22 Burst results for "White Society"

"white society" Discussed on VS

VS

05:28 min | 8 months ago

"white society" Discussed on VS

"A light. It remains a women's dormitory. In some cases, now having housed several generations of students from the same family. Its carved staircase was sent from Sierra Leone by a former student, and an Appleton hall on the first floor, a portrait by Edmund havel of the singers who toured Europe, still Hanks, a gifted commission from the monarch who never quite looked them in the eyes. In the middle of the portrait, taller than the others stands the oldest member of the group. An established singer when he joined, loudon's debut at fisk was a triumph. His name should be mister loud man. He has a wonderful voice and seems a man of some experience. Mister white asked him if he thought he could stand being flattered and praised for one year. Mister louden thought seriously for a moment, then replied, he did not know, but he hoped so. Very different indeed from jubilee singers, replies. Loudon had been shut out of white society at every turn of his early life in the United States. He was born free and excelled as a student in his hometown of Ravenna, Ohio. In fact, loudon was at the top of his high school class, which led the parents of his white classmates to.

Appleton hall Edmund havel Mister white Sierra Leone Hanks Mister louden loudon fisk Europe Loudon Ravenna United States Ohio
"white society" Discussed on Time for an Awakening

Time for an Awakening

07:55 min | 9 months ago

"white society" Discussed on Time for an Awakening

"Specifically how you appear and religion and having a white savior hold that please psyche. Thank you. All right, thank you, brother Marcus. And definitely we'll do that. Definitely. That is absolutely right. We are functioning based upon white narratives. And those narratives won't be accepted as being true, we turn ourselves against ourselves. I think the best example of the power of who control narratives is when you study the history of the European Jews. The Europeans, first of all, they were never Jews and slaves in Egypt. That's a fairytale. When they created the Bible, they created a fictional story of Jews coming to actors out of Egypt. They never happened. But here's the deal. So although the Jews merely converted to Judaism, there are no way to connect it to the hebrews. They're not connected to the Hebrew of ancient times. These are Lake converse to Judaism. But what they did, what they did was they created this narrative that they are the Jews. They impose that. Right. And then you jump in your condo driver and you see buildings, communities, synagogues, you would see billions of dollars these people have built based upon the narrative that it's narrative don't have to be true to some people function based upon them. All that matters is the people who receive the narrative, believe that they're true. So groups, the white society, feeds false narratives into society. And society function based upon it. You know, when you come from the lowest, you can't teach that damn history. You can not teach if you come from the lowest. You can't teach the history that history. Because when you pick that true history, it's undermines your position of dominance. It undermines it. So the white man can't teach you his true history. I've had living in case of how a barbarian he was. So he whitewashes up a pair more relevant, more significant and more humane to our history than if we were. And people and people function based upon that. Wipe their minutes of white people walk around with a false sense of superiority. White supremacy. Right. We have to understand how people function offer them narratives. Okay. One thing early, I think, request for someone said earlier. I never say things like most black people are know what it has going on. I never say that. And I never say that because I have to be honest with myself that I don't know the I don't know anything about the collective city of black people other than what the white man gives me. And I know that the white man has always wanted to give me an image of my people that makes white supremacy stronger. I did a whiteness also and give me an image of my people that she took the moralize to just make the trust easier to control. I know good information is coming from. Now, ask yourself this. Every negative narrative that black people president believes on themselves can't either directly or indirectly from the white society. Right. No, anyone listening right now answer this question. When in history of the white society, earn the blind trust of black people. And when in history, did the white society ever earn the credibility to equally control all black narratives. You never lie about black people for 500 years. Right. And black people, they socialize to continue believing what they say. And we can accept in the lies, although they've been doing exact same thing for 500 years. Let me tell you, I think a good time to come back on and talk about what brother Marcus is talking about is next month. Easter. Easter. Let's get this caller in. I hope this is my good friend from across the pond. Is this brother Paul? I'm alive and kicking. Are you being there? Are you in a while? You sound great. Good. Good to hear. Every day I get another day and I get to breathe this beautiful ear and I get to see the sun. I know I'm alive and that's all I need but obviously that's right. That's confirmation just about. And if you're still alive, man, you can still do the work. You still have to. Anything else that I see another day. And if I see a double down, I'm healthy and strong, I will do better. That's it. As simple as that. Right on. Good to hear from you, brother. Yeah. And I ain't got much time, so I'm going to make it quick. You know, I like to think I'm now 51 years of age biology. And I've been doing this thing a long time, studying our people, observing, listening to the rhetoric. In my research, reading books, et cetera, sex et cetera. The point on that right now, I realized a long time ago, we are under attack, we're under severe attack. I'd just like to put my brother Franklin and maybe we can do with it another time because I know he's a soldier, next soldier. I'm saying to him, this is my point and the way I see it right now. We can search to know what the enemy is doing. Can regurgitate it. We can verbally masturbate it. We can do everything we want to do. But at the end of the day, as an ex soldier, he must know through the threats with all the cross examinations with everything he studied, learning objective is to come back alive. Now, the point is, right? Many of us are not coming back alive. Many of us are contributing to our own death, many of us are committing suicide. Many, many, many. So with all the. Feeding, we know that we must know the end of the day, we still dying. Be kind, big, big, big time. So I want to know from him. And maybe next time, when he comes on, tell us how we stop this attack, how we can come back alive, how we can stop committing suicide, how we can stop selling drugs to our brothers, to kill our brothers and sisters, how we can stop selling out one another. That's what I want to know. We can survive this because we ain't surviving it. We are under a serious serious effect. These are two years, right? Some of us, I hope people come in the radius and to go and get an injection. I've heard that, right? And these people call yourself conscious. They tell us to go to this devil and take these injections. I heard that. Thank you for a lot of content as far as I'm concerned. They pretended or they lost it in their pretending that they're conscious. They're pretending that they know something they don't. How can you, after this devil's history, tell me to go and get an injection from this devil? You're not right. You're telling me that. You're not right, just pretended. And this is where we're at. Let's stop pretending. Let's stop pretending. Part these people come on the radio, telling me that they're conscious and telling me to go and get an injection from this devil with its history. If a history of white class art. This is where we're at. We can broadly masturbate all we want are right as many books as we want. We are under severe attack and it hasn't stopped just getting worse. Right. I wanted him to tell us when he comes back on. How we can stop this attack and how we can survive. Because he's an ex soldier and he knows we're all a verbal garbage, right? Everything in the end is that you come back alive. Come back, because if you haven't got your life, you haven't got nothing. A million of us are just committing suicide. Take care. All right, brother. Thank you, brother, Paul. I appreciate you man. Thank you for listening. Please continue to listen and call brother Paul. Oh yeah, brother, Franklin. When I was a trainer, I could make a.

white society Egypt Marcus Paul Franklin
"white society" Discussed on Time for an Awakening

