35 Burst results for "Whitehead"

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:48 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"Attempt to do is enter into his spirit so that you are seeing the world from his perspective so it's a book that deals with spirit or the inner self or the interior life of somebody in the same way of figuring a novel you might deal with so that but i suppose working with is the emotional life but not just the emotion life at thomas mann but the emotional life of the reader. The reader reads the book. I'm attempting to get you to feel what is happening in a scene. And so i'm working as much with rhythms of sentences or with way images are presented in order to give you something that might hit your nervous system before. It is entertained by your intelligence. Who is there a moment for you in the process of researching or even writing in which he felt. I get it. I know this person. I can inhabit him as character. No i think you'd want to be arrogant to say that you could know someone like thomas. Mann is very complex. Figure so i was always sure that that wouldn't be possible but i would do. Is i would find images to suggest a way of seeing him or to suggest that he was seeing the world so so it's not an attempt to pin him down so by the end of the book you really know him. I'm as interested in his unknow ability. As i am in attempting to draw very clear portrait of him. I think it's an important question. I often hear novelist. Saying i felt i really knew my character and i often feel the opposite. I feel i often feel mattress become even more vase of the further attempts. I have made to enter their spirit. Produ on keeping it does but but only honor the process in two thousand five. I mean i've been thinking about this book for a long time. I got access to the top of the house at thomas built in pacific palisades which is where the book this novel. The magician was launched because the german government. Now owns that building that thomas matt had designed in nineteen forty two and i saw his study and i saw his study later..

thomas mann Mann thomas thomas built pacific palisades german government thomas matt
"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:33 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"Pastor does in the novel he went to visit her. And so we spent that time did noblet literally vivid about the early weeks of hands. Cast-offs visit to the sanatorium where it's getting used to the rituals and he's getting used to the who who is in the next room who is everywhere else and so from that intimate visit justices wife. He made his panorama for the tar. Future of europe is in some way both dramatized and debated in the book. He began the book before the first world war. He abandoned during the war where he wrote a. I think a ridiculously bad book called reflections of a non-political man which is his efforts to write or political philosophy which she really fails and then he takes to book after the war so that it has that sense of european disruption of defective europe is not a settled place as it might have seemed to anyone looking at it and say nineteen ten or nineteen eleven that by by the time it takes the book up again in nineteen nineteen say realizing that europe is still up for grabs or up for debate and so the novel becomes. I think crucial intervention by artist in that debate. Can you touch for a moment on that book reflections of a non-political man. And what makes it ridiculous. It was just republished this year. It's really worth reading. Just see often very good novelist. Try to intervene. politically often. Should stick to the day job and right problems and stories you know. He didn't have a great education. didn't go to university. Intended if he was writing an essay to read all the things he needed to read for that essay but not know anything more than the essays. His wife pointed this out on stage. Two people don't ask him anything because he doesn't really know more than in the essay tending to to write sort theoretically abstractly about what it meant to be german from a particularly paranoid position which he began to maintain in nineteen fourteen believing that germany was surrounded by its ademi's Believing that germany was special..

noblet europe Pastor ademi germany
"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:43 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"Twenties she threw in her lot with this famous novelists because he was famous at twenty five having written his novel burden brooks. She knew what she was getting herself. In for and one of the happy parts was he never looked at another woman. An old years she. I think was cleverer than he was. I think more politically astute than he was a think. The marriage oddly enough and being happy and fulfilled strangely and she knew he was game. There's a moment in. Her book told unwritten memories where she describes being advanced with him. Nine hundred eleven just before he wrote death in venice and yes he said yes. Tommy did looked at this boy. This beautiful boy on beach. yes. I do remember that. He didn't follow him in the streets but he did laugh at him all the time. He was intrigued by its beauty and that we take a real acknowledgement. Oh i don't think she was in any depth but if she if she was in dust diaries were published. Twenty five years after his death when she was still alive and his diaries. I think chairman scholars people working on his fiction. Berg surprised in his diaries when opened published in nineteen eighty to find that he has explicit accounts of his desires and is he would pee at a reading. Even be on the podium. You'll be talking about serious matters. In german literature about girth or beethoven wagner but actually was thinking would be a boy in the second row or young man at the third row. I would catch any with. That is j's thomas. Mann's gaze was particularly intense. We learned that the diaries and so so this most respected with man visited the white house. Friend roosevelt consider the most important german alive during the second world war. Two great democratic great believer in freedom for enemy of hitler and fascism had a secret life. A life of secrets is is. Let's talk about putin brooks which you know he. He wrote when he was twenty five. Which i still upsetting and shocking away that someone could produce something like that. So young to what extent was it autobiographical and and was it deliberately autobiographical. He had lost new beck where he was born in. The north of germany is family was a well known family owned ships. Warehouses father was a senator father dies when he's fourteen and in his will says that the entire companies to be wound up and his mother leaves look back to munich so in other words by the age of sixteen or seventeen. Thomas man has lost his important place in this city. In other words they owned a number of houses he was everyone knew him on the street and suddenly he's nobody now. This is a great gift to arrive in a way where now anything early twenties. He begins to reconstruct that world. there's completely obliterated and he goes back three generations. He writes about his great grandfather. He writes about the source. Strange decline of this great commercial family. And what he does with his own generation is although he's one of a family of five he makes seven only child and it gives him seven extraordinary precocious musical talent and instead of his mother being brazilian which is mother was born in brazil. He makes his mother exotic also coming from amsterdam rather than visit. He changes that and he also in the novel. Of course he kills himself. He gives hanno a fatal disease so that we watched the actual death off the author imagining his own death as a young teenager..

beethoven wagner Friend roosevelt putin brooks brooks venice Tommy Berg girth Mann white house thomas beck munich germany Thomas brazil fatal disease amsterdam hanno
"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

02:35 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"But but it is the same idea that you take a figure about whom a great amount has been written but who remains me ambiguous or hard to pin down or shadowy and you attempt then not to be moved shadows and find substance but to work constantly with the shadows to mold the shadows and find the texture within them over a life. That is i think mysterious. Still the life of henry james or the figure that he was or the i suppose gaps or distances in in between one thing and another if you say one thing about him. The opposite is often true so explored that in the and then i think sixteen years later. I have another figure the same sort i should say. I don't have a third but these these are two figures worked. Have been reading since i was in my teens. And then who. Both of them are views of them. Changed in the one thousand. Nine hundred eighty s as more more information became available about them as other books were published. As some of henry james's letters appeared for the first time in the eighties and nineties. And indeed when thomas mountain diaries republics twenty five years after his death. Both of them obviously had one thing in common more than one thing. I'm sure about when major thing. Which is that. They were both of course. Gay deeply closeted was that part of the the mystery that you'd think intrigued you that you spoke about earlier that you mentioned a yes. I think how they navigate this or how they don't the amount of revelation and concealment sometimes both at the same moment in their works. Interested me but but that wouldn't be enough for me in other words. Oscar wilde was gay. But i couldn't think of writing a novel about him but interestingly about both of these figures also is their relationship to home our native country in other words james very early in his life his father moved the family to europe back and forth to your back and forth to new england. So that by the time he arrives to live in england. When he's in his thirties he really has no home. And succumbing sense of trying to find one trying to go to lamb house in rye in sussex and england and set up a home there but of course he was solitary. He was a bachelor. So there's always an uneasy sort of flickering relationship to home and thomas mann in nineteen thirty-three was outside germany when hitler came to power and he didn't come back in warrenton not and so he so he goes to switzerland to france then eventually arrives in princeton and ninety thirty eight and then eventually to california in nineteen forty one and so he spends the warriors outside germany thinking germany sort of living in.

