27 Burst results for "White School"

The Early Life of Activist Barbara Rose Johns

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:20 min | 2 months ago

The Early Life of Activist Barbara Rose Johns

"Barbara faced stark disparities in education quality. Her small one story school building had no gym and no cafeteria but it was forced to accommodate over four hundred and fifty students. On insulated shacks were built outside to hold additional students and learning out. There was particularly difficult in cold weather. One january in nineteen forty prince. Edward county had particularly frigid temperatures with readings of sixteen degrees below zero. In contrast to barbara school the nearby white school had two stories. Great facilities and fewer than four hundred students. Barbara shared her concerns about the conditions of her school with her music teacher. Who responded why. Don't you do something about it. At first barbara felt discouraged. She was just a student. What could she do. But the final straw for barbara came one april morning. She was helping her for younger siblings. Get to the bus stop. When she realized she forgot her lunch she ran back home to fetch it when she returned. She realized she'd missed her bus. And she was forced to try hitchhiking for a ride. She stood on the curb for an hour and no one stopped to help then. She saw the so called white bus drive by it was half empty. Barbara's bus was always packed to the brim. She leader wrote in her diary right. Then and there. I decided that indeed something had to be done about this inequality so. Barbara's sprung into action. On april twenty third nineteen fifty. One barbara forged note from the school principal to the teachers telling them together. All four hundred fifty students in the auditorium when the students sat down they were shocked to find barbara on stage. She delivered a speech and shared her plan. All the students would walk out of the school until a new building was under construction. Some students were afraid they'd get in trouble or end up arrested. Barbara replied the farm bill. Jail isn't big enough to hold us.

Barbara Edward County Barbara School Nearby White School
Activist Barbara Rose Johns Profoundly Impacted Her Community as a Teenager

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:20 min | 2 months ago

Activist Barbara Rose Johns Profoundly Impacted Her Community as a Teenager

"Barbara faced stark disparities in education quality. Her small one story school building had no gym and no cafeteria but it was forced to accommodate over four hundred and fifty students. On insulated shacks were built outside to hold additional students and learning out. There was particularly difficult in cold weather. One january in nineteen forty prince. Edward county had particularly frigid temperatures with readings of sixteen degrees below zero. In contrast to barbara school the nearby white school had two stories. Great facilities and fewer than four hundred students. Barbara shared her concerns about the conditions of her school with her music teacher. Who responded why. Don't you do something about it. At first barbara felt discouraged. She was just a student. What could she do. But the final straw for barbara came one april morning. She was helping her for younger siblings. Get to the bus stop. When she realized she forgot her lunch she ran back home to fetch it when she returned. She realized she'd missed her bus. And she was forced to try hitchhiking for a ride. She stood on the curb for an hour and no one stopped to help then. She saw the so called white bus drive by it was half empty. Barbara's bus was always packed to the brim. She leader wrote in her diary right. Then and there. I decided that indeed something had to be done about this inequality so. Barbara's sprung into action. On april twenty third nineteen fifty. One barbara forged note from the school principal to the teachers telling them together. All four hundred fifty students in the auditorium when the students sat down they were shocked to find barbara on stage. She delivered a speech and shared her plan. All the students would walk out of the school until a new building was under construction. Some students were afraid they'd get in trouble or end up arrested. Barbara replied the farm bill. Jail isn't big enough to hold us.

Barbara Edward County Barbara School Nearby White School
"white school" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"white school" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"I can't remember. I don't know i loved it though. Thanks for reading the book. Thanks for getting the book. Kevin jackson thank you black friday the title. What do you think. Paul bryan so in hell like friday night lights about high school football because they play their games on fridays Fish out of water story What's funnier white ghost and all black school or or black kid from the ghetto come to like super preppy white school where they don't play they don't play football well star of the team instantly. I would say the joke. The black friday would be one of those all just black friday night lights kind of schools that you see in the high school football games when they televise a regional ones on like. Espn two with crazy bands. And there's one white kid. And he's the kicker but they find out he's the fastest kid on the team which freaks out all the brothers. Yes hello my name. is graham. Well his name is wellington. The third and I'm trying to justin bieber plays graham. It is graham welling kent in black friday. So he's not only a kicker but he when they find out that he's a fast guy and the team because during the kickoffs he goes down and covers it and is the first guy down the field like he's beating all the brothers down the field. Now you know the coach's car weather's perfect perfect apollo still in fantastic shape but there's not interest. There's gotta be a twist odd twist is the love affair. Yeah.

Paul bryan white school football Kevin jackson graham welling kent graham Espn justin bieber wellington
Interview With Walton of Black Woman Owned

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:32 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Walton of Black Woman Owned

"Thanks so much for joining today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. Yes my name is walton. I was born in delaware. A raise between pg county maryland in an fat ville north carolina. In my business is black. Women owned so talk to me about growing up in several paces down to us. Break down for us where exactly you grew up. Yes so i. Until i was ten so from mike a couple of weeks until ten lived in ville which is really like slow I didn't it at the time. But like i went to basically in all white school it was very i. It was very slow. But i loved it. I was like obsessed with living in north carolina so it was so funny i I moved in maryland virginia. In like by fifth grade year that was just four year. Then finally settled in brandy wine maryland and that's pg county maryland for alma dnv. People out there. It's been like total opposite of country. Living it's bay. When i first moved here i was like it's so fast and but it's it's really nice. I love it here. i'm my son here for the moment and i love it. I love all those places though. So like i still like country living. I would like to settle down.

Pg County Ville North Carolina Maryland Walton Delaware Ville Mike North Carolina Virginia
"white school" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"white school" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Com in the middle of my investigation of the pure assessment score and its many implications. I had a conversation with a professor at duke named bill. May you may friendly with some bond traders and he was talking with some of them one day when they mentioned that they were having difficulty with bonds issued by historically black colleges. Hp see us as they're known if you're a bond trader you worry about moving the bonds that you haven't inventory and they just mentioned you know. Hey we're having a really hard time placing these hec schools because people. Don't wanna hold along the way. The bond market works is at an institution needs money. Let's say a university wants to build a dormitory. The cost fifty million dollars. The school can't raise all that money on its own so it goes to a wall street bank which purchases a bond a promise of repayment from the university then the bank breaks that bond into many hundreds and hundreds of pieces and sells those pieces to wealthy investors or insurance companies or hedge funds. Suan mei yu. Here's that banks are struggling to sell bonds for historically black colleges he wonders is this just some apocryphal wall street story or is it. True luckily is a simple test. This the price. The bond trader charges is called the gross spread. If it's super easy to find buyers for the bonds the gross spread is like to be low if the traitor has difficulty finding buyers the spread can get quite pricey so if the bonds from black schools or harder to move than bonds from white schools. The spread should be higher. and are they. Yes they are. May you and his colleagues compared black schools with non hpc us that were otherwise identical. The spreads for the historically black schools were twenty percent higher in the bond market. A twenty percent difference in spreads is huge mayo and his co. researchers went one step further. They zeroed in on three states in the deep south. And you those three states were so those are louisiana mississippi alabama and. What's the difference in spread in those states. Not twenty percent thirty seven percent. May you and his colleagues have given us a scientifically rigorous measurement of just. How much of a burden black institutions face in the real world. You've put a number on reputation. What is a reputational cost being school. That overwhelmingly accepts and educates black kids in louisiana. The reputation cost is thirty percent. That's one way to think about it. But i would say it's the racial component of reputation. Spread is a reputation. Score isn't it. Investors don't know the precise ins and outs of all the institutions. They're asked to by how could they. There are literally hundreds of thousands of bonds on the market at any given time so the investors proceed on a feeling a feeling about how worthy and how safe it held egitim it the institution getting the loan. Is you see a black school and you say to yourself. I don't value that. Hp you quite as highly as the white school across town so you give the black school. A discount which is what prejudice is by the way a discount. Black life does not matter as much as the white life and who are these people imposing discount on black schools. they're wealthy successful people who are simply checking a box. I like this bond alex when a lot. I don't like this one they are. I suspect not a whole lot different from the college administrators. Who signed a number two. There appears for the us news rankings. Every year motivated by the same unconscious bias. I like the school four point two. I like this one a lot. Four point five. I don't like this one. Two point four even though i don't really know anything about it so if you were the president of a historically black college in one of those states with a reputational discount for being black is thirty seven percent. How do you think you'd feel about your peer assessment score. I thought i'd call walter. Kimbro president of dillard university a historically black college in louisiana. Someone i started looking at the formulas and dig into it. I was like this isn't a real good measurement of what we do in fact is a measurement of privilege dillard's reputation score is two point six. That's not good. You can't ever get to the top of the. Us news rankings. With a peer assessment score of two point six. Maybe it sounds. Defeat is but it's not yet fetus. Realistic is realistic horrible living. Nobody's gonna just go and say this school with all. These black people is great in their haste to compete with time and newsweek way back when maybe all. Us news did was create a system that allowed the presidents and deans of every college in the country to assign a number to their prejudice to.