Time for an Awakening

08:20 min | 9 months ago

"white society" Discussed on Time for an Awakening

"Were from an African perspective. When you look through that scenario, there's an African who only speaks only a European language to go African language. You know, if you saw it, a European only spoke African language, you would not be saying, this guy ain't right. You would know that that's his mind that being under the ideology of another people, his mind would be distorted. But when you come to the reality, we do millions of Africans throughout the Diaspora, that is our reality. All of the narratives we receive come from the white society. And the wife society had false narratives that exalt themselves and marginalize us. Then they imposed that narrative upon it as fact. And then we function based upon it. That was social science behind the power. You know, social scientists learned and I can fix that by constantly inundating black people with fraud and negative matter, but ourselves and fraudulent favorable narratives by the caucasians, they couldn't still a value system into the collective minds of black people that serve and protect the system of white supremacy. You know, the reality is these kids being white man, the Neanderthal. They control the media industry we see 24/7. The narrative that we hear, if someone don't think that they're using it monopoly to shape our minds in ways that benefit themselves, then they are delusional. They are delusional. They don't understand our true reality. You know, one of the greatest tricks the white man has done to the black man is manipulate black people to believe that there are in fact many truths. And everyone's entitled to their own troops. This sounds good when you say that. But there's such Internet rule when it comes to the old premise. The oppressed must function based upon an accurate understanding of the applied condition because if our understandings are flawed, can all remedies attempt to lose understanding what else we applaud. So the white man has lots of disinformation into our communities. And this information is designed to keep our understanding flawed. And because our understanding is for we can't liberate ourselves. You see, if everything is a social science, that's being deployed against that. And a white man uses monopoly over information against black people. Most people don't hear about the current commission, for example. The confidence. But when we read or hear about the critical mission, we're hearing the narrative from the white man. Who distorts the narrative to always benefit themselves. But the current commission, what was really done, they studied the African American culture. And the side of what they needed to do to control black people. And doing slavery, as we know, the utilize the Bible to make the enslaved black people by indoctrinating a black, a white God into the African mind. And this made the African more subservient towards white and therefore into better slaves. Because you have to think what the indoctrination does, black people are taught to this white dot above everyone. You need to support to love this white God, more than you love your children, lord, you love your wife, your husband, like yourself. Now when you indoctrinate that type of adoration towards a white dot into the minds of black people, that's going to affect how they perceive themselves and how they perceive white. You know? And see, the fact that they have developed this religion of Christianity and an imposed it on the world, in particularly on to us. And how they've done it. It's most crippling. I think that doctor Clarkson at best is that, you know, the damage that they have done aside from the physical captivity of us and physical enslavement of us is and the colonization, but they call it information about the world and they shape it in fashion in their image and in their interests at the expense of all humanity. And many people around the world believe whatever the hell caucasians say. You know. Two years ago, I would like to tell you guys, go remember, they found these bodies of Native Americans in Canada. They would still remotely mature when they were 200 grades like and they were buried 200 bodies were buried. And these were even Native Americans to be European. Right. Many of these people are still alive. And they were there to explain how they were taken from their homes and placed into these white government places. And they said, they would teach them. Right, these boarding schools. They took them from their families and put them into a boarding school. So they had them 24/7. But when you listen to those people, it's just up there. 80 years old and 79 and talking about it. And at the place, they would teach them that they were savages. That their personal belief is evil. And they should only be Christians. And they were teaching them that they were ugly. That they were now, here's a D amount. This is an institution. This is the government teaching these Native Americans in Canada to believe that this particular system is lesser to believe that they're ugly to believe that their curse. So when you see what these people what was done to the Native Americans in Canada, you have to, we have to pull back to recognize is a deliberate social science. It's a delivery central science. And I'm going to show if you go to Canada, for example, and you meet the black population, or if you go to the UK and you encounter by populations, you go anywhere and you encounter black populations, you will find the same symptoms, existing among the black communities, where black people think we're our own where enemies, then we bear caucasians in spite of the blue history to the contrary. Now, when you see everyone you're going, I used to the same mindset I'm on black people. It's because the same programming is being employed against us all. And in 19 see, your most correct because the bottom line is when you want to understand, it's not about being German, Italian, Irish, any of those things is caucasians. And they have the one agenda for them to dominate and control. And so whenever you go and wherever they are and we are, in fact, Bobby Wright said it best. This defines all laws of probability wherever they are and we are, they're in a position of dominance and control and we're up in your position. And with that dominant they control the narrative. I mean, you refer to us as fitted to me and I always stick to my head. You set out in power, is the ability to create your own self serving narratives and pulls those narratives upon another people. And then have those people accept them. Exactly. Have them accepted. That's the social science with the white man has done. But all the information he gives us tells us that we ain't shit. And he's everything. And they've been posing our planet those narratives. And we see we start to function with those narratives, and we don't realize.

white society Canada Clarkson Bobby Wright UK
"white society" Discussed on Time for an Awakening

Time for an Awakening

05:59 min | 9 months ago

"white society" Discussed on Time for an Awakening

"Before I get to my guests, brother Franklin Jones, the black people matrix. It was not the day of death until Julius Caesar ignored the soothsayers warning, because march really is the beginning of the year. In the eyes of March was celebration, that was a celebration of the 15th of March. And it's logical that in this hemisphere the northern hemisphere that particularly in the areas where there is the four seasons that spring would be the beginning of the year because things begin to be brought forth, life begins to spring open so forth. After the winter time or hibernation time or whatever, but it became the day of death because of Julius Caesar's ignoring the warning of the soothsayer of the cater of the psychic, saying to him, don't go up in the Senate, dude, 'cause they ain't feeling you. Okay? But of course he ignored it and cassius and Brutus was laying in the cut, and they jump out and stab him, I don't know, 20 some times whatever. I don't know. Just started digging on. And of course, at that time, Cleopatra the 7th, who was trying to deal with Julius Caesar and of course she had a baby by him. And which is the Syrian where we get the words to Syrian section, you know, because she wanted to save kemet. That's one thing I must add, even though she was not African, she was part of the ptolemies, the Greeks that came in, but because of the mixing, I'd say she looked like a high yellow sister. You know? Because of the. Amount of Africa that we're still in chemist and always will be in kemet. You know, regardless, I ain't just talking about them. You know, the nubians and the Africans that are presently encompass in Egypt today, you know, that's because I just saw another piece about where the Africans were ancient Egyptians black. Hell yeah, they was. Yeah. That's why I love that great pyramid K 2019. And that's why all of you should watch it. Again and again, because. It's substantiates what we're talking about in terms of who built a pyramids us Africans, toxic and people. And how they were built. They went, we went dragonstone. That's literally impossible to drag. Ten, 20 tons of stone. How much is a ton? 2000 pounds. Exactly, that's a lot. So anyway, let's get on with this conversation with brother Franklin Jones, the black people's matrix, and of course my good brother Franklin Jones always brings us great information. Good morning, dear brother. How are you? Good morning, my brother. I'm fantastic. I'm always fantastic to build your program. Thanks for having me. Oh man, you bet. You bet. So how have you been? You've been doing okay? Fantastic. Good. Fantastic. You know, matter of fact, I did a total lifestyle change two months ago. I became a vegan. Right on. I know. I was talking with you about that, and I'm very happy for you. I'm proud of you, man. You know, once again, it says these life changes at the age that we are coming to get older and so forth are necessary if we want to live longer. And if we're in four to fight for our liberation, we want to be here as long as we can. That's right. Because see, this is not a sprint. This is the marathon. You know? And so we got to be here, you know, I look at it this way, brother, a brother, Franklin. I want to be here, at least to see that our people have waken up and more and more are waking up. And we're moving in that particular direction. You know, that's why I'm dedicated to doing what I'm doing. You know, because not all of us are lost. Not all of us have fallen victim to Uruguay. You know, there's a lot of us. There's definitely a lot of us, unfortunately, but not all of us. You know what, it's really tricky. There are millions of us that are awake, but the ideology of the awakened is that being given an actual platform. Right. So it creates this illusion that we're all asleep and then what they do is they take the most ignorant amongst us and they propagate that to the media to create a source of the people we are. I think a good example of that is in America the millions of African Americans who hate the N word and never use it. Right, that's me. That's me. Among the African American culture, that group, they're being ignored by the white media controllers who control our media images. And so they keep making out these movies where we're calling off niggas in our music and everything. Right. And it's some of the norm of who we are. You know, the white society has distorted our image of ourselves as well. You know? Well, Francis Chris, you said, we're the only people that celebrate our demented Ness. We call ourselves bitches and hoes and niggers and this and that. You know, exactly. You know? I was thinking, excuse me. I was thinking if there was a European who only spoke an African language. A European who was everything.

Franklin Jones Julius Caesar cassius Brutus Cleopatra Senate Egypt Africa sprint Uruguay Franklin white society Francis Chris America
"white society" Discussed on Angela Yee's Lip Service

Angela Yee's Lip Service

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"white society" Discussed on Angela Yee's Lip Service

"Yeah, my pussy blew it one time. Exactly. I mean, there's been times that I got my ship fucked up and it was swollen after and I was like, no, that's not what the question. 'cause you can't just sit down and be like it was this white society. I need you to agree. I say no. So it's right. All right, the truth is that yes, it does experience. We all don't get no point. They just get all right, so now that's what I'm saying. Fire. Inspired as you asked that and it wasn't like some no brainer shit. It wasn't. Nobody knew except. I just feel like credit for that. We need a point. No, you don't give away. Yes. Y'all gotta agree. All right. Here's the question. True or false? Wearing socks during sex can actually increase your chances of having an orgasm. True, because when your feet are warm, it makes other parts of your body single faster. And that's my story and I'm sticking to it. Jay-Z? Scientifically, I would believe that. Because you know, he escapes from the top and the bottom. So when I get high, I want to take my socks off. So I can imagine keeping my socks on, it's going to make everything hot, like he said, and things people in it. I'm going to say yeah, because every time I look down and my socks doing it. You feel me like the great part all the way up under my heel, you feel me? That makes me happy. I know I'm going. It's about the credits by the roll up in a second. So I'm going to say yeah, too. Skillet, you agree with that? Yeah, because I don't take my socks off. Why? You have a lot of strange habits. How can you not take your pants up during this? It.

white society Jay
"white society" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