henry james thomas mountain Oscar wilde england new england james europe sussex thomas mann warrenton hitler germany switzerland princeton france california warriors
"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:32 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"It's about being a hustler. Heroin addict in new york and the south in the fifties forties. I read in college and member. Just how he would describe third street. Which is where. I grew up as this hub of heroin traffic. 'cause like city workers would come from downtown. Get off the window. Third street station score and then head back downtown. And he's a lot of of great criminal slang so i'm so memoirs newspapers and furniture pamphlets. You're not a patrick. Modiano where you're sort of consistently working in the same register in the same themes often the variation of the same story book after book after book. I mean you've done speculative historical fiction coming of age zombie novel street historical fiction book in your mind. Is there something that makes each of your books A colson whitehead novel for me. There's a hook of yet gets in keeps insisting on itself so what is the overall was a real train then years. That's i keep coming back. this idea. That sounds cool. So i mean a newspaper report or watching. Tv and my own book in that twenty twenty story and the stays with me and crying in germany and so i think there's that i keep coming back to certain things you know the city american history technology will not lately humor. You know if. I can get some weird jokes in any happy. So there's not one thing but there's a handful of things. I keep pretending to third not all in the same book of a definitely been recurring sewer talking about high stories in the beginning. We're talking about books and also of course movies. And i imagine it's hard to think about heist book without maybe thinking. What would this be like onscreen and this book was written. I believe crimea me. If i'm wrong after the underground railroad was optioned for tv and then adopted as a series. Did that experience. Infiltrate your writing. Do you see things possibly as adaptations now. Symbols more readily i can see his former tv.

Modiano colson whitehead patrick new york germany crimea
"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:28 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"His pay grade so can't survive and then there's a revenge paper where he gives into his dark side and decides need some pave after a social wrong and then no-one described the third one in each one. You know. I think harding has to face. What kind of man he is is he that humble store owner or is he like his father. I'm giving into that darkness. That's with him. I think all of us. I think all of us have that self. We are more alone with friends with family at work and we juggle is different personas sometimes those hoses personalities aren't so starkly different and then sometimes sometimes are definitely in the case of carney particularly the new book. He's one person night as you come up with these schemes and one person at noon in this store in described him coming up with these ideas for these heist and the fact that hi sir generally always a bad idea. What's the process for you coming up with the ideas of. What is the house going to be. Does that come naturally. Was it hard to think of what the scheme was. It's hard to actually execute them. You know i have to make. This is hotel highs convincing the reader pickers and where is in a right in saying like no actually safe deposit boxes in nineteen sixty four a secret. Latch that prevented you from opening them this way. So i think heathrow luckily haven't editor who like really is really is nippy so so there's a whole hopefully we'll pick it up another fact check i imagine for you could come from your parents right because they grew up in central harlem in the nineteen sixties. Yes my momma started be saying. I found the hotel theresa That's gets robbed on. The first floor of chock.

harding carney harlem
"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:50 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on The Book Review

"What's the great appeal of a. Hey story colson. Whitehead joins us to talk about his new novel. Harlem shuffle. why write a novel about the novelist. Thomas mon- holum. Tony will be here to talk about the magician. Alexander alter will tell us what's new in publishing us plus my colleagues and will talk about what we're reading. This is the book review podcast from the new york times. It's temper seventeenth. I'm pamela paul. Colson whitehead joins us now from manhattan. His latest novel is harlem shuffle. Welcome back to the podcast. And i think this is your third time here are. The ones are so disastrous. That's right that's right. We'll fix things. Well this is actually really different novel from the two. Most recent ones that you're coming off of it is like the other two. I guess you would call it. Historical the underground railroad. Of course you jump around in time but you start in the nineteenth century with the knuckle boys. You are into the twentieth century. And then in this book harlem shuffle. You are in the nineteen sixties. Were you consciously moving forward in time continuing in this vein of historical fiction. No i mean. I'm in two thousand and four had basically on my good ideas for books. Some still implement fitting. Give a list somewhere getting shorter. But i I decided to commit to the underground railroad had years before. 'cause like okay. I'm going to do it open pretty off. At that summer. I came across the story of the doozer school which became the model for the nickel boys. And thought you know that is a book. And they're probably and around. That time. I was staring off into space as i often do and was thinking how much i love. Ocean's eleven heist movies could have a novel when actually got around to writing it. I was knocker writer Eighteen fifty or so take the sixty s and had a great time today. What was going on in your life in two thousand and four. That made this setup. Fertile moment i been fiction for years. I was teaching a lot paying the bills. There's some folks who can teach and write the same time..

Thomas mon holum pamela paul Colson whitehead colson Whitehead Alexander the new york times Tony manhattan doozer school
"whitehead" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:37 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with colson. Whitehead his new novel harlem. Shuffle is set in harlem between nineteen fifty nine and sixty four. It's a crime novel mount morris park which is no called. Marcus garvey park is a place where bodies are buried in the novel. Like if you if you've killed somebody that's the place to hide the body And a lot of our listeners. Who aren't familiar with harlem. Might know mount morris park. Now marcus garvey park from the quest of documentary about the nineteen sixty nine harlem cultural festival. Cassatt festival was held in mount morris. Park so what do you know was it really. Is this part of like the parks. Laura or is it really true. Their bodies are buried there. What's the story Yeah not buried but dumped and so yes yes so. I went to newspapers for what's happening in the city..

Marcus garvey park colson Whitehead harlem Cassatt mount morris Laura
"whitehead" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:00 min | Last month

"whitehead" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm terry gross. My guest colson whitehead won a pulitzer prize for each of his last two novels the underground railroad and the nickel boys. The underground railroad is about a fifteen year old and slave girl who escapes a brutal georgia plantation. It was adapted into amazon tv series. Which is now nominated for multiple emmys. The nickel boys was based on the story of the dosier school for boys in northern florida. A reform school infamous for its mistreatment and brutal punishment of the boys who were sent there and for the buried bodies discovered on its grounds. There's many sites to colson whitehead's writing he also wrote a novel about a plague where everyone who's infected becomes zombie and wrote a memoir about playing poker. Now is a crime. Novel called harlem shuffle set in harlem between nineteen fifty nine and nineteen sixty four. The main character ray. Carney owns a furniture store in one hundred twenty fifth street in harlem but he has a sideline trafficking in stolen goods as offense or as he prefers to think of it. He was a middleman part of the natural flow of goods in and out and through people's lives from here to there a churn of property that he helped facilitate in his mind who is nothing like his father. Who was more of a fulltime crook with crooked friends raise also a family man. He and his wife expecting their second child when the novel begins. The novel is about his dual life. Class divisions within harlem and the crimes of the elite compared to the crimes unreal. Carney's level colson whitehead. Welcome back to fresh air. I love this novel. Thanks for writing it and thanks for coming back to our show. Yeah thanks for having me back. It's very exciting. I want to start by asking you to do a reading and just to set this up a little bit. So you know ray. Carney is offense. It basically deals with pretty small time stuff..

colson whitehead dosier school for boys terry gross pulitzer prize harlem Carney georgia amazon plague florida ray
Vaccine Passports Could Lead to 'Segregation

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:11 min | 2 months ago

Vaccine Passports Could Lead to 'Segregation

"Headlined. A new state of segregation vaccine. Cards are just the beginning. John whitehead as whitehead. Excuse me as agreed to join us on the program here on the dennis prager. Show talk more about this john. Thank you for the time. How are you today. Sir by busy is used the do and by websites run for dot org dot rose dot com apologies for that. Thank you for the cliff fan. I understand yeah. But i just want people to make sure they can get information and they should read this commentary on talk about the new type of segregation. Because you're absolutely correct sir. Where we we definitely in that direction. We've been we've been moving in that direction law for about twenty years. They've done the government's done it slowly. Clementi the now expedia very quickly. Yeah you know. I mean it was a great commentary that you wrote john which is why reached out to have you on today to talk about this. I want to quote you. In your article in the early portions of it by allowing government agents to establish a litmus test for individuals to be able to engage in commerce movement or any other right that corresponds to life in a supposedly free society. It lays the groundwork for a show me your paper society in which you're required to identify yourself to at anytime to any government worker who demands it for any reason. This really does remind me of leper colonies. They're going to take the unvaccinated into say you can't mix in and mingle with proper company. Those who have taken their government jobs as directed. You won't be able to go to the grocery store eventually. This continues though to restaurant You know i. I there are there. Those object to the mass. Yeah we we've I would say again. I doing this for forty years now fighting for civil liberties for people and finally cases and cars. I've never seen anything. This is the worst i've ever seen. I've talking to some older friends of mine. They're saying john. This is not the america. I grew up in. I don't wanna live here anymore. I've actually hearing more people. Say that. And i mean with a cancel. Culture was saying All of the things coming at people right now And the kids are growing up today. They're gonna they're gonna be afraid and clear