Suan mei yu louisiana Hp white school mayo mississippi alabama Kimbro dillard university alex Us walter dillard
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 10 months ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today. We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. Pleasure. To be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? Okay. I'm aged fifty, two currently and as a child, my parents were in the US foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. and. So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools. Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. Well I left. CHICAGO. Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. Or newly integrated, and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, sixty, eight, I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently, all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was because I had never been to. Before and it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my cub leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, asked him, I, said, why am I being hit why they're doing this? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. Just keep moving. and. So they never answered the question. At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. were, fixing, cleaning the UP, putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. That same year nineteen, Sixty, eight. On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism.

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King United States Chicago Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
"white school" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"white school" Discussed on WTOP

"L. A to Georgetown, which is a predominantly white school. I just had so many questions had no idea who to turn to the book explores the school's history of slavery lists. Community groups and resource is available both on and off campus. But we wanted to do with the black book as well as really marked those big first that we have within our community student reporter for the Hoya Ashley's house, says the black book is a needed resource obviously has made a lot of progress. It's a much better place to be now, but there's still a long way to go, Meghan Cloherty. GOP news A little over a year ago, Popeye's chicken sandwich mania was all the rage. The fried chicken chain is now adding a New Orleans staple to its menu. Benny A's chocolate filled many A's food beast reports. This new item is currently available in just a couple of locations. But Popeye says it will eventually be added two menus nationwide in New Orleans staple is a desert of deep fried pastry dough. Boston powdered sugar and serve warm, sometimes stuff with fillings for made with Savory ingredients. The fried to order bunions Come in 36 and 12 piece options for a dollar 99, 3 99 and 7 49 respectively. Who knows if the way is good is what you get at Cafe du Monde in new or hunts, But maybe they are worth a try. 7 54, now in Washington, Montgomery County Board of Elections would like to remind voters to register to vote. Text vote to 77788 deadline is October 13th Here's Mark McNulty, corporate vice president and general manager for US federal at Motorola Solutions on Cloud Strategies to fulfill the mission sponsored by Motorola Solutions were highly focused on the hardware side around No purpose built on Dragan ized types of devices. And how do we bring the right combination of device or devices to the user based upon how they want to actually perform their work? Listen to the entire discussion on federal news Network search Motorola in times of crisis spent everyday.

New Orleans Motorola Solutions Popeye white school US Motorola Cafe du Monde Georgetown corporate vice president and g Meghan Cloherty Benny A GOP reporter Mark McNulty Dragan ized Boston Montgomery County Board of Elections Washington
"white school" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"white school" Discussed on WTOP

"White school. I just had so many questions had no idea who to turn to the book explores the school's history of slavery lists. Community groups and resource is available both on and off campus. But we wanted to do with the black book as well as really marked those big first that we have within our community student reporter for the Hoya Ashley's House, says the black book is a needed resource. Sean obviously has made a lot of progress. It's a much better place to be now, but there's still a long way to go. Already. W T O P NEWS. We don't normally associate golf courses with the civil rights movement, but changes Eircom ing to three local courses that do have that history. The National Links Trust is a non profit dedicated to protecting affordability and accessibility of public golf courses, which has not always been the case. The trust has signed a 50 year lease with the National Park Service to operate and improve East Potomac, Langston and Rock Creek golf courses. Playing on those courses has been a civil rights issue that goes back to the twenties in 1921. African Americans won the right to play these Potomac half a day each week. Langston his name for John Mercer Langston, the first black man to represent Virginia in the United States. House of Representatives. Kyle Cooper. W T. O P News for marking a big transportation anniversary around here. This region is definitely evolving, and we just did it 25 years ago, the Dulles Greenway Open this week in 19. 95, says the company's CEO Rene Hamilton, the first private toll road in Virginia since the 18 hundreds 14 miles stretching from Leesburg to the Dulles toll road. Before that, you would actually have to use Route seven, which at the time did have a number of stop lights. Ridership on the Greenway has never lived up to expectations. She wants to make the road Morva solution really looking at our customers and what Would be beneficial and valuable to them. In Loudon, Counting the alloy consisting W GOP News for sports at 15 and.

John Mercer Langston National Links Trust East Potomac Rene Hamilton White school Virginia Dulles Greenway Eircom House of Representatives Kyle Cooper reporter Sean National Park Service Loudon GOP United States Rock Creek Dulles
Ten Doors

Criminal

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Ten Doors

"We know now that they were following us for about a month. Cry To our we did. Notice strange things happening. But when you're working underground you are. For most of the time, you're a bit paranoid you. You kind of imagine that everyone is looking at you knows what you're doing. And looking back off to the arrest. We realized that they were following us for quite a while. In Nineteen Seventy, eight, twenty, nine year, old Tim Jenkin was active in the political efforts of South Africa's anti-apartheid movement. The country had been operating under apartheid for thirty years. A system that institutionalized racial segregation. The word apartheid means a partner. and. The government was controlled by white minority. Tim Jenkin White. He grew up in Cape Town. So I grew up under the situation with everything was divided. So. spatially, cities and towns divided the white areas. Black areas. So we went to white schools. Were black schools in black areas. Everything was separated even buildings had separate lifts for White People. For Black People. Talk said benches, white people and black people and certain beaches with designated for black. People. Most of the beaches with what people So. I just accepted eight. Because I didn't know any better I just assumed that the way things were. And then. Maneuver Twenty one years old the to the K.. He says, everyone he met their asked him what he thought about the fact that he lived in a country that was so racially segregated. He says he was actually confused. But then he started seeing programs on TV. Shows that would never have been broadcast in South Africa about the consequences of apartheid and at first I, didn't believe these These films that I was seeing. I thought it was all propaganda. After awhile, and after reading books that I couldn't obtain in South Africa. I began to realize the started thing is something quite terrible. I'd be living. Positive it. Really maintaining it in the sense and not understanding. What's Black South Africans? was suffering. He, returned to South Africa, and started studying sociology at the University of Cape Town. There, he became friends with another white student named. Stephen Lee. And started cheering books that he had brought back from the UK. anti-apartheid. Books and political histories that were censored in South Africa. At. This time the most prominent anti-apartheid organization was the African National Congress also known as the ANC. Nelson Mandela was a member of the ANC. By the nineteen seventies, the organization was banned in South Africa that had been declared unlawful. Seen by the White Minority Threat to. Public. Order. They operated underground and Tim and Stephen had heard that if you wanted to get involved, you could try contacting their office in. London. So the two of US traveled to the. UK. and. Simply went and knocked on the door. and. It was quite an amusing. Incident. because. The person who received US Said please just sit down there and you'll be wasted. Then he went into his office and type something on a piece of paper. The piece of paper said. You should not come here. Please meet me at the cafe around the corner in half an hour. So that's what we did. Tim and Stephen met with members of the ANC several times. And they asked to be put to work back home in south? Africa, the said Okay you can go back and sit up your print shop. And we'd need to teach you various things like security matters, how to conduct yourself in the underground. And showed us a few other. Innovative. Devices for for distributing leaflets and information one of these was. The is the leaflet bomb. It's not really a bomb. It was really just. Kind of exploding device. That would kill. Hundreds of leaflets up into the air, and then they would rain down on a crowd target crowd somewhere. So we went back to South Africa. With this knowledge. And set up shop.