04:42 min | 10 months ago

"white society" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"I work on cases where the social workers are extremely traumatized trying to help people and watching people just suffer and get ill and they're the ones that face that collateral damage. So I think what I would say is that if we see that in a capsule and say, in this moment, the only thing to do is send the cops into so we're missing the picture around everything. So how do we reach a point where those children were there at that store? How do we reach a point where kids feel that they need to rob a store, whatever that is for money because they don't have anything else to do. How do we reach a point where you have low paid employees that are put in the position of defending stock and product? What if we imagine something different? What if everybody had a living wage and people didn't feel the need to commit crimes for money? There's other, there's so many other solutions and it's so broad that when you start getting into them. And I know that people will be listening to saying, well, after that, that's ponies and fairy dust, but it's not. It's actually practical. It is practical. Because I sure didn't get bored and be like, you know, what I really want to do with my life. I think I want to rob liquor stores, you know? I want to be a doctor. I don't want to be a lawyer. I don't want to be an entertainer now, you know, you know what sounds good. Robbie, liquor stores. That's not what happens. It doesn't happen in the black community. It's not that these are our dreams. These are things that happen to us because of specific historical forces that have brought us to where we are because of how we're treated in school because of sexual trauma because of abuse in our communities caused by white supremacy and colonialism. They are complex things. And we need the resources to begin addressing them to heal each other to get competent mental healthcare that works within our cultures to bring back our elders and our forms of knowledge to bring back our ways of living together. Those are things that are lost in the black community too. And it isn't a surprise when we have alienated young people as a result when they go to schools that criminalize them and police them when they're told from the minute they step into the white society that they're worth less that they don't deserve anything that they're just born to be a criminal, I just don't think that we contain it in one moment. We have to look at the whole history. And say, what would fix that situation so the employees can be safe and so those children can be safe as well. Yeah. When I said earlier, policing is your first sort of point of contact in your journey through the justice system. It's also like if you're at that point in policing, it's also the end. Of a lot of things that should have happened to prevent that moment. So that history, that history that colonial history, but even just an individual history and that immediacy and things that could have been available for indigenous youth and black youth in particular who are just they just don't have that. So by the time you're getting to the policing point, there's just so many things that could be reimagined. I like that we're just imagine something different. My sister's in some neighborhood, Facebook group, I won't say which neighborhood because anyone out here, but you know she has a lot of white neighbors and they're always like, oh, people came and stole bikes, you know? I was getting mad, but I'm not looking at the wealth divide in Winnipeg, right? We have extremely wealthy. Wellington Crescent where all the extremely wealthy people is turns into streets that run through extremely impoverished areas, right? And I actually, if you're a kid growing up and you see that I can get on the bus and see this huge mansion and I don't have any of it. Maybe I'd rather lick a saw too, right? And I'm not speaking for youth, but I'm saying that social inequality is real. And we'll look at one kind of trespass and say, oh, these kids shouldn't have been doing that. And we won't look at anything else that shouldn't have been done. Yeah. I mean, I think I've said this on the podcast before, but I think it can't be said enough. I mean, what we decide to label a crime because I think just like we racialize, we criminalize certain activity. I mean, wage theft is a huge problem. That's much more massive than petty thefts of a liquor. Bottle from a store. So notwithstanding that, I do think it's fair to say and it seems it's an old thing, right? Society's get the crime. They deserve almost. And we've taken up so much of your time. This has been so enriching. I just wanted to get into, I mean, the report is still relatively fresh. How has the report landed so far with black people with indigenous people with police? Both the institutional form and maybe rank and file officers. I'm just curious about what's the reception been thus far? Well, I think what's interesting is, and as I said, we've strategically on purpose and also because we are academics and law students and grad students that wrote this report. So it wasn't just me writing taria, Julia Rogers, who a PhD student in political studies, and then Harry Critchley, who's now a police commissioner, so he went into the police board as a result of doing a lot of this accountability work..

white society Robbie Winnipeg Wellington Facebook Julia Rogers Harry Critchley
"white society" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

08:12 min | 10 months ago

"white society" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"You're listening to TED Talks daily. I'm your host, Elise Hugh. Entertainment culture, powerfully shapes the public's imagination. It always has. And sometimes an awfully damaging ways. In her 2019 talk from TEDx mid Atlantic, music scholar Juan Rees lays out the lasting impact the arts industry has left by making black people into caricatures for white audiences. Support for ted-talks daily comes from Capital One. Getting paid up to two days early with direct deposit is another reason banking with Capital One is one of the easiest decisions in the history of decisions. Even easier than deciding to listen to another episode of your favorite podcast. And with no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts is it even a better decision? That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet? Terms apply, see Capital One dot com slash bank. Capital One NA member FDIC. TED Talk daily is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet? It works just the way it sounds. You tell progressive how much you want to pay for car insurance. And they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive. Get your quote today at progressive dot com and see why four out of 5 new auto customers recommend progressive. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. When I was ten years old, we traveled from Colorado to New Jersey to visit relatives. A Christmas time. We did a host of a variety of things that I actually got to see the original cast and the whiz and did a lot of sightseeing. But one of my favorite moments was to stay up late at night and wait till everyone else had gone to bed. And then I would sneak downstairs to watch television. A host of old movies that probably had no business watching such as Bonnie and Clyde and Oklahoma. That was a little okay. But I remember one evening come across a show, it was an old movie, and it must have been why Christmas or Holiday Inn of that type. But it was a musical. And I started watching. And then they started to do this musical scene. And I noticed I saw Bing Crosby and blackface. And I was confused. I couldn't quite understand what the blackface had to do with the singing and dancing. That was my introduction to blackface minstrelsy. Blackface minstrelsy originated in New York and not the south as a lot of people would think in the 1830s. It was an incident where white actors would blacken their faces with burnt cork, paint on bright, red lips, exaggerate the white, so their eyes and put on a tightly coiled wig to create characters of African Americans on the American stage. The typical minstrel show was a parody of black culture, song and dance and speech. Interspersed with stump speeches, jokes, musical interludes, and theatrical skits. The cast included a roster of recurring characters. The interlocutor acted as the MC. You had mister tambo and mister bones, as the in men, then you also had characters like the clownish slave Jim Crow, which was also the name of the Jim Crow laws that we knew in the American south. Or the maternal mammy, a hyper sexualized winch, and arrogant dandy zip coon and the lazy childish sambo. The caricatures were often brutal, but not to the white audiences who laughed at the antics of the illiterate slaves, as they sat secure in their own superiority. The image of the dancing simple minded buffoons captured the public's imagination and spread across the country like wildfire. Blackface minstrelsy grew to be the most popular form of American entertainment in the 19th century. Abraham Lincoln and Mark Twain spoke highly of the American minstrel show, applauding the characterizations and the source of its humor. But just as it entertained, it also dehumanized the subjects of its ridicule. Leaving the abolitionist Frederick Douglass to describe blackface minstrels as, quote, the filthy scum of white society who have stolen from us a complexion denied them by nature. Ironically, after the Civil War, African Americans forged their own careers on the professional stage. The route to success often meant appropriating the mass that was used to mock them. White audiences also embrace black performance in their local communities. These amateur minstrels used instructional guides that provided them with jokes, routines, songs and costumes, they needed to put on their own shows. Such was the habit of politicians, fraternal orders, colleges, high schools, and community performances, who carried on this tradition well into the 20th century. The professional minstrel show left an indelible imprint on the American psyche. The images and racial stereotypes that continued to circulate in American society on sheet music, magazines, books, vaudeville theater, film, vision, radio, records, and all kinds of formats. These stereotypes were powerful reinforcement of the ideas of white supremacy and black inferiority. The news headlines of the last few months have shown us that the legacy of blackface minstrelsy continues to haunt us. In a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, they found that one in three Americans say that blackface is always or sometimes okay if it's used in Halloween costume. So let me ask this question what is the appeal of darkening one's skin in order to impersonate someone of a different race? Blackface minstrelsy was born out of the realities of slavery and racial segregation. And it's a continual reappearance echoes the pain and suffering felt by black people whose bodies and cultures were presented as strange and grotesque. It is a persistent reminder of the racism and prejudices that bred is very existence. The way it infiltrated society is a clear example of how deeply ingrained racism is in this country. And the racial subjugation embodied by blackface menstrual C and perpetuated through a continuum of its history is a form of aggression, a psychic wound that refuses to heal. Racial impersonation of any form can not escape this legacy. So it's time to shift the power of representation to develop more expansive narratives about the rich complexity of who we are as human beings. Acknowledging and recognizing blackface for what it is and what it symbolizes is a step in the right direction. Educating ourselves and how stereotypes reinforce racist ideologies is another. Success in either case depends on an honest self assessment of our social and cultural biases and how they came to be. The legacy of blackface minstrel C is our shared history and requires all of us to take collective responsibility and dismantling its power to oppress and humiliate. The next time you're confronted with someone in blackface or see a racist stereotype, tell me what will you do. Thank you. PRX..

