36 Burst results for "Wikipedia"

Fresh update on "wikipedia" discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

00:44 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wikipedia" discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"There's what i grew up in the south That really angers me that that that that my regional manager has said you guys need to read So that we can understand better. What african americans are suffering through a look with with without eric looking to see what else is is eddie has written in the past and so. Here's the thing that people need to understand here. Is that Most of corporate america's doing this forcing their employees to go through these things as some sort of religious sacrament to woke his them hoping that the woke won't come for the company you're having to do the penance for the company hoping that the woke won't come for the country they're essentially caving to woke. Oh haram by making you do this and by the way let let me read you. I just pulled up a hurry. Each yoma a lose biography on wikipedia. Her writing covers racism. Misogyny intersection lysm online harassment. The black lives matter movement Feminism and social justice. Oh yes sounds like something that corporate american each read because you know You worked for corporate america. So you're inherently bad just by working for corporate america ee viglen. This bothered see i debated. Do i say something to do. I write a kind note to my management team team has requested that we re this and do i share with them. These are the writings of this person. I'm offended by this. Because if i do that i put a target on my back from this day forward. You do I i will tell you it might experience. It's not gonna do you any good if you write that. And that's why there's a seething resentment among people in the united states right now knowing that if you were to write that a truthful statement that this person has insulted you and your values and consider as you re matter for a vote. You're gonna you're going to be the bad guy and this is why by the way. I don't think this is sustainable by the left. I don't either i. I told my children. I believe this is cyclical. My children have drank the koolade lock stock and barrel regarding this minutia and i. It's everything that i can do to say. Are these kids mind yet. Listen i i. I hear from so many and look i. I'm looking at the clock. Billy i gotta let you go there. Because go to break. But i i from so many parents these days Their kids have just gone head over heels into social justice My my suspicion is that it'll come back They'll come back because as the walks get even more. Terroristic realized that there's no escape. It doesn't matter what you do You're all burning because you're the original because of the color of your skin and that's unfortunate that the woke have gotten that way but they have the only way to push back is to not play. It is eric erickson here. Welcomed the full number eight seven seven nine seven three seven four to five to the phones. We go theodore in valdosta..

Eric Erickson Billy Eddie Each United States Five Four America Eric Theodore American African Wikipedia Eight Seven Seven Nine Seven T Valdosta Americans
The Curious Case of the Purple Daisy Photo

Kottke Ride Home

03:24 min | 2 weeks ago

The Curious Case of the Purple Daisy Photo

"There's an ordinary photo. That has been getting a lot of attention like a lot of attention and people aren't sure why usually would photo goes viral so to speak. It's because it's funny or salacious or just plain bizarre but this photo is simply of a purple daisy in a field of grass. It looks like something that would have been a desktop background choice on windows. Xp the photo was taken in the hague in the netherlands back in two thousand four and a version of it currently lives on wikipedia media comments. Where for some curious reason it has been getting roughly seventy eight million hits a day since last summer mostly from india that accounts for about twenty percent of all data requests on the sites but why in a wiccan media forum discussing the conundrum theories ranged from in indian health conglomerate named astor also the name of the genus of flour. The daisy belongs to perhaps using the image in its app or website to an online coding class. That used the photo becoming particularly popular because several on the forum said it like a photo they had seen in their own coding courses but there is also this quoting rest of world. Many online commenters noted that the purple flower had been used in sample code on sites like stack overflow a question and answer forum programmers. They theorized that an app developer may have accidentally copied and pasted one of the samples and forgot to remove a link to the photograph using code snippets from stack. Overflow is a common strategy among developers around the world. It appears to be a classic case of hot. Lincoln said michael donahoe head of product at rest of world. Hot linking is when a website displays an image by linking to the original site where it's hosted of uploading separately. The practice allows the site borrowing the picture to avoid using their own server space. That's why we can media is forced to handle the requests to the flower photo. As i'm sure you've gathered. People often do it by mistake. Copy paste code without knowing what it does when done by developer. It's usually sloppy. Coding in doesn't look good. Donohoe explained and quotes. The hot lincoln seemed to be the leading theory but then the sleuths realized another piece of the puzzle. The spike from hundreds of hits a day to millions started on june twenty-ninth twenty twenty the very same day that the indian government blocked a number of apps created by chinese developers most notably tiktok. So the theory goes that one of these several tiktok competitors that people flocked to after the ban may have included a link to this flower photo in. Its code somewhere now. We the public don't know which apps specifically it is yet but sukhbir saying an engineer at the wickham media foundation said they have identified it and are waiting to hear back from the developers before releasing the name and quoting once more saying added that wickham media couldn't find the image anywhere in the app itself confirming our theory that it fetches the image but does not display it in other words every day. Millions of phones are sending traffic to a beautiful photograph of a flower. But no one is able to actually witness its beauty. It's like a weird version of the butterfly effect except for throwaway code end quote.

Michael Donahoe Astor The Netherlands Wikipedia India Tiktok Donohoe Lincoln Sukhbir Wickham Media Foundation Indian Government Wickham Media
Tesla buys $1.5B in Bitcoin, will accept as payment soon

the NewsWorthy

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Tesla buys $1.5B in Bitcoin, will accept as payment soon

"Tusla is throwing its weight behind bitcoin. The electric automaker has now invested one and a half billion dollars in the crypto currency and says it plans to eventually accept payment from customers as reminder. Bitcoin is the world's largest crypto currency. It's basically like a digital form of money that's decentralized or in other words there's no main authority like a government. Ultimately the value of bitcoin is based on what people are willing to pay for it and tesla founder elon. Musk has high hopes for it. Tesla's investment could have a domino effect to as the washington. Post points out. It could prompt other major corporations to accept bitcoin as a legitimate form of money already microsoft wikipedia and pay pal accepted worldwide. But now that tesla is in. Bitcoin hit a new high yesterday topping. Forty seven thousand dollars per coin that said some market experts are skeptical. They think tesla is just investing in bitcoin. As a distraction meant to stir up more interest in its own stuff to be continued.

Tesla Bitcoin Elon Musk Washington Microsoft
Hollywood Monsters  with Mallory OMeara

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Hollywood Monsters with Mallory OMeara

"History is written by the winners by men early editors of science fiction anthologies choice to exclude by women and in doing so made many believe that women did not write science fiction in the genres earliest years. This is just one example. And by no. Means the only one mallory mira self-confessed monster lava and film. Ned discovered a similar story in one of her favourite monsters. Millicent patrick was one of disney's earliest female animators and went on to design one of the greatest film monsters of the creature from the black lagoon but a jealous smell. Coworker ensured that there was no prestigious career. A rating millicent. Mallory decided to set the record straight in her book. The lady from the black lagoon. Hollywood monsters and the lost legacy of millicent. Patrick and reestablish. Millicent of monster design mallory. Thank you for joining us. But before we get stuck into things would you please introduce yourself to our listeners. high Yeah thank you so much for having the ottoman cited to to talk about this with you. Three i m author of lady from the black lagoon an fulltime author. And i'm also fellow podcasters. I host the show reading glasses every week with my friend. brea grant. what did you hope to achieve by. Unearthing the story of million patrick and setting the record straight about her contribution to monster design. Well a few things honestly the impetus behind me working on in in writing from the black lagoon was just i wanted to know. Millicent has been my hero. Since i was a teenager and i wanted to satisfy my own personal curiosity i found out about her when i was seventeen and it just seemed creature from the black lagoon like nobody even knew if she was still alive. She didn't have a website. She didn't have a wikipedia entry. Nothing about her online. So i personally just really really wanted to know at as i started digging into her life and her work and in this book i i also just. I wanted people to know that we've always been here. You know i. I actually started working on this book before the metoo movement happened and while i think it's amazing that there's such a huge push right now to get more women in front of the camera behind the camera writing doing everything women everywhere in cosigned for me but i also think it's really important to have people know that women have always been here. We have a legacy here and millicent. Patrick is proof. That and if i could only unearth her story and bring it to the world than i could could prove it is funny. You say that. Because i remember i was a massive star trek fan still but i remember in high school being completely obsessed with original series star trek and then discovering that d c fontana was a woman and i was like women have been there from the beginning. We right star trek. Yeah so i. I definitely can get on board with excitement. It changes everything. I mean finding out that a woman who designed this incredible monster that i became completely obsessed with it changed my life. It made me realize up until that point all of my heroes in the monster world. Where met you know tom. Savini rick baker. Dick smith jack pierce. It never even occurred to me that women did those things and seeing just one single photo of seeing a woman working on the creature from the black lagoon. It broke my brain open. It was like being struck by lightning. And it you can. You can make a direct line from that moment in time in front of my computer. Seven seventeen to me becoming a filmmaker later on up reading a bit about medicine on. You mentioned that you back. Then she didn't have a wikipedia entry. She does have one now on your on it as well. Yes i mean we're competing is basically all from the bottom up until that point there was no there was really no biographical information about her and the stuff that was out there was largely false Sometimes because of Militants own she liked to fabricate biographical information about which was very fun for me to deal with as biographer But it's now now actually people who she is and she has a wikipedia. Entry people You google tons of stuff comes up. It's really it makes me really really happy. So how did she become raised from history in the first ice so the her boss at the universal studios monster shop and she worked there in the early nineteen fifties was a man named bud west more and he was part of a very very famous big family of makeup artist. The west morris His father actually. George west was the man who invented the idea of a makeup department so they were huge. Deal in hollywood at the time he had a massive amount of power and influence not just at universal but in the film world is a whole unfortunately he was also known for taking people's credit being very jealous of the other artists that worked with him if they were more successful or more talented than he was which wasn't hard to do And she designed creature and they shot the movie and it became very clear that the movie was going to be a huge hit. They the universal studios publicity department wanted to send millicent on a press tour to promote it and up until that point in history know in the fifties. There was no twitter. There was no. Imdb there is no way for people to really look into the details of of credits on films. You know back then. There was no like ten minutes end. Crawl at the end of a movie like we get now. There was only like these cards that gave the heads of department Credit for the things that they did so no matter. What but didn't design at on a movie increase in the credits creature. It says makeup. Bud west more So he never was challenged. People always just assume that he designed everything that came out of his shop

Millicent Millicent Patrick Brea Grant Patrick Mallory Savini Rick Baker Jack Pierce NED Disney Hollywood Dick Smith Fontana West Morris George West TOM Google
Airliner Hit By MANPAD!

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

04:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Airliner Hit By MANPAD!

"So i wanna tell you about an airliner a airbus. A three hundred guinea hit by a man pad. So you're wondering probably wondering what is a man pad that is a man portable air defense system. mp a day that's Looks like a bazooka. It's a shoulder. Mounted sam surface to air missile. And it can be carried by antibody. Because it's not very heavy and has a three pound warhead now. Three pound warhead. Doesn't sound like he'll do a lot of damage what it can knock a big airplane out of the sky now when i was in vietnam We were called. Destroy la back. Then the sa seven and it's picked up the name grail also but in russia they still call it destroy. It's a russian Device and back then. It was heat-seeking only work only hit your airplane from behind what we were would home in a basically on a heat source which typically is the exhaust but now they have a new version of the strella which can home in on an airplane from the front. Also so here. Is this eighty three hundred Taking off from iraq going there. They're headed toward took out from baghdad. Headed toward bahrain and a three man crew of was seen firing one of these mad pads and it struck the airplane. There's a picture in our our in our Web page of what. It looked like after that airplane got struck it was struck in the left wing and fortunately it was right after takeoff so the left wing fuel tank was full so there was no fuel air vapor in the tank because if they've been vapor that would have been highly explosive but it was bernie and The missile in addition to punch a big hole in the wing took out the hydraulic system. So now the the crew is flying this airplane with no flight controls. They're doing like what united airlines flight to thirty two did. They're using differential thrust to manage the the the altitude the heading the airspeed. They're using that to fly around and try to come back and land back at back at baghdad and it took about ten minutes for them to get back around now. The flight engineer on this flight was doing a magnificent job because if the left if the source of fuel to the left engine had run dry. They wouldn't have been able to control the airplane anymore. They needed all of their engines for differential thrust. They needed both engines to be able to to operate so that they could maintain directional control. So he's constantly monitoring the state of fuel in the left wing when the state of fuel is leaking out dramatically. And he's using crush meeting to get fuel back to the other engines so that they could continue to power both engines so they brought it in. They made a landing. They didn't incredible job made landing. They were not able to control the airplane. What's it was on the ground than it went for. Like a thousand feet off the runway. But but no one was injured. The airplane was substantially damaged and it eventually was scrapped. So why do i bring this up. Well man pads are available everywhere They ever virtually every country where there's any violence you will find that. There are men pads. If you look on on wikipedia you'll see a list of countries where there is is documented documented. Proof that they have man pads somewhere there and all it takes is one person who's been very briefly trained in how to use it. You turn it on. Turn the machine on and you're aiming at an airplane and squeeze the trigger. That's basically it and so you could be. You could be at risk especially when you fly. Overseas special show fly to third world countries. You could be at risk of a man pad anywhere you fly. So that's something to think about a three pound warhead. Doesn't sound like much but it can do serious damage in its knocked airplanes. Who even back. When i was flying at four as there was a foreign. My squadron got out of this guy by by estrella

Sam Surface Baghdad Airbus Guinea Bahrain Vietnam Russia United Airlines Bernie LA Iraq Wikipedia Estrella
Personal data stolen from Dutch coronavirus track-and-trace programme