John Whitehead Dennis Prager Whitehead John Clementi America
Why Every Leader Fails Without Community with Dr. Darren Whitehead

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Why Every Leader Fails Without Community with Dr. Darren Whitehead

"We were made to be around one another This something about the full embodiment of being with one another. That is the way that god is actually designed us. You know when you're physically with someone. There are terabytes of information that is going between brain to brain and it's spacial communication and it is the the things that you sense emotions and you you just have like the so much of communication is nonverbal so when when we are in the presence of one another that is the maximum level of communication flow when you reduce it to screen and you say you face timing now. You're looking at megabytes of information that is going by you. Don't have that same spatial. Understanding is you have when you're in the presence of someone within if you then reduce it to a phone conversation now you just hearing you not seeing and so you're not actually even getting to to what someone's facial expressions you know what i would to discern what they actually meant by something because he just hearing the audio within when you reduce it to say an email you just talking about bites of inflammation and you having a difficult time disowning you know. What did they mean by that. Well then you get even less than that and you start looking at a couple of characters on a text message you say we were made to be able to discern one another's presence and communication by being in the presence of one another and we've been essentially stabbed of that for the last year. So i think people are lonely. I think people are missing reference group in other words than the missing. What natural relationships do when you with one another as you kind of your reading people's response on how they receiving you and that in many ways coat-tails things that you say or things that you say. You're you're working on huma. All of that kind of natural interaction. Motion shared experiences happens in the presence of other people You don't get on zoom. You don't get that on a phone call. You don't get that on email to the degree that you when we are in embodied space with one another

"whitehead" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"whitehead" Discussed on KCRW

"On the novel by Colson Whitehead. The Underground railroad is available for TV Academy members and consider amazon dot com. It is 3 48 KCRW on a Wednesday afternoon, Thanks so much for joining us, for all things considered still ahead on the program this hour, Samuel Wright might remember him as the voice of Sebastian, the crab aerials sidekick and Disney's The Little Mermaid. He's dying. He also played, among other roles. Dizzy Gillespie in the 1988 biographical film about Charlie Parker. Also the part of new fossa in the original cast of The Lion King on Broadway. He was 74. We'll have a remembrance a little bit later this hour. Coming up next. Our Dr Anthony Fauci spoke today about the likelihood that the Corona virus is a natural occurrence. On that note. Leading US officials now have renewed calls for a deeper investigation into the origins of the Corona virus outbreak will have more on that in the possibility again that the virus may have emerged from a lab in China. Take a look at your roads in Culver City, the four or five North bound. Let's see at the 90 some slow conditions all the way over to Nordhoff Street before that gets better Sorry about them. Santa Monica 10 eastbound on Centinela Avenue, also some slowing over to Matteo Street and some slowing out of Hollywood, one of one South bound at Hollywood Boulevard over to about Mission Road before that gets better for you as well. Now. 60 degrees in Santa Monica 82 Rancho Cucamonga 66 in downtown L. A From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. Loss of smell has become a hallmark of covert 19.

Samuel Wright Elsa Chang Dizzy Gillespie Ari Shapiro China 1988 Culver City Colson Whitehead Nordhoff Street Centinela Avenue Matteo Street Hollywood Boulevard Wednesday afternoon Santa Monica 60 degrees Anthony Fauci Hollywood The Little Mermaid Disney Mission Road
With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

"Underground railroad was a network of abolitionists routes to free slaves. But what if it was an actual railroad with a train chugging toward freedom? That's the premise of Colson Whitehead's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, now adapted by Barry Jenkins into a 10 episode miniseries. This isn't a straightforward, inspirational narrative like Harriet. This combines the brutality of roots with the social commentary of watchman and a hint of magical realism like the Polaroids. Press to some ADO is empathetic as the lead Joe Edger tennis sinister as the villain, slave catcher and child star chased Dillon is his precocious psychic. I still have eight episodes to go. But judging by the first two were in for a powerful train ride by a master conductor. I'm Toby Toby film critic Jason Fraley, giving the underground railroad for five stars. So far, dolphin

Colson Whitehead Barry Jenkins Pulitzer Prize Harriet Dillon Tennis Toby Toby Jason Fraley
'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

The Takeaway

01:19 min | 5 months ago

'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

"Miniseries adaptation of the Colson Whitehead novel, The Underground Railroad premieres on Amazon Prime Both the book and the Serie Center around Cora and enslaved woman who escapes from a plantation in Georgia and travels through a literal underground train system in search of freedom. And while the series does depict the traumatic reality of slavery, early reviews have lauded it for not sensationalizing the violence shown on screen as well as for emphasizing the humanity of the enslaved characters. Much of the project success can be credited to Barry Jenkins Theosophy are winning filmmaker behind Moonlight and If Beale Street could talk here he is on the take away back in 2018 talking about his plans for the underground railroad. Most clearly I can say about it is, you know the hero's journey, and I remember as a kid, you know, hearing about the underground railroad for the first time and really literally imagining to two trains. Running underground. And so I think that reading Coulson's book kind of reactivated the childhood kind of off, you know, around just like the power the ingenuity, you know of black folks to create this path to freedom, and I thought the best way to tell that was to go on the four hero's journey. So I was really happy to partner with Amazon and find a place where we could tell the story on the course of 89 10 hours.

Colson Whitehead Serie Center Barry Jenkins Cora Georgia Coulson Amazon
CDC Declares Racism a Serious Public Health Threat

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

CDC Declares Racism a Serious Public Health Threat

"Head of the nation's top public health agency, is warning that racism is a serious public health threat. Sam Whitehead of member Station W. Abe, reports. Director of the CDC, Dr Rochelle Walensky says the Corona virus pandemic has underscored generations of health inequities. In a statement Thursday, Wolinsky said the disproportionate impact of the Corona virus pandemic on communities of color has highlighted longstanding health disparities. She says racism has created structural barriers that have lifelong negative impacts on those communities, physical and mental health. Wolinsky says the CDC will expand its study on how racism affects health will make new investments in health infrastructure to help reduce disparities and will launch a new Web portal to track the work, she says the agency is also Looking inward, expanding efforts to grow the diversity of CDC

Wolinsky Sam Whitehead Station W. Abe Dr Rochelle Walensky CDC
"whitehead" Discussed on Beach Talk Radio

Beach Talk Radio

01:51 min | 7 months ago

"whitehead" Discussed on Beach Talk Radio

"New friends chase and kneel at the paradise parasail. Neither out there now without their sunscreen and they're taking people all they have and they're taking people for two miles and four miles and if you go. Please send us a picture so that we can post it on our own. Hey great idea. Why if you're up there high in the air like that take a picture and send it to us so we can post it on the facebook. Or we're at yeah. Did you hear my voice crack right there and sound a little girlie Who else charlie whitehead and. Don't forget to watch the meetings in august or whatever the next month is it's beginning today april and that's when the myreside thing is going to be decided to set public hearing and stay on top of the council of about the homeless. We're we're going to say these homeless people dear gonna take them in and we're gonna make sure that we got room in our house we'll shimao you'll shoot them out the way you were getting anxious with my mom there. She's not homeless. You need to live with us. I'm just saying else in the house with these crackers to work out doing the yard work and all that stuff. They were perfectly nice over there. They were very appreciative of the water. The twenty bucks. I gave them and all that but you know we don't want violence. We don't want anybody else getting killed. We want the we human beings after all. Just don't act like dick's while you're down here to if you're homeless. That's all just be nice. The people all right everybody. We'll be back with episode number one hundred and fifty nine next week. Right one fifty nine and you'll have yourself a jolly little weekend. Anything else one on say all right bye bye. Everybody love you..