Elise Hugh Juan Rees TED Talk Jim Crow FDIC white society TED Bing Crosby ted Clyde Bonnie New Jersey Oklahoma Colorado Frederick Douglass Mark Twain Abraham Lincoln New York Pew Research Center
"white society" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:32 min | 11 months ago

"white society" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's here and now As the new young adult novel the chosen one opens we meet echo Brown a young black woman in her first semester at Dartmouth as the first person in her family to go to college echo struggles with coarse demands and the burden of expectations both positive and negative It's a subject that the author knows quite a bit about She's a Dartmouth alum in the first woman in her family to graduate from college She's also named echo Brown and she joins us now via Skype Welcome Hi Thanks for having me So you called your character echo Brown in the book You set this novel at Dartmouth and she like you is breaking a lot of new ground for her family in many ways How much of your own experience did you draw from to write this book This book is basically a memoir that's infused with magical realism So a lot of those incidents that happened in the book actually occurred in my life And more than anything I think what the book tries to reach for is the emotional accuracy So the feeling of being out of place of being in this new world of feeling isolated and alone all of that is very accurate to my experience of coming from Cleveland and then going to a place like Dartmouth Right from the beginning we learn that echoes struggles with feelings of inferiority and she says that the college brochures that so piqued her interest promised a diverse environment where she could thrive It wasn't really that way Was it a similar experience for you Yeah you know it was pretty shocking to me because I really believed that I was going to go to this kind of diversity Mecca But when you actually get there you start to get immersed in these different kinds of racial dynamics So the way that people separate you try to figure out which group you belong to If there is a group that you feel like you belong to And for the most part because I was a black student and because I was a poor student a lot of the students there weren't actually from the kind of poverty that I came from even students of color It was really hard for me to find a place for myself And actually I really didn't find a place for myself until I was a senior So the first three years were lonely It was hard and you have to have this kind of mental fortitude to survive in that kind of environment where you feel totally out of place in isolated So I would say more than anything at Dartmouth what I developed was this mental fortitude Echo talks about competing against students who come from schools with unlimited resources She also says that she feels generations behind at Dartmouth Can you explain what she what you meant by that I think you know when you come from a community where you're used to being interacting with people that have graduated from college you're used to being sort of ushered on this path this collegiate path toward college You have an understanding of what that environment is going to be like before you get there For me I'm really coming from a family where nobody has gone to college Nobody knows what college is like Nobody can inform me of the kind of social cues that I need in order to integrate into this environment So you kind of have to hit the ground running You have to be adept at reading the social cues You have to be a depth at understanding how to pick up academic tools that are going to help you succeed in this environment And so what I mean when I say I'm starting generations behind is just that I didn't have that foundation to teach me those things ahead of time before I got there Yes and you talk about expectations in the book Expectations are a real burden for echo There's a high school guidance counselor who advised her against applying to Dartmouth but they're also the expectations from her family that she'll be the one to succeed that she'll be the one to make the family proud Was that also something that you struggled with as well Of course I mean I think you know it's the burden of feeling like you have to carry your entire family So I made it out of that environment but actually my family still lives in poverty You know what I mean Because I haven't been able to earn enough to pull everybody out So you have this kind of expectation in this burden that you are supposed to be the one to go back and get everybody else out for a lot of us that's just not possible because it's really hard Number one to pull yourself out and it is tremendously difficult to pull your family out And to that point it really struck me in the book that echo always feels watched all the time by her white classmates especially Talk about that Was that something you experienced as well Yeah and I think what I'm really trying to get at it's a couple of things The first thing is I think white society sometimes we have eyes on brown bodies or you're being watched in a store or you can't just move freely through society You kind of feel like there's this watching outsider right That's trying to determine your movements and putting up these limitations of how and where you can move in society And then the second part of that is really about the trauma that I experienced So I'm hypersensitive in that environment because I had come from an environment full of trauma So you have this other level of hypersensitivity where you're always on edge You're always like who's coming after me You mentioned the trauma and that really underscores echo's life in the book She was sexually assaulted as a child It's a difficult question to ask but is that something that you also draw on from your own life Oh of course Yeah and in fact I will say that in the neighborhood I grew up in I don't know a young woman that was not sexually assaulted in terms of my friend group So that's how pervasive it is That's how you know as a child you have to overcome that as well right And that's enough to crush the whole spirit So when you add those other layers of challenges you know you're really fighting an uphill battle It's not just not having money right It's the kind of abuses that you have to survive I mean you have to be so mentally strong One of the most powerful sections to me in the book is where you draw up a line of abuses that were inflicted on echo's ancestors who were slaves and how that abuse runs through the generations to her and to her brothers Can you talk more about what you were trying to portray there Yeah I think what I was getting at there is just the generational nature of pain right So sometimes we say oh alcoholism runs in my family or oh my mother was this way and then so am I and where does that come from in our community Where was the initial impetus for it And I think a lot of this at least for black Americans is you can trace it back directly to slavery right That stuff doesn't just disappear And then how do we stop that How do we heal that How do we have genuine conversations about this stuff without one person feeling attack And so what I'm really trying to get at there is healing the lineage born out of that kind of pain You talk about the mental strength that you have developed and it's so very clear Echo in the book says she often recited the words of doctor Martin Luther King in difficult situations out loud over and over until courage burns were worthlessness once did Do you feel like a different person and even stronger person in the years since you started this journey Oh of course Of course I mean honestly I can't believe I did it You know you look back on all the challenges that you had to overcome And honestly I can't believe that young.

echo Brown Dartmouth Skype white society Mecca Cleveland Brown Martin Luther King
"white society" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on Black History Year

"The system accountable. Well, you need to know your children's teachers, open up that line of communication with them. And let them know that you want. You're interested in the best in your students, getting the best education that they could possibly have. And you are raising a black child and you want that child's child to be affirmed in their blackness. And I think that it's okay to just tell us straight out. I have two children in school. I have a daughter, closing her first year of high school right now. But in 8th grade, she took 8th grade algebra. But she was denied admission to the class initially. And this is after she went through accelerated classes in 6th and 7th grade performed well in those classes and took a course during the summer. She was denied access to it. I was able to go to, you know, after a little back and forth with the school. I was able to go to the civil rights data collection, which is something that anybody can go to. You can Google civil rights data collection, and go to the website. If your toggle is a public school, you can put in that public school, the location. And data will come up about how the school is performing on a variety of metrics. I was able to find out that my child school, which is only 10% white, how the algebra, 8th grade class, that was 50% white. When I took 10% of the total number of students in the school and divided there by three to estimate about how many white students were likely to be in the 8th grade, it turned out that at that school, just about all the white students at the school were taking algebra in the 8th grade. Yet they're denying this class to a qualified black student. And so I present that information to the school. And ask them to explain that. And so they kind of gave them a weak response. But they decided to give my daughter another assessment. She passed those assessment and they let her in the class. But you know, these are sites of things that we have to go through in order to fight against these systems. The administration, mostly white or black at this school. The principle is white, the assistant principle that I was directly communicating with was black. The white principle did reach out to me after that conversation. And said that they need to do better and say that the school had a task force. But my wife served on the committee and one of the meetings that I listened to via Zoom, that same teacher who was actually making the decisions on who to come into the class. She said she was actually on the committee. And the irony is that she was talking about she was social justice warrior at the meeting. But at the same time, they shared a story about another black girl who she said didn't qualify for her class. And that black girl told this teacher that she was an Oreo that she was black on the outside and white on the inside to try to talk their teacher in the getting her in this album class. And that's heartbreaking that we have black children out there that feel like they have to act like their white in order to get into the class that they want that little girl's fighting the best way she knows how. And to her, that's posturing as someone who belongs in the class because she's white on the inside. And the same teacher who denied those girl that right to get in the class and deny my daughter is telling the story as if it's so heartbreaking to her. But at the end of the story, she still doesn't let the girl in the class only thing she did was convince the girl that the standard 8th grade class wouldn't be so bad and that's why that's where she came. That's where she arrived at the end. So, yeah, we got we have a fight. I appreciate you sharing that and unfortunately I believe that that is probably common across the country. So and I think that also gets that point to made about the need for positive affirmation of blackness and black identity in these environments. Are there things that can be done in, say, private Afro central schools that can't be done in public schools? Are there things that public school teachers or administrators can implement in the public school system? So, you know, more black kids can benefit from this type of affirmation. I mean, the reality is that these schools are bending at the will of parents who feel more empowered and feel like they have the agency to tell the school what to do for their kids. And they are, I remember talking to another white teacher who enjoyed talking about diversity. And she was teaching other predominantly black school. Had a lot of leadership and their teachers union. And she said that she's always liked to teach it at schools that work predominantly black. And she hates teaching the predominantly white suburban schools. And I asked her, I asked her why. And she said, because at the suburban schools, every parent thinks their child is gifted. And that kind of yeah, it struck a core with me. It hurt me in a way. Because, you know, I want every black parent to think that their child is gifted. You know? And by her coming to predominantly black schools to get away from the type of parents that put pressure on them that force them to say that their child is give even when they're clearly not thought. And so now she's going to these predominant black schools where our parents are accepting what the school was telling them about their child. I wish everybody would go and say, you know, my child is gifted, proved me wrong. And that's where we have to get. I mean, and that's what we're competing against too, right? I mean, if all the white parents are going in saying that their child is gifted, and they're forcing the school to prove them wrong. We're not fighting the same way, then we are going to put our kids at some of the disadvantage. Psychological disadvantage. I definitely definitely see that. Certain type of demands that white society makes is trained to make certain expectations they have that we have not been encouraged to have. So I can see that. So what if black communities across the board built more black schools and divested from the public education system?.