Smashing Security

07:20 min | Last month

Personal data stolen from Dutch coronavirus track-and-trace programme

"Chummy chums. There is a fellow working at a company in the netherlands. Okay i'm in shaved for awhile sam. He's he's wearing upper the same and he has an interest in the dark web. Okay that's where we diverge. But he's no malicious hacker. He is daniel velarde who is a cybercrime reporter at the dutch tv service l. news he's the guy who loves to dig up facts about what's going on on the dark web and -mongst cybercriminals all the hackers and he's a cool technology guy and it's his job to dig up details. What the bad guys are up to and uncover cyber goofs. Okay this is. This is what he does for a living basically. Yes oh yeah okay. For instance last november. He gained a little notoriety because he gate crashed a european union. Defense ministers video conference court. This was after the dutch defence minister accidentally posted the logan details on twitter so yes of frayed is still happening so you want to show. He was hard at work so he took a screen shot and he posted up about to join this video conference call with the other defense ministers of the and that our man decided to join the conference. Well well to to the credit of the minister. He didn't reveal all of the pin code. Only some of the digits. So i think they're about to missing and so this inventive young germans to twenty tries gotta clean. Well that gained him some notoriety but he's is now in the pipe is again because he has uncovered what appears to be a serious security breach which has been happening in the netherlands. He found that someone for months has been gone onto snapchat. Onto telegram onto weaker with wicker. Weaker is a encrypted a messaging service a bit like signal telegram yet. Weaker is particularly beloved of drug uses bluetooth. Only one or my i. No no no. You'll think you're thinking of different. Yes wicker isn't just for local. Contacts can be anywhere. But we're wicky you don't have to a phone number so you can super-secret anyway. You want to buy your jazz cigarettes do that okay. Good to know right now and found is that someone has been advertising a month. Something their their access to sensitive data from the dutch health. Service smith civically. These people have access to databases of people who've taken corona virus tests in the netherlands are have been documented in the testing tracing system so their home addresses that email addresses the telephone numbers dates of birth and their b s n. The bsn is the dutch equivalent to social security number. Okay so someone has been advertising this Boy so you can pay between thirty and fifty euros. And say hey. Can you tell me the home address. Phone number email address and social security number of this person wetness wicker telegram if you contact the hacker via the ad. Wow that's a good rate so you can get those details. Jeez and you kind of course request details about more than just one or two people. You can say well. Could you give me all the information you have about everyone who lives in amsterdam aged over. It's like do you know database. Well is it shown a sequel query. Now why why. What do you mean why for funsies. Why would anyone want this. Yeah why would anyone want this information. say i've had four coronavirus tests or i've had done who cares well because matching wanted to scam somebody. You can send the message or an sms. Say no no you that you took your test on this date and we've now got the results for you or can you pay this amount of money to get now. We decided we're going to give you some treatment. Go to this site and shook pretty cuttittas but more that you also get their social security number and you can begin to do all kinds of fraud with that all and this is a bit scary okay. They discovered that the private data of celebrities was also sale and even crime jones. There is a chap in the netherlands. Code you have to excuse my accent because it's very very good. Jan van den. He sure everyone's going to recognize her. Well our friends probably will he in the netherland. that's yesterday. He is famous because he is a crime journalist. A former police chief he receives the same kind of full-time police protection. Which is afforded to the dutch. Royal family super the squadron of bicycles for threat. Seriously because he's considered so much for target to his work in the past assisted in the capture of criminal sneaking. Read all about him on. Wikipedia is being upset so he goes around town with like a dozen people him yes. He's got bodyguards. He's got the police looking after him and so he doesn't want his personal dress. How tall is this guy. Jesus he's going to be quite. So i say that about a lot of people how y'all so yes so he puts put seeming danger because of course he's a person of interest to criminals and these are criminals. Can you tell me where he lives. News phone number and is social security number you can imagine. He's not terribly pleased about this. So this journalist daniel a etc He got the prior consent of individuals. A number of people a few hundred people and he did a request he said i would like information about these. Hundreds of people approached the scammers. And said how you thinking of making a purchase just as a little test can me details about these people and he confirmed the authenticity of information. It should been offered for sale and it was correct so this is the legitimate information. They even posted screen shots of the computers with access to the databases now the dutch health service. They say they haven't found any evidence that they'd been hacked. But he screenshots. Suggest in thi- job it exactly. Yeah they're twenty six thousand workers and cool central employees working inside the dutch health service hoover access to this information and many of them have course at the moment where they working at home you pitch and that makes it easier. I would argue for them to pulse on the dates criminals or even just photograph their screens. Or you can't put your screen in the office can be people might not really giving any would've noticed anyone. Royd camera out brave. Do

The Netherlands Daniel Velarde Wicky Smith Civically Jan Van Den SAM Wicker Twitter Amsterdam Jones Daniel Dutch Health Service Hoover Royd
Twitter pilot to let users flag 'false' content

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | Last month

Twitter pilot to let users flag 'false' content

"In its attempt to fight misinformation on its site, Twitter is enlisting the help of its own users, creating a crowd sourced back checking project it called Bird Watch. Pilot program on Lee in the U. S. For starters, taps pre selected users with no rule violations to help flag misleading and outright false tweets and write notes correcting them. Witter says it wants both experts and non experts to write. Bird watch notes exciting Wikipedia as a site that thrives with non expert contributions.

Twitter U. LEE Witter
Unraveling America

Travel with Rick Steves

04:24 min | Last month

Unraveling America

"We're all glad to have survived. Thousand twenty the change in the us administration suggests it may be time for a different tone in how americans work on the issues our country needs to tack. But are we up. For an essay on the unraveling of america an anthropologist. Wade davis wrote for rolling stone last august. Got people talking. He joins us now from his home near vancouver. Bc to explore. America's changing role in global politics is essay is sort of like a letter to a neighbor who needs a little tough love and that neighbor happens to be a canadian anthropologist. Wade thanks for joining us. My pleasure could be with you so you wrote an article. That apparently is the most widely read thing. Rolling stone has ever published. Will it hit a real nerve. Million people read it on the site. It trended number one for five weeks three hundred and sixty two million social media impressions within two months and my visitations to my wikipedia. Site soared from a modest one hundred fifty a day to over four thousand. Just hit this nerve wrecking a none of us expected that nervous like that Little quip that's going around on the internet suggesting that to live in candidate today is like owning an apartment above a meth lab. Robin williams. Actually your essays. You say. it's a love letter. But it's a love letter called the unraveling of your neighbor america. How is it a love letter. Well i think when you have someone you love and you do. A family intervention. The most important in the first thing have to do is hold a mirror chisholm to show how far they've fallen. Because that's the first step in the path of rehabilitation and. I think that things have happened so fast. In america that in a way people look in the mirror and they still see the myth of their on exceptionalism and they don't necessarily see how far things have changed and i think kovic revealed that you know it didn't cost the country to fall but revealed to what extent the country had fallen. And i think a lot of that's just about the nature of community and i think where canada's not perfect place but it is interesting to compare the consequences of covid in the two countries way. It's it's interesting because americans. I think we take up a little bit offence when somebody from country critiques us. But we're more likely to listen to canadians. And it's so helpful for somebody to remind us that the global view of america has changed a little bit. I mean people used to look at us differently than they do now well as a great reporter for the irish times you know. They've been many motions expressed about america's since world war two but one that has never been there is there now that was pity. And that was how the world saw america's frontline healthcare workers were waiting. The arrival of emergency supplies on air lists from china. It was almost like the hinge of history opened the asian century. Pity that's something new. Another thought that. I've had is. When i if i ever refer to america's as an empire people take offense to it but we're an empire to me and empires rise and empires fall. I'm a historian and and it's frustrating to me. How unable or unwilling americans are to realize. History may be speaking to us in your essay. You reminded us how empires come and empires go. Well no kingdom expects to fall and they all do you know historically if you think in european tradition. The fifteenth century belonged to the portuguese the sixteenth to the spanish to seventeen to the dutch. The eighteenth to the french and the the nineteenth to the british. The british empire actually reached its greatest geographical extent in nineteen thirty five. But we know of course that by the end of world war two empire was bankrupt and bled white in the torch had in fact passed to america. What clearly yeah. I mean if you look at the numbers after world war two we were so dominant and comfortable thinking. We're the last great superpower. But of course as you said look at what the past has taught us and i think pretty clearly right now. There's a changing of the the torch ever further westward in it and china is emerging as the next great superpower I mean i don't necessarily look forward to that moment with any kind of The light and i think if if and when we find out that this is the fading of the american era. I think we'll be very nostalgic for the best years of that era.

America Us Administration Wade Davis Kovic Robin Williams Wade Chisholm Vancouver Canada China
The C64 'Maxi' Review - Full-Sized Commodore 64 Replica

Hands-On Tech

09:55 min | Last month

The C64 'Maxi' Review - Full-Sized Commodore 64 Replica

"Retro video game consoles are pretty awesome. But i just got the one that i've been anticipating the most. I'm going to review these sixty four by retro games next. This is tweet hello everyone. Welcome to hands on tech. I'm jason howell. So if i had to trace passion for technology back to one key item from my childhood be pretty easy for me to put my finger on it. And that's the commodore sixty four. That's the one of the most popular computer systems. Especially at the time. I think it was known as the most popular computer system in the eighties. And i had a commerce sixty four for quite a few years. When i was a kid and i just had so many memories of connecting to bulletin boards with my three hundred baud modem downloading commercial games that i probably wasn't supposed to have just trading floppy disks with friends at school. I mean this defined my childhood. So when i heard that retro games was gonna put out a commodore sixty four mini console. I was elated now in twenty eighteen. They released these c. Sixty four mini. And it's about half the size of a normal commodore sixty four included some games but you could also tap into it to basically run any disk images from the congress sixty four that you wanted. I thought that was neat. Until i heard that the keyboard was completely functioning which is an issue i have a retro raspberry pi with retro pie on it and i've emulated commerce sixty four many times but not having the commodore sixty four keyboard actually changes. The experience are certain keys to re map is just not the same thing. So then i was super excited. When retro games announced that they were doing a maxi version known as the c sixty four happens to be what i have right here the full size version with a functioning keyboard and it is awesome especially for someone like me on the perfect person to give this a spin. So let's take a look at my experience with the c sixty four first. Let's talk about the hardware itself and boy. Am i happy that i waited for the full size keyboard release. The design is impressively faithful to the original bread. Been model of the commodore sixty four. There was a sand papery texture that surrounds the keys on the keyboard that to my memory is pretty spot on the like chunk of the space bar and how it feels when you slam. That feels just right. Totally takes me back and the keys themselves. They're pretty good. There may be a tad wobbly compared to my memory of the original commerce sixty four but thankfully typing this review on it. So i don't care as long as i can hit that run. Stop key when a game tells me too about the only real difference that i can tell from the original. Is that the shift. lock key. doesn't lock down into place when pressed like did on the original. It is a software toggle so it still has the same functional use is just not quite as satisfying all in all. I'm very pleased with how faithful this keyboard replica is. It's a joy to us where things are very different from. The original is the side and the back of the unit. Basically the i o ports on the side is a power button that you just tap and hold power honor office different from the switch on the original. Also three usb ports for plug near joysticks in on the side or other usb peripherals on the back is a micro usb port for power and aced out for your modern television or monitor. Something you can't do with the original commerce sixty four and another usb port and. I'm super pleased that they included that additional rear facing port because that allows me to keep a thumb drive plugged in there. When i want to add more games which you can do and we'll talk about that. My only real complaint is simply how light and in some ways kind of hollow. The entire system feels the original. Had some heft to it. You know one thousand nine hundred eighty technology and this new version contains a small arm computer with five hundred twelve megs of memory so it's pretty svelte. This nation system running vice after all also no true comer sixty four peripherals can be plugged in here at least not easily so no user port no port or expansion port. Now packed in the box is this joystick. Which as you can see has a lot more buttons than any commerce sixty four joystick. Ever had really you just end up with one if you're using a traditional commerce four controller. There's a lot more here and we'll talk about how that interfaces but definitely not quite the slick stick that. I adored back in the day but it does the job. It is super clicky. Pretty loud characteristic. Personally i never really cared much for in those old school joysticks. There's a large button on both sides. That makes it usable for lefties and righties and along. The bottom is a row of specialized buttons that tap into the carousel interface of the sixty. Four which i'll get to as well as for allowing specialized functions during game play so you can load and save states. You can open a virtual keyboard which on the maxi the large version of the c. Sixty four is is unnecessary. Really and then of course you can exit out to the main carousel screen to load a new game. The stock joystick is really kind of essential. If you want to jump in and out of games quickly. It's a bummer. There aren't other designs to choose from. Because like i said it does the job but it's definitely not my favorite for long stretches. Bluetooth support is not included But some people in forums have had luck with different. Modern controllers plugged in via usb. So assume that you're probably using the stock controller unless you really wanna go diving deep and experimenting you might be able to take your favorite controller and plug it in here but it's probably not going to be super easy out of the box now a mini console releases often only as good as the games that are included on it and if you check wikipedia it says that the commodore sixty four originally had around ten thousand commercially released software for the platform. So no matter how. You chop down to disappoint somebody. The c sixty four ships with you guessed it sixty four titles out of the box including a few vic twenty. Titles a firmware update. They you should. Flash brought another seven games to the carousel and some additional functionality. Over although game selection is pretty paltry and my opinion. It doesn't quite match my own nostalgic experienced. But like i said everybody has a different experience. I really appreciate the epochs heavy offerings here. So you've got impossible mission of all the games games summer winter games the jump man series of pretty much many of epochs is a classic titles are in there. There's also a few other favorites. You radium perr odroid. There's some good games in there. Don't get me wrong. But many of these titles simply were not on my radar when i was a kid so when it comes to nostalgia i'm really looking for titles that i know and going to get to more on that in a second but gameplay itself is as smooth as it needs to be. I didn't find any games that didn't work the way i remember them Playing it is an emulation approach though so consider that. It's not going to be perfect. But i didn't detect anything that clued me into it being ambulation. I have emulated the congress sixty four on the raspberry pi and some keys. Don't exist on the keyboard that you have to plug into the back of the raspberry pi in order to do it. So like i said earlier. Having this keyboard makes the game play experience that much. Better the carousel which used very frequently with the c. Sixty four is thoughtfully done as well. You've got some game. Cover art some gameplay screenshots and then a description of the game along with details like who the composer was which personally is a c sixty four aficionado. I can say that super important. The ship is is an amazing music. Chip that was included in the sixty. Four this dozen a perfect job of emulating it and it is really nice to know if hubbard produced not track that you're about to listen to either our display options if you wish to add some crt style scan lines to the experience though. Personally i kept those off for the most part so sixty four games out of the box pretty limited when you're talking about ten thousand total titles but it isn't a deal breaker because if you format a thumb drive to fat thirty two you can add play d sixty four disk images added to your heart's content though you might have to do some cleanup work. I in order to make that happen. The integrated file manager only two hundred fifty six files in a single folder. So if you have a library of thousands of games you're going to shift everything around into their own folders in order to get access to all of those within the interface or you can tap into a community driven upgrade for the c. Sixty four called project carousel. Usb this actually adds hundreds more games directly into the carousel interface so it's as easy to pick and choose as the stuff that ships with the sixty four. Now do note. Project carousel may violate copyright rules. So you're going to want to be sure to check your local laws before diving in check with your own ethics and see if you feel comfortable with that and if it's legal for you to do so but if you do choose to explore this it's super easy. It's non-destructive doesn't override the firmware permanently. Basically you just throw the image files on a thumb drive and then flash the firmware temporarily after boot up to access all the games in that interface power off. The original firmware returns to stock.