Tim Jenkin White South Africa Black People White People Tim Jenkin Stephen Lee African National Congress Stephen Cape Town TIM UK. United States Partner. Nelson Mandela University Of Cape Town London
Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

"Alot from wonder media. Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca. Today we're talking about the first major American movie star. She openly criticized racist typecasting her accomplishments were groundbreaking and many of her critiques still. Ring true today. Let's talk about the prolific Anna. May Wong. Anna was born in Los Angeles in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. Her birth name was Wong lead song. She initially attended a majority white school but transferred to Chinese school to. Escape racism she. From her classmates. Anna often skipped class to check out nearby film sets pushing her way to the front of the crowd to get closer to the cameras. She came up with Anna May Wong as her stage name by age eleven. And she was fourteen when she appeared in a silent picture, caught the red lantern. At Seventeen, Anna played the lead role in the toll of the sea one of the first movies and color. Anna's most notable early role was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, she played in the hit movie the thief of Bagdad. Though. This part was a stepping stone for her career. It's also emblematic of the problems with Hollywood casting that Anna would soon after vocally advocate against and interviews. In the thief of Bagdad, Anna played a treacherously in a subservient role wearing very little clothing. Anna appeared in more than fifty films throughout her life and she often struggled with subservient. typecasting Hollywood also repeatedly granted lead Asian roles to white actors and cast actual. Asian. Actors. As villains. After working in the United, states for several years, Anna had had enough of Hollywood's biased casting. So she moved to Europe. Europe was more receptive when it came to Anna's acting ability. She started films throughout the continent with reporters praising her transcendent talent. One notable appearance was in the British movie. Piccadilly in nineteen twenty. Nine After a few years in Europe and a decided to give Los. Angeles. Another shot she appeared in the famous nineteen thirty two movie. Shanghai Express opposite. Marlene Dietrich. I must confess I. Don't quite know standard respectability that you know newborn how But Hollywood hasn't really improved. It's racist casting methods. Anna, auditioned for the lead role in the gutter. A film based on the novel about a family of Chinese farmers despite Anna's film

Anna May Wong Hollywood Europe Jenny Kaplan Bagdad Marlene Dietrich Manteca Los Angeles Chinese School Shanghai United LOS
"white school" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"white school" Discussed on WTOP

"Up and one twenty three expect delays beginning just after nightly street I morning light there WTOP traffic pleasant day ahead even though we're off to a cold start sunny skies with high temperatures this afternoon in the upper forties to the low fifties by the act evening clouds are going to build rain showers are likely through your Monday high temperatures on Monday in the low fifties Tuesday we got a good run at the mid fifties but more rain cloudy skies as well Wednesday highs in the upper forties a mix of sun and clouds with showers increasing as we head through the overnight hours I'm stern team for meteorologists Mar Theodore in Bethesda thirty three degrees land over thirty six degrees Viana thirty one degrees it's one forty nine I historic meeting place for African Americans in Montgomery County is among twelve sites Maryland's governor wants to improve the Maryland commission on African American history and culture and the Maryland historical trust recently awarded twelve nonprofit organizations nearly one million dollars in funds to improve sites that have historical meaning to African American communities the grant help identify and preserve buildings communities and historical sites of importance to the African American community in Maryland the one historic site in Montgomery County which is said to be the last Maryland to keep a church school and lodge hall intact which were the main meeting spaces for African American communities after the Emancipation Proclamation I one of twelve awardees eleven other historic schools churches and cemeteries are among the list of places awarded grant winning from twelve to a hundred thousand dollars intrigue Cameron WTOP news it's one fifty Maryland's house speaker has introduced legislation to settle a long running lawsuit over program disparities between four historically black colleges and traditionally white ones house speaker Adrian Jones introduced the measure calling for paying out five hundred and eighty million dollars over ten years the bill creates a special fund for for historically black colleges and universities the thirteen year old federal lawsuit alleges the state had under funded the institutions while developing programs that traditionally white schools that directly compete with the and drain prospective students away in twenty thirteen a federal judge found that the state had maintained a dole in segregated education system that violated the constitution one fifty one locally and statewide Virginia is contemplating changing how it frames it's Confederate history in Fairfax county the school board has unanimously voted to start the process that could end up changing the name of Robert.

Bethesda Montgomery County Maryland African American community Adrian Jones Virginia Fairfax county Robert Mar Theodore Cameron WTOP
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 1 year ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"white school" Discussed on 20 Minute Morning Show

20 Minute Morning Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on 20 Minute Morning Show

"<Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> so the question <Speech_Music_Male> is over the next <Speech_Music_Male> two years. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> What <Speech_Music_Male> is going <Advertisement> to take place <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in the most <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> segregated <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> school <Speech_Music_Male> system in <Speech_Music_Male> North Carolina <Speech_Music_Male> talk about Charlotte <Speech_Music_Male> Mecklenburg <Advertisement> schools <Speech_Music_Male> with this <Speech_Music_Male> majority <Advertisement> White <Speech_Music_Male> School Board? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Turn <Speech_Music_Male> this thing around <Speech_Music_Male> with equity <Speech_Music_Male> in education like <Speech_Music_Male> they always talk about. <Speech_Music_Male> We'll see <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dan right <Speech_Music_Male> here. Sprint <Speech_Music_Male> this podcast <Advertisement> with <Speech_Music_Male> friends. Let <Speech_Music_Male> them hear what's going on <Speech_Music_Male> in the city of Charlotte. <Speech_Music_Male> 'cause we got <Speech_Music_Male> to make a change coming <Speech_Music_Male> up next two <Speech_Music_Male> years. We'll keep an eye <Speech_Music_Male> on this situation <Speech_Music_Male> and you can hear all about <Speech_Male> it right here on <Speech_Male> the twenty minute morning. <Speech_Music_Male> Show the real people of Charlotte <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> begging for listening <Speech_Music_Male> to the twenty minute morning <Speech_Music_Male> show A podcast <Speech_Music_Male> production <Speech_Music_Male> brought to you by inside <Speech_Music_Male> urban media <Speech_Music_Male> written and produced <Speech_Music_Male> by BJ Murphy <Speech_Music_Male> from our Charlotte North Carolina <Speech_Music_Male> Studios. Please <Speech_Music_Male> subscribe to the <Speech_Music_Male> show and you'll be alerted <Speech_Music_Male> when on our daily <Speech_Music_Male> episodes are published <Speech_Music_Male> weekday <Speech_Music_Male> mornings at six. <Speech_Music_Male> Am <Speech_Music_Male> Our daily contributors. <Speech_Music_Male> Are Sean Sunday <Speech_Music_Male> Aka <Speech_Music_Male> from the U. <Speech_Music_Male> I. N. Uncut <Speech_Music_Male> News in steam <Speech_Music_Male> and for more news <Speech_Music_Male> about <Speech_Music_Male> and for people <Speech_Music_Male> of color go to our website. <Speech_Music_Male> You I knew <Speech_Music_Male> that net. <Speech_Music_Male> We'll see you <Speech_Music_Male> on the next episode <Speech_Music_Male> of the Twenty <Speech_Music_Male> Minute Senate Morning <Speech_Music_Male> Show wherever <Speech_Music_Male> podcast <Speech_Music_Male> play <SpeakerChange>