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"white society" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

It’s All About Health & Fitness

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

"To tell your story. You tell your children your story. That's it. And I always had a black history one on one now at home. I did too. I absolutely did too. And it's important. And I really feel that that has helped my two girls as they navigate in a white society. They're not surprised when stuff happened. You know what I mean? Correct. Correct. Absolutely. You have to do your own sitting down and teaching your story and the impact of how that is on society. And teach them how to maneuver and the other, because like I said, it's not going to be taught in school. No, it's not. And then like you say, I'm black folks. We as black folks, let's face it, as you just said, whether you like it or not, you have to move between communities. You have to move between cultures. You have to know how to operate the world. And I think if you teach your kids at home, they'll have the skills that they have to do that. It's about giving them the skill set to be able to deal and a dual world. Whoever you love being contact with. Exactly. That's exactly what I like that article about the resiliency thing with your kids, you know, I knew that your kids were that way because you all need by example. But even though you didn't home school, I know you charge your kids. You know, all those lessons of walking in your moccasins at home. And then being able to send them out into the community. So they can deal. As you say, as we say, you send them out so they can deal. And everybody knows what that means. Exactly. That's it. And you did the same too. All of us, all of us have to. We have to do it, you know? It's like you know how to do it. It's like it's a part of what you do, right? It's a right to pass. Rice up passage. Passage is the right to passage. That's exactly it. All right. So, yeah, this was an awesome show. It was. It was. Yes. And as always, for more information, go to our website. Vicki dough fitness dot com. And remember, if you have any questions, comments or just something to say, tweet us, email us, go on Facebook, and share with us your thoughts. You've been listening to it's all about helping fitness with doctor and Vicki Hayward Doe and doctor Virginia banks bright. Vickie dough is owner of Vicki do fitness a multimedia health and wellness form, a place to discuss, learn and participate in healthy living. You can get in touch with Vicki by email and info at Vicki dough fitness dot com..

Vicki dough Vicki Hayward Doe Vickie dough Vicki Facebook Virginia
"white society" Discussed on All My Relations Podcast

All My Relations Podcast

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on All My Relations Podcast

"We also know that native babies are being born to couples who aren't married either. So like we have much, much higher rates of Native American babies being born to moms who have never been married compared to the rest of America as well. So it's like we're thinking through how I think the historical experiences of generations passed. I think continue to influence who we think our good partners, who we think will be good fathers who we think will be good providers. But I guess it'd be interesting to thinking through how some of these historical narratives might be embodied today and how that might influence who we think is a good love match or a good love partner or who's yeah who's good lovers. So perhaps this idea that and it's probably psychosomatic, right? Where they feel that maybe that marrying is that entry into whiteness that has been so denied for so long, right? Because whiteness and white privilege and ownership of land and wealth and all of these things that we've been denied for so long could possibly be accessible through this gateway of marrying into or becoming coupled with somebody that holds that unearned privilege, right? It had to do with sort of the nuclear cis heteronormative ideas of who's raising children. So it was presumed that if a white woman married an Indian man and they had kids that the white woman as the woman would be teaching culture and language and be at home with them doing the schooling, doing this and doing that, that would ultimately pass her white traditions onto the children and they would ultimately become enfranchised and lose their assimilated, right? Because then the woman the Indian woman couldn't live on the reserve anymore if she got enfranchised that then all of a sudden she'd be a part of the broader society and then the children we become assimilated that way. So it was a really pervasive way of, I guess negotiating who was marrying who and Canadian case that might be something that endures, right? The idea, the notion that, either being raised in the white society, interacting with white society being forced into the white society would result in that taking up of white society that would ultimately be more beneficial. Maybe it's happening subconsciously too. You know, like, I think about relatives that I know that have married white people. Do they consciously know they think to themselves like, oh, I want to get close to whiteness. No. This is how we talk about it in philosophically and when we review academically. But when people are following in love and swiping on Tinder, is there like, oh yeah, I want that white woman because that white woman's gonna help me get power. No. But we are deeply impacted by dominant society. And measurements of success in white society are related to being a part of this industrial capitalist system and being productive and therefore we're attracted to people that appear more successful doing air quotes successful in the white man's world versus a person that's traditional. And so in on the res, you know that's like a hunter or something, but maybe lives in a hud house, you know? Just sort of thinking out loud here, but I just want to say like this conversation is not necessarily at the forefront of our mind when we're when we're dating necessarily. Or is it really? I think it also when I was hearing you talking with tika, I also want to bring this back to this notion of love and how we show love and how we value different types of love and how love is displayed or like, I remember thinking, you know, well, if he buys me something, is that a display of love that I should value more than say somebody who's gone and caught a bunch of fish and brought it to my family or this perspective partner has all this education and makes all this money and oh, am I going to consider him perhaps a better life partner than somebody a res boy who's grounded in community who knows our ways and our language, but who doesn't make money in this white man's world? I think how we think about love as indigenous people. Obviously, is very much tempered by white society, but it also has me thinking about, I think a lot of it is overt. We think about subconscious, but we also think about how there are very real ways in which love has become manifested in our society through material objects and possessions that weren't a part of indigenous ways of doing and being and knowing and relating. But compulsory monogamy expects you to stay with that person because it assures the security, first of all, industrial complex, because it's secure, you're in this relationship that doesn't have fragility to it, and then that industrial complex can continue to rely upon your labor and you being in this union. You're reproducing, literally, right? Like the reproduction of workers, really, like this is what it all sort of relies on. Whereas if you're entering into multiple relationships, there's that lack of continuity. There's a lack of security for that complex that relies upon someone to work till their death type of thing. Well, you know what? I think we should switch gears, you know, because because you teach a course, decolonizing gender, sex and sexuality, first, what are the main tenets of that class, maybe can you take us through the framework and really interested in how it impacts people's lives or the feedback you've heard around this topic and why this topic? Right. So, you know, there's a matrix when we come to talk about sex gender and sexuality. And that's how I sort of preface the course, making sure that we understand off the hop. These are different these are fluid. This is cosmological. It's not just a binary, first of all, but to really understand what it means by sex gender and sexuality. Sexualities, actually. And so we preface the course with that we get into patriarchy and colonialism. And in my teaching practice, I sort of refused to put our pain and suffering on display all the time. I just start by saying, I'll talk to you about that colonialism. So you know that it endures and it's around you. But I'm not here for this constant like trauma porn. This is not a part of how I want you to envision those bodies because then that's how it keeps perpetuating that idea of that Pocahontas perplexed, right? Of this forever scarred, scarab, killable body, because all we experience is trauma. So how can love and joy resonate in a body that's only performing or talking about trauma. So we talk a little bit about that, but then I really like to focus on these radical re envisioning and what people are doing, centering on indigenous feminism, in particular, we jump off from there. We talk about critical polyamory episode of cheim tall bears is actually on us a little bit, so and I ask people, yeah. I asked my students to reflect on that as a part of the assignments. And I've heard so much just excellent feedback from that. Understanding the power of critical polyamory in this decolonizing sex genders and sexualities and how it's this framework of freedom really and liberation, right? That is tied to sex that is tied to gender, but ultimately empowers bodies. It readies our bodies for those acts of resistance for those rising uprights. If we're just constantly negotiating trauma and pain, you know, we're in a state that's limited to what power we can bring to those circles. So talking about how something like, you know, if I had asked a student, how do you think having many lovers would prepare you for battle? At first that's just sort of you got more people behind you. You got more people to call up to come down to the front lines and it's like, no, listen to this podcast and then.

white society tika hud America Pocahontas
"white society" Discussed on IlmFeed Podcast

IlmFeed Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on IlmFeed Podcast

"For me. Definitely i was adding for you know like i actually wanted to get married I think i wanted to get married since i was about sixteen to honest. So my parents just kind of facilitated it so i think having that romance in your life especially if you're this will present he's yearning for that. I feel like that. Paul view gets the satisfied. I think also having a lot of energy at that age is definitely a pro when you have kids Like for me. I didn't find getting married so life. Changing but i found having my first child extremely life changing little bit of a shock actually like as to how just how much responsibility it was you know. I think i had just imagine that. I would just like Carry milo baby with me and just carry on his own and most of us. Kind of underestimate what is actually likes to have any baby at the same time because you're young and the energy you'll body does deal with it. I think better probably an Also you you still got that you've got the energy to kind of take. The challenges head-on on So i felt like that was a pro. Also i feel like i. We should view it as an investment. Like all those years. People invest their time into korea. They invested time into building wealth. For example people invest their life into building all sorts of things. But i guess. I feel very grateful for is having had the opportunity to spend i would say my twenty s especially and my thirties Investing the next generation. In 'cause that's literally what we were doing right investing in building human beings the believers of the future and. I don't think a lot of young people are thinking of motherhood and parenthood in that way and we need to kind of revive that that sense of purpose you know. 'cause assist changed. I just share with you. The at one point. I remember when i had like three little. Abc's and over. I was quite motivated. Driven mum because our society doesn't value motherhood right like white society doesn't see motherhood as something to be proud of her or something that is a significant contribution right. I think we also internalize that. Somehow somehow and i remember at one point. Maybe i was just feeling down one day because i'd had some challenges or whatever and i was just talking to my dad unless that that you know i. What's my legacy going to be. What's my legacy going to be right like. I need to do other things i want to do. And he was like what is these are two kids and a of course. Of course my kids are a huge part of my legacy right like so i think. Sometimes we we forget that because the whitest society in the culture that we've been brought up pin never really looked to us about motherhood in that way you know so out. Say one of the pros is it's a huge investment and you will reap in shaw lowther the fruit of that investment. Not just in this life later on but in chat line the in the life here after and generations to come. And i think the other thing is the Having so much responsibility at such a young age makes you.

