issues that come with being a large ngo by you've actually worked with small ngos in the past two could you described from perspective how a larger ngo functions differently from a smaller one a thinker come on large ngok respecting our at the week me have a lot of staff we have a lot of divisions in as an end at departments within the organisation so what can do a little bit challenging as is coordination an and on our our ensuring that were all and stuck with each other on to two to make sure that uh our work on science is linked to our work on policy arm is linked to our work with the corporate sector finance and ensuring that were all on a working towards the same goal and i think that's where having a bold like mine on i i sit within the strategy our team spirit ci arm and my job is will lead to to ensure that were uh as an institution working towards kirk coherent and uniform and consistent girl up on climate change particularly out and so i think that you need challenge on is just making sure that well coordinated.

nature conservancy kirk climate change coherent
"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"wildlife conservation society" Discussed on The Pulse

"A raccoon but it has uh head of a squirrel and in fact the tail uh as large and long and slender cool much like red fox's that's pederzolli from the wildlife conservation society squirrel which is called sergei by locals had not been documented since nineteen twenty four that was the only time scientists documented this creature and peter went on a quest to see if perhaps there was still one out there somewhere i went up to a big work now they're building baltistan region of northern pakistan which is one of the more mountain regions in the world or wherever miller moeller only teir crimes and the hindu kush mountain ranges all come together in this gigantic massive mountains died i spent most of my time both in 1992 and then when i returned mentioned 1994 hiking up into these incredible and camping out for weeks at a time and setting live trap south i a lot of interesting animals but no actual will be flying squirrels it wouldn't be surprising if there were lots of flying squirrels bear because it was such an incredibly vertical landscape that you could have blue flying squirrels you know up on a ledge above your head and you'd never know it and then after about a couple of weeks uh not catching anything in this big valley uh a local fellow came out of the bushes basically and get a clashed off on his back and it was quite an impressive beauty fellow and he said i guess you you were looking for share game and i said yes.

red fox peter pakistan miller moeller