"white school" Discussed on 20 Minute Morning Show

20 Minute Morning Show

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on 20 Minute Morning Show

"A principal hot me in this is wind. Dr Wilcox was still here and they were talking about reducing spit suspension rates. Will Dr Wilcox caught up. All the principles that were in schools from kindergarten through third grade and told them you know don't suspend the black students and the principles like okay. What do we do with them? When they're acting up them is behaving he told him? I don't care what you do with. What does it mean now to have a majority white controlled school board and Charlotte Mecklenburg which is by the way the most segregated school system in the state of North Carolina? And you ask the question. How could this be in Charlotte? Yes in Charlotte. Now you have a white majority controlled school board and that Albright. She ran for at-large seat for the School Board of Education and Charlotte. She's here to unravel rabble some things with us. It just gives some insight on what the black community can look forward to very proud of the race that I finished it wasn't that's quite. Give me over the finish line but I was very proud of those numbers anyway right well. Now that Mary McRae is stepping down Erica. Okay Ellis stewardess stepping down and At least Daschle Jennifer de la Hora and also nor ship are the newly inducted members offers of the Mecklenburg County School Board of Education. What does that mean for? Our children are black children. Well plus us in a unique situation because because we had to African American members of the Community Step Endow and the ideal situation would have been to get to War African Americans and they're on the board plus maybe one more by getting the least voted out so the situation that says in now is that we have a six to three majority which means we have six white board members and three African American board members. Thor's so those three African American board members will somehow have to convince two of the White Board members to vote along with them to get anything push through for children of color a cms is seventy two percent minority which is made up a Hispanics and blacks saw so you would ideally? Won't your board to represent those demographics. So what we have here is a situation where twenty seven percent Dan of the students within. CMS are white but we have six white board members right. Seventy two percent black and Hispanic students and a majority white school board as well so with Miss Daschle. She's going to be the chair person right. She's out of South Charlotte and it seems like to me. She wanted to be control of the school board but my question would be for. What reason season are they so interested in controlling a majority black school district? And you know that actually is an excellent question. I cannot not tell you that because I feel it the situation was reversed. Would the white community allow six African Americans to tell them how to educate their children or when they're going to educate their children or allow us to make the decisions on what resources will be allocated to which school in a system where they will represented by seventy two percent and African Americans will represented by twenty seven seven percent. And I think that we can all say the answer to that is no. I'm thinking on. How do we as a community allowed this to happen? We're well we're not unified as a as a big voting block because you and Queen Thompsons should've been grouped together as a as a Strong voting coalition and to get you to on to replace Erica and and Miss Mary Stephanie. snead she was also also running than we had another brother who was running for office For the school board we have had a black neil represents yeah in a long time also also another black female principle. which was Donna? Park a tape so we had a large field of highly qualified Black candidates but a lot of the black community and especially are black ministers are black community leaders threw their support in behind on Dash Shoe and Jennifer Delara you know including sitting council members and members of the board of County Commissioners. So so you have to wonder what was their strategy. If they're throwing their support behind the white females who already come in with the money. You know the more affluent Ashley the Black Political Caucus endorsed Stephanie Snead Monte Witherspoon Blown Eleanor's ship. But what you had working against the black political caucus was you had the black ministers You had the black Prominent leaders and community leaders endorsing a leaf and de la Hora so then the other six black candidates candidates you know we're all also fighting for those black bolts so now you're splitting the black vote eight different ways and then of course or statue and de la Hora had the ability to go to the white communities and also Get their bowls but not only goals and this is what makes a huge difference. You know a lease raised. I believe over forty thousand dollars. Dila Hera came in at twenty twenty four thousand dollars that was. The money raised goes toward their campaigns as a black candidate. We cannot raise that money in our community. T- sold the white candidates had the ability to come to our communities and get our boats and then they went back to their communities. Is it hey we need donations. Yeah candidate cannot do that with Mrs Dash. ooh I know there was a some things with her Coming into these black churches and the black people just fallen all out over her and You know something about us when you know white folk show some attention. We just go crazy and I wonder what was promised Thomas if you support me. I'm going to do this. What do you think the The trinkets were are going to be You know I I have no idea I couldn't imagine you know what it would take to sell a seat at the table especially when we're talking about educating our black youth so I I don't I can't ask her that I have no idea what you trade off of that but it's very disturbing one of the things that you think is going to happen under their leadership. What what do you think is you this point one thing if I apply it to want one thing I think Struggling schools are going to struggle even more because I think a lot of the work is going to be done from behind the diocese and we need it representatives that was ready to push up their sleeves and walk into these films schools. and to see Ashley for themselves what was going on and help implement implement a plan of improvement and with the candidates that you have sitting on the remembers network because they will be members at their January so with those members members that are going to be sworn into the board. I just don't see that passion for I fell is old because failing schools do make a lot of money right absolutely village. Schools is a huge billion over four billion dollar a year business. How do they make money with a failing school because they so you're saying they're not gonNA do anything to the try to make some of these schools improve because of the amount of money that the school system gets or they're buddies good consultants and things of that nature right exactly? I think that you know they're gonNA put some things on paper that's going to look real good but you. I know who's going to implement. Were who's GonNa follow up and with films schools. The way they received money automatically. If you're in a title one school they. Each child receives an additional four hundred sixty dollars. And that doesn't sound like a lot when you say it but you multiply it by thirteen hundred. Some some of these schools have sixteen hundred kids. That's over a million dollars a year just for that school if the child has IEP plan. That's extra money any if a special needs then that's extra money so you also have federal incentives that they sat down to these schools to help them improve. So when you look at all the sources of money that's coming into the schools. A school like hard in high. School is receiving per student student. More money than a Myers Park. What feels in the gap? Is You also have the parents at my us part so you might have a booster club that has has fifty thousand dollars sitting in because the parents donated a low performing school will just continue to be a low performing school. As long as it doesn't get too bad whereas really glaringly obvious for the most part they just let I ride and keep the money pouring in just let it ride absolutely what you have have in your head. The black parents need to hear it and they need to hear it often. And kind of uncover the the The elephant in the room room. What's going on in Charlotte Mecklenburg schools especially the forty two thousand suspensions? I still don't think that's been addressed to the level where it needs. Yeah absolutely not and and you know one of the things I think as black folks we have to be careful about is how we ask for things from this board. I do remember when a principal hobby this win. Dr Wilcox was still here and they were talking about. Reducing spits suspension rates. Will Dr Wilcox Wilcox Call Dope all the principles that were in schools from kindergarten through third grade and told them you know don't suspend the black students and the principles like okay. What do we do let them? When they're acting up or they're misbehaving? He taught him. I don't care what you do with them. Put them in the back of the room. Put them in the hall send him to I. Why is it? I don't care. Just don't suspend them so we you look at that. Are we serving the students absolutely not. We're just housing them both. But those were the marching orders from Dr Wilcox because he gave us what we asked for. He's not suspended students. But at the same time you're not educating them and addressing their needs so that's worthy bore steps in because if you have anybody that has an ounce of Integrity Hegarty in them then they will go to that superintendent and say no Sir does not what we mean. We mean that you're going to handle the discipline problem. You're indicate the channel and the best that we can. We're going to keep them in class. So what you say. They don't do what they want to. I don't care just don't suspend them so well. We have to be very careful what we're asking for.

"white school" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on AP News

"Their traditional white school uniforms AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports they're showing their commitment to the city's anti government protest movement they have got that in the hundreds after the Chinese University of Hong Kong I'm too public spaces in the city's central business district the nearly three months of youth dominated protests calling for democracy and an independent inquiry into police conduct will be tested classes resume after the summer break in the semi autonomous Chinese territory I'm Charles de Ledesma actor comedian Kevin Hart has been hurt in a crash while riding in a vintage muscle car in California a report from the California highway patrol says heart with the passenger in the nineteen seventy Plymouth barracuda that went off the road in the hills above Malibu and rolled down an embankment early Sunday morning the reports as hard and the driver both suffered major back injuries and were taken to hospitals another passenger a woman only complained of pain the report says the driver was not under the influence of alcohol. tens of thousands of Hong Kong high schoolers are boycotting the first day of school wearing gas masks goggles and hard hats along with their traditional white school uniforms AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports they're showing their commitment to the city's anti government protest movement they have got that in the hundreds after the Chinese University of Hong Kong I'm too public spaces in the city's central business district the nearly three months of youth dominated protests calling for democracy and an independent inquiry into police conduct will be tested as classes resume after the summer break in the semi autonomous Chinese territory I'm Charles de Ledesma..