two miles twenty bucks august today april four miles next month charlie whitehead facebook next week episode number one hundred one fifty nine
CDC Reports Rise in Adults Experiencing Anxiety, Depression Symptoms

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

CDC Reports Rise in Adults Experiencing Anxiety, Depression Symptoms

"Says it's seeing a rise in adults experiencing anxiety or depression in recent months. From member station W. A B in Atlanta, Sam Whitehead has more CDC researchers surveyed hundreds of thousands of adults about their mental health during the pandemic. They say the percentage of respondents who reported symptoms of anxiety or depression increased from 36.4% in August of last year to 41.5% last February. In that time, the percentage of people with unmet mental health needs increased from 9.2% to 11.7%. Researchers say The largest increases were among young adults aged 18 to 29, those with less than a high school education. They say these trains could be used to target mental health care to the populations who need it most during the pandemic.

Sam Whitehead Depression CDC Atlanta Anxiety
Vaccinated Americans Have Been Getting Their Second Doses on Time

Fresh Air

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

Vaccinated Americans Have Been Getting Their Second Doses on Time

"And Prevention in Atlanta, says most Americans who got the first shot of the two dose covert 19 vaccination regimen also got the second one member station W. A. B in Atlanta, Sam Whitehead reports. Eden's, He says most people are also getting both doses and the recommended period of time. In a new report, CDC researchers looked at second dose completion for vaccines from Visor and Madonna for mid December to mid February, They found nearly 90. 6% of people got their second doses on time only 3% miss them completely. Researchers say public health officials should work to better understand why people don't fully complete the vaccination. SYRIZA reporter Sam Whitehead

W. A. B Sam Whitehead Atlanta Eden CDC Madonna Syriza
Vaccinations Have Sharply Declined Nationwide during the COVID-19 Pandemic

On Being

01:15 min | 8 months ago

Vaccinations Have Sharply Declined Nationwide during the COVID-19 Pandemic

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that almost 136 million doses of covert 19 vaccines have been delivered with close to 37 million people in the US having been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus as of this weekend. More than 7.5 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in long term care homes. But what about other vaccinations unrelated to the coronavirus? CDC chief Dr Rochelle Wolinsky says there's been a troubling and substantial decline in childhood inoculations since the pandemic hit the US early last year. From member station W A. B E Sam Whitehead has war. The pandemic has kept Americans from taking their Children to the doctor, Molinski said. During the most recent Biden administration Cove, it 19 press call. That has meant lots of missed inoculations. CDC orders for childhood vaccinations dropped by about 11 million doses as we work to get our Children back to school. We certainly do not want to encounter other preventable infection outbreaks such as measles and mumps. Well, let's get encouraged people to check with their pediatrician's before sending their kids back to school. If they've skipped a vaccination, she says, the CDC has a schedule of how they can

CDC Dr Rochelle Wolinsky Sam Whitehead Molinski Biden Administration United States Mumps Measles
Storylines galore as Brady and Mahomes hook up in Super Bowl

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 9 months ago

Storylines galore as Brady and Mahomes hook up in Super Bowl

"The Tampa Bay Buccaneers continue their week of preparation for Super Bowl fifty five with another practice session at their facility Thursday offense of tackle Donovan Smith explains how he and his teammates have improved in protecting quarterback Tom Brady over the course of the season we talk about every day it's only got there on the field in which we know as long as you know we will establish we also you know at the beginning we were just trying to brings together all of us where we would go group go slow and judge were Syrians said safeties Antoine Winfield junior Jordan Whitehead and wide receiver Antonio brown all practiced for a third straight day but any determination of whether they'll play Sunday will be made until after Friday's session Steve Carney Tampa

Donovan Smith Tampa Bay Buccaneers Super Bowl Tom Brady Jordan Whitehead Antoine Winfield Antonio Brown Steve Carney Tampa
Buccaneers get ready for Super Bowl

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Buccaneers get ready for Super Bowl

"The Tampa Bay Buccaneers held their second practice of the week in preparation for Super Bowl fifty five Wednesday at their practice facility for defensive lineman and Donna can sue this week is all about trying to finally reach the pinnacle of his profession this is the second time around in I look for to have an opportunity to close that out because I've been very blessed to be able to have individual career that has many accolades but ultimate goal is to have the team accolade less liberty trophy head coach Bruce Arians said wide receiver Antonio brown safeties Antoine Winfield junior Jordan Whitehead and linebacker Lavonte David were all limited the Buccaneers will again practice Thursday as they get ready to host the AFC champion Kansas City Chiefs Sunday at Raymond James stadium Steve Carney Tampa

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Super Bowl Bruce Arians Donna Jordan Whitehead Lavonte David Antonio Brown Antoine Winfield Buccaneers AFC Kansas City Chiefs Raymond James Stadium Steve Carney Tampa
Black voices that make a difference: The Karson Institute’s Karsonya Whitehead

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 9 months ago

Black voices that make a difference: The Karson Institute’s Karsonya Whitehead

"Is the first of February And that means it is the first day. Black history month and we're introducing you to a woman who wanted a place where people could go to discuss sensitive social issues. Professor Carson A. Whitehead launched the Carson Institute at Loyola University of Maryland in Baltimore. People can eventually come and study race piece is also justice. We could talk about this. We could do unusual conversations. The answer America's most pressing questions, the D. C native named the institute after her father who was a sin. All rights activist Carson Eugene Wise, who I am named after us, My dad who lit that fire in me. She was motivated to found the institute after the death of Trayvon Martin when I sat down with my two sons, and I had to look them in the face and realized that that you can't outrun What is embedded within society. You can't outrun systemic racism. You actually have to confront it and dismantle it. That's the goal of the institute. I realize that if I could not help to create a world where my boys could get home safe In my work meant nothing.

Professor Carson A. Whitehead Carson Institute Loyola University Of Maryland Carson Eugene Wise Baltimore Trayvon Martin America
"whitehead" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