Jason Howell Congress Wikipedia Hubbard
Apple sued for not removing Telegram from App Store over violent content and hate groups

Mac OS Ken

03:02 min | Last month

Apple sued for not removing Telegram from App Store over violent content and hate groups

"An interesting turn in an interesting case. Piece from berlin. Cider says the group coalition for a safer web and former us ambassador to morocco. Marc ginsberg filed suit against apple late last week for not kicking the messaging app telegram out of the app store. Ginsburg isn't just a former ambassador. According to his wikipedia page he served in a couple of positions during the carter administration before that he was a legislative assistant to senator. Ted kennedy the also worked on bill clinton's campaign and ninety two and al gore's campaign in two thousand and he's been a foreign policy and national security contributor to cnn cnbc bloomberg tv msnbc bbc allow arabia cbc and fox news as for the coalition for a safer web. The organization's website says he s w was a nonpartisan not for profit advocacy organization whose mission is among other things to promote new public and private partnerships to facilitate the expeditious removal of extremist and terrorist incitement and instruction content from social media platforms additionally cs w dedicated to restricting extremists access to internet infrastructure support companies vital to their dark and deep web operations. Basically what happened with parlor would be right up. Cs ws now. They'd like to see happen again to telegraph like parlor before it. Cs w argues that telegram is being used by hate groups and extremists to attack the capital further. The organization says apple knows that telegram is being used to intimidate threaten and coerce members of the public according to apple insider. There is also the accusation that anti-black anti semitic groups have openly utilized telegram with little or no content. Moderation by telegrams management despite the cs ws warnings and media reports about the app. Cbs w argues that apple has not taken any action against telegram comparable to the action. It has taken against parlor to compel telegram to improve its content moderation policies by not doing enough to moderate activity on its own app. Cbs w says telegram is in violation of apple's terms of service. Just like parlor and just like night. Yes they went there but instead of taking it up with telegram for some reason. They're taking it up with apple. Well they're taking it up with the courts to take it up without appleinsider says the demand a jury trial and asked the court to provide compensatory damages to each plaintiff and injunction to be granted prohibiting telegram from the app store until it complies with apple's guidelines and legal costs

Marc Ginsberg Cnbc Bloomberg Apple Carter Administration Ginsburg Ted Kennedy Cider Morocco App Store Berlin Al Gore Bill Clinton Msnbc CBC Fox News Arabia CNN BBC Telegram CBS
Q&A: How about an app to help people care for plants?

Side Hustle School

03:07 min | Last month

Q&A: How about an app to help people care for plants?

"I've always had a green thumb. And i'd like to code. That's why my idea is to build an app to help people take care of their house plans. It will include lots of faq's in troubleshooting as well as notifications to remind people want to water. The only thing. I can't do is keep people from over watering but i'll try. What do you think of this idea. Bryan. what's up ban. Thank you so much for listening. Congratulations on your multiple skills. Multi-skilled ability green thumb and like to code. I think i want this app. I love plants myself. But they don't love me back. And i realize it's not their fault. I think i am the problem. It isn't abusive relationship. Which i acknowledge and i would like to change my behavior but i. I guess i can admit this to you brian to our listeners. Because i'm not the only one like there's definitely a market to help people take care of plants better. I recently met a woman known as the plant doctor. Who makes house calls to both care for your plants as well as show you what to do and what to avoid so. She's coming to take care of the plants and then washes there. She's also teaching you to fish but not really fish. she's teaching. you know what i mean. Now it sounds like. Brian wants to provide virtual plant dr services. That's why bring that up. Basically what he wants to do is virtual dr services in the form of an app which is probably a lot more efficient than going to somebody's house and probably the most common model for something like this. These days is advertising where the app is free and has lots of little sections of advice. You can think of it like a blog. That isn't chronological like when you think about creating the content for it. It is a lot like creating content for eight blog. Ray wikipedia style site and all. This information is then going into the app so not chronological just topical. But they're also like you know the advertisements a lot of what we think of as perhaps annoying banners pop up from time to time and often you know how annoying they are is based on the frequency and the duration of those ads and such so it is possible to strike a balance and provide good user experience while still monitoring the app now. If you don't want to knowing banners or any banners at all then this might be a good low cost app. When i say low cost though i think this is something that has changed in recent years as well like there used to be a lot of ninety nine cent apps and one dollar apps and for the most part those apps these days anything. That's ninety nine cents or a dollar is going to be supported by more advertisements in the app or opportunities to purchase something else. So i think it's i don't think you should sell it for a couple of dollars. I think that should be introductory offer or a special promotion perhaps but if it really has good info and can be a reliable guide to help keep those beloved plants alive make it a quality product in charge at least ten dollars which is still not a lot of money to keep your plants alive if you create a resource that is really helpful and is achieving those results and who knows this could really be something so good luck with that. I think it sounds interesting. Let us know what happens in. Oh one more question for our listeners. Before you go. How much room should you give to grow. How much room should you give. Fun guy to grow was just doing some research on this. You should give it as mushroom as possible all right. You're welcome go free to use that today.

Ray Wikipedia Bryan Brian
How To Manage Digital Reputations With Josh Greene

Lochhead on Marketing

05:00 min | Last month

How To Manage Digital Reputations With Josh Greene

"Josh. It's great to see you. It's great to be on. Thanks for having me. I'm really excited. I your fascinating guy so Here's sort of an idea. I think we live at a time. Where when most of us get introduced to somebody new one of the very first things we do after somebody says. Hey i want to introduce you to josh green. I'm gonna go you. And i think that's pretty pretty normal and in a world where i saw post from a dear friend of mine duska zapata. Who's rough and tough six months into a new job and she. Her post was all about the fact that she's never met the people that she works with in person. And so we're living in this digital first world right and so. I think it's a natural thing when we meet somebody. I think a lot of google them so this leads me to a question which is but yet. Most of us don't know how to take responsibility for what happens. Somebody types josh green into that little box. And so maybe let's use that as a jumping off point in terms of. How do i manage. What happens after somebody starts searching for me absolutely and really the first thing that you want to do is take a look at the overall results when someone Searches on your name and take stock of how many of those results are items that you control or about you and then start thinking about whether you would like to have more mentions of yourself on that page or the ones that are already there. Are they conveying what you would like them to convey To the world when the world looks at you so If they if they google you are you the world's best stockbroker or you a stockbroker who's been barred three times from the industry very different results. Very different impact could be the same person But but what shows up in google especially on that first page is really going to influence a large chunk of the world of their first impression of you. Yeah it's interesting. My buddy isaac morehouse. Who's the founder of crash. One of the things he says is i love be your own credential and of course part of that is what do people see about you. Digitally when they start digging around and so You know when you and i met. I didn't know much about how i myself or for that matter. If i'm a. Ceo or cmo or an entrepreneur. What have you My company you can actually take control over a fair amount of what happens after somebody types in your name can't you you can you can And i think you're a great example of of someone who's done a nice job of that whether intentionally or not it wasn't so tell tell me because when you and i first met. You told me that you said that. Hey the shit that comes up is good and anyway tell me about what you saw and what was good and what was not good. And how that applies more broadly to other people in other companies. Well when i took a look at your name there was a nothing negative really on the front page at all. You had your twitter feed was showing up in the top three or four results which is usually a subconscious. Cue that someone's something of an authority in their area or google algorithm thinks that over on the top right side of those search results is what's called the knowledge panel and most people it's powered by their wikipedia page In your case it was powered by amazon bio. Which is i suspect. Both something you or publicists have written and also very flattering And also much more positive than a typical wikipedia result would be there which is a much more neutral encyclopedia extending entry and the nice thing for you is. People are so used to sing with a pd content. There that when they see that you're a number one podcast an author and cult classic writer. They assume those things are all automatically true because they're used to wikipedia source of truth being there and in your case you're probably the you're the first person i ever saw. Who had something other than wikipedia. Showing up there in a meaningful way I've seen a couple of others since since that started looking for it but really if someone looks at this page are gonna say. Wow this is someone. Who's you know a thought leader in his space. Whose accomplished a bunch of things which is a really great start. Anyone trying to learn more about you

Josh Green Duska Zapata Google Isaac Morehouse Josh Twitter Amazon
"wikipedia" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

09:46 min | Last month

"wikipedia" Discussed on Short Wave

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach <hes>. She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that <hes>. I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

cairo npr wikipedia emily london jess
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | Last month

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
Dozens of Al Jazeera journalists had their iPhones hacked this summer by state-backed attackers

Mac OS Ken

02:07 min | 2 months ago

Dozens of Al Jazeera journalists had their iPhones hacked this summer by state-backed attackers

"A seriously troubling security story and gadget ran a piece over the weekend saying that the phones of thirty seven journalists most of whom worked for al jazeera were hacked. Using an i message vulnerability that had been present for roughly a year. That's according to findings from citizen lab reported by the guardian. According to the peace the zero click attacks left no trace and would have allowed access to passwords microphone audio and even snapping photos. The expert was reportedly part of a software suite from nso group. Wikipedia says nso group as an israeli technology firm who spyware called pegasus and the remote surveillance of smartphones. And they're saying don't get us according to end gadget the nso groups that it was not familiar with citizen labs claims and maintain that it doesn't have access to targets data. It said that it investigates any instance where there's credible evidence of misuse by customers and that the software is only meant for pursuing criminals. Apple said it couldn't independently verify citizen. Lab's work but said the attack was highly targeted and that it always urges people to install the latest versions of ios. speaking of which i s. Fourteen is believed to plug this particular hole as for. Nso's argument that their software is only meant for pursuing criminals. Who gets to decide who those are and gadget says. The exact motivations for the hacks aren't clear. But there were four that appear to have origins in saudi arabia and the united arab emirates and and at least two cases acted on the government's behalf so long as the findings says n. gadget. They suggest that some countries are still abusing. so group tools to spy on critics and dissidents. Of course you can just call them criminals and it's cool right

Nso Group NSO Al Jazeera Wikipedia Apple United Arab Emirates Saudi Arabia Government
'Masked Singer' spin-off 'The Masked Dancer' to premiere in 8 days

Rob Has a Podcast

01:16 min | 2 months ago

'Masked Singer' spin-off 'The Masked Dancer' to premiere in 8 days

"The premiere of the mask dancer in about eight days. So that'll be coming. We'll be talking about that. We just wrapped up season four of the masked singer. Yeah so you can find all both those shows on the reality rap. He work will the mask dancer be hit. I think the first episode will do well. I just need to envision it. Like i understand why the singers they hit like singing shows do wells. Dancing shows have noticed. There is so think like give it. Those are legitimate stars that you know who's dancing but the league with the mask you could tie is going to be lower for the masked singer and i know there was at least one or two people on the thing this year that like donate wikipedia pages basically so i don't know okay because what support what celebrities agreeing to dance. More people can sing and dance. While i think i think there's some athletes. I've heard some olympians rumors. I don't know but we'll see we'll be interesting thing about all those shows. The athletes are usually like jerry. Rice in theory in sports is like a bigger deal but like he could go on dancing. Th you know what. I mean like for some reason get better athletes than they do celebrities for some reason. Why okay

Wikipedia Jerry Rice
Havent I been here before

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:42 min | 2 months ago

Havent I been here before

"Welcome to kiss myths and mystery. Siamese your host kit crumb. I've got to mention that if you're hearing a little background noise there's nothing wrong with your computing device or however you're listening to this podcast is my neighbor dominate away. Who's drilling well while that said. Today's topic is a deja vu. When you go to a new place me someone that you've never met before and had the feeling that you knew that person or to that place. Well you're not alone. But i deviate a little bit when i was researching this story a french carver. Not a real name said. She grew up in las vegas but eventually moved to shasta city california. She told me it wasn't uncommon for her to have the name of a friend that she grew up with pop into her head. And within minutes would run into that person at shasta. Although janice experiences nada deja vu. I felt it was in the same league and i just couldn't help explain it to my listeners. Okay onward we go. Wikipedia says deja vu feeling that one has lived through the present situation before the phrase translates literally as already seen although some interpret deja vu in a paranormal context mainstream science approaches reject of dacia who is pre cognition or prophecy. So how does science explain deja-vu they the world of science has four possible causes of what is referred to as vu. First attention explanations of deja vu involve an initial perception that is made under degraded attention which is then followed by a second. Take under full attention for example. If you're about to unlock the front door of your house and you momentarily are distracted by a noise in the distance when you return to the task locking the door the first perception may seem further off in the past the distraction that separates these two perceptions could be est fleeting. I said i blink. Their second explanation is memory explanations. They make the assumption that some detail of the do experiences familiar but the source of this familiarity has been forgotten. The premise of this explanation is that people encounter countless things during the course of the day. But don't pay attention to all of the information later. Processing of information may occasionally induce. The million era at deja vu. Then there is the next explanation dual processing explanation so vu suggested to usually synchronous cognitive processes become momentarily as synchronous for example familiarity and retrieval could become out of sync alternate league perception and memory could become a synchronous and finally neurological explanations for deja vu attributed the phenomenon to either a small temporal lobe seizure in a person without epilepsy to a delay in neural transmission between the eyes ears or other perceptual organs in higher order processing centers in the brain. Wow do processing. Explanations have received a lot of attention. They are much more philosophical and theoretical and less mechanistic but do processing explanations can be tested in the lab. Similarly neurological explanations are appealing in their neurological basis and seem logical but again we lack the advanced technology to test them. Thus dual processing explanations are less germane to researchers instead attentional memory explanations are best supported by what we know about cognition and could be tested vertically. Well it sounds to me like the scientific explanations can't be tested and repeated in a generally scientific method. Wow that takes the fun out of experiencing deja vu on monday. I'll provide explanations for deja vu from a pseudoscience or paranormal point of view. And we'll see what stands out