Kevin Hart California Plymouth barracuda Charles de Ledesma Chinese University of Hong Kon Hong Kong three months
"white school" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on AP News

"And hard hats along with their traditional white school uniforms AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports they're showing their commitment to the city's anti government protest movement they have got that in the hundreds after the Chinese University of Hong Kong I'm too public spaces in the city's central business district the nearly three months of youth dominated protests calling for democracy and an independent inquiry into police conduct will be tested as classes resume after the summer break in the semi autonomous Chinese territory I'm Charles de Ledesma the trade war between the US and China is heating up as a P. correspondent Julie Walker reports this comes before the holiday shopping season that means Americans are facing potentially higher prices for some clothes shoes sporting goods and other consumer items says bill levy chief economist at flex port yeah the new cost in the supply chain and each company can deal with it differently apple can choose to. swallow this and you can cut into their earnings or they can choose to pass it along president trump says trade talks are still on for September first see what happens but we can't allow China to rid myself anymore to god the new fifteen percent tariff applies to about a hundred and twelve billion of Chinese imports I'm Julie Walker. a rescue puppy has been welcome to the high with British prime minister Boris Johnson and his girlfriend Carrie Simmons the male Jack Russell is a rescue from a Welsh poppy foam the charity friends of animals Wales says it's absolutely overjoyed the puppies found such devoted illness the puppies been named Dylan and felt the Welsh way and joins Larry the often photographed.

Carrie Simmons prime minister president bill levy Chinese University of Hong Kon Larry Dylan Wales Jack Russell Charles de Ledesma Boris Johnson trump apple chief economist Julie Walker China US fifteen percent
"white school" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Paul. I've never gone to an all white school. Never been on the sports team that that did not have black athletes. I would give my life for some of my teammates. I know again, I just thought copies of that nature, black athletes, boycott and southern schools. I mean I thought we were past, but I really thought this country had moved past that we're not bombing churches and killing little girls in more. We're not burning people out of their houses and things of that nature. I mean I really thought we'd make some improvement, the past fifty or sixty years. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe I'm wrong. What I know there's no question. We have in total agreement with you on that. Okay. Well, that just wanted to clear the air on that. But again, you're entitled to your opinion, I'm entitled to mine that gentleman was titled to his mislead was titled to hers. Thank you for taking my call. Thank you. Got that cleared up. AC is up next in New Jersey. Hello. How you doing? Good. Can you hear me? Yes. Perfect. Well. What's going on rate? Michigan is doing it. So they had another to go. So I guess you sort of that, that, that I. But that's him Harbaugh in when when, when he needs to make a gut call. He can't make it. And that's why he is not been successful at Michigan. Yes. Is as your own. Then surely them I am the wheel dick Klay refined bombs. I don't know who the hell was, what cutting college. All the moose was. You on like horns, it's not gonna happen book. And if it happens, they has to go with authority, which is different person. And he was saying something about that. So that case miss the news. Plus, I'm gonna put you in a mass, then the linens. Panties much more. Swami is up next. Good afternoon. Hey Swami, the Swami the Swami just to, you know, I'm just an SEC observer and I I've kind of been watching this. You know, thing pointing you and about this little wager. You gotta go winning then. But, you know, I think beaten down Paul, you kind of want his respect. I mean, I know he bash them a law and everything, but is it just me? Or do you truly want her about his respect any answer would just play to whatever particular side is either for or against me. But it really doesn't matter. I don't know Jim Harbaugh met him once or twice he, he is a topic of conversation. I think I think some of it's over done..

Jim Harbaugh Paul. Swami Michigan dick Klay white school New Jersey SEC sixty years
"white school" Discussed on Collectively Podcast

Collectively Podcast

15:29 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on Collectively Podcast

