36 Burst results for "White People"

Trump's Twitter Account Permanently Suspended

The News Junkie

00:19 sec | 5 d ago

Trump's Twitter Account Permanently Suspended

"Banning President Trump this GOP lawmaker accuses Democrats of joining with big tech and trampling First Amendment rights were now living in a country. Four or five countries or companies, unelected, unaccountable have the power of monopoly power to decide. We're gonna white people out. We're gonna just erase them. Senator Marco Rubio

President Trump GOP Senator Marco Rubio
Fresh update on "white people" discussed on Radio From Hell

Radio From Hell

00:29 sec | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "white people" discussed on Radio From Hell

"I'm a white guy asked me if they could say the n word. Feels like an alcoholic asking if they could have a sip of my drink was probably harmless, but it's a slippery slope. And I don't wanna be e. I don't understand why white people can't just accept the fact that there's just some things you can't say. As a black guy. I noticed that I can't say like screwed the pooch I didn't know it was an actual saying. Have you ever heard that before the first time I heard it. I was at work, and he's in terms of brings coffee. And they brought me the wrong coffee. And I was like, Hey, man, I don't know what is coffee? He goes. I'm sorry about that, Shay. I really screwed the pooch on that one. And.

Shay
How To Talk About Human Population Issues Constructively

Rewilding Earth

04:13 min | Last week

How To Talk About Human Population Issues Constructively

"So you sit there and you realize like all of these discussions about overpopulation are historically pretty racist in jingo gewiss stick and eugenicist in their origin because nobody You know maybe this is touchy for your listeners. But you know nobody ever takes a picture of like a pga tournament with a whole bunch of white people crowded together and say on god. There's too many people on the planet but they sure do zoom in on a big big crowd of black or brown people in some city and say oh my god there's too many people on the planet right and so that's just the nature the origin of of this debate. Even if people were right in their assessment that there's too many people on the planet earth can't support that many people the framing of it was wrong and then because of this kind of paternalistic eugenicist racist you know origins of the concern the pathway. to resolving it was always paternalistic kind of the population policy approach. Not realizing i think in the fifties the nineteen fifties through the nineteen seventies the power of empowering strategies and again if we just Empower educate integrate into the workforce And provide access to family planning technology for all women on the planet this would resolve itself. And that's really the crux of the book. And what's funny. I think is when i give my you know my big lectures my big talks with all my maps and my powerpoint. You can feel the tension in the room until i get get to the fact that it can be resolved or women's empowerment and then you just get like a round of applause and cheering and nobody knew it's not in the in the you know the popular mind and i think that's the biggest problem we've had. Who are people really having those discussions. Still about overpopulation. They are. But i believe it's a generational thing and i actually don't try to impede malice to you. Know a lot of older generations the language you learn when you're young you use it even if it doesn't necessarily fit your do your new view of the world You know we all fall back on old habits and old language But also you know. I gave some talks at the royal society and the royal geographical society. And you know some of their some of their older patrons would come. And i appreciate them showing up but i get questions from old british you know folks in their seventies and eighties and they say you know but don't we need population policy to keep those people from you know breeding animals. And you're like dude. I don't think he meant to phrase it that way. But in some cases they do and that's part of the problem right because there is a history of that. And if i were someone you know from another part of the world you know where the total fertility rate is is higher and i hear somebody come in and start talking about population and their white from the us or the uk or or europe. I i'm sure i would. Squint my eyes and listen very carefully about the words coming out of their mouth because it is part of the history of this whole thing and you know it's just yell at people say chris don't write this book. Don't go with that message. You're gonna end up being one of those people. And i'm happy to say but i'm not one of those people read the damn up And it really does come down to. We have exceeded our planet's longterm ecological carrying capacity every additional person we add to the planet incurs further ecological debt that will take generations to pay down but we can't even pay down until he bring the population down right to our long-term meek. Lots kathy and i'm more than happy to debate is three billion four five. I've i've dared anybody to try to tell me it's seven point seven or higher and nobody's even tried like even the people that you know want to try. They don't even try because they know they can't defend it. And so you know give or take a billion we've got a long road ahead on this issue but

PGA Royal Geographical Society Royal Society Europe UK Chris United States Kathy
The Population Control Movement