Shasta City Shasta Janice Las Vegas California Epilepsy
 burst 2 expand 04:22

Ubuntu Podcast

04:22 min | 2 months ago

burst 2 expand 04:22

"Hello hello how. Each apps doing not bad looking forward to finish work to the suckers. I did that last week. And this is our penultimate episode this year and in fact my last one ever this year. Sorry this week. We're going to do community news and events and news headlines but before we get onto all of that we martin. I have been playing that. They're saipan twenty seventy seven on open to his into good Yes see. I don't know i still don't understand what that means. But it's briefly billed as Role playing action adventure computer game and this driving so that keeps me happy. Is it like grand theft auto. I've never played any of the grand theft autos so i wouldn't know is driving like hotshot racing and as such will. I be able to completely spank you like i did the other day. No it's not quite like hotshot racing. I think i shouldn't have been drinking. The coke was playing that game next time should be turning up sopa. Is this like the the cia. Champion chess player. Who said that she'd never played a man who was ill because afterwards there was always an excuse i had very good. Yeah now so cyber punks Good i know that there's been a lot of soda reports on the internet that it's full of bugs. I haven't actually encountered any of these bugs just yet. The issue i counted playing under lennox is the performance is a bit lacking i understand. There are fixes coming to address that. Not just for the next just generally. But i haven't seen any of the of you know floating debris and confused people and you know unusual graphical glitches. And what have you. You know playing hard enough. What i've done these upstart that you can start in three different. You can start the game in one of three different sort of origin stories. And i played the initial bit of each of those starting points up to the point at which i've completed the basic on weapons training so probably i don't know about forty five minutes to an hour's worth in each of those and i have not encountered any significant issues and i saw xdsl He's also been playing on. Amd graphics on arch lenexa. I'm playing it. Using and video on up into twenty four as it using proton is using proton. Yes on experimental. I'm not using proton experimental amusing five thirteen dash for interesting. Well i have to join you in buying that game. I seem to be buying every other game that you buy recently. Welcome what about you mark. Not well i have caved in to considerable pay pressure. And i've been writing alabama to membership application Britain s which involves you editing wiki page. Yes which i involved with getting rights to edit wicky which leans pigging me on telegram saying to this group. So i must get permission to edit the wiki and then i'm out to create the wikipedia and writer and then i had to digitally sign the code of conduct which meant i had to work out how to upload and verify. Pgp and then work out how to read encrypted emails thunderbird because no one ever send encrypted emails. I wasn't up to do that. Is a relic from the boss. Isn't it is so. Yeah actually that was probably hard them writing the application itself so now i just need to work out when the next meeting. I can attend as in submit my application. It's usually like the first tuesday after full moon when the river is flowing. Also thing isn't it. It's written on wikipedia somewhere. Yeah yeah like this choices. I just have to actually make my name down. Put my name down three. And if any of our listeners have received valuable contributions for mark of the as

Coke Lennox Martin CIA Chess Wicky Lenexa AMD Alabama Wikipedia Britain
Interview With Cindy Crawford, supermodel

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:13 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Cindy Crawford, supermodel

"Today. Cindy crawford joins me on skimmed from the couch. She needs no introduction. But i will give her one anyways. Her decades long modeling career catapulted her to global supermodel status and she is also a business woman as the founder of the skin. Care brand meaningful beauty. Cindy thank you so much for joining me. Welcome to skimp from the couch. Thanks for having me. It feels very weird to even. Try to do an intro for you. Everyone knows who you are a very good job. Thank you was short sweet. We skim here so skim your resume do the quick skim at on you. Wow let's see let's go way back student. Ben worked in the cornfields cleaned. Houses worked in a clothing store. Senior of high school started modeling. My freshman year in college Northwestern but continued to model in chicago dropped out of college to pursue modeling in a more. You know fulltime way. When i was twenty. I moved to new york. And that's really where my career took off. And from there you know i think modeled but also paid attention and so eventually i was able to start doing some of my own projects and having my own voice and i think being excited about fat part of modeling is what has enabled me to do it for so long and still be enthusiastic about it today. As i was from the very beginning. You know obviously many wikipedia. Google searches to come up on you. What is something that we wouldn't be able to find out about you will. Oh i hopefully alive know. Because i don't think there's part of your everyday life just isn't not that you are ashamed of it. It just doesn't make into public. Consumption was funny. I was having this conversation with my son the other day about fame and you know a lot of times. I think for children of famous people. That's a lot of pressure on them. And i was saying. I hope you're not proud of need for being famous. Like fame is just a byproduct of what i do I hope you're proud of me for blah blah blah. So it's i think it's all those little things like being a good friend being a good sister being a good daughter. I like to bake. I mean some of these things. I probably have randomly mentioned in interviews but like they don't come up. If you google my name so i can start in the beginning of your career. Which is is you mentioned like really young and had career with once in a lifetime career opportunities in front of you. How did your family think about pursuing these while. I have jokingly say but it actually isn't really a joke that you know when i was a kid. I don't think the average girl thought about modeling as a really. I didn't even know it was a real job. You know i mean. I think i got teen vogue. And i knew who phoebe cates was in brook shields but other than that. It was never something a girl from a small town in illinois would have thought about and then at one point. I was approached by the local photographer in our small town and he took pictures of everything from like a burnt down house to a homecoming parade and he saw me like at high school football game and he asked to photograph me and my parents insisted on accompanying me on. That photo shoots Was some kind of pre vet. I little step kind of led to another step led to another step. But i think you know. My parents were rightly concerned accompanied me when i went to chicago for the first time and when i met with modeling agencies and then finally i think they started getting a little more comfortable with you know they. They let me do some stuff on my own. I think my dad thought it was a nice word for prostitution to be honest with you like he. He didn't really understand. And then also like coming from a blue collar family and like my beginning. Modeling rate was seventy five dollars an hour very quickly. I was making more money than that. My parents and i think that that was confusing for them and didn't quite understand anthem. Certain jobs that just pay like a stupid amount of money. It's not like that. I work harder. Necessarily i mean i work hard but i've done jobs like picking corn for twelve hours a day. That is much harder than modeling.

Cindy Crawford Cindy Northwestern Brook Shields Google Chicago BEN Phoebe Cates New York Illinois Football
Speech and Systems

Exponent

06:15 min | 9 months ago

Speech and Systems

"A few weeks ago and is about to publish zero trust information that basically made the argument that you would think would not be a controversial opinion, but that there might be some upside social networks you know in that you can surface information. That might not be surfaced. And I actually told you before I published at that Oh. This is going to be a controversial one and you're like why. What's? I'd have been right. It was at a virtual I would point I add three journalists from a particular newspaper attacking same time on twitter. For literally not attacking out anything about any. Neither here nor there. So that case sort of I saw it coming, right. So fast forward to this week. I wrote a couple of pieces about sort of moment I mean it's almost hard to know how to characterize what's going on. We had delay the PODCAST, so the helicopters that. Were over, your house could move on. Protesting. We've covered and everything I felt like it was necessary to go out with suitable precautions, but yeah I was out there a couple of hours earlier, yeah, and I felt that I needed to write piece, and his first one was about growing up in Madison. This sort of. Sort of city ranked number. One City live in America where that came out. When is in high school was very excited about it, and it turned out. It's not necessarily a great place to live if you are African American, and to understand the history of that and things like redlining, and you can still see the scars from that today, and you can see it very clearly in a place like Minneapolis where. The murder of officially the homicide right now of George Floyd and you're the racial covenants that were in place in Minneapolis that's still define sort of the makeup of neighborhoods, today and point that forward the Tech Angle here and this isn't a cliche. Let's see we can work in tech. Hear to me, this is such a text story because of things like phone cameras and social networks that show what was likely. Almost certainly we know was happening for many. Many, many many years, but was just swept under the blanket, swept the rug, and no one knew about, and that is something that is important and meaningful. It's important meaningful for the world broadly important meaningful for people like you and I to understand. Yeah, you know our position in the world and I think it's something that's important and I appreciate the feedback. I got for that article. Generally you know people like it and sort of with that in mind. We get into the article in a bit, but with that I wrote an article the next day sort of defending facebook's this isn't did not take down president trump's tweets, and in this case I'd legs Masonite is sort of posted it and then think about it and. I was pretty surprised at the extremity of the feedback. I don't feel bad for publishing it, but it was one. I didn't quite see coming. In the way to Zero Trust, information and degree to which this has become a almost tribal and political point is pretty incredible, and that's why award you are. You sure you want gasoline this? We already had Charlie podcast or you wanted to do another one, but you wanted to die. Right in so here we are here. We are I mean those along as deducted. That's why reticent that's why I'm reticent. And it makes sense. Let me just state it clearly upfront. I have been a facebook critic over the years for a number of things, but I am not going to criticize them full leaving up the tweet, the comments of the president of the United States of America like starting down the path where a private company that is like a route from a elected official to the people of the country. Country that a private company should be standing between those two entities and deciding what's okay for that to get passed along, and what's not okay K for that to get pasta along. It boggles my mind that people think that we should be going back into the gatekeeper era on something so fundamental to democracy. It just boggles my mind so apparently. I'm to Fatu now on not being able to pick. Pick up on when these things are going to go incendiary, because like I didn't pick up the one on zero trust information that you found yourself in a fight with journalists on. Even though you did, but this one I would have picked up on either. It's like I'm down to give. facebook crashed when I feel like they deserve it, but I feel like they deserved that this time and I. I certainly don't feel like you deserve to fascinating in such a well reasoned logical way why that was the right Cole, yeah, I'm fine to be clear, so we kind of fast forward to the end here. The conclusion is right up front, but I think it might be sort of back up because it's been a I, think developing over a few weeks, and it does predate sort of the current. Moment with the protests and the video of George, Floyd and so even before that happened this started with twitter, attaching effect label, or you get the facts label to to trump tweets and these tweets were about trump. You're saying that Malan belting with peaceable to huge amounts of fraud. Obviously, the question about mail in balloting is the top of mind because of the crow virus, and they attach the labels. Trump did not like that to say the least bit. That's a good place to start. How did you feel about twitter attaching those labels to trump's tweets? Question Okay, so we certainly not at the point of taking post down, but this is such a slippery slope. It's so difficult I. Mean on one hand good on them for making a decision, so they made a decision like okay. This is how we're GONNA do it. We're GONNA attached reliable. But like how does this play out at scale like a week and a goes through every elected official and decide when they? They nate, fact, checking and win then not, and where are we going to get a common set of facts from I think the twitter get the facts post. Initially, that was referenced underneath that trump tweet. Correct me if I'm wrong, but pointed at something that had a factual inaccuracy in that's right. Did like they planning on building out a wikipedia style organization with an accepted set of facts that everybody agrees on bike. I get it in the instance, but like I'm trying to think about how this works on mass, but I don't know how it works at scale