"But you're, you're mentally jaded by by people 'cause yet Blat bags peers with don't let that turn you off from pro blackness danger black brother because of his weakness in ill educated. Mindset, you know spaghetti the by brother. Yeah. I agree. I do as an adult when you're kit, yet hearing things like oh, you're an Oriole you speak, too proper usage of rock music. I it's like I didn't I fortunately high school made friends with lack guys, invaded black guys at coup actually listened to rock music, growing up before, then not really like it's moving out to the all white school, the five black his liking rock music, because it was like it wasn't an Esa thing that people that try tell people it's not about race. You know, it's, it's about for life people. I won't say for because we're against that. It's not about always about race like for you. I'm hearing in for myself. It's about who just wants to fucking washing may place like for you place. A magic can't what I what you quite like this. What's, what is going to like me because I'm a dork, I guess, I, quote unquote, speak, why I don't speak. I don't use slaying enough to be black enough. It's, it's everyone else's wards a simulated uneducated mindset. That pushes black black. Let me just say, if the black men and the black women who look at people of color, who aren't there. Stereotypical media fed bullshit of blackness that reject black men and women who are quote unquote, different. So when you start riding people for dating people outside their culture when there. Cultural except that they are part of their culture. That's the problem's, not them rejecting lack people. It's like nowadays, it's okay, it's okay to be black nerdy. We have blurred con here. You see, it's okay to be lack in different half black rock groups, but for a long time, it wasn't in a lot of places it still isn't like it's not. Okay. To be black. Listen to rock music, like an may it's cool. Now when I was growing it wasn't cool. It was like you're just trying to be white. Yeah. Like you were doing too much like you were trying to be one of them. It's like no, yeah. I like this stuff before even New Zealand. Meeting, a sense, knee PI feel like it definitely did come from or not necessarily the healthiest place for me. But I like now from the other side as I've gotten older, I can I can definitely see a the issues that had regarding a how I felt like people on both sides feed me like I didn't Philly. Yeah. People can't fault that way since we couldn't necessarily express the things that we liked without saying or without being called being trying to be white or something we felt like we didn't really belong from on either side. Right. As we've as we were younger, and I felt like because of that I who's in relationships with white guys who also kind of perpetuated that stereotype, but ninety feel lake can now, kind of see that. And definitely try vocalise it in vocalized exactly, what I like in a partner, regardless of whether. They're black or white say, this is what I need you to understand based on. I think that everyone has to kind of come to that. Yes. It's difficult. Right. Especially when you're younger, and you don't really get to see that I feel like when you get older, it's you see, like the nuances in that. It's okay to be a little bit different. People are, are little bit more accepting. Yeah. I feel like when I have a lot of conversations with some. Well, I won't say a lot. I'll have have conversations or listen to, you know. So if the podcast YouTube channels, we've talked about off air of a lot of people are kind of just like pro black means, but music this by that, and it just this, you know, just moving into dating. It's like the other argument that kinda just touched on this right at irks, my nerves like you have to everything blast. We pro black. Okay. Yeah, I get. I wanna upload. Black music. I, I try shop at black businesses. I try to, you know, promote and beyond that American culture, wise, I like to support African businesses west African businesses west African culture was Africa music, like you know here in DC play to fuck in African on station progress, but can play current. They play fall veto overtime with a frigging screen like the song is old anyway. I'm glad made it to the I love you. Please quiet missing indicated concert, but it's just like that's great. But I, I'm gonna promote that I'm we promote afro visa African debt limit from everything African in black black artists black riers by everything, but feel like. Because of that. I've heard the education argument that if you date, someone who is not black, like this, one YouTube channel, I like to watch and it's run by a Nigerian girl, she was has his panel discussions, and she wanted her commentators on his very subject about interesting pro said that would she dates people who are not black? She finds that she has to explain everything to them. And when she because dating is the argument dating is strategical marriages, strategical, you marry a date people based on a law strategic things. But just like dateable a you look at their income. If we saw, I don't get me wrong girl show scrape by flake. Our panel is sometimes filled with some very privileged. That's really it was fight privilege black people, and they all have similar. Westworld or a similar mindset. Oh, yeah. Background similar yet. Not much diversity very sprinkled than. Yeah. If usually they don't let person taco. Oh, yeah, thanks to people in the only come every other episode Yan's like thirty people. Here's his chief people who sprinkled through award anyway. But this girl, I digress. This girl talks about how she when she shoots stating strategical as she dates that she has too often educate her partner wonder non black on black culture and black beans. And when she date, someone who is black. She knows that she doesn't have to do that. And when I heard that this is older episode, and I brought up before we start recording is that I find it very interesting being a person who. Who is African? I often have to educate lack of people on being African, so that's very exhausting. Very exhausting. I understand her argument is exhausting. Sometimes explain things that you think you should just know I'm black, you're black, but no it's deeper than that. And that's frustrating here in exodus. Not just that it's like literally I've had to explain people up north where black about shit in the south that people do that. They understand though. It's like your education is never gonna stop an advisor as one of your arguments dating someone outside your racist, very weak because there things he would do in Callie. I love bicycling Kelly. So she got the other understand. I don't understand that part of black hole. Ch. I don't people who don't understand things about black southern culture, other act take out from that 'cause we're from Georgia n were African. So that figure every time we cook something explained to I have X that I could not understand African Nigerian or Liberia food for the first time, she smelt, she actually did tell me it's it smelled. We're in a stock, and I was like, girl just you're saying, right e and she's from northeast of this country, and I was like, okay, whatever. And then she started eating like show of rise. The fuck is. Like not met anyone who doesn't live. Fuck fufill we've laid Africa it is. She like a her job rise than shoot sinners girlfriend now likes all that shit. And this is kind of, like even the she was black, my ex exits black. He and she's I felt myself explaining so much about my culture's them over and over and over again, but you know what? That's caught fucking dating someone because unless you're dating someone who grew up in your culture and yearn, neighbor, your family, which is kind of Liberia, this is mild bit with successful than this probably will have we might be related in so short of. Chance. I never swiped right. Liberian. I'm sorry. Like Like a fly. a flag. Give a cool date. You even they. Who's your parents name? We got call phone call to call your mom. Color grandma's. So, you know, so those grandma. With. Let's get together and cross them with that we can date family tree girl. Right. But it's like I mean I understand saying that you feel that alive, pro black people argue against I mean argue for pro black love, because they feel it, they'll have explain things, and yet I had to explain a lot things staying people who are like, like I had to explain my hair. You know, I had to explain why I were extensions not one where my natural out all the time. I, I have to explain a lot of things about culture, late wide any know what the great part of it is, is digging someone who isn't personal caller have asked you things really scarily. Why? Why? Here in my face with Iraq tech myself. You know what I rather? You ask me to not ask and you know what happens in those moments they create they have understanding like the best part. My girlfriend's offend the black girls hair to other black men at her job, who was making fun of a black co worker, who changes her wits all the time. She actually took came home, probably told me I had to defend I explain these black men that black women don't always want to wear the hair out because their hair is really their hair's. Fragile is curly, and they'll necessarily want always have to deal with the on top of it. That is the freedom of expression like when they're ever run reports. We know took her dating black women who actually took the time to educate her on things that maybe she would have never know if she didn't date, someone like me, who changes their hair, like we're. Use my drop. A why why is that a burden? I don't consider it a burning like a Syrian I could sit progress. Let me educate, just like we talk about why people knowing our history. Let's help them understand, isn't that. What if you're so pro plaque? You're so pro. Glad you're like everyone's going to understand this black. This black cost everyone cars, if they're black white Asian who gives a fuck everyone's gonna know what it means to what black culture is. It means to be win. Means field have seen the table. Because when you sit at that table, you're gonna have conversations to educate people who resist at dinner table full of people from all walks of life, and don't have have to explain shit all the time you fighting for a seat, but you'll want to explain these people don't understand undone dam that was dropped the Muslim allies. How you educate your partner, even just follow up. Got educating foreigner for one. I love the fact that you mentioned that we want everyone to know our history, but we don't want to put the work into let them know I think that is very important. And one thing that we all sat your member is everyone was taught a different like history like southern history books. Tell you a different history than northern history books, you know, playing this fact remains that the truth is not as easily accessible as we like to believe because there's so many sources in. So I feel like it's important to put the work in, but it's also important to know how much work you put in. I think one thing that we all we all generally have to keep in mind is that racism and this discrimination is. Normalized, and we all grew up on that, and the only way to fix it is by talking about it. And so, I think all of that is definitely the most important aspect of all me personally, I feel like my experience is when it came to my axes with the exception of my last one, the other ones didn't want to put the work in a lot of the made of sumptious of black people and. Due to the fact that I was really young. And again, had internalized racism, based on how I felt about myself in how I thought that life you will receive me when I was younger and the whole Oreo bullshit, that got me fucked up tunnel. Honestly, another thing too, that a lot of times when people told me that the whole Oriole thing, a lot of probably a hey, this probably didn't have that intentions, like my best friend when I was younger when I was just mentioning to you thought probably thought that was just to keep little thing that really pissed me. The fuck everytime. She mentioned that, like, I literally had a white guy that I was best friends with that I was possibly going to date when I was in high school, but it just never worked out. I don't know it just one of those situations, but he literally would tell me that all the time that I was going to announce like you know what the person that I would ever marry if I would get married, but never told me that. People..

partner YouTube Africa Liberia all white school New Zealand Philly Westworld Georgia Yan advisor Kelly Iraq
"white school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"white school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Were you looking high school? Depends on when we're talking I came into it very lost very lost in early in high school. Did you get lost in middle school? I got lost in fourth grade when I'm got transferred out of the school. I went to the projects and went to school. I got bus to school north side of Chicago. I got lost at first day and didn't get unlawful until like sophomore year high school. What was the feeling that you had when you got to the north time? Just suddenly, suddenly, my identity just didn't exist. I just had no footing socially to to build an identity off of. And so most of my memories. In middle school, and and early high school just kind of scrambling for something to hold onto 'cause you get there, and you don't know the rules, basically. Yeah. And it's a lot of it is like racial stuff. Like, I went from an all black school to a mostly white school. And I think I experienced a lot of it through that lens at first, but in thinking back about it was a lot more about going from a poor school to a school where a lot of kids have money and the combination of those two things at just really never felt connected to any people there. And and when I was there was other people who seem to be kind of oppressed by the whole thing, either economically or socially, what a lot of kids were like super sad in seventh grade when like Bain died, you know, what I mean, like a hung out with a lot of those. But also, you know, I played sports. So I had that. But also wasn't cool enough to hang with those guys because they were like good with girls that no idea what to do with a girl. At that point in my life. You know, so just a lot of flailing a lot of gravity straws until about midway through high school, you graduated from college and went and got a job. And so what was the point where you thought I'm not going to be a guy with a job? I'm going to be a guy who makes music for a living. I got laid off in two thousand nine from being a teacher and a newer what like twenty eight twenty nine years old. It was twenty eight. So you're a grownup. That year. Also got my first record deal though. So I got signed in like February March of that year to my first independent. Do I got laid off in the summer that fall supposed to go on a tour. My first tour open for bus driver, abstract rude. And when I got laid off it was like a conversation home me, and my wife like, you know, I I mean, I was driving home argued thinking when I was gonna go home, get monster.