milo white society Paul korea Abc shaw lowther
"white society" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on The Kicker

"Come back and wanted to tragedies of the black american experience. Is that double. Victory isn't on gibiley loans after the war red line mortgage loans to black neighbor. It's my very own family. My father was was nod veteran. But someone who wanted to buy a house and we did not have access to thirty year fix mortgages. That was a material handicapped. A to racism. What posit to both and please feel free discreet. What does happen though for those catholic and jewish immigrants or children of immigrants. This time imperfectly but largely is coming out of the war. It's socially unacceptable in proper american society to have bigotry against those white racists. Restrictive covenants against jewish Homebuyers tend to fall by the wayside. Decide judeo christian. Tradition becomes accepted political gospel in this country and they are absorbed as never before into a meadow white identity. You were asking about what. The appeal of whiteness was what motivated immigrants to want to identify with whiteness. And i was saying that there were. There were two strands of that. One is the sense of aspiration that immigrants that at european immigrants had to become a part of american society to to climb the social and economic ladder to perhaps become middle class and that that in that particular context they came to understand that achieving that also meant becoming apart of the white society fully becoming a member of the white society Taking advantage of all the privileges that offered although they may not have thought about it as consciously as we're we're talking about it now But that was kind of In you know if you look at images of of advertisements from the night. I found even an immigrant. Newspapers advertisements depicting middle life To which immigrants were supposed to respond by buying you know So ben pancake syrup and things like that the the pictures. Our pictures of young white children being cared for by african american domestic servants intake. So in others. There's a way in which american culture frames middle-class status wight middle class status In racial terms. And there's no said that they you know th this also meant concrete benefits concrete benefits of homeownership of of employment. The one thing. I wanna say is that there was also a another element of coercion..

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"white society" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Well let's see. We said about the black community at the concert. Do you say some hot white pussy out here tonight. It's not That's strong opener. Care not going gonna allow me. He's got the cloud got him in. Its clutches right now. Now that romo hightlight push this. This sounds like how. Chris lambert opens this show you know. I'm just joking gaza. Chris doesn't do that. Doesn't mean joke girls also. Tnc every jason white blind that. Oh no listen another says white supremacy light using blonde compliment in itself like it. Don't get no better then blah. Does days stupid games. The white insulting to the blonde white women also. Why was the white do so excited. When he brought up the white jake shit he was yay. I'm going to white chicks. They clearly didn't rehearse this is all free style but he was like correct wise. Affirmative right choice. But i'm like you. Shouldn't you be kind of upset that he's getting these women i don't know did i'll seen it. I was in the corner drinking scotch and the dog of soup with no life zone. Directions telling them what to do talking over the film you see club. A sat out to my may the other person guitar who is trying to help do what. The caller is fronts as a white bitch out. This group like don't be because emails because like this i'll why rich lobby leaving khloe. Oh why beach. Pretty pretty nice young lady. That's the coon coon in life. All it does not get worse than that the so we reject the you. We're not inviting you to be. T does the problem with so many of these types of stories they never wanna cop to the anti blackness inside of them is always the black communities fall always because ostracisation. Fromm whiteness is different from ostracization from blackness. We are very inclusive except in community. Will you catch some jokes. Yes because we joke each other from love and you come. That's us welcoming you in like come on in you. We've got every type of black here yet. Top proper black year black yet country black. You're black you got big shoes year black. Are we going to make some jokes yes. Maybe it's all pudding compared to white society where y society will do shit where they won't joke. What you but you also are not allowed at the table. They won't count you among them but they'll be like well. We won't say anything rude to his face but on guys we know he's not one of us whereas black people are like we will stay rude shit phase. But that's because you want us so any taiwanese to start equating. I'm not allowed to be black. I'm not allowed to be white. I'm always like leave us the fuck out of your mouth. 'cause you notice not true the only time you really catch them in especially his age the only time you really cash that you've done so much fox. She has such a negative attitude towards us. The motherfucker dyke. We don't fuck with you. You know this is the same still come out. Why can't i get to talk about the ratio on tv at you. Demean all your black colleagues at decried black lives matter and john invite me to the black event bitch. You don't wanna be here. We don't right here right. Don't try to act like we. I always carry favor white people when they do that. Because then white people go oh poor carlton. The blacks are treated him so bad we had to bring them back alfonzo. You're one of us now. you'll never be one. They don't want you. You know they only wanted you much. You denigrated every everyone involved by the way you like because people obviously you denigrated black women that goes without saying because and of course shouldn't say goes out there some. Y'all simple motherfuckers won't even get it. I'll be nervous worried about black women right. The it's obviously you denigrating that but then you turn around and given white women. The most basic as applaud insult didn't a blonde white women. White women white woman right like just like you reduce them to pussy right like this whole thing is a farce. Yeah like like and just proud to be dancing form. So man that first comment they had about not Feeling like he belongs. That's inside of you. You know nobody knew your wife was white. None of us will keep them soon but none of us knew none of us was keeping on what you liked that bro. Nigga was happy he got to stay for one thing. I don't remember call lowest good. He's funny that's it. None of us have been around. Like let's go google his wife. I'll fuck him. Fuck chris paul mike. Oh my god. I on white woman being this. Yeah thinking every time. I know like i know you know people feel away about this but i do think this. Rg three women under the be. Like i'm this is why why i will be like. Why did you do that. I'll be fucking livid. Robert you knew i was just dad lifting. You didn't need to put my ass on the internet and make all kinds of comparison to black women. I'm just living my mother fucking life mine and my business like what is it inside you. They needed to challenge all of the black community today on a saturday. You know same thing. We'll call them. Shit man like subaru but.

Chris lambert jason white white society y society romo khloe Fromm gaza alfonzo Chris carlton fox chris paul mike john google Robert
"white society" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Walk into native america calling from studio eight six nine in his letter pueblo. I'm tara game. Would since the last election several states are pushing a new round of voting laws. Most of them are putting limits on voting with restricting mail in ballots and getting rid of expanded voting hours. Proponents say they want to prevent voter fraud. Some voting rights advocates say. The laws are the latest attempts to suppress needed voters and other people of color. The new laws and the complications elections experts fear could resolve from them. We go by right after national native news. Stay tuned this is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The grim discovery last week of the remains of more than two hundred children at the site of a former residential school in canada has opened old wounds for first nations people down carpenter chuck reports on some reactions from former students and calls for action from native leaders. The residential school system operated across almost all of canada it was designed to assimilate native children into white society. Those children were taken from their families and forced to attend the government. Funded church run schools. Thousands were abused native. Historians believe about four thousand died of neglect and abuse the undocumented graves of two hundred and fifteen were uncovered on the site of the former residential school in kamloops british columbia. It was proof that what many had talked about are feared was true that children disappeared from the schools and no one knew why but they never talked about it. Harvey mcleod is the chief of the upper nikola band and a survivor of the kamloops residential. School it was assumed that ran away. And we're never gonna come back macleod. Says he remembers children missing but can't remember their names. He says his experience at the school was horrific and life changing over the past couple of days since the discovery memorials and vigils have sprung up across the country as people native and nonnative honored ingred for the children as well as survivors families from the residential schools. George mira st is a health support worker in prince. albert's scheduling and a residential school survivor. Begin to acknowledge responsibility.

George mira st canada antonio gonzales macleod Harvey mcleod last week more than two hundred children Thousands kamloops albert about four thousand studio eight six nine two hundred and fifteen kamloops british columbia first native america prince nikola
"white society" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"white society" Discussed on KGO 810

"Really funny. Take on race, but he was making a point. Yeah, hey was it was tough to take. I'll tell you something. I saw Paul money many times at the comedy store down in Los Angeles, and he He says things that presumes prejudice of white people. And it bothered me to be perfectly honest about because I don't sure Yeah, well, no, no, it wasn't the uncomfortable pointing out truths. It was the uncomfortable it comes with. Not all people of a race are that way. You cannot talk about White society in certain ways without Uh, and indict literally everyone, You know I could. I could be more specific, but I'd rather not be but s O Paul Muni made me uncomfortable in a in a way that I felt I was. Being wrong, But at the same time as I've just shown you I can see the virtue in a lot of the uncomfortable that he Produced in pointing to Ah, lot of, you know, institutional racism and that kind of thing, But and this is the best part. He did it in a in an absolute funny way. I mean, just the greatest funny shell. Which is laughter, right? So I've loved W. Kamau Bell, who also from Oakland. He He summed it up this way, and I would score the repeating here. Says I was lucky enough to open up for Paul Muni several times. He was a master. He was master class. Basically, it was like a Malcolm X speech that had been punched up by Red Fox. And then in the middle of everything, he'd go off on a tangent about Jane Fonda was that's a great description that is that it really is and you know, clearly Such a smart guy, But then Paul Muni past. How old How old a man was he? Oh, boy, 70. He was in the seventies. He had a heart to heart attack 79, according to Chris. Pad is here. We'll talk to her. Next. Mark Thompson kgo a 10. So let's say you're into yoga or Pallotti's..