George Floyd Minneapolis President Trump Twitter Facebook America Fatu Masonite Madison Charlie Malan Cole Floyd Donald Trump George Nate
"wikipedia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:26 min | 9 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"How both readers writers and editors of Wikipedia are navigating the need for information amidst both the pandemic and ongoing protests over police abuse of. NHS! It's the law. Fair podcast June fourth. Ryan Merkley on Wikipedia works. So I've heard wikipedia described. I think by Jonathan's as the experiment that is terrible in theory, but works in practice the idea that we could crowdsource an encyclopedia it would end up. Being full of reliable information is not intuitive and yet it's remarkably successful. According to Wikipedia Wikipedia is the largest most popular general reference work on the world. Wide Web. It's one of the twenty most popular websites it has over fifty three million articles with six point one million English lawyer at one point five billion unique visits per month. But I think it's fair to say that. Probably most people use wikipedia really be aware of how it actually works with all of that content comes from. So could you give us a brief you on hell? Articles created edited. She could you to travel around with me to do the Inter? That's a very nice description of wikipedia. It's the largest collective act Hasley in human history it's. A. Remarkable thing that as the train says shouldn't work in theory, but completely works in practice. Everything on Wikipedia is authored by its contributors by regular people like you and me who come with a desire to share knowledge freely, and they edit as sometimes at the level of the Comma. Sometimes at the level of mastery of whole subjects, and that compendium and collection of human knowledge is generated and regenerated daily in real time, and so add to of in breast tags. How does this work so you mentioned off the top sir, fifty million articles there about two hundred fifty thousand editors a month in an organization behind that that is only four hundred six staff and none of the staff have the job content author in their title. Our job is to support. A movement and a set of worldwide contributors, some of them expert, some of them, making their first added as they tried to contribute knowledge, and over three hundred languages worth of wikipedia. There is no one wikipedia. There's actually one for each language. Each one has a collaborative Kennedy bills in. So regular folks show up every day sometimes on the mobile browser desktop and submit edits those edits are. Reviewed sometimes by humans in order for the to be criticized for their veracity or their accuracy, or whether they are appropriately sited because every fact has to have a source on wikipedia. They're also reviewed by bots. That examine them for vandalism or grammatical errors, and or a lack of sources in ought to be a citation. And then there also a series of folks who are at men's and our article monitors so doozy. Gastric expert editors who track articles topics of interest who see alerts windows edits come in, and may pass them by say nothing, or may come in and comment. All of this happens in public behind every single wikipedia page is what's called the talk page and behind that on that page you can see over the history of the entire article. The discussion of free single contested at on some edits are made. Go live immediately without without issue, other edits require discussion, and those those facts are negotiated by communities every day, and sometimes over and over again. Don't that loss. Point that you mentioned that some edits go live immediately and others require further discussion Could you unpack that a little bit for us? How do you distinguish between those two categories sure so the the entire site and a m one miss state that so every edit on the site the unless there are restrictions on the article. Every on the site goes live when the editor submits their change. Sometimes the case that those edits are questioned or contested or dated sometimes three by the other editors who contributed to that page, and so that then happens a set of discussions than happens on the top page for people say I don't believe has the source I feel like this is not written in a neutral fashion, et Cetera and those discussions happen, and then some consensus is reached, and they edit is then perhaps reverted to what was there before or perhaps accepted or perhaps modified? So that happens all at the editor level. That's all regular humans not. There isn't as a staff moderator. Who Does that work? There are of course administrators Sir of course experienced editors who contribute in that way, but at the end of the day every editor shows up with their talent and their ideas and their sources and makes their suggestions. One of the things that I found really fascinating is the sort of cultural view of wikipedia over the course of the last say ten years I remember being in school and having my my teachers. Tell me no, you can't sight two-wicket Vdi. You can't sight to Wikipedia. That's not a reliable source, and my feeling is that as as time has gone on I've heard lesson less of that and actually UC jokes being made about that as something. Something! Silly to that now wikipedia is more often held up as an example of a good place to find information. Certainly something that you know you'd WanNa. Check which is the sources are useful, but not something that is inherently unreliable, because so many people are working on it, so I wonder if you could talk about how how you think about the role of so many editors to what extent that is a a strengthen to what extent creates complications. I think it is a strength that absolutely creates complications. The beautiful message of that is something that brings us back to the early comment that you makes no sense in theory that would that would function, but who will be the arbiter of a will be the final editor. There isn't one and that's for allows hard to grasp and and. I think it's fair. That used to begin with this idea that for very long time, wikipedia was not a trusted source or not a trusted site. It's maybe a better way saying. And the that's a trust that the community has earned for the projects over many years of doing the work that it does so, what makes you wikipedia and the weekend year? Project special is that they are radically open there open in their code of course, but there are also open in the way that we do our work as a community. You can see not just the article, but you can see how the. The article became the article every single step of the way from its very beginning, there's an accountability that comes with being transparent in addition to that this thing you know folks all this that the sources on Wikipedia are cited and so there's always a link to a reliable source, and that again is a thing that has built credibility for the projects over time that those sources are there that idea citation needed. And the people can follow them through. We know that most people don't. Most people don't follow those links. And resources, but the fact that they're there and that they can be checked creates confidence. We also have research over time that has shown that when people learn that Wikipedia is written by community volunteers immediately, their trustee in wikipedia goes.

Wikipedia editor NHS Ryan Merkley Jonathan vandalism Kennedy WanNa trustee
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:22 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Mean Arcade very well may have made that same joke. Okay, but I don't read pending pending arcade. I know it wasn't fitting arcade all right well, that's fair. I'm not. I'm not criticizing the. Comics any more I. Just don't have the time share, but I used to read a lot of them I recall seeing that that as well at any rate whoever created it? Somebody somebody right Intel. All otherwise I used to what you know. What's worse I used to have these pinned up in my cubicle. They're not up there anymore, but I used I can't even remember, but I used to have a whole bunch of them. But anyway not, that's one of the things. That's one of those things that you could joke about. Is that that seemingly? Irrelevant things would get a huge amount of attention because they were, they were interesting. You know especially stuffing Geek culture that people are really really passionate. Interested in like you know, which again shows you why? They're these wikileaks now? That exist all around these properties. Perfect format for that kind of level of minutia of of interstate entail I, mean it's ridiculous when I can look up a comic book character and see every single iteration of that comic book character, and then I look up. An someone who is fundamentally important in some huge moment in history, and they have a fraction of the. Not Not that you couldn't cover the important contributions of that person. In that amount of space, you might be able to, but it just gives you this weird feeling like if I were to put these scales whereas this one so heavy. You know we Kapiti is as as of January two, thousand, thirteen, the fifth most popular website in the world behind only Google Yahoo Microsoft and facebook, and in fact ahead of Amazon Apple and Ebay. And again there's a lot of valuable stuff on there. So I know that we definitely kind of criticized wikipedia quite a bit in this this podcast, but keep in mind. We're talking about specifically in the use for things like academic public academic research and I want to say what we do what Jonathan. I both do I think is We'll did say already. We we, we go to Wikipedia and we go straight to the resource sexual. References you take. A look and see like because there. You can learn more about you know. Go to the the the places where the people who have written the article on wikipedia where they got their information from because I mean also. Allows you to remove the interpreter as well right because anytime. You're reading an article on Wikipedia. You're reading an interpretation of someone else's stuff. Because you know there's another thing we didn't mention on Wikipedia. You do not publish primary information. You don't publish information for the first time. Typically against the rules you have to you have to. If you're going to present a fact that someone could look up and verify or reject. You have to be able to sight it and that wraps up another classic episode of Tech Stuff. Hope. You guys enjoyed it. If you have any suggestions for future tech, stuff topics, no matter what it may be if it's a company or technology trend in tech. Maybe it's a great innovator. New would like to have sort of a biography of that person. Let me know you can reach out to me on twitter or on facebook. We use the handle.

Wikipedia facebook Intel Kapiti twitter Jonathan Amazon Google Ebay Microsoft
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:22 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Mean Arcade very well may have made that same joke. Okay, but I don't read pending pending arcade. I know it wasn't fitting arcade all right well, that's fair. I'm not. I'm not criticizing the. Comics any more I. Just don't have the time share, but I used to read a lot of them I recall seeing that that as well at any rate whoever created it? Somebody somebody right Intel. All otherwise I used to what you know. What's worse I used to have these pinned up in my cubicle. They're not up there anymore, but I used I can't even remember, but I used to have a whole bunch of them. But anyway not, that's one of the things. That's one of those things that you could joke about. Is that that seemingly? Irrelevant things would get a huge amount of attention because they were, they were interesting. You know especially stuffing Geek culture that people are really really passionate. Interested in like you know, which again shows you why? They're these wikileaks now? That exist all around these properties. Perfect format for that kind of level of minutia of of interstate entail I, mean it's ridiculous when I can look up a comic book character and see every single iteration of that comic book character, and then I look up. An someone who is fundamentally important in some huge moment in history, and they have a fraction of the. Not Not that you couldn't cover the important contributions of that person. In that amount of space, you might be able to, but it just gives you this weird feeling like if I were to put these scales whereas this one so heavy. You know we Kapiti is as as of January two, thousand, thirteen, the fifth most popular website in the world behind only Google Yahoo Microsoft and facebook, and in fact ahead of Amazon Apple and Ebay. And again there's a lot of valuable stuff on there. So I know that we definitely kind of criticized wikipedia quite a bit in this this podcast, but keep in mind. We're talking about specifically in the use for things like academic public academic research and I want to say what we do what Jonathan. I both do I think is We'll did say already. We we, we go to Wikipedia and we go straight to the resource sexual. References you take. A look and see like because there. You can learn more about you know. Go to the the the places where the people who have written the article on wikipedia where they got their information from because I mean also. Allows you to remove the interpreter as well right because anytime. You're reading an article on Wikipedia. You're reading an interpretation of someone else's stuff. Because you know there's another thing we didn't mention on Wikipedia. You do not publish primary information. You don't publish information for the first time. Typically against the rules you have to you have to. If you're going to present a fact that someone could look up and verify or reject. You have to be able to sight it and that wraps up another classic episode of Tech Stuff. Hope. You guys enjoyed it. If you have any suggestions for future tech, stuff topics, no matter what it may be if it's a company or technology trend in tech. Maybe it's a great innovator. New would like to have sort of a biography of that person. Let me know you can reach out to me on twitter or on facebook. We use the handle.

Wikipedia facebook Intel Kapiti twitter Jonathan Amazon Google Ebay Microsoft
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

11:39 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Nine hundred down? Actually we're going to wrap up the timeline pre two thousand twelve. The big story I have was of course that Wikipedia took place in the blackout day on January eighteenth of Sopa Piper. Pippa sorry that's fine. You haven't you haven't been through the whole ordeal of talking about SOPA and PIPPA. I call it pipe for about three weeks until everyone else technology just consistently called Pippen as our final been wrong. This whole time But yeah so Ben. Pippa those were of course. The online piracy acts that were in consideration in Congress in the United States and several sites ended up doing blackouts to protest. This proposed legislation to bring more attention to and say these the way these these laws or these. These potential laws are worded. They could seriously harm the operation of the Internet and cause trouble to lots of people and lots of organizations and they should not be turned into law and then in two thousand thirteen over but before before we leave two dozen important cultural note that is the year that encyclopedia Britannica ceased publishing on paper. After two hundred forty four years of doing. So you know there's also kind of interesting there was I remember and I didn't read the sound bite my research because it didn't actually didn't occur to me while I was researching it but I remember specifically. There was a time when wikipedia was starting to consider looking for experts to send in articles. Just like the old new pedia days they were. They were actually thinking about going to experts to get expert subject. Matter experts to write information from Wikipedia at the same time Britannica was looking at the possibility of crowd sourcing article so like for a moment that these two models were about the flip flop. That didn't actually happen that way. But I remember hearing about that or my brain just invented one of two all also interesting cultural point in between two thousand eight and two thousand twelve this kind of dead space that that we have created. I in our timeline here. Though we can media foundation total assets went from five point. Six million to about forty nine point three million again. It's existing on donation donations only and so and that's that's fabulous for the concept of shared knowledge. I think right then also really interesting to see what kind of I mean to know. Exactly what they mean when they when they have this giant banners every year. To Beg for money when you see. Jimmy Wales faced on there saying on every page. Yeah give money so this can continue to exist. I mean and not that. You shouldn't donate I. I just think that it's it's an. Interestingly it's a really cool number and I think it's IT'S. It's cool that they took that approach. I mean it definitely gives them the benefit of saying look. We're not beholden to any organization or company. We are accepting nationlly crab crowdsource and this. This is really meant to be a tool to enrich the the human race. It's meant to really make things better for everybody and it's not meant to be the platform for one company to say. Hey buy our stuff instead of that other guy stuff right one. Two thousand thirteen speaking about companies. So let's let's hear earlier this year. A story broke that British Petroleum or BP. I should say beep beep as the Brits hate it when I say British Petroleum because they said look you don't bring us into the story was edited. Its own wikipedia. Page maybe rewriting up to forty four percent of the content in order to make the environmental impact of the oil spell the deep horizon and the Gulf to make that seem less bad. Maybe it's kind of hard to word this properly. But essentially they sort of whitewashed the The disaster and the follow up to it And here here's I'm quoting this directly from C net which reported on this be is not directly editing. It's page but instead has apparently inserted a BP representative into the editing community who provides wikipedia editors with text. The text is then copied as is onto the page by wikipedia editors while readers are none the wiser than sections pretending to be unbiased. Information are in fact vetted by higher ups at BP before hitting the page bb's image cleanup cleverly skirts wikipedia editorial rules wherein wikipedia editors are using text that BP posts on Wikipedia self as the source although the text is not published on BP's website this way the significant involvement of EP in its own entry is completely hidden from wikipedia readers while wikipedia editors as usual argue and attack each other over editorial policy while favorable. Pr Editing Continues. Right and all right so there. There's really one person who is demanding. These changes Someone by the name of Arturo Silver Are Silva Pardon me. He was from the Corporate Communications Department in Houston and And he was actually going through the correct channels to submit these changes he he suggested the change to editors he identified himself as a BP employees to those editors essentially. What was happening was that he was playing by the rules in good faith aside from the part that that was still whitewashing whitewashing whole Jewish right so when we were talking about earlier about how you know Jimmy. Wales had edited his own his own article and that he should have gone through the proper channels. These are those channels that we were talking about. This is what the person was doing but it was still putting in possibly you know you might say what bias information is clearly. I mean clearly biased. It's from the company that the pages about so you can't you know. There's no way it can be unbiased if I ride my own wikipedia page. That's going to be biased. Even if I think I'm being objective I'm still gonNA talk about how frigging awesome. I you know trail right but I look at that point. I would personally speaking as an editor so I might be a little bit Uppity ABOUT IT. I I would blame. Editors has because if they're not if they're not going like maybe not the right source to trust with information from And this is going beyond a factual a clearly factual chain. They're not showing good editorial judgment correct. Yeah I agree with that and And so you know Jimmy Wales actually came down again and said that that while BP is saying essentially that they play by the rules he said that's not what the rules are there to protect right. The rules are there to protect against the kind of stuff that this this company is pulling. It's just this company is pulling the tricks within the context of the rules which either means that. The rules themselves are faulty. Or The people who are who are in charge. Like the editors like you were saying. Lauren are faulty. At any rate. This is something that if you know. I don't want to put words into Wales this but I assume from what he has said he would not want this to have happened so anyway. All of that being said there's an awful lot of information on Wikipedia and a lot of that over twenty four million articles in two hundred eighty five languages in fact and then there's stuff on there that's incredibly useful. I use wikipedia casually all time every all the probably every day it is incredibly useful. But because of what we've talked about. That's why a lot of teachers and publications like how stuff works say. You cannot use wikipedia as a source and it's because of the reasons we've listed. It's not that it's a bad thing. I actually think that Wikipedia is an amazing idea and it's actually phenomenal to me. That's worked as well as it has a rate right considering certain certain portions. The Internet can definitely derive scum and villainy you look at Youtube comments. And then you think this is the same the same world that we live in where we can go to wikipedia article about something you know something really technically advanced and get a really good understanding of it and it's this is a collaborative effort on the part of possibly hundreds of people share. And then you go to youtube and read the comments that you think. How is this the same world how what happened You know it's amazing but there are also some things that you can poke some fun at like there was A. I wish I could remember what which web comic this wasn't and listeners. If you happen to know what I'm referring to if you've been reading web comics forever and the strikes a chord let me know. I remember reading a Web comic ages ago whereas a whole series about wikipedia and and one of the things they pointed out very snarly was if you were to assume that the the the entries the have the most words are the most important to the human race then optimus prime would be more important than Abraham Lincoln. I feel like Penny Arcade. Somebody somebody please please rate until I can tell you it was not. I mean putting arcade very well may have made that same joke. Okay but I don't read pending pending arcade so I know it wasn't fitting arcade all right. Well that's fair I'm not I'm not criticizing. I don't read any web comics anymore. I just don't have the time share but I used to read a lot of them. Eric I recall seeing that that as well at any rate whoever created it somebody somebody right until all otherwise. I used to what you know. What's worse I used to have these pinned up in my cubicle. They're not up there anymore. But I used. I can't even remember but I used to have a whole bunch of them but anyway not. That's one of the things that's one of those things that you could joke about. Is that that seemingly irrelevant. Things would get a huge amount of attention. Because they were they were interesting. You know especially stuffing Geek Culture. That people are really really passionately interested in like you know which again shows you. Why they're these wikileaks. Now that exist all around these properties right right and that's perfect format for that kind of level of minutia Of of interstate entail. I mean it's ridiculous when I can look up a comic book character and see every single iteration of that comic book character and then I look up an someone who is fundamentally important in some huge moment in history and they have a fraction of that not that you couldn't cover the important contributions of that person in that amount of space you might be able to but it just gives you this weird feeling like if I were to put these scales whereas this one so heavy you know we compete is as as of January two thousand thirteen the fifth most popular website in the world behind only Google Yahoo Microsoft and facebook and in fact ahead of Amazon apple and Ebay and again. There's a lot of valuable stuff on there so I know that we definitely kind of criticized wikipedia. Quite a bit in this this podcast but keep in mind. We're talking about specifically in the use for things like academic public acedemic research. And I want to say what we do. What Jonathan I both do. I think is We'll did say already we we. We go to Wikipedia and we go straight to the resource sexual references. You take a look and see like because there you can learn more about you know..