white school Bain Chicago twenty eight twenty nine years
"white school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"white school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me we decided as a family that that would happen. Our community wanted to have our best and brightest go to the white school to lessen any fear around whether or not the school with dilapidated anyway. Attending it. And I was one of the first, and I remember my first day going into my English class. And I thought oh English has always been one of my better subjects and I'm gonna fail because I couldn't understand English teacher. She had a twain that sounded so different to me from my side of tar Pora mind, you we're talking about a distance that I could walk to school from my home. But she sounded so different the communities were truly divided in that way. And we had a teacher who stood up on the desk that day the first day. I went into his history class and explained so eloquently if you can even see the paradox that that how blacks were so suited to slavery. Never chilling. So hard. Saying God, please don't let me cry. If you just let me get out of here without crying on never come back. That's how intimidated how fearful in how foreign I felt a US history class. Did you wanna stop going to that school? I absolutely want to stop going. And I told my dad I didn't want to go back and dad gave me three options. He said you can come back here and compete against other black Qiaotou are gonna be scholarships to go to school go up and he could floor the teacher and seek retaliation. Or I could go back, and I could understand. And this is something that if you say too, many black people they will finish the sentence for you is not what they call you. It's what you answer to. See you graduated high school, and then you went off to college to North Carolina. A and t what do you what do you remember about that time I loved that campus? And that's where my older sibling set gone it. It was such a wonderful time to be at North Carolina ENT when I graduated and what did you do when you graduate? I I worked in the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC I worked here for about a year and a half. And I went home to visit mom and dad, and I remember one morning I got up to walk through the hall, and I saw them kissing and hugging just just like teenagers. And I thought. You know, I'm an adult by then. Right. That was the last time. My mom saw my dad alive. Many times since then have thought if you have to say goodbye, what a wonderful wait for her to know that the last time he saw her alive he held her and loved her so richly and she him have a heart attack. My dad had taken two young men out on the waters in North Carolina, shrimp fishing. They wanna shrimp boat and a storm came up. My.

white school North Carolina US twain tar Pora Qiaotou National Academy of sciences Washington
"white school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"white school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"How blacks in this country and the country, you know, because some races not all, but we fought for liberty. We all need to be three. And always should do. I want to ask you a question. The the Virginia governor, I guess is under fire for doing something. Very foolish. Nineteen Eighty-four in school. I wanna I wanna get this perspective from you. During the early days of the nineteen twenties and thirties and stuff. When when they would do minstrels in white folks would try to become black folks, they would put on what they called black face, obviously. And it was accepted in those days. Now nowadays, it comes across as racist and everything else, but as an African American Cornelius tell me is it is that offensive to to African Americans today. George. Let me say I'll be honest. When they did that in the night was raised because they didn't want black be onstage with white. And stuff like that. But like you said as time's gone by this guys hippie skidding and also come out. Now, he won't save twenty years playing all the black bass Taylor. He just won't say, but I'm gonna tell you something. Republicans have always tried to help blacks and stuff like this and democrat, especially in the south. I don't know about the north south. It'd been very racy. I'm gonna give you one afternoon in my life. I was the first elected a black president at my high school. I was a sophomore class president white and black. The dominantly white school. Come the next year feel good? Although we've got too many blacks, they all the black Pineville, which is the next city over and Taga the next other city over only black whites more books. So that just goes to show like I said, I was the first African-American liquid south five more class president at my high school, Alexandria, senior high, and then they took you out. Yeah. It's better jet black that Alexandria, senior high. She. Yeah. Another city of black across the river from. And that's how rape is wide around in my area. And you know, what I went through your comedy told me y'all going through the Steph, I'm gonna give you a very good. He said that too much stuff. I'm gonna give you a cliff and like that guy Muller that's going after Trump more personally, but I sent him material. And like I said, I got my FBI five finally where they said, I contacted them by phone and by mail and nothing was ever done. All right, my friend. Well, not we don't know. Exactly if he's going after Trump or not we don't know that yet. There's been some reports the president said he's not subject to the investigation. Let's see how it unfolds, but they've indicted, Roger stone seven counts seven counts. All right next up. Let's go to D in Minneapolis. Minnesota d welcome to the program. Hi there. Hi, George nice to talk to you too. What's up? Hi, bill. Since I was ninety six when I was sixteen and stumbled across coast to coast over the years, I've listened to many many broadcasting you, and I have.

president George dominantly white school Alexandria Trump Virginia Pineville Minneapolis FBI Roger stone rape guy Muller Minnesota twenty years
"white school" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"white school" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"My thing everything you're saying is like that's how it happens in real light. I agree because there is nobody exists in a vacuum. And nobody exists without their own individual experiences. It's something about you can think about it on a theoretical. And and like like, you can think about it from a from a philosophical standpoint of like or anthropological standpoint of like, oh, yeah. This is what happens, you know, in the whole of black men and white women and race dynamics in the country. But at the end of the day one they're in high school and to they're all coming. They're all bringing their own. Individual experiences to the situation. So you know, you can't separate that stuff. Which is what is going to be like, that's how it exists in the movie this little tough. I I hear both. I hit that point. And I hear what everyone says in the movies. I interested in is that if this was reversed if this would have been look who's coming to this would have been like Patrick going to the suburbs. And he stayed away woman blatantly within the first time he opened the first time he walks in school. We now know his race would be a problem like, and you kind of get to hear like because there's white whatever. But the moment there's an attraction is really race would have been pushed in front of your face. Right. And I'm not gift. Well, here's the other thing. There are gender dynamics that plays. Well, so we have to keep that in mind. Like, one of the reasons I think nobody brings up the fact nobody talks about the race in the beginning is because it's not a relationship if it's just him having sex with a white girl that most people are going to be okay with it because they're. Whatever like, it's just a guy having sex with a girl. Oh, there's a white girl like like all like a bunch of them wanted to have sex with her 'cause she's like a new girl in school. But once it starts to be apparent that. Like, oh, no, he's having a real relationship with her. And he's not hanging out with this person. Now, and he's not hanging out with that person. Now, then they're like, wait a minute. Like now, you're actually like taking a person away from us not just having sex with them. So do you think it so I think a black women going to a all white school? Then the idea of like a white guy like trying to pick her up like all the other white dudes would be like, yeah, we can go smash that. But then if it's like, then it's then if it's like them having a relationship, then it the same thing would happen. Like, then they were like, wait a minute. Like, you shouldn't actually like are you should think aided to that? But it's maybe not okay. To actually is. Hey Hey ya, ya. but it's difficult to conclude. My initial. All. Don't do it. There was just another character. I think. James? They could have had that. That that Carrie Washington introduce I just I just think that that would be just made the movie strong. I think I think you need it more because I hear it both got the same. But like this. This is told to her I Ness my hunter. So this is her as right? And again is one of those tricky things like, you know, we're doing this movie at the person the leaves white in. It's like this is the thing. The only reason I even did this world because this is the thing that you were allowed to see movie this when you watch birth of a nation, right? That thing that literally propel to enrollment of the kidney K was a movie that a white man in black face stoking, white woman the movie, right? The reason that James you're gonna test because you wrote this like the reason a lot of black. You weren't a lot in pools because white men thought that black men we're gonna come and take their women. Right. So the thing is like the of this movie is based on the net is soul. Immaterial like thing is black men and white women. Right. Like, it is the thing. White made him fear. Is that thing where like sometimes the black community? Feels like oh, you're leading us. You're you're selling out. What you do this thing? Yeah. And those are two different different things. Right..

White white school James Patrick Carrie Washington
"white school" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