Mark Thompson Chris Los Angeles Jane Fonda W. Kamau Bell Malcolm X Oakland 79 70 Paul Pallotti Paul Muni seventies 10 Red Fox yoga
Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

"Guest louis gates has written a new book called the black church. That's a companion to the pbs series. He hosts of the same name. The book explores the history of african american religions from the days of the transatlantic slave trade to the black lives. Matter movement says black churches were the first institutions built by black people and run independent of white society in the us with the earliest black christian congregations. Roughly contemporaneous with the declaration of independence. He describes how churches became the foundation of black religious political economic and social life. He also tells his story about the bargain. He made with jesus that led him to the church at age twelve but life eventually led him to become more of an observer than participants in religion. Henry louis gates has hosted many pbs series and written companion books exploring the history of african americans including the recent book in series on reconstruction. He also hosts the series finding your roots in which through dna tests and in-depth genealogical research reveals the ancestrally. History of his well known. Guess gators a professor at harvard where he directs the hutchins center for african and african american research. Our interview recorded last thursday. Henry louis gates welcome back to fresh air a pleasure to have you back on our show in the acknowledgements in your book. You think a list of people for helping you fully realize the awesome significance of the black church and black religious beliefs in your own life and in the lives of other people. Let's talk a little bit about your own life when you were young. Your mother was methodist your father episcopalian. You attended your mother's church as a child. Would you describe that church yeah. It was a small methodist. Church is called walden methodist church. It's still there and many of my cousins and old friends so worship at church in many of the people most dear to me who passed away or memorialize on the walls of the church but it was a methodist church but it was almost the fundamentalist church. If

Louis Gates White Society Foundation Of Black Religious Henry Louis Gates Black Church PBS Hutchins Center For African An Gators Jesus Harvard United States Walden Methodist Church
"white society" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"white society" Discussed on KTOK

"America is going to implode from within. Because White society now all right, people, I say White society. That's what we're up on the You're a victim of it just as well. I'm a victim of it. Okay? So though we don't know one white man control nothing. But its society That we Built on it was gonna destroy America from within. Well, Roy again. I don't disagree completely. I do disagree. I think what you're calling White society can also be interpreted as the deep state. I mean, there are a lot of people making a lot of money to do very little in Washington, D C that have been very, very upset with Trump, and this is also part of it. This is part of why there is so much vehemence against Donald Trump and the people who elect him elected him. Kathy is in Oklahoma City High. Hi. How are you? Good. Thanks for hanging on. Hey, I want to say something before I say what I called for. And the when he was talking about white privilege. It wasn't white privilege that stole all the votes in Georgia after hours on hidden camera. That wasn't exactly white privilege. Dr Bennett. Adamantly disagree with the previous caller. I don't know where he gets that because I don't feel like white privileges is going on right now. Exactly. Today, my mom and I were some of the people that went out in 2010. With the tea party into DC and did the 9 12 project and we were as as peaceful as possible. There were over, they said, half a million protestors. You know what I hate to say that you use the word protest? But we were out there defending the Constitution against Obama at the time, and then today happened. I also got a word from a friend of mine who saw something that NPR sent out earlier on enough. Everyone has seen this, but apparently I don't know if this is truly maybe you can help me with this. But apparently at 9 33 this morning there was something from NPR that was sent out about the protests this evening. Stopping be the count at 9:33 A.m. this morning. I haven't had to look into that. I'm afraid I've got around Kathy News radio 1000 Katie. Okay, this report is sponsored by variety care. Roof. Dash Rx dot com That prescription for your ailing move Traffic center westbound to 49 35 reported wrapping up He's bound to 40 western southwest 15th and made southwest 25th and western Southwest.

White society Donald Trump America NPR Kathy Washington Obama Roy Dr Bennett Oklahoma City High Katie Georgia DC
Asians have the highest incomes in the United States

The Dave Chang Show

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Asians have the highest incomes in the United States

"According to the US census in two thousand Seventeen Asian people at the highest median household income in this country by a lot, which is more than twice the median household income of black people. And that's what we're talking about. Here is that we have intentionally assimilated into white society. I mean we have to kind of exam kind of interrogate the fact that most Asian Americans have a white American accent. That's because we have assimilated with White Society, so let's start from the start acknowledging that we have done that. That's I think the bias that a lot of asian-americans come from is that we have surrounded ourselves with white people and have kind of neglected understanding, other minority communities namely the black community. Well Look I. The the truth is I. Didn't I never grew up around black people I think Ron. Any black people there was one black kid in my middle school and I watched him get relentlessly made fun of and I stood by didn't do anything about it and I have a lot of guilt associated with that, but like the truth is. I was I had no exposure to black people until college. My parents didn't have any black friends. It starts there. It starts with not having that experience like I. I'm not GonNa pretend that like I. Spend most of my days hanging out with black people like I, said I have a limited number of black friends now like it's not, you know luckily. I I work in food media where I get to encounter a much broader range of people than I, did growing up, but like I wanted to speak very frankly about my own experience in that is like. I just didn't have that exposure. My parents had even less of it. and. Their perspective is informed very differently from ours. And I think it's really important that we have these conversations with them, but we have to just sort of. Remember how hard it is to empathize with the group that you have no contact with. But we need everybody to see this right and this is the giant Delta between. What we need them to know and what they WANNA know, of course, look, it's interesting. Right because the three of us are maybe not. The ideal group because. We all have had ambitions to be heard we all in our own ways. We've wanted to be out there. Dave is very out there. But I don't think and tell me if I'm wrong but like. I don't think that the previous generation. Our parents have any desire to stick out. They don't want to stick their necks out there. I'm just talking about the model minority thing again. That's not that's not their parents. Generation that's Asian culture, too. Yeah. I think that's pervasive over across generations I think even now the prevailing attitude of Asian Americans, I can speak for my generation, generally speaking of an aberration like I'm very outspoken, but I'm the aberration. I'm the exception to the rule out of times and that. That kinda needs to change especially as it pertains to very important issues like this like police brutality against black people like we should be at the forefront of this, we should be allying. I was at the protests on Saturday in mid city Los. Angeles and I saw a bunch of Asian people in that gave me a lot of hope but Asian people make up about ten eleven percent of the population Los Angeles I don't think we were ten percent of the crowd that was out there marching. And we can do better. We can do better as asian-americans. Madge. If you're listening to this right and I was like this isn't a podcast. This is just a conversation. Well, yeah because I don't think there's anything you can't talk about right now. Other than what's happening I. Think it's so important that we need to have an honest conversation with my friends that I work with about how we can. Change perspectives and shift the alignment so old generation to generation to the newest generation all on the same page. Because the reason you're here and you have the civil liberties that you do have is simply because. Black. People had to go through slavery. They've had to endure the most. Awful of atrocities. Jim Crow Segregation. Now voter suppression everything is wrong and built against black people yet. Somehow people have benefited from it. And I can see a lot of Asian people being. That's not our problem. Well it is your problem because I don't think is right for you to benefit and to not have any issues right because someone else's carrying the burden.

White Society Black Community Asian Culture Dave United States Jim Crow Segregation RON Los Angeles Madge Angeles
White supremacists pose as Antifa online, call for violence