Wikipedia Jimmy Wales editor Pippa Wales Congress Pippen United States British Petroleum BP Gulf youtube Penny Arcade Arturo Silver Jonathan Google Lauren representative Corporate Communications Depar Houston
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

08:41 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Meanwhile it's bad. Press was not particularly affecting. The growth of Wikipedia by by mid two thousand six. I think that they had five million articles. They went from. They had one million in English, but probably I million think total total. Yeah, so right right? There's a little bit of debate about well. Because I got confused, I saw one point two thousand four, they hit one million articles, and then I read later. My two thousand six hit one million articles again, and then I realized Oh wait. The first one, two thousand four was one million articles total across all languages, two thousand six was one million in English, but it was the the growth was incredible. And in two thousand seven. We have another scandal. This is when it was discovered that a wikipedia editor who is using a handle called S J e. s. s a. y. was discovered to have also created a false identity in this case. S. J had been. Posing as someone who held a PhD. In. In theology, ask him because he was saying that he was a tenured professor with an expertise in Canon law, and in reality was a twenty four year old guy who had been several colleges in Kentucky. Did Not hold a less of an expert. Perhaps yeah, but objectively speaking, he was saying that he created identity in order to give himself a buffer so that people who disagreed with him would not be able to attack him personally so in other words he was just creating a handle is just a little bit more more involved than just a handle, but here's the problem. He was also using his fake credentials to back up his arguments whenever he. He was making edits Oh. Yeah, that's that's going beyond death. Yeah, because of my expertise in this field I know that this particular thing should be worded this way rather than that way, and he didn't hold those credentials, so the New Yorker writes about Wikipedia, and they write about S J before finding out that S J is not who he claims to be. Then the information breaks that S J has actually someone else, and the New Yorker ends up. Bribing pretty strongly worded response to that and again mainstream media, blows up and online at blow up. The community begins to sift through all the edits that s j made on Wikipedia particularly in the places where he was using his false credentials to bolster his arguments. Because now the community has the responsibility to fix this, or if if in fact needs to be fixed, they have to address it so that they can again show that wikipedia is something you can rely upon at least or the at least useful rain and. Race to the ground. Yeah, it's not just a database of information you cannot really be sure is accurate or not it. was you know it was fighting a powerful? Perception problem right right right. that was also did, did you? That was also the year two thousand seven that Virtual Griffith Griffith released wicked skinner. Okay, so so so wicked scanner Was this you know a? Little program that he wrote that whenever an unregistered anonymous email at its Kapiti entry, the site logs Caesar's Ip address and and this can come in terrifically handy because you know I, it's not not all the problems are with people pretending to be who they aren't. When an anonymous user can log in and talk about anything that they want to, you know furred the kind of things we're coming out of this wicked scanner business where facts like people from Apple Ip addresses had been editing Microsoft pages on Wikipedia and vice versa right, which is another reason why we find wikipedia it's. It's one of those reasons why it's hard. Hard to trust stuff, because sometimes people with an agenda will go in and adjust a an injury, either to make one party, and look better than than it would otherwise have looked or look worse depending upon the person's agenda share. Yeah, yeah, I remember you know and Democratic Party members. Ip Address was traced to at about rush limbaugh. That were extremely unflattering. This this happened. Any election year this stuff runs rampant, sharing the where sometimes we compete will lockdown a particular page about a subject in order to avoid the crazy number of edits that different sides of debate will will put onto a page in order to support their side I mean think about it. This is kind of crazy, right. It's like if I if I have a disagreement with Lauren about a particular. And then I go to Wikipedia and edit a page, so it supports my argument. And then I cite Wikipedia as a support for my argument. That's. Very insidious. That's dirty pool. Yes, that is. An and I don't want to say that all anonymous wikipedia editors are bad or nefarious. Suffered for example, a couple of other things came out of. This is what they found out that. Someone from the CIA contributed a really long entry about lightsaber combat. Some someone from Darpa had. Fairly extensively about child booth. Stuff, it's not always bad. But we don't mean to suggest that it's always bad or that. This happens. All the time is the fact that it happens? That's the problem and you don't you know unless you are actually adept at looking at the edits page and understanding what that means, you may not be aware of something that's going on. That's not quite right and so while while the odds of that actually happening on any given page on any given day maybe low, because you're talking about lots and lots of people using this resource and lots of opportunities to fiddle with it, it does happen. That's that's why you're like you know. The odds are with you that you're going to be fine whenever you use wikipedia. Still. Eighty five thousand regular contributors and seventy seven thousand regular editors Wikipedia, as of two thousand thirteen, so and after that whole that whole problem with a dollar where the the the quote unquote the joke about him being a a suspect in the assassination of the Kennedys. Wales at instituted a new policy, saying that unregistered users can no longer post new articles at all because that was. The he wanted to head off that problem and then by registering, he hoped that that would. Create more accountability now. Of course, the S J issue showed that there were other problems and Wales came down pretty hard on that too once all the facts came out in two thousand nine. The arbitration committee had to restrict access to its site from the Church of Scientology. Ip addresses. and. Banned several anti scientologist editors because the two sides were both manipulating the same articles to either post scientology in a positive or negative light. Obviously avoid. Those around when. Anonymous I believe was involved in their campaign, so the the the the thing that was coming up into question was the neutral point of view here, and both sides were trying to use wikipedia to bolster their own arguments. And whether you side with one or the other, it was clear that both sides had agendas and. Know. Some of those people may have been trying very hard to create an objective post, but there were a lot of people who really weren't. And that's where the banning and the an Ip address blocking came in, and that same year wikipedia became licensed under creative Commons right? Yeah, yeah! which which basically just means that It's license under there. Sharon share like Yeah, so in other words you don't have to worry about. Getting chased down by lawyers using this material, and and you cannot like a person who contributes to wikipedia cannot claim that worked to be their own it all they have. They have essentially signed off right, right? It's the content. is still technically owned by the contributors, but it is freely reproducible distributable. When anyone can go in edited. Actually, that was one of those things that people worried about early on and we Kapadia this. Wait a minute. I'm an awesome writer. I write awesome things, my serve credit for my awesome thing, or even if I don't get credit, I certainly shouldn't be subjected to seeing other. Coming in editing, my awesome prosed. where I wrote this amazing. Piece on optimus prime in his importance to western culture, and some idiot came in and said that he turned into this model of of a semi truck..

Wikipedia Griffith Griffith Church of Scientology Darpa CIA Kapiti Wales Democratic Party S. J Apple Kapadia S J professor Kentucky Lauren writer
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Find Genuinely Amusing, and there's some things I find genuinely helpful, but but yeah I would never go so far on either side now. So April two thousand six. We have another scandal. Guy. From Glasgow. Whose name I will not be able to say Allen MC mcilwraith, the kill Rafe. It's got to be killed. In front of me, that sounds that sounds. Share MCI L. W. R. A.. H. McGill mcilwraith so he created a wikipedia entry about himself. That portrayed him as a decorated army officers something that he was not and Again the mainstream media picked up on this and said look. Here's a guy who's promoting himself. Created a false identity a for himself, and and the shows that you can't trust what's on Wikipedia. Meanwhile it's bad. Press was not particularly affecting. The growth of Wikipedia by by mid two thousand six. I think that they had five million articles. They went from. They had one million in English, but probably I million think total total. Yeah, so right right? There's a little bit of debate about well. Because I got confused, I saw one point two thousand four, they hit one million articles, and then I read later. My two thousand six hit one million articles again, and then I realized Oh wait. The first one, two thousand four was one million articles total across all languages, two thousand six was one million in English, but it was the the growth was incredible. And in two thousand seven. We have another scandal. This is when it was discovered that a wikipedia editor who is using a handle called S J e. s. s a. y. was discovered to have also created a false identity in this case. S. J had been. Posing as someone who held a PhD. In. In theology, ask him because he was saying that he was a tenured professor with an expertise in Canon law, and in reality was a twenty four year old guy who had been several colleges in Kentucky..

Wikipedia Rafe professor Allen MC mcilwraith Glasgow L. W. S. J Kentucky Canon editor
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:21 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Do you have anything between two thousand, three and two thousand five, because otherwise I'm just gonNA. Skip right on the head I believe that in two thousand and four wikipedia was founded on which is which is the for profit kind of branch of wikipedia that that maintains a whole bunch of entertainment, mostly related with I. Think I think that the the wikipedia is among them stuff like that okay, and you know those are the Wikki that I've recently become more and more familiar with because. Pretty much any kind of entertainment thing out. There has its own wiki. The point where I'm like I can't believe this has a Wiki. I can't believe textile doesn't anyway. Because and these these are ad supported. However, they're still community, run and. You know yeah right right so so similar, but again the following moral on the wiki lines of. Philosophy rather than the wikipedia one because again, the one of the things sanger also said in his in his talks or in his writings whereas that You know he he saw the wiki philosophy was kind of. Counter to that of an encyclopedia like the to do not deny. A very very seamless way, and that that that was a concern to him, but that he felt that because we can pedia was specifically supposed to be an encyclopedia, it helped guide the policies. For better or for worse, so it's the community on Wikipedia is not exactly the same as what you would find on your average wicky. The! The process is slightly different, because it has a very specific purpose to be an encyclopedia. In two thousand five wired published a report that said that the Jimmy Wales had done. Something is generally frowned upon within the Wikipedia community, and that is to edit your own page eighteen times apparently. And supposedly the edits that were made were removing things like like sanders. Involvement in the early Genesis Wikipedia. Essentially there was there was charged that Wales had removed sentence that had referred to Sanger Co founder of pedia. And then there were other things well. That's that Wales said was it was just an attempt to remove some inaccuracies? It wasn't he wasn't trained. Washing anything are cleaning it out. He was saying anyway. Defense this by the way right in general that that's considered. Bad Form on Wikipedia it's it's not. Explicitly against the rules. Not. You're generally I mean you're. You're generally if if you find it inaccuracy about something that concerns, you due to an end date to have an acronym for all. It is the conflict of interest. That that yeah that you're supposed to submit it to an editor, who can then make a non conflict of interest judgment, call about whether or not that it needs to be made. It's interesting that particular sequence is going to play an important part towards the end of this timeline conversation because it turns out. Some people have taken advantage of that particular approach. To the point where they have been able to insert misleading information or at least. League important truths. in the process of quote, correcting or right adding to an article, so we'll get to that in a moment. So Wales ends up getting some heat for this. Even though to day. He says that you know wasn't. It was not a big deal. It doesn't even say he didn't do anything wrong. He's like I don't understand what the big deal is here. Right fixing errors he's he's like he I did it. There was nothing wrong with the idea so calm down, but then other people say well. If you had just gone through the regular channels than it would have been a story. May of two thousand five was when we had an anonymous user who was later identified, but I'm not going to say the name here, but he. He posted comments in an article about. Siegenthaler John Similar saying that. He was a suspect in the assassination of both John and Robert Kennedy. Dollar as a journalist and was a friend to Robert, the actually one of Palmeiras. So seeing color. said that this amounted to Internet character assassination. At the comments were a hoax. It was supposed to be a joke, although I don't know who would find this particularly. Yeah, but the hoax was made in May, but it wasn't discovered until September of two thousand and five, and then the mainstream media cut hold the story and began to cover it and this. Ended up being a big black eye on Wikipedia, because everyone ran with the story saying how can you trust a resource that anyone can go into and change in vandalize or create a hoax like to joke? Insert completely false information or delete something so that whatever is left is not an accurate portrayal of the actual subject. Per the entire site, it's useless, yeah. Media was kind of ripon right. It definitely escalated to from Hayes sometimes. You can't trust what's on Wikipedia to. WIKIPEDIA is bad. Because people are evil, they will mislead you. And by the way I don't really think either. Extreme is healthy. While I often will dismiss Wikipedia in any sort of academic approach. I am not WanNa to stay fits all. The time. There's some things well. We competed that I. Find Genuinely Amusing, and there's some things I find genuinely helpful, but but yeah I would never go so far on either side now. So April two thousand six. We have another scandal. Guy. From Glasgow. Whose name I will not be able to say Allen MC mcilwraith, the kill Rafe. It's got to be killed. In front of me, that sounds that sounds. Share MCI L. W. R. A.. H. McGill mcilwraith so he created a wikipedia entry about himself. That portrayed him as a decorated army officers something that he was not and Again the mainstream media picked up on this and said look. Here's a guy who's promoting himself. Created a false identity a for himself, and and the shows that you can't trust what's on Wikipedia. Meanwhile it's bad. Press was not particularly affecting. The growth of Wikipedia by by mid two thousand six. I think that they had five million articles. They went from. They had one million in English, but probably I million think total total. Yeah, so right right? There's a little bit of debate about well. Because I got confused, I saw one point two thousand four, they hit one million articles, and then I read later. My two thousand six hit one million articles again, and then I realized Oh wait. The first one, two thousand four was one million articles total across all languages, two thousand six was one million in English, but it was the the growth was incredible. And in two thousand seven..