08:08 min | 11 months ago

"whitehead" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Portland arts and lectures in september twenty twenty. There are few writers who are both as versatile and accomplished as colson whitehead. His subjects have ranged from elevator inspectors to middle-class black american suburbia to the world series of poker he is written warr zombie thriller a semi autobiographical coming of age novel and historical fiction at the same time he has won dozens of awards and accolades most recently culminating in two pulitzer prizes one for the underground railroad and one for the novel nickel boys whitehead's significant contributions to literature come about not only because of his mastery of the craft but also because he has range he deploys pop culture history and a mixture of realism and the fantastical and by doing so helps. Readers see sometimes familiar subjects in a new light. Whitehead begins this episode by talking about why he writes and also about the arthur. Does your school for boys the infamous and brutal facility. That is at the center of the novel. The nickel boys after a brief reading will hear him in conversation with mitchell. S jackson who is the author of two celebrated book set in portland the residue years and survival math their conversation ties the characters themes and stories of whitehead's books directly to our present social and political moment exploring fictions role in helping us understand more fully the past and present. Here's whitehead so my story. I suppose if somebody else could he now eighty people no such a hero that sometimes i thought that description place were saying or emotion might escape the normal people wires job near the final words other people and see it. The same way you do lay is also pretty large sending people for me ask. Did you for one smarter. Russell doesn't doesn't thousand honoring words on the nation awards. Thousands of people were all the same and ideas. She for me had be summer if somebody's house one place. It's happening places. Well there's one does your There are dozens of form schools. Same tragedies on earth or on my mother's arabs residential who des indigenous children from the families to teach them way culture uses. Your redone does your their native Regime our southern border refugee. Children's seeking agents anywhere we're a culture of impunity reigns short routes as being about numbers on married but also multiply are these characters Sometimes a fragment mattress now. Nixon suedes my out or sometimes not name tang's were cast Core agnes the underground over now. The in her probably wives line article fine knows at the books at least now. Artan voice not create outdoors. I've my own team rights and trumpet in an office a month or team. He's already up last year after year. Great addition these divisions and disuse with us in some service rules often which are alleged thing getting better for my kids jesse my app seeing to my parents who not generation have better than like the injustice precious through nation of in-house begun make progress fall. Achna seeking are reading. Silent arts might more realistic art much. More evidence of things aren't going is lung tag nece when missile through my awful problem for the reverend warm user teen junior advising the worst of usual standup fighter justice renamed the world turner's offices on survivor rule as it actually is not how he wants to be so sad. News hang on standards also love hours winds down and meet us out in front of us and debates begins velocities on the in world some for under art look pretty solve plants or the boys regressed was miserable bullied who jim tried the weaknesses and they can find sitcom. You're not jesus even if your knees never not will life for these fat falls and slapping around with you. Get away with it. He pumped out dragging them into darkness. worse made pretty low given. The general student is still desserts on multiple occasions. Swipe from trees of grin and eagles desserts question. Not rich shits. The boys regrets represent the nickel at the annual. Boxing match animated what he did the rest of the year. Today fight would be all a black on the knock white boy ups happen swell. The naval academy was reformed over boys juvenile offenders or states orphans. Runaways out get away from mothers. Entertainment escaped fathers remains of nights. Someone stole the money has that their teachers damaged property. They told stores up pool. All fights uncles. Who so named shy wasn't that revenge. Irving's malinga ring gorge ability words. The boys understand either point with their meanings never combat service kind of model signs. Fell five irina. Because boys bossy mash title for fifteen years. One thousand nine hundred forty nine old hands on stop remember. The last election is low off other things. The old days not.

whitehead colson whitehead warr Artan pulitzer Whitehead Portland mitchell portland jackson Russell tang Nixon jim naval academy Boxing Irving irina
CDC modifies travel advisory for winter holidays

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 11 months ago

CDC modifies travel advisory for winter holidays

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging Americans not to travel during the upcoming winter holidays amid spikes in new infections. Sam Whitehead with member station W. A. B says it's similar to what the CDC warned ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday. CDC officials say travelers risk exposing themselves to covert 19 and spreading the disease to other communities. Testing before and after travel and taking measures like wearing masks can reduce those risks, but officials say it won't eliminate them entirely. The CDC recommendations come as new covert 19 cases and hospitalizations surge across most of the U.

CDC Sam Whitehead W. A. B U.
"whitehead" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"whitehead" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Finally let's start with little motion arts wisdom power on the vatican. Scroll is fine disney style. It's nothing it's okay. I didn't get it the first time. Either what s no secret ingredient. It's just you stick around. I got great chat with the truth. Seeker warrior. david whitehead when it comes to triggers these are informants for you to take notes and say why is that so triggering for me. Why is it so hard for me to look into this. What if i find something valuable about this. Even if i find that what i'm looking into is something i i don't like or find out that there's something to it that needs further investigation. You're still learning. The average man is hooked to the other average man. The warriors hooked to infinity. Welcome to skept kobe. Rix floor contra. She'll science in spirits reality with leading researchers thinkers and their critics. I'm your host. Alex harris and today we welcome the truth warrior himself. David whitehead skept co. dave is just a really interesting guy. And we're just chatting you know he was a nice enough to kinda co host of episode. We did if you. I don't know a couple of years ago. On on slave. Podcast with michael zarian and We met through that but just in the last couple weeks. I contacted him about What i was doing with the evil project and boy. I was just telling you know blown away with the extent of your work. Just excellent stuff. for folks who don't know you will have seen david on the ancient aliens podcast and if you're really into kinda geeky reality tv. Like i am. You've probably seen him on the curse of oak island as well Show i watch folks. I'm not. I'm not hating at all. But this guy date at this point buddy. Your i. M d your. Imdb is looking pretty. Stout i mean here. We go ancient aliens of curse folk island. What are we travel special and that stuff yet spin. I said to be honest. I know what shows they threw me into they. Just bring me down and interview me. And then i find out later. People are on this show. So i've been doing prior to the lockdown with get to I was doing regular appearances on. Unexplained with william shatner which was a fun new. Show that they're doing And then ancient aliens was multiple seasons of that. And then i think they put me in a few cursive islands and sprinkled me here and there so i didn't even know i had an imdb page to be honest. This is the first time. I'm seeing this good. Good buddy you got it. You gotta be sending that out there. You're that's that's impressive. it's a good one. You know so what..

David whitehead Alex harris skept co michael zarian vatican Rix disney kobe warriors oak island dave Imdb Stout david william shatner
Atlanta-Based CDC: ‘Excess’ Deaths Soar During COVID Pandemic

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta-Based CDC: ‘Excess’ Deaths Soar During COVID Pandemic

"Centers for disease. Control and prevention in Atlanta says a Spanish people who've seen the biggest increase in excess deaths. This year Sam Whitehead from member station WABC reports a new report from the agency is looking to track the true toll the covid nineteen pandemic. CDC researchers say official counts of covid nineteen deaths are likely underestimates because of limitations and diagnostic testing an incomplete reporting on death certificates. So they counted the number of deaths that happened in the US each week from January twenty sixth to October third of this year then compared the figures to the average number of deaths that happened in the same weeks from Twenty fifteen to twenty nineteen. CDC researchers found some two hundred ninety nine thousand excess deaths in attributed two-thirds to covid. Nineteen. Hispanics saw a fifty three percent increase in excess deaths which researchers say is consistent with known trends in Cova nineteen mortality.

CDC Sam Whitehead Cova Wabc Atlanta United States Official
"whitehead" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"whitehead" Discussed on The Archive Project