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

09:43 min | 2 years ago

White supremacists pose as Antifa online, call for violence

"Brand as protests rage across the country over the police killing of George Floyd white nationalist groups have been using the unrest to their advantage not a new tactic remember Charlottesville in twenty seventeen you from Charlottesville Virginia white nationalist rally that descended into deadly violence it is impossible beyond words you also had people that were very fine people on both sides some of those very fine people included neo **** Klansmen protesters from other alt right groups trump blamed antifa a collection of people who protest fascism and he's blaming that group for today's unrest it turns out that some of the people involved in Charlottesville are also behind the violence in today's protests and joining us now to talk about that is Amy's Potomac she's executive director of integrity first for America and that's a nonprofit group suing the organizers of the Charlottesville unite the right rally for conspiring to commit violence thanks for joining us thanks so much for having me well where do you see some of the same people popping up now so it's really important to understand how these groups operate and some are incredibly organized with military style higher keys and others are a little bit more amorphous but the same trends we see throughout the board whether it's in Charlotte's veil or now or the many other white supremacist accident happened in between most notably just last night and number of news outlets reported that a white supremacist group called identity Evropa which is one of the defendants in our Charlotte's lawsuit in fact they're the group that quoine that phrase you will not replace us that we heard chanted a few moments ago I'm they were posing as antifa on Twitter to urge violence including during the protests Twitter suspended the account the other day but that tweet had gone viral minute set people off understandably so who are concerned about violence in their communities and allow people including the president to then say that they were going to target antifa deploy the military and so on and so the ways in which we see these extremist groups trying to call walked a moment like this and use it to spread not just is this information but also he an actual violence is a sad trend that has been happening over and over again over the last few years our our so I just wanna unpack that a little bit more about the role of identity Europa first of all what is this organization so there are a number of neo **** and white supremacist groups that are focused around this idea of identity the idea of a white identity and identity Europa believes that there should be a white homeland they believe in the white identity being superior to all there are white supremacist group in that sense and they're big claim to fame if you L. was helping to organize the Charlottesville violence what happened in Charlottesville was not an accident it was not Spontini yes this violence rather the violence is planned for months in advance on social media by number of neo **** and white supremacists including identity Europa where they talked about everything in advance from what to wear what to bring for lunch with weapons to carry and whether they could hit protesters with cars and then claim self defense which is of course ultimately what they did identity Evropa and over played a role in which they organized white supremacists from around the country to descend on Charlottesville and helped us bird this weekend of violence of course as you might expect since they were sued by my organization and since they started seeing additional fallout he will bad PR from their role in Charlotte's well they've tried to rebrand the now go by American identity movement but at the end of the day if they're the same white supremacist organization that has been working to sow disinformation fear violence and of course we are going to ensure that they remain liable for the violence that they cost insurance now sadly there role spreading disinformation and hate and violence right now during the George Floyd protest only underscores the importance of holding them accountable so aside from posting fake tweets posing as antifa do you think that they are actually posing as demonstrators on the streets or that other alt right groups are doing that too posing as as demonstrators and and causing havoc so we don't know for sure exactly who is posing as who at this point but what we do now is that there are a number of extremists including a number far right extremists were trying to take advantage of this moment and exploit it for their own game we also know that they're armed extremists were showing up at these protests in trying to start riots or urge what they call a Google which is their code for a second civil war you might know these guys by their automatic weapons and Hawaiian shirts which are the hallmarks of their identity and some might claim that they're there to protect the protesters but I wouldn't let that fool you they are part of this loose coalition of far right militia extremists who believe in urging a second civil war or some sort of revolution they're generally support of anti government violent resistance and they think that these protests can serve as a catalyst for the violent upheaval that they've long wanted we've only seen a number of incidents over the last few days in which these will extremists have been showing up at protests with their automatic weapons in some cases we've had folks arrested including one who was arrested for firing shots at a black lives matter rally the other day we had the department of homeland security warned lawn for or spend that white supremacists including some of these Google extremists are encouraging their supporters to shoot protesters one of these extremists that on telegram which is a social media site frequented by extremists that they are encouraging them to quote frame the crowd around you for the violence and so we've seen over and over again a number of these extremists go to these protests with their heavy weaponry with our automatic weapons and then either bring violence against the protesters themselves or try to frame the protesters for violence there's so many details that are still on the phone but these anecdotes definitely illustrated construct a concerning pattern and where are they most active these extremists have been everywhere we saw a report of police using automatic weapons and other tactical gear from local extremist in Denver they've truly been all over the place I believe one of the arrest of a protester a rather of an armed extremist who was firing shots at the rally was in North Carolina until they're all over the country and typically these extremists are finding each other online on social media platforms like the very one which the Charlottesville violence was planned and they're inspiring each other with their means and with these other calls to violence so that when an individual goes to one of these protests armed with their automatic weapons wearing their you know their meetings on their desks and on their shirt wearing those Hawaiian shirts it's part of this larger effort to call walk these protests and spread their extremist ideology use these protests exploit them to further their really stick a vision for a second civil war and by second civil war you man like a race war exactly you know and and I would say a race war in certain cases within the balloon movement there are various ideologies as well some are straight up white supremacists who believe that we need to whites rather a race work to spur the rise of a truly white society others are more focused on taking down the government itself they're worried about the government quote you know stealing their guns their quote unquote individual liberty and so within the movement it's important understand that there are factions but there are certainly white supremacists within the global movement and ones who as you said it are doing so are sort of trying to use these protesters burn race war on and bring about this collapse of society that they so crave and so these guys as you say and I assume most of our guys are pretty identifiable because they have their Hawaiian shirts are carrying weapons but I assume there are other groups that are more under the radar a hundred percent I think over the next few weeks we're certainly gonna learn a lot more about who might be coming to these protests are just coming and and looting inciting violence trying to take advantage of a very legitimate protests and distract from it in order to spread their own hate and violence and I think that's really what this is all about at the end of the day these are extremists who are trying to coop these protests in order to sow fear so he and his distract from the actual issues at hand which are racial justice and police brutality and so as they continue to do this it only serves to undermine the very legitimate protesters were out on the streets rightfully sharing their grievances and standing up for the justice thank George for and so many others

Charlottesville George Floyd
The death of George Floyd, and calls for justice

On The Media

02:12 min | 2 years ago

The death of George Floyd, and calls for justice

"Thursday night also saw protests in Phoenix Denver Memphis Columbus New York City and in lieu of that peaceful protests demanding justice for the shooting death of Brianna Taylor during a police raid in March turned violent I think America must see right do not develop finance Martin Luther king in April nineteen sixty seven a year before his assassination ambitions continue to exist in our office which must be damn bad we condemn our in the final analysis all right the language of the unheard what is it gonna marathon has failed yeah there will be here that long segment white society are more concerned about tranquillity and the status quo learn about justice equality and humanity so on a radio show and nations summers of Ryan all calls on nations went to delay six summers ago months of unrest followed the police shooting of Michael brown launching the black lives matter movement now is video evidence of abuse of power piles up amid a pandemic that has killed black people at a strikingly disproportionate rate the sense that black lives still don't matter is hard to shake take the murder in February of another black man also caught armory a young black man who in February almost to the day it happened a Trayvon Martin eight years ago was chased down by white men in pick up trucks and shot and killed on a residential street in Georgia a reminder of why incidents like this other one on Monday in New York city's Central Park are so harrowing a white woman named Amy Cooper had her dog off leash and a part of the parkway leashes are required a black man Christian Cooper in Arden bird watcher asked her to leach said doc

New York City Brianna Taylor America Ryan Murder Georgia Central Park Amy Cooper Christian Cooper Phoenix Denver Memphis Martin Luther Michael Brown Trayvon Martin Leach
Warriors Women: The Hart Sisters

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:18 min | 3 years ago

Warriors Women: The Hart Sisters

"Month we're talking about warriors as encyclopedias. Manica is created by two sisters. I am extra excited about today's episode talking about two antique when writers and educators whose work challenged the patriarchal order. These two sisters are believed to be the first African Caribbean writers to be published meet Elizabeth and an heart or the heart sisters. Elizabeth Hart was born in Seventeen. Seventy two in Antigua an and followed suit in seventeen seventy three. He grew up in a wealthy household with slaves though their parents were freed slaves themselves. The sisters had access to education and help to teach their younger siblings after their mother died in seventeen thousand five the following year booth. Sisters were baptized methodists. Their religion would play a huge part in their activism. The sisters cited Christian theology as a rationale for quality and they argued that women should be able to participate in holy work in addition to men and Elizabeth both married white. Men who were active participants in antique was early Methodist Even Jellicoe movement and married a preacher named John. Gilbert Elizabeth married an evangelical teacher by the name of Charles tweets. Their relationships were not received well by white society as injury marriages were uncommon frowned upon still all signs point to the sisters having happy relationships with their partners and Elizabeth's faith is a significant part of their writing both wrote histories of methodism Antigua and also finished her husband's memoir on his life and Elizabeth wrote poems about slavery and her spirituality. Elizabeth was more outspoken about emancipation than her sister. Her attack on slavery was also connected to her religious devotion. She believed that abolishing slavery would restore the faith which had been tainted by oppression and injustice. The sisters profoundly believed in the power of Education. They advocated this slave should be educated emphasizing. They were intelligent in eighteen. O One Elizabeth founded a private school and Saint John's a few years later. The sisters opened the first Sunday School in the Caribbean is true for the school to accept people of all genders and races and even hold school meetings in the dark so the students wouldn't feel ashamed of disparities in their clothing in eighteen. Sixteen and Elizabeth founded the female Refuge Society but organization just orphans and women. The Society Fed clothed and supported the hungry and for the sisters were passionate and outspoken. About lifting up the voices and lives of black women and wrote about her disdain for prostitution and her belief that it stemmed from the institution of slavery while Elizabeth wrote about sexual abuse and its role in keeping black women from social mobility. Elizabeth died in eighteen thirty three and died a year later. They were both sixty one years old. When they passed away the heart sisters work impacted discourse about methodism and slavery and their actions affected and improve the lives of many around them

Gilbert Elizabeth Elizabeth Hart Antigua Manica Seventeen Saint John Sunday School Prostitution Caribbean Society Fed Female Refuge Society Charles