wikipedia Wales pedia Jimmy Wales sanger sanders Robert Kennedy Glasgow John Sanger Co editor ripon Hayes Allen MC mcilwraith founder Palmeiras L. W. Rafe
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:21 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Do you have anything between two thousand, three and two thousand five, because otherwise I'm just gonNA. Skip right on the head I believe that in two thousand and four wikipedia was founded on which is which is the for profit kind of branch of wikipedia that that maintains a whole bunch of entertainment, mostly related with I. Think I think that the the wikipedia is among them stuff like that okay, and you know those are the Wikki that I've recently become more and more familiar with because. Pretty much any kind of entertainment thing out. There has its own wiki. The point where I'm like I can't believe this has a Wiki. I can't believe textile doesn't anyway. Because and these these are ad supported. However, they're still community, run and. You know yeah right right so so similar, but again the following moral on the wiki lines of. Philosophy rather than the wikipedia one because again, the one of the things sanger also said in his in his talks or in his writings whereas that You know he he saw the wiki philosophy was kind of. Counter to that of an encyclopedia like the to do not deny. A very very seamless way, and that that that was a concern to him, but that he felt that because we can pedia was specifically supposed to be an encyclopedia, it helped guide the policies. For better or for worse, so it's the community on Wikipedia is not exactly the same as what you would find on your average wicky. The! The process is slightly different, because it has a very specific purpose to be an encyclopedia. In two thousand five wired published a report that said that the Jimmy Wales had done. Something is generally frowned upon within the Wikipedia community, and that is to edit your own page eighteen times apparently. And supposedly the edits that were made were removing things like like sanders. Involvement in the early Genesis Wikipedia. Essentially there was there was charged that Wales had removed sentence that had referred to Sanger Co founder of pedia. And then there were other things well. That's that Wales said was it was just an attempt to remove some inaccuracies? It wasn't he wasn't trained. Washing anything are cleaning it out. He was saying anyway. Defense this by the way right in general that that's considered. Bad Form on Wikipedia it's it's not. Explicitly against the rules. Not. You're generally I mean you're. You're generally if if you find it inaccuracy about something that concerns, you due to an end date to have an acronym for all. It is the conflict of interest. That that yeah that you're supposed to submit it to an editor, who can then make a non conflict of interest judgment, call about whether or not that it needs to be made. It's interesting that particular sequence is going to play an important part towards the end of this timeline conversation because it turns out. Some people have taken advantage of that particular approach. To the point where they have been able to insert misleading information or at least. League important truths. in the process of quote, correcting or right adding to an article, so we'll get to that in a moment. So Wales ends up getting some heat for this. Even though to day. He says that you know wasn't. It was not a big deal. It doesn't even say he didn't do anything wrong. He's like I don't understand what the big deal is here. Right fixing errors he's he's like he I did it. There was nothing wrong with the idea so calm down, but then other people say well. If you had just gone through the regular channels than it would have been a story. May of two thousand five was when we had an anonymous user who was later identified, but I'm not going to say the name here, but he. He posted comments in an article about. Siegenthaler John Similar saying that. He was a suspect in the assassination of both John and Robert Kennedy. Dollar as a journalist and was a friend to Robert, the actually one of Palmeiras. So seeing color. said that this amounted to Internet character assassination. At the comments were a hoax. It was supposed to be a joke, although I don't know who would find this particularly. Yeah, but the hoax was made in May, but it wasn't discovered until September of two thousand and five, and then the mainstream media cut hold the story and began to cover it and this. Ended up being a big black eye on Wikipedia, because everyone ran with the story saying how can you trust a resource that anyone can go into and change in vandalize or create a hoax like to joke? Insert completely false information or delete something so that whatever is left is not an accurate portrayal of the actual subject. Per the entire site, it's useless, yeah. Media was kind of ripon right. It definitely escalated to from Hayes sometimes. You can't trust what's on Wikipedia to. WIKIPEDIA is bad. Because people are evil, they will mislead you. And by the way I don't really think either. Extreme is healthy. While I often will dismiss Wikipedia in any sort of academic approach. I am not WanNa to stay fits all. The time. There's some things well. We competed that I. Find Genuinely Amusing, and there's some things I find genuinely helpful, but but yeah I would never go so far on either side now. So April two thousand six. We have another scandal. Guy. From Glasgow. Whose name I will not be able to say Allen MC mcilwraith, the kill Rafe. It's got to be killed. In front of me, that sounds that sounds. Share MCI L. W. R. A.. H. McGill mcilwraith so he created a wikipedia entry about himself. That portrayed him as a decorated army officers something that he was not and Again the mainstream media picked up on this and said look. Here's a guy who's promoting himself. Created a false identity a for himself, and and the shows that you can't trust what's on Wikipedia. Meanwhile it's bad. Press was not particularly affecting. The growth of Wikipedia by by mid two thousand six. I think that they had five million articles. They went from. They had one million in English, but probably I million think total total. Yeah, so right right? There's a little bit of debate about well. Because I got confused, I saw one point two thousand four, they hit one million articles, and then I read later. My two thousand six hit one million articles again, and then I realized Oh wait. The first one, two thousand four was one million articles total across all languages, two thousand six was one million in English, but it was the the growth was incredible. And in two thousand seven..

wikipedia Wales pedia Jimmy Wales sanger sanders Robert Kennedy Glasgow John Sanger Co editor ripon Hayes Allen MC mcilwraith founder Palmeiras L. W. Rafe
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:54 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Guests, their employees and for our communities. Right now back to wikipedia. Okay, so we just talked about two thousand and three. Do you have anything between two thousand, three and two thousand five, because otherwise I'm just gonNA. Skip right on the head I believe that in two thousand and four wikipedia was founded on which is which is the for profit kind of branch of wikipedia that that maintains a whole bunch of entertainment, mostly related with I. Think I think that the the wikipedia is among them stuff like that okay, and you know those are the Wikki that I've recently become more and more familiar with because. Pretty much any kind of entertainment thing out. There has its own wiki. The point where I'm like I can't believe this has a Wiki. I can't believe textile doesn't anyway. Because and these these are ad supported. However, they're still community, run and. You know yeah right right so so similar, but again the following moral on the wiki lines of. Philosophy rather than the wikipedia one because again, the one of the things sanger also said in his in his talks or in his writings whereas that You know he he saw the wiki philosophy was kind of. Counter to that of an encyclopedia like the to do not deny. A very very seamless way, and that that that was a concern to him, but that he felt that because we can pedia was specifically supposed to be an encyclopedia, it helped guide the policies. For better or for worse, so it's the community on Wikipedia is not exactly the same as what you would find on your average wicky. The! The process is slightly different, because it has a very specific purpose to be an encyclopedia. In two thousand five wired published a report that said that the Jimmy Wales had done. Something is generally frowned upon within the Wikipedia community, and that is to edit your own page eighteen times apparently. And supposedly the edits that were made were removing things like like sanders. Involvement in the early Genesis Wikipedia..

wikipedia sanger Jimmy Wales sanders
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:25 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"They also you know, we're putting in those policies that allow people to publish rough drafts or rough ideas that could be polished over time, either by themselves, or by other people, and then Google started to include Wikipedia, and its search results for different topics, which that there was suddenly a huge rush of. People yeah, and Sanger notice as more people were coming to visit wikipedia more than we're getting involved as editors and contributors, so that meant that even that as the wikipedia traffic was increasing, so was the content you were suddenly seeing even faster growth as far as how much information was being contained within wikipedia. In the summer of Well. One of the. Summer two thousand one thing singer did note. was that even in those early days that he was starting to notice that people who were? Difficult and who were persistent? Were sometimes irritating very valuable members of the wikipedia community and the valuable members were like. I don't need this. I'd never mind I'm a volunteer. And they just left and then so that meant that you started to have more of the persistent difficult type and fewer of the valuable expert types. And Singer saw that another downfall of wikipedia and there there wasn't really any way to counteract that. Without essentially violating kind of those philosophies that wikipedia was founded upon right, and you know one of those philosophies is definitely the that editors and contributors should be polite to each other, which happens sometimes. Yeah exactly you know it's human error. The the vast majority. I think the vast majority of people who are regular contributors to Wikipedia are. In general very courteous, but all it takes are a few trolls to really stir things up and and trolls who are particularly effective, can cause huge amounts of frustration in the community. And in fact, that's why they do it. With a little effort they make a big impact and boy. We did a whole episode on trees where it was a great when you guys should go back and listen to that one, but in summer of two thousand and one someone ended up using.

Wikipedia Sanger Google
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:36 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"You read stuff you see and I mean there's there's love rancor on both parts race lately. SANGER has a lot to say about the direction that Wikipedia took, and and it's pretty clear that he feels that. It's not ideal I mean he doesn't outright. Come out and say that this is It's it's useless or like that, but he has a lot of criticisms. Meanwhile the Wikipedia community intern has a lot of criticisms that they direct who singer and they both both sides have relevant points, so even though I'm talking a lot about sanger's mainly because that's that's the account I went with. For. Years Yeah. It's not that not that I necessarily side one hundred percent saying. I'm not that far to that extreme Anyway a lot of the the. Policies of Wikipedia actually came out of the community. It became sort of communal decisions of how the sites should work, which was kind of interesting, because they had originally thought of it being of again an extension of new pedia, but this became more of the communal approach to the Internet, which again is more of the Tim Burners Lee approach share, which makes it a lot harder to direct you. Can't you know when a group of? People who have all decided. They want to go left. It's really hard to make them go right. You know when you're one guy. Yeah, yeah, and you know there's there's voting systems in place. Know even even back in those days there were a lot of a lot of ways for people to communicate with each other these ideas that they had for the community. A they decided that that we appeal content would always remain free for others to read and edit. Meaning there would never be a point where there'd be a paywall or subscription for wikipedia and. They also you know, we're putting in those policies that allow people to publish rough drafts or rough ideas that could be polished over time, either by themselves, or by other people, and then Google started to include Wikipedia, and its search results for different topics, which that there was suddenly a huge rush of. People yeah, and Sanger notice as more people were coming to visit wikipedia more than we're getting involved as editors and contributors, so that meant that even that as the wikipedia traffic was increasing, so was the content you were suddenly seeing even faster growth as far as how much information was being contained within wikipedia. In the summer of Well. One of the. Summer two thousand one thing singer did note. was that even in those early days.

Wikipedia Sanger SANGER Tim Burners Lee intern Google
"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:50 min | 11 months ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on TechStuff

"Contributing in some, way So that kind of also. Made the funding dry up for new PEDIA, wikipedia by the way was existing at that time, and still is to this day on donations. So the new PD was trying really hard to redefined the rules that were needed to review submissions so that they could streamline the process, but by that time it was. It was too little too late share. and gets really sad in another year, but. When I get there I'll mention it so. Even at this early stage of Wikipedia, Sanger was really saying. Let's pay attention to what experts have to say. Let's give them special attention and respect and make sure that their voices are. The ones we pay the most attention to not that we won't accept submissions from the general public, but that we should pay more attention to things that are coming from people who are recommended. Because, again, this is this sanger saying that in order to be a credible resource for people you have to have some form of. Review, or or you know you have to have some way of of saying the information here is from right right the same way that scientific journals won't just you know accept accepts research that has not been checked over. Peer Review System because it's really and you ideally. Crest if you ever hear in fact, this just a little side note. This is important. If you're reading something on Wikipedia and you look at the references, something that Lauren and I do a lot. It's important. Also pay to what the references are. Because there are quote, unquote scientific papers out there that are actually blogs that aren't scientific papers right right so then you will quote unquote have a paper published in a scientific journal, but it's not a peer reviewed scientific journal Correct Yeah. I see this with a lot of free energy papers where energy is one of those things where like love. It was published in session. Such mickey I check that out..