"You experience it? Yeah, I think it's it's kind of cliche for a black writer talk about slavery this sort of sitting there was a big topic. I think we're expected to address it. It took me eight books to address it in terms of right by my experience. I think definitely when you're performing your identity and you feel pressure to represent and it's self-imposed and impose by The Gatekeepers of identity theft. I think if you want to just write about gardening you can just cuz you're African-American doesn't mean you can't be a great writer of gardening books or love poetry off. So I think you should as an artist you should write whatever you want to write and don't get hung up on some weird voice in your head or other people's voices and do it makes you feel happy. Yeah, but I think also just follow follow your interests and if that goes toward slavery, then that's great. But if it doesn't that's also great, you know, you just just write the thing that you want to write and and and worry about who reads it and what it means all of that later. You know, this is a question for you. I'm curious about the sections of your novel that are set in Ghana and how much of that came from research or how much from stories from your parents or other family members. Yes. Most of it came from research. I I was really hesitant I think to do any kind of genealogical research into my own family's history just because I didn't want to feel behold and I guess to to the truth in any way the pieces that I did borrow from is again, I'm a con. My mother is fun T. And my father is a Shante and those are the two ethnic groups that I focus on but aside from that I tried to kind of leave it to research and fiction. I was curious as a writer when you're writing something that is so powerful and personal in a way even if they're fictional characters. How do you find self can for yourself? When you're you're writing you're researching your posts or pulling these stories that really are coming from truth. Yeah for me, I don't I feel I guess a little bit distanced when I'm writing. Like I don't I don't feel like overwhelmed with the weight of the of what's happening to my conjectures as I'm writing. I think the more difficult aspect of this book was the research because that is where you're kind of constantly encountering truth. Whereas at least at the end of my writing day. I could kick myself with the fact that this is fiction and that it's all being made up. I couldn't do that when I read these research text that I was reading and so part of I guess what I did to care of myself was just to make sure that I wasn't spending my entire day working on this book, you know, but I gave myself the three hours and then I went on and did did other things that had nothing to do with slavery at home after that. Yeah. I mean for me I found a narrative voice that allowed me to be in the situation with the characters but also distance enough to shape the material. So I found that voice early on so that helped and then you know like a 3:00. I do most of the cooking so I just like figure out what to make for doing that night and I come up to my office and I made dinner for the fam and I'm out of the world. So that's my self-care reject Sam sifton the times and making the chick that chicken tagine or whatever. That's an interesting question that same question was asked of the architect of the African American History Museum. He's I think he's West African and he said that researching the history was healthy, but then he tried to detach himself so that he could design and be actual space. So that's an interesting point of caring it while you're understanding and then letting it go once you start to execute a question for Mister Whitehead you mentioned that you had been stopped and perhaps frisked. I wonder if you would be willing to tell us more about that what your feelings were at that time? Well, I mean I think happened to some most young men of color. You're you're walking down the street and you're driving and you know the police stop you and want to know why you're in this neighborhood or what you're off the street and you're actually just standing outside in my case. I was buying beer with some friends. I was sixteen and a supermarket and a policeman came to life market and put me outside and handcuffed me and there's a white lady in the back of his police car. And she said no that's not him and then handcuffed me and let me go I guess she been mugged a few blocks away and I was the first or a Natasha and August 1st, but I was a young black male in the vicinity so luckily she can she was like one of those they all look alike types, but that's pretty standard operating procedure for a lot of segment of law enforcement. And a common experience for people of color. In your feelings at that time shock humiliation. Also don't get busted for buying beer. I am just recently read the underground Airline. I just kind of wanted you guys have thoughts on telling the slave narrative if maybe you're not African American or a person of color cuz it's I didn't realize that it had been written by a white man. And then I sort of had a back track of hm. I'm not sure the book on airlines is a sort of alternate history about the railroad and written by a very nice wait individual named Ben Winters and Jack. So can you write about people who aren't you? I'm a male writing with a female character people say she seems realistic. I think if you use your m c and intelligence, you can write about anything and then if you fail and criticize like Lionel Shriver or something, you should take the hit and try to do better next time..

writer Ghana Lionel Shriver African American History Museu Sam sifton Mister Whitehead Ben Winters Jack
"whitehead" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"whitehead" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Of our history that draws us closer to the humor. The of those who lived through those times and by doing so they give us a deeper understanding of race in America now, there's our moderator. Rakiya Adams. So we look forward to this conversation. I thought I might start out by telling you what we plan to do will start off with readings by Colson and you will have a conversation for a few minutes and at the end will save some time for questions from the audience. So I thought we'd start with a short reading from both authors. If you don't mind certainly thanks so much for having me. This is the very first page section of the book and I wanted to have a sort of an overture of slavery. So this six-page section. I'm going to be the first page is the life story of a jari or as a grandmother. The first time Caesar approached Cora about running North she said no, this was her grandmother talking whores grandmother had never seen the ocean before that bright afternoon in the palm of WETA and the water dazzled after her time and the force dungeon the dungeon stored them until the ships arrived dahomeyan Raiders kidnapped the men first then back to her Village the next moon for the women and children marching them in Shane's to the see two by two. As you stared into the black doorway a jury thought she be reunited with her father down there in the dark the survivors from our village told her that when her father couldn't keep the pace of the Long March the slavers stove in his head and left his body by the trail. Her mother had died years before Coors grandmother was sold a few times and attract to the Fort passed between slave for glass beads. It was hard to say how much they paid for her and WETA as she was part of a bulk purchase 88 human Souls 460 crates of rum and Gunpowder the price of life upon after the standard haggling in Coast English able-bodied men and childbearing women fetched more than juveniles making an individual accounting difficult. The ship was out of Liverpool and made two previous stops along the Gold Coast the captain staggered his purchases rather than find himself with cargo of singular culture and disposition who New Age kind of what brand of mutiny his captives might cook.

America WETA Shane Cora Colson Rakiya Adams Gold Coast Coors Coast English Liverpool Raiders Caesar
"whitehead" Discussed on Exvangelical

Exvangelical

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"whitehead" Discussed on Exvangelical

"Hi. I'm Blake chastain and this powers and principalities. The show focuses on the systems and institutions that prop up evangelical power and influence in. America and the world season one is focused on evangelicalism and Christian nationalism. This is episode three. I guess this week, our Sam Perrin Andrew Whitehead they're the CO authors of the book taking America back. God. Christian nationalism and the United States. Salmon Andrew are both professors of sociology and their work takes a look at how Americans relate to Christian nationalism as ambassadors accommodate. Resistors, or reject. Through sociological study, they have been able to quantify some of the harder to describe aspects of Christian nationalism and also discuss why it can be helpful to distinguish Christian nationalism from White Evangelical Ism even though there is considerable overlap. This conversation may also help you understand some of the people you know in your own life, how they relate to Christian nationalism and whether they can be swayed politically or socially. If you'd like to support the show. Please do so by telling people about it, leaving a rating a review on Apple podcasts and signing up for paid subscription to myself stack newsletter to post evangelical. Listeners can get twenty five percent off a subscription by visiting the Lincoln the show notes. If I receive a hundred subscribers, I could dedicate more time to bringing you content and even expand my coverage. You can follow me on twitter at Biard chastain and on Instagram at B. R. Chesting core without further Ado let's get to this conversation. My guest today are Andrew Whitehead Associate. Professor of sociology UPI and Sam Perry associate professor of Sociology and Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma. They are the CO authors of the book taking America. Back, for God Christian nationalism in.

America Sam Perrin Andrew Whitehead Blake chastain Andrew Whitehead associate professor of Sociolo White Evangelical Ism Biard chastain Professor of sociology Sam Perry United States University of Oklahoma B. R. Chesting
"whitehead" Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

The Roots of Leadership Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"whitehead" Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

"Welcome to the roots of leadership with Anthony. Grupo. Sometimes, when you walk into room and you meet your guest. There always impressive people but today. You're about to hear from gentleman. Who's going to press everyone that's listening today. This is to hear Whitehead. He is the NFL great who plays for the Oakland Raiders linebacker position to hear welcome to the show with Anthony. Thanks for having me You Bet here. So Great Avenue. So, to hear you know you had. Already eight years are going to your nine year in the NFL This will be year eight into my Avia eighth year. Yes. Sir, and you know you've already achieved well past with many athletes ever aspire to. You play. In the big game. In a tough tough setting. When it first started to happen for you. What was that feeling to here? Man I. Thought. It was a bunch of films you know I I was. Confused just in all just honored, it was so many things that just enter my mind because I never thought that I'd have the opportunity you know never ebay. It wasn't even a dream of mine to make it to this level but. I think. It was. I was I was on it was extremely honored to be able to play you know at the at the biggest level. You said something right off the bat that so. So impactful to share that with the listeners. In Leadership Whether whatever your role is and many of your listeners that are here today are. And, various. Professions and. Working in different roles. When to hear when you said you know I was confused I was honored I was excited. That's what many people feel every time they're cheating something new. Tell us about your background. So you're in New York New York New Jersey Guy Ed. is just fantastic the work you do with inner city, but but tell how was like growing up for you. Know.