06:47 min | 3 years ago

"white school" Discussed on No Jumper

"I watched like four movies. There's no like there's like, right? What's your favorite movie? I don't know. I really like seeing that many movies. And usually, I don't remember the ones I do see so. Well, I mean Friday made a big impression on me. But that's because I seen it like eight times. That's like one of the only movies seen. Little pump. I don't watch know movies. I quote, I was like thank you someone else. So so air by using right there, right? Live Aid as self you feel me definitely a lot of fucks not they self. You feel me like. You're not gonna get nowhere for trying to be the next person. Or you think you're going? You're going to be happy. Could you not do you don't even know yourself? How you have you don't even know to fuck. You is what I'm saying. Like people think money is them you feel me. And that's fuck everything. Money route volleyball just like. I was the one that can go hang around the killers angle header on skateboarders. Always been like that though is like not by my life who set up like that. Like, I want to the worst schools. I went to the white school being only black person in the whole fucking school. Learn how to debt air by the same person, they put in different places. And they put shit out there to make little light. We different we really designed people like me like, I outta matter. Why grew up in with the borsch it where he grew up. Ing. Just like I learned to like set people 'cause I'm leaving. He will be having ego problems. Definitely you feel me like like. I'm like, I'm aware. But people always want to call it a person who we're we're lucky. You're a normal not normal out of the ordinary. But yeah. We gotta look forward to what are you trying to drop next came back and bam. Vigils dropping. The whole family drop in. Everybody just seeing in her dropping. And his life. About the light do a little west name to about star low podcast to oh. For real. What saying do is tech. You. What the hell is talking about for the regular? There's a chance I didn't look as shake his hand. But it's probably because I was thinking about the camera. Where he at DC wearing a lizard Costner that on purpose. The lizard Kosta worked definitely made an impression. He in life like he ceded shit shit in the industry. And he's so used them fuck adding light feel me like like fake as people you yourself. You feel? That's why he said why name me an ASO see so used to that. Is like. Live. Like a dragon costume. Tara, actually. The podcast. We don't I like the idea me like you should wear dragon costume to rep Dr not Mito, that's your that would be off brand director. He'd be Tiber extra create of shit. Like being a director. You've got gotta be like a. I'd be another way. This is true. Air by. Art, either everybody can wrap you can just go into say anything. This is true. But I ain't by the where no lizard hostile. Because that ain't me that's him. And not let him wearing I see her. Yeah. That's not like every day. Not in every day thing. Well, I mean you ever seen that rap a little, but it's like a full cost. Like he really being married day. I just went to a party winning are rich people anywhere swith and Detroit jersey, right? That's hard. Perspect- myself Donna dinosaur costume fuck. You wanna get one with no jumper own. That's a fact I don't wanna talk down on his culture. I thought it was hard. Shit. So it was w I talked to man appreciated. I thought I get to meet your mom that you came through is burgundy during this podcast that was pretty. Oh, yeah. We definitely photos after this. If I wasn't aimed good. Get your picture shot. Really do everything though. Appreciate you. The city. Dry. The show. Hey. We about to get the photo right now during the podcast lit. Yeah. Shotgun. But I don't care. Shit. You called? Call the I'm not gonna Bud Light. We're talking about. Everyone thinks this. I'm definitely not about it. I want you to drink one of those never mind shot. I don't know if I see boozier, but I- tricking God there, but like. Although. Iras. Here we go hard for sure. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. They're real..

Kosta Tara Bud Light tricking white school Detroit Costner director brand director
"white school" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"white school" Discussed on KCRW

"We live in an in this society. Everybody wants to have this online. Clouds people want to have access, and then one exclusivity file is basically, right? It's come to life in here. You had something that was presented as the ultimate sort of festival experience. And the reality of it was so different. And I think that you know, it feels like a very much a reflection of the times that we're in right now Chris Smith his new documentary fire is out this week on net. Flicks. Thank you so much for coming onto the program. All right. Thanks. Sometimes people have a profound impact on our lives shifting its trajectory. This story in our ongoing missed connection series begins at south ridge high school in Beaverton, Oregon. So when I was in high school, the police officer that was stationed in my school at oftentimes sorta call me and a lot of my friends out of class in his office. Greg mckelvey was a junior. Andrew helper was the school resource officer the police departments Representative to south ridge high at the school. There is a rather rampant theft issue. Anything was easily picked up until like, a graphing calculator. Ipod iphone any sort of small latronic that was easy to take. It was a group of probably four to five people that were consistently being implicated in thefts. They thought that it was this group of friends that I. Had it was predominantly white school. Crib. Mckelvin is black. He says the few black students at south which hung out together. And so in that group, they thought that we were responsible for the calculators that were going missing. And they viewed me sort of the leader of that group. And so I think that led them to want to find out if I knew where the calculator was or multiple calculators, Andrew Helberg, followed his leads in addition to his other duties selfishly. I would rather be doing outreach and education than taking theft reports. But I was also getting pressure from the school, and parents who were the victims of these thefts to actually start doing something about this. So I started a rotter investigation and just started collecting information and investigation that Howard says included interviews digital forensics and culminated in a search warrant for grad mckelvey, home, the next thing. I know they're barging through the door in riot gear..

white school Greg mckelvey south ridge high school theft officer Mckelvin Chris Smith Andrew Helberg Beaverton Oregon Howard Representative
Kansas schoolgirl at heart of landmark desegregation ruling dead at 76

01:40 min | 3 years ago

Kansas schoolgirl at heart of landmark desegregation ruling dead at 76

"Or abuse in this hour we'll consider how metoo changing this controversial industry this society even care what happens to women insects work and if so what should be done to protect them from us it's a difficult conversation but we'd love to hear from you so comment on our facebook page or tweet us at one eight live from npr news in washington i'm shay stevens the woman at the heart of the lawsuit that outlawed school desegregation has died into pika kansas linda brown thompson was seventyfive kansas public radio stephen kuranda reports brown was in third grade when her father oliver tried to enroll her in an all white school in topeka kansas the school turn them away and oliver was later the lead plaintiff in the brown v board of education of topeka lawsuit the nineteen fifty four supreme court decision said segregated schools were inherently unequal and unconstitutional it wasn't important step in the civil rights movement the n double acp says linda brown broke barriers and change the meaning of equality in the us for npr news i'm steven kuranda the white house says president trump maintains he never had an affair with porn star stormy daniels and disputes claims that she was threatened with harm if she didn't keep quiet as npr's scott horsely reports about twenty two million people watched sunday sixty minutes interview with gandules the news magazines biggest audience in nearly a decade the white house won't say whether president trump himself joined the audience to watch his accuser but the night before the broadcast trump had dinner with his longtime attorney michael cohen cohen's acknowledged.

Michael Cohen Cohen Attorney Scott Horsely Daniels President Trump Linda Brown Topeka Stephen Kuranda Facebook Washington NPR Donald Trump White House United States Oliver Brown Kansas Linda Brown Thompson Shay Stevens
Linda Brown, student at the center of landmark Brown v. Board of Education, dead at 76

02:30 min | 3 years ago

Linda Brown, student at the center of landmark Brown v. Board of Education, dead at 76

"The canadian prime minister justin trudeau has formally apologized for the hanging in the nineteenth century of a group of indigenous leaders by the british colonial authorities mr trudeau absolve the joke ot chiefs of any wrongdoing in what is considered to be one of the most infamous episodes in canadian history they were tried and hanged over the killing of fourteen white settlers after being called to what they thought were peace talks linda brown who was at the center of a landmark legal case that ended racial segregation in american schools has died at the age of seventy six reforms resulting from the case had a transformational effect on american society peterborough's reports linda brown was nine years old when her father tried to enroll her at an all white school in the city of topeka in kansas at the time all the state schools were segregated and she was refused admission because she was black her father sued the local education board for similar cases were combined and the complaint was heard by the supreme court in a landmark and unanimous ruling in one thousand nine hundred ninety four the court said separate educational facilities were inherently unequal world news from the bbc the relatives of ninety argentine soldiers who died in the falklands war in nine hundred eighty to her pay their respects to their loved ones after their remains were identified using modern forensic technology praise from argentina and the falklands conducted a ceremony in the windswept darwin cemetery among among more than two hundred mourners us federal trade commission has confirmed that it's investigating facebook's privacy policies following revelations that our political consulting company had been given access to use his personal data facebook could face fines for its actions running to hundreds of millions of dollars the governor of the state of arizona has suspended the ridesharing firm uber from testing self driving cars following a fatal crash earlier this month the company has already halted such tests in the wake of the incident jonathan joseph's reports just over a week ago bakar hit and killed forty nine year old elaine hertzberg she crossed a road late at night the video of the incident was disturbing and alarming according to arizona's governor who in a letter to uber said it raised many questions about the testing of self driving cars doug ducey explained public safety had to be his priority so he was suspending uber's ability to test the.

Justin Trudeau Peterborough Linda Brown Topeka Kansas Argentina Darwin Cemetery Facebook Arizona Elaine Hertzberg Prime Minister Mr Trudeau Jonathan Joseph Bakar Doug Ducey Forty Nine Year Nine Years