Wikipedia Sanger mickey Lauren
"wikipedia" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

10:31 min | 1 year ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on How I Built This

"Of this. I mean it's amazing because we compete on a day-to-day basis. Everyone use I use it. Everybody uses I use it but I remember at that time that John Siegenthaler article two thousand five. NPR We were not allowed to use wikipedia as a source and it wasn't just NPR's was was all news organizations like e we compete. It was not considered reliable source and it just shows you sort of. Yeah well I mean I think that should still be your policy Wikipedia is quite good. It is definitely not perfect and what I always say is. WIKIPEDIA is the place to go to get the questions. Not The answers is the way to get yourself oriented in context and I always say go on the talk page of any article and see what are the wikipedia and struggling with. If they're saying Gee oh you know this source says this and these sources say that and there seems to be a conflict. Hey that might be the most interesting question you can ask because let's get to the bottom of this. There's conflicting information out there. And also so you know if you want to use wikipedia as a starting point then you can always go to the footnotes in the actual source. And that's what you should do. So she meet of just cannot imagine like running this volunteer organization with hundreds of thousands. Maybe millions of people today certainly millions who were voluntarily editing editing sites and did average like get you so wound up that you just want to do it any mirror. No not really You you know the the interesting thing is I remember in the very early days I would get up at night and check the site is I was convinced that somebody who's GonNa come in and trash it overnight which never happened and then quickly actually I realized like Oh yes vandal did show up at three. Am My time last night. But guess what somebody who's a known community member was up in Australia and actually block the person and fix the problem And so you you. I began to understand like communities do inherently scale and I think that is part of what helped me not be overwhelmed by anything. So we're now in this phase in the history of the Internet people call fake news. I don't like that term obvious reasons but So much information that looks real. That's not real. This is not new. I mean this is happened throughout human history but now because there is so much information available sometimes it's difficult for people to discern what's real and what's not an I and I wonder whether one of the challenges with Wiki is reasonable people are disagreeing agreeing about basic facts. So how do you reconcile at as has wikipedia deal with that. I mean a few of the elements so one When we think about the quality of sources That's a really core thing in wikipedia and we have a lot of discussions debates and I think a fairly sophisticated approach to thinking about the quality of sources. And I agree with you. I don't like the term fake news but the original use of the term was really about clearly completely completely made up websites that look like new sites with no concern for the truth with outrageous headlines and so on and those kinds of sites have had almost zero impact wikipedia. Because while you know that might do well to share on facebook something that comes from a publication called the Denver Guardian because it looks like a new you cite and Denver. Everybody knows Denver. City in America and Guardian. Sounds like a newspaper so it seems plausible as we Gideon's would take one look at it and say I've never heard of that paper. That stuff doesn't really get into Pedia a broader problem that I am concerned about is right now the the trust in media media in the US but also around the world but in the US is really at an all time low It's a tough problem and I think it's a societal problem to say. Look we really do need quality information. Most people are very passionate about wanting to be told the truth. You know the the best way to prepare people for you're authoritarian. Rule is not to indoctrinate them into an authoritarian philosophy but to make them believe that there is no such thing as truth. And that's that's a trend that I'm not not happy. About how many times do you know how many wikipedia pages there are today in English for example There's over five million in English English last. I checked so total. Probably all languages Zebbie forty million. How close to fifty close to fifty? Do you even know how many people contribute to wikipedia around the world. It's something around seventy five thousand people every month Who Make at least five edits? It's probably three to five thousand. Is the core community of people who are making a hundred or more at its And so that's that's quite a lot of people but it's not as many people as some might think Now of course making five edits in a month. That's not a huge amount of participation. But you're pretty you know around And there'll be a lot more people who just make one at a year but in terms of the real community. It's probably that seventy five thousand Jimmy. Wet Let motivates seventy five thousand people or a few hundred thousand people to donate hundreds of hours of time every year for free to do this. Yeah I think it's two things so I you know the mission. A free encyclopedia for everyone in the world is is meaningful. I mean you could spend your hobby. Time playing grand theft auto or doing something else and the world wouldn't be any better off when you're done and if you spend spend a few hours editing wikipedia you can go to sleep and things. Yeah I it was productive. The world is a little bit better than it was and someone somewhere will benefit from that. And that's great and then also just fun people you get to meet. People are interested in things. You're interested in no matter. How obscure the ethos of the community is to say look no personal attacks? We're here to discuss the content if you go on the discussion page for a controversial topic. You're not there to debate that topic You can do that. Lots of place on the Internet. What you get it wikipedia debate about? How do we improve this article? And that's just a refreshing kind of feeling and so a lot of people really find. It suits their personality. Do you know what the revenue is like any revenue for Wikipedia from donations. Yeah a revenue new. I should know the number exactly the head but I don't But I think last year was around. Eighty five million dollars. Wow just from donations just from donations. Incredible credible primarily from small donors. That's important to understand that when the community gets together to debate something about what they WanNa have. Wikipedia say what policies should be. There's never a question of will. What will the funders thing? Yeah and over the years. We've really tried to run the organization in a very financially conservative way. Every year we try to build a reserves a lot of our donors one of the things that they really want from wikipedia is that we pedia be safe and so that drives rises to say okay. They don't want us to run on a shoestring they don't want us to run. Nearly a break even in nearly going broke every year we need to be stable. And that's been a real value for many years when you think about this thing that you built and your role in the history of the Internet. How much of the success of Wikipedia do you think because of your brilliance and your hard work? And how much do you think is simply safe. Lock a huge amount due to lock brilliance and hard work. Okay maybe not so much I do think a component of the success of wikipedia is that I'm very friendly and Nice person and I'm very laid back back and so therefore I was able to work in a community environment where people basically yell at you and you just have to kind of roll with it and you're in some sense a leader but you can't tell anyone what to do volunteer so you have to work with love and reason to kind of move people along in in a useful fool way so I do think that I'm not irrelevant to the process but I also think that you know the community is amazing and the luck of the timing of really hitting that moment when it was possible to bill wikipedia. Jimmy you've seen The estimates that you know that if we you were a for profit it could be worth at least five billion dollars maybe more. Yeah doesn't mean anything to you no not really. I mean it's you know people They love to write about Jimmy. Wales is not a billionaire. I think there's actually actually their articles with that headline Jimmy exactly and for me. That's all a bit odd because you know. My life is unbelievably interesting. I have the ability to meet almost anyone in the world who I want to meet and usually I introduce myself. I'm Jimmy Wales founder. gave me and they go. Oh Wow right. Yeah and if I say oh I'm Jimmy Wales. I own the largest chain of car dealers across southern part of America. Okay whenever like not that interesting at least in that regard I do. I do think that no one will remember me and five hundred years but they will definitely remember wikipedia. And that's really. I mean it's really something I mean. That's something that you can really hardly get your mind around there. In comparison to the Gutenberg Press Right and this is the biggest sort of dissemination of knowledge in in modern world history but I duNno. It's been embarrassing to talk about it that way. I'm just trying to have fun. That's Jimmy Wales else. Founder of Wikipedia by the way a few years ago. Jimmy Got Grief for trying to change his own wikipedia. Entry which big No-no his entry you showed. He was born on August eighth nineteen sixty six. which is what is birth certificate also says but that was a mistake because according to his mother? Jimmy was actually born shortly before midnight on August seventh so he made the change only to be confronted by angry. wikipedia editors who demanded documentary evidence which of course could not furnish because he had to go on his mother's version of what had happened anyway. Or the record we just double check the page. And according to Wikipedia the man who created it could be the fact.

wikipedia Jimmy Wales John Siegenthaler America NPR Gideon facebook US Pedia Denver Denver Guardian Australia Gutenberg Press theft Founder Wales founder.
"wikipedia" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on How I Built This

"Guy Roz on today. Show the story of how Jimmy Wales started an online encyclopedia as a side project project and watched it grow into one of the pillars of the Internet. Okay so I'm looking at a list of the most viewed websites in the world number one. Of course probably know so. Is Google also at the top of the list Youtube and of course facebook also a handful of Chinese websites like by do and then clocking clocking in somewhere around number Ken Wikipedia so imagine for a moment that you are the founder of one of these enormous websites well Forbes puts out an annual list of their net worth. And here's what we found. Larry Page founder of Google. It's about sixty six billion dollars. Mark Zuckerberg edges him out with about eighty two billion dollars. One of the founders of BINU is worth around ten billion dollars and the founder of wikipedia Jimmy Wales else. He's not listed by Forbes but judging from media reports Jimmy's net worth is nowhere near the billions. In fact it's likely in and low millions in other words. Jimmy Wales is quite possibly the least rich Internet Titan in the world but unlike a lot of famous founders Jimmy Wales legacy is likely to live on for centuries because in some ways he's like a Modern Day Youhana's Gutenberg and just it's like Gutenberg's press made it possible to spread knowledge beyond village or town. wikipedia made it possible for every single person on earth with an Internet Internet connection to gain access to probably the biggest collection of knowledge ever assembled online and like a lot of the entrepreneurs we interview on the show. The story starts with influential people and important events that happened pretty early in life. He grew up in Huntsville Alabama where his uncle owned a shop that sold old early personal computers and Jimmy worked there part time and it's too big hobbies tinkering with computers.

Jimmy Wales founder Ken Wikipedia Google Forbes Guy Roz Mark Zuckerberg Larry Page Alabama Huntsville Youtube facebook BINU
"wikipedia" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"And they happen in places that you wouldn't necessarily expect. I think that harassment there. Instances of extreme harassment, the kind that you see on some of the other social platforms. We see a lot less of that because we Kapiti has rules around civility around in that determine whether or not you can participate as an editor. And if you violate those rules, you will get walked in band by our community members. I think the bigger issue for us tends to really focus on tonality. So we've done some interesting research around a conversational failure, and it's turned out that if you start a sentence in dialogue with another editor with the word, please, it actually is a really high predictor that that conversation is going to fail because it tends to be followed by, please stop doing that or, you know, please don't do something that you don't know anything about. And so please is actually not an indicator of necessarily a positive outcome. So what we're trying to understand is in an community and in an ecosystem where harassment or unfriendly spaces, look very different than harassment on, say the comments section of YouTube or in a Twitter channel. What can we do to facilitate more. Civil and respectful conversations when we can't necessarily automate to be able to understand because of the use of bad words, for example. And so it, it's really about how we create a culture of friendly interaction as opposed to specific instances of harassment. 'cause we just don't have that problem in quite the same way which is not to say it doesn't exist. I do want to be really careful to acknowledge that. We have had instances of people who've been her ass on Wikipedia attends to be somebody gets a bone between their teeth and really goes after an editor group of editors. The times that we've seen this happen in a targeted way have tended to be around things that you would expect to be controversial. You know, we were one of the sites to be involved in the whole gamer gate controversy. And we absolutely saw, you know, people really go head to head over what that particular discussion meant. And we had a number of Wikipedia editors who on all sides of the conversation and found themselves, you know, sanctioned for the way that they participated in those conversations. You know, I write a lot about harassment on social media, and obviously we pedia is a social place where people come to interact. We do not hear as much about creating a culture where people would be less prone to harass each other. It's more about moderation. So this is really interesting. We don't do moderation in the same way that other social platforms do. We don't have armies of folks sitting offshore going through content posting, trying to determine if it's a harassing language, or if it violates our terms of service our community because it is truly a community engages in that conversation directly. And then they have modes in means of policies to refer conversations. You know, for review in sanction as appropriate. I think that harassment is a problem. But for us, it is a relatively small problem relative to the challenge of how do you create a truly inclusive space for folks when we come from a certain culture and we come from certain demographic background, how do you open that up so that it becomes a place where more people feel welcome. It's so interesting to hear you say you don't have moderation. I understand what you mean. You mean that that Wikipedia or the wicked media foundation isn't going in and moderating what the editors can say or or what people can add to an article. But in another sense, the whole project of Wikipedia is a project of moderation where people are moderating what each other can say and regulating each other's speech in various ways. It reminds me you talked about the social platforms and it reminds me of the difficulties that the big social networks are having right now with misinformation, conspiracy theories, fake news, all that sort of thing, and they talk about what we can't be an arbiter of truth, or maybe and Facebook's case we're trying. But it's really hard to be an arbiter of truth. Wicked pedia is at its core, an arbiter of truth. That's what you guys do. So why do you think they're having such a tough time with it? And would you have any advice for the people running those platforms? Well, I think one thing that's really different from us from the beginning. It's been a community driven project. We don't set policies. Around what? What we don't sell editorial policies for Wikipedia. The communities that sat in the community has evolved over time with these aditorial policies in order to assess information quality and also the sorts of standards that they want for conversations and their spaces to tie back to the conversation around friendly spaces and contribution. But specifically for content moderation. You know, there are a couple really core policies that drive the way that we Kapiti articles are created. And I think the reason that they are effective is at their, they're clear, there's only three of them. They're fairly easy to understand. There's tons of examples for how they work. There's lots of different is that focus eyeballs essentially like people who are focused on ensuring that this policies are upheld and it all happens in the open, the policies around accuracy of information. It requires that we cite back to what we call reliable sources. It means that people can't just put out fringe series based on what their interests are. They have to find citations and information. It has to be. Reviewed or published or have some sort of process of editorial scrutiny. These are the policies that that have created a sense of accuracy and accountability on Wikipedia and accountability. Not just for the editor has been accountability to the public who reads this content, and I think that's just so completely different from the way these other pot farms work. You know, another thing that I point to is we don't have divergent

harassment editor Wikipedia Kapiti Facebook YouTube Twitter
"wikipedia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"wikipedia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Independent volunteer editors consistently monitor wikipedia often aided by technology to ensure its articles remain neutral and well sourced for the hundreds of millions of people who rely on it every month if repeat violations to wikipedia policies do occur volunteers have a variety of mechanisms to draw from including issuing warnings and blocking 's to address content and behavior that does not meet wikipedia standards this process is done entirely by volunteer editors collaboratively independent of the wicked media foundation who does not control content or make editorial decisions about information that's included on wikipedia i also george galloway what he'd likes site to the co founder of wikipedia that you are risking what is potentially a very valuable addition to to the public cana you are risking its credibility by allowing a person i happen to know that is not just a person going through his ruta but it's not just a person you're allowing a sale to selfconsciously with clear political intent it's a cell of neo con fanatics how much do you know then about philip crossed that your willing to share with us today only the we've spoken to his relative i can't see how close that relative has told us that he is a person and not vulnerable person in my opinion is being ruthlessly exploited the co founder of wikipedia jimmy wales refused to speak to us any words we've had from jimmy wales on this can be found on twitter the journalists neo clock asked him when he would be dealing with philip cross adding why no response to complaints from public figures about he's actively he's jimmy replied as far as i can tell so far those complaints are so wrong as to be risible look into it further there's only one person who can answer our questions about philip cross the man himself so we contacted him by his jazz infused twitter account his twitter humble incorporates the numbers nineteen sixty three i'm starts a clue to the owner of the account sage or perhaps he's a reference to the release date of juke afro bossa album either way we didn't receive a response so we tried to call him on a number pass to us by one of our sources the man who picked up the phone didn't want to record our conversation so compliment the phone did not belong to philip cross did however belong to someone who was able to pass on a message us we waited an hour and a half and then we got word back the person behind the philip cross account did not want to speak to lee with jonathan griffin tracking down the elusive and still silent philip cross now get ready football fans we've a feast of facts and some fascinating insights into just what makes the game the most popular in the world these stay with us for the second half of the thought shave a short break coming up but who'd be back in a minute distribution of the bbc world service in the united states is made possible by american public media producer and.

wikipedia