Whitehead Anthony New York New Jersey New York Oakland Raiders
Dunkirk Awards

Filmspotting

06:36 min | 1 year ago

Dunkirk Awards

"Welcome to film spotting, we will get to our Nolan Review Awards. Later in the show, we might have an for those awards picked out by. Then we might not. We will share our awards for favourite supporting performance and lead performance from this retrospective of the work of Christopher Nolan will also share our picks for best Nolan moment in the overall best moment or seen after we have revisited all ten of Nolan's films and that will culminate with our Christopher Nolan rankings. The definitive Christopher ranking for each of us one to ten will there be some shifting Adam Gimme a tease. Shifts definitely from the last time, I posted a Nolan ranking on letterbox. There's been some movement Yep me too one I think you'll like I don't know if you'll like it enough, but you will like it I though the World War Two movie from Christopher Nolan that we didn't know we needed dunkirk. The enemy tanks stop. Why? Why waste precious tanks when they can pick from the. Barrel. Their full hundred thousand men only speech. Your position. Josh, coming into this rewatch was that done kirk is Christopher, Nolan's best film and there's at least one longtime listener and regular commentator who agrees with you that we are culminating this overview triumphantly with the filmmakers greatest achievement Adam Grossman in Vancouver says like many of us. I've completed my Christopher Nolan Review. Biggest takeaway hoover is a really hard were dispel. Well, second takeaway. I've decided dunkirk is Nolan's career highpoint while my heart loves interstellar the most good on you Adam and I. Hugely Admire. and. The Dark Knight for what they meant to Action Cinema and Superhero movies respectively dunkirk is his masterpiece got laid down for you tenant. I just don't know how anyone could argue that the legend of dunkirk could be told any better the setup and the first eight minutes alone from the falling paper from the sky to the distress. Cry of where's the bloody air force is a wonder of a short film. In itself, the lack of dialogue works perfectly for what this movie wants to achieve with. Hans. Zimmer's relentless scored doing all the audio work that's necessary among all the chaos. There are frequent moments of grace. Kenneth. Branagh face as Commander Bolton as the cavalry arrives in the form of the civilian vessels the empathy as Peter Tells Killian Murphy's PTSD soldier. The young George will be okay and no moment more than the shot. Be Okay and no more than a shot of Tom Hardy's planes silently gliding over the beaches of dunkirk knowing his job has been done. dunkirk is also uniquely Christopher Nolan Movie One where his signature use of time has never melded together better and more cohesively than it does in the final twenty minutes of this film while Dunkirk will understandably never be a wholly enjoyable or easy rewatch. It's one that gets richer and richer with repeat viewing. Now, Adam Mention Nolan signature use of time, and that is one aspect of dunkirk among others that certainly connects to his entire body of work. But there are other aspects that Mark Dunkirk is unique. It is only film that is based on historical events, which means it is inherently rooted in the past and yet I'd argue it is only film that truly feels present tense meeting there are no. Dead parents or wives or forsaken children or other tragic events haunting the air's barrier played by Tom. Hardy the Moles Army private Tommy fiene whitehead or for the most part the sees Mr Dawson played by Mark Rylance like all Nolan protagonist there's plenty of personal sacrifices on display but no guilt no sense of futility about toning past actions just the seemingly futile need to survive the current event that they. Are Tragically experiencing here's something else that argues unique about dunkirk as we every other commentator on Dolan's work is discussed in some form or fashion for all those dead parents and wives and foresaken children. There's nothing so emotional or borderline sentimental in any of his previous films as the climax of inception and yes, mileage may vary there which led to interstellar and not only mcconaghy's crushing breakdown watching twenty three. Years Worth of miss video messages from his family but the verbalize message love is the one thing we're capable of proceeding that transcends dimensions of time and space. Maybe we should trust that even if we can't understand it, it's hard to imagine any character in previous Christopher Nolan movies saying something like that which led to Dunkirk am I crazy josh this is his most blatantly sentimental and even heart film. And if so is that what establishes Dunkirk as his best its balance of coldness the sober portrayal of the hell of war of life in the misguided choices, some men will make when facing death with warmth. In the compassionate inspiring choices some men will make to maintain a way of life. So a lot of subtleties in that question and you're onto something so you're not crazy I think I would distinguish. The word blatantly, I. Don't think this is blatantly emotional or moving, but I do think you're onto something in the fact that it is maybe his most heartwarming in where it ends up and let me kind of try to parse those. You're right as long as the Nolan Canon has convulsing McConnell. Interstellar is going to be his most blatantly emotional I mean you can't have a scene like that without registering that on it surface. That's his most emotional movie. But I will also say that I find Dunkirk to be his most emotionally affecting movie maybe even more. So than inception, which we about how I did find that very moving especially in the character of Mal. So yet dunkirk is really a unique thing even as it's working within the strands and trends that we have been tracing in Nolan's other films, I. Think the heartwarming aspect is probably a part of that. You've nailed it there in that it brings us to a place that. Is One of Constellation and I think it's earned because I think up until that point we have just been suffering alongside all of these other characters in so many ways and we've also been recognizing as the movie does that this is You know a an account of a military failure, a huge defeat and so for the movie to kind of offer, some sort of solace at the end of that I think is. In proportion and well

Christopher Nolan Dunkirk Mark Dunkirk Adam Grossman Nolan Canon Tom Hardy Josh Hoover Action Cinema Zimmer Hans Kenneth George Moles Army Tommy Fiene Whitehead Vancouver Branagh Dolan Kirk
Trump administration orders hospitals to stop sending COVID-19 data to the CDC

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Trump administration orders hospitals to stop sending COVID-19 data to the CDC

"Hospitals to stop sending data about the Corona virus to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta from member station W. A. B Sam Whitehead reports facilities have been told to direct that information to a new federal database. The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the CDC has created its own system to collect data on hospital bed capacity, staffing and the availability of personal protective equipment. Dr Robert Redfield leads the CDC. No one is taking access or date away from CDC having the fastest possible access to data as very real benefits for our public health response, the CDC had collected that data through a national network of thousands of healthcare facilities, but HHS officials say that old system was too slow. I'll use their new system to make decisions about where to send resource is like supplies and covert 19 treatments for NPR

CDC Dr Robert Redfield U. S. Department Of Health And W. A. B Sam Whitehead Atlanta HHS NPR
Georgia Gov. Kemp: Mask Mandate Not Needed Amid Virus Spike

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Georgia Gov. Kemp: Mask Mandate Not Needed Amid Virus Spike

"In Georgia. The total number of coronavirus cases has risen above 100,000 but Georgia's governor says he won't require people to wear face coverings from member station W A. B E E Sam Whitehead reports. Georgia has routinely added thousands of New Covad 19 cases to its official count over the last week. Corona virus Hospitalizations air also up, but Governor Brian Kemp says he doesn't think it's necessary to require people to wear face masks in public to slow the spread of infections. Kemp says Georgians don't need a mandate to do the right thing.

Brian Kemp Georgia Sam Whitehead Covad Official
In Jazz-Movie Endings, Some Story Elements Just Keep Bouncing Back

Fresh Air

04:51 min | 1 year ago

In Jazz-Movie Endings, Some Story Elements Just Keep Bouncing Back

"One cable this month Turner classics is presenting a series of movies with jazz connections as it happens our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead has a new book about movies that tell jazz stories so we invited him to talk a little about the subject in the first of two segments he looks at what he calls the stock jazz movie ending a basic plot element subject to many variations here's Kevin over ninety some years of movies about jazz some plot points and story elements keep coming back we see young musicians had been meant toward by African American elders who work basement clubs and want to play the way they feel when the man just wants him to play the music is written it's the movies so there are romantic complications sometimes tied to divergent musical tastes such problems may be resolved in a version of the stock jazz movie ending a big New York concerts or parties at odds are reconciled it turns up by nineteen thirty seven in the romantic comedy champagne waltz Fred MacMurray plays a saxophonist who turns old Vienna onto jazz killing business at the waltz palace next door and wrecking Fred's romance with the waltz kings are pressing her granddaughter in the end they're all on stage in New York romantic and musical differences are resolved is gigantic jazz and classical orchestras mash on a swinging the classics mashup of tiger rag in the blue Danube it's kitchen music clear storytelling symbolizing the wedding to come in the nineteen thirty eight Irving Berlin song fast Alexander's ragtime band moving the reconciliation between bandleader and singer to Carnegie Hall the gold standard for classy venues in the movies that template came back with minor variations for decades in nineteen forty sevens the fabulous Dorsey's battling brother bandleaders Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey playing themselves patch up their feud just long enough to play a double concerto just as the real Dorsey's cooperated long enough to make the movie a couple of months later came the film in New Orleans with the most over the top New York concert ending which clears the way for an opera singer Merion jazz Booker at Symphony Hall the singer acquire three pianos the Philarmonic orchestra and woody Herman's big band all cram onstage to murder the film's instant hit song which we've already heard Billy holiday do rather better the New York concert capital turns up through the nineteen fifties a jazz movie tradition as in the Benny Goodman story or St Louis blues or WC handy's disapproving people finally accept as blues music once performed in concert alongside Mozart and Mendelssohn more variations came later in nineteen seventy twos lady sings the blues after an analyst U. S. tour Diana Ross as Billie Holiday is finally allowed to play New York again at Carnegie with violence the real holiday did play Carnegie Hall but without the fiddles in twenty sixteen Nina is always held on as Nina Simone who's been living in better French exile plays a free concert in Central Park and discovers her people still love her reconciling Nina Simone and America no reconciliation ending has grander implications

Turner
The Evolution of ML  and Furry Little Animals

Talking Machines

08:58 min | 1 year ago

The Evolution of ML and Furry Little Animals

"You are listening to talking machines Catherine Gorman Lawrence and Neil. We are again taping an episode in front of a live audience digitally recorded though on on talking machines. And if you want to be part of our live. Studio audience big quotes. You can follow us on twitter at Ti Okay. N. G. M. C. H. S. Or hit us up on the talking machines at gmail.com and our guest today for this interview on talking. Machines is Dr Terence. Annouce key doctors and thank you so much for taking the time to join us today. I really appreciate it Great to be here so we ask all of our guests the same question I. How did you get where you are? What's been your academic and industrial journey. You're also very involved in the reps conference. Tell US everything well. A wise man once told me that careers are only made retrospectively and I have no idea how he got here. There was no plan. It went through a sequence of stages starting with graduate school at Princeton in theoretical physics. From there when I finished that I for reasons that have to do with the field of physics. At the time which was a little bit more bummed I went into neuroscience so that was a post doc and then from there that's when I met. Geoffrey Hinton and had changed my life because we met him at a small seminar here in San Diego and set nineteen seventy nine. We hit it off and From that over the next few years you know blossoms the the Boehner Sheen and back prop and you know. The rest was history. Terry who you post talking with where you post talking in San Diego no no. This was a post doc at Harvard. Medical School in the Department of Neurobiology with Stephen Kofler who was widely considered to be the founder of modern neurobiology and It was an experimental post. Doc I actually recorded from neurons. Subic seventy nine. You mentioning physics. It was a little bit more bond a in some sort of connection modeling. That was also a very quiet period. That wasn't a lot going on it. Was this sort of age of classical. Ai Right you're absolutely right. This was in fact. It was the neural network winter. The seventies and it was primarily because of the failure of the perception. That's neat because you say failure of the percents on I read about that a lot. Do you really did fail. All was the men's ski paper little. What the mid ski books are in Minsk. Eighty books have killed it but was it a fair representation. Well you know it's interesting. I think that that's the myth that that book killed it but I actually think that there are other things going on and and Rosenblatt had died as well which seems pretty significant. Yes well He. He was a pioneer. But you have to understand that digital computers were regally primitive back. Then you know that even the most expensive you know the biggest computers you could buy. Don't have the power of your wristwatch today. Rosenblatt actually had to build an analog device. It a million dollars in today's dollars to build a analog device that had potentially otters driven by motors for the weight sums the learning. Wasn't it potentially because you know digital computers? Were good at logic but they were terrible. Doing a floating point is amazing so he built that at Cornell. Right that's right yeah Funded by the owner. Any case by by the time that we were getting started computers was the vaccine era. It was becoming possible. Do Simulations You know they were small-scale by today's standards but but really meant we could explorer in a way that Frank Rosenblatt couldn't so what you're saying around the perceptual and so just forbid of context for Central and sixty one. Is that right? It was fifty nine. I think it was the book but you know it was in that era of early sixty zero and so then there's this period where the digital computer actually wasn't powerful enough to do much and then digital kind of overtook and divinity but these analog machines would just now impractical from a point of view of expense. So you're saying it's less the book and more of a shift to the Digital Machine. That in those early days wasn't powerful enough to simulate the perception. Yes so I I have you know. I have a feeling that history will show that A. I was like the blind man looking under the Lamppost. His keys and someone came along and said where did you lose your keys He said well somewhere else. But this is the only place right can see. I was reading Donald BACI quote. I recently At the beginning of his book about the I which is just a fascinating area and I guess he spent a lot of his career and he did work in in the wool on radar and he was talking about the Radio Club. Which is these early Cybernet assist and the potential of the analog or digital computer to be what represented the brain and his perspective was he. He was sure it wasn't a digital computer and he wasn't sure it was an analog computer either and he thought it was kind of somewhere in between but it feels like that in between is what you're saying is that was the difficult bit to look and perhaps a police were able to look now. That's right I you know. It's I think it's being driven. This is true all science that what you cannot understand is is really determined by the tools that you have for making measurements for doing simulations in it's really only this modern era that has given us enough tools both to make progress with understanding how the brain works and also with a because of the fact that we have a tremendous amount of power now but just to go back to that early era. I think you know I once asked L. Annual you know who is at Carnegie Mellon and it was a time when Geoff Hinton was an assistant professor and I was at Johns Hopkins and I you know he was at the first fifty six meeting at Dartmouth or a I was born and I I said well. Why was it that you didn't look at the brain and for for inspiration and he said well we did. But there wasn't very much known about the at the time to help us out so we just had make doing our own and he's right. That was a era. You know the the fifties was kind of the the beginning of what we now understand about the signals in the brain. Actually potential synoptic potentials. So you know in a sense. What what he was saying was that we basically use the tools we have available the time which was basically computers but what they were good at. What were they good at? They were good at logic at rules. A binary programming. So that you know that was In a sense they were forced to do that. That's a really. WanNa come back to nine hundred seventy nine in a moment but this is an interesting context to that because of course. Vena initially was someone who spread across. Both these areas of Norbert Vena who was at mit founded cybernetics spread across both these areas of the analog and digital he did his PhD thesis on Russell and Whitehead's book but one thing I was reading about recently is there was a big falling out between Vina. I'm McCulloch Pitts. And it's sort of interesting. That Vena wasn't there at the I. E. T. in fifty six and I sometimes wonder was that more about personalities and wanting this sort of old guard to stay away because you always feel veto with someone who who bridge these worlds it. You know that's the fascinating story. I actually wrote a review of a book about Warren McCulloch came up. They were friends. They actually had had been friends yet. It has something to do with their wife's. Yeah I think the lifestyle McCullough was not line with its a side story but but I guess the point you're making which I think is an I'd like us to take us back to seventy nine and the meeting with Jeff is and I think that that's true. Despite the story between humans the real factor that drove things then was the sudden available at a t of increasing cheap digital computer. And no longer the need to do this work that Rosenblatt and McCain and others had done having to wire together a bunch of analog circuits. That you couldn't reprogram to build system. Yeah I think that was a dead. End It for the very reason you gave. Which is that you know you. It's a special purpose device. That isn't good for anything else. And and really if you're trying to explore you need the flexibility of being able to try many ideas and that's in that really is a digital simulation allows you to

Frank Rosenblatt Geoffrey Hinton San Diego Norbert Vena Twitter Catherine Gorman Lawrence Dr Terence Subic N. G. M. C. H. S. Harvard Minsk Boehner Sheen Warren Mcculloch Princeton Cornell Donald Baci Terry Mcculloch Pitts