Behind the Bastards

04:35 min | Last week

The Population Control Movement

"The negro project was very popular with black community leaders at the time and it would be unfair to frame it as an act of genocide. Sanger wrote repeatedly of the importance of bringing in black doctor stating at one point. I do not believe that this project should be directed a run by white medical men which is good. If you're going to do a healthcare project like focused on the black community like that. That shows like she. She was like she was capable of understanding what was necessary in order to actually reach people in nineteen thirty nine now so that i guess yeah. Yeah in one thousand nine hundred nine. She argued in a letter. That black ministers needed to be heavily involved in the project in order to gain the trust of their communities. We do not want to go out that we want to exterminate the negro population in the minister is the man who could straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members again sue problematic language there but also there's no evidence she was actually going for genocide because she was again doing the same thing with white people. She was a birth control across the board advocate right. She wanted everyone to have more access to contraceptives. There are people on the right. Like denise souza who will spread wildly untrue claims about sanger like that. She called black people human weeds in a minister civilization. And there is no evidence of this sanger's own legacy contains enough problematic facts without making up lies. She was a eugenicist and she wrote in nineteen twenty-three that birth control does not mean contraception indiscriminately practiced. It means the release in cultivation of the better elements in our society and the gradual suppression elimination and eventual extinction of defective stocks. Those human weeds who threaten the blooming of the finest flowers of american civilization. So she did call people human weeds. But she wasn't referring to black people. She was referring more to mentally challenged people more to people with like who are prone to diseases. And that's bad that's really bad. But she was not like a four exterminating everything but white people. She was four exterminating people. She considered unhealthy or at least exterminating them from the gene pool. Which is again bad. But let's be accurate about the kind of bad it is. You know we don't need to make it anymore. Yeah criminal. I don't say because it's not flowery. It's already bad. Didn't wanna make better by wiping out black people. She wanted to make black people and white people better by wiping out folks who had what she considered to be like bad qualities through selective breeding and. That's really terrible for herself. What does back. Yeah these are yes. Yes thanks at up. Yeah that is bad but like it's not the kind of bad luck again because they tried to. I like the progressives always been trying to wipe out black like. That's not what she was doing. We don't need to add information. She was just a she was a. Here's plenty that's bad about her. Yeah let's let's be intellectually honest when we can dennis someone. She also stated during another speech. I believe now immediately. There should be national sterilization for certain this genetic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out where the government not feeding them. You know that's bad but again it's the kind of like part of why they like to try to frame her. Badness is something different is because if you're accurate about it you can find a fuck load of republicans who say the. The poor should starve right. Like the people who can't work on their own by jordan peterson. Talking about like how terrifying it is that. Some people aren't intelligent enough to be in the military and like say like because. What do we do with those people like. That's a really. Like what margaret sanger was. Saying back then is still common today. Apple dress it up a little bit more. I mean kind of relate to the copay things like that's fine. They're already they're already probably die. So it's the run productive. Yeah they're in productive there on the government dole. Exactly yeah she just. She was bad she just was not the kind of bad people. Like desouza liked painter. As and in fact a lot of progressive black leaders at the time like margaret sanger. And what she was trying to do in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine letter to dr. cj gamble of proctor and gamble fame. She urged him to get over his resistance to hiring a fulltime negro physician. Ask quote the colored. Negroes can get closer to their own members and more or less lay their cards on the table which means they're ignorant superstitions in doubt again. She's also she's number one saying that black people are ignorant and superstitious which is bad but also saying that like no you get educated black people to talk to them about birth control so again. She's a problematic person but not painters

Sanger Denise Souza Jordan Peterson Margaret Sanger Dennis Desouza Cj Gamble Apple
Matt James on 'pressure' of being first Black 'Bachelor': 'I don't want to piss off Black people, I don't want to piss off white people'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last week

Matt James on 'pressure' of being first Black 'Bachelor': 'I don't want to piss off Black people, I don't want to piss off white people'

"Off its 25th season on ABC last night 29 year old map. James is the first black bachelor and he told host Chris Harrison. He feels the pressure that comes with that. My mom is white and my dad's black and I experienced what it was like to be. Product of interracial marriage, and it's tough because you've got people who have certain views. Old school views on what a relationship and what love looks like. And you've got people who are cheering for you to find love. And then you Welcome. 32. Women Seeking to find love Look

Chris Harrison ABC James
Sarah Alcorn on her podcast "Ivy League Murders"

Too Many Podcasts!

03:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Sarah Alcorn on her podcast "Ivy League Murders"

"Of cambridge. And it's a super liberal bastion and growing up. I think part of part of what motivated us to do this. We really grew up in with harvard in our backyard. You know harvard square was our hangout places teens and so but i think for a lot of people the ivy league. Is you know as exotic as a place like hawaii. So that's part of the reason why we put this together was to to our whole premises. Basically got somebody really intellectually intelligent but emotionally not so much and so we see that time and time again and not everybody went to i. D league at some of the victims are actually from the ivy league is also. We're really trying to explore crimes. Crimes academia crimes of crimes. We always think of privilege is being this bubble where things like that can't happen. So that's what we're looking into and we're trying to just take true crime to next level and put a little bit philosophy or history or literature in there too because it is ib leak. And that's our niche actually with the ivy league murders. Hey it's the same kind of mystique as white people so fascinated with celebrities. They wanna know what happens when they're not in front of the camera. We all these scandals people are drawn to it in with an ivy league schools at. You might see these captains of industry or tech giants or whatever. They may turn out to be. You know what's what's going on. When they're out of the hollow they're not immune from human frailties which are know mental illness and drugs and alcohol an obsession and love and sax and money and greed. And all those all the things that motivate people to to make the ultimately bad decision of murdering somebody else. Did you think that some of the people who have that kind of education just will say the killer obviously that they thought that there was some sort of an entitlement. We find that quite a lot. In in fact some of the subjects that we look at a for example thinking of dr grindr which is one of our episodes absolutely brilliant doctor and he perpetrated a ridiculous crime sloppiest crime in you know so it does go into my theory that some people could be. They can be very intelligent in certain categories and then just suck Committing crimes. Do think. There's a lot of like entitlement or hubris or whatever you wanna call it where they think like. I'm so much smarter than everybody in these blue collar. Cops will never be a the solve this crime and it's like dude. You know the you did a terrible job on the crime. Sorry you know varied sloppy. That's one thing. We like to look at There is there's a famous writer. Dominic dunn really was fascinated with crime in privilege and is a great quote. and i'm paraphrasing. Can't remember the exact quote but that people are more interested in seeing kings fall than peasants. Basically in that the kind of you know serfs or whatever the phrase is that he says. I just think it applies to this as well because i think the presumption is when you go to an ivy league. Everything's perfect after that right. You make six figures year. Everything's taking care of van.

Ivy League Harvard Square Cambridge Harvard Dr Grindr Hawaii Dominic Dunn
2 strip clubs can stay open and set own COVID rules, judge rules

The KFBK Morning News

01:31 min | Last month

2 strip clubs can stay open and set own COVID rules, judge rules

"Here's a story making headlines across the country. Couple of strip clubs in San Diego allowed to stay open. Well, just by virtue of the business, there's not a lot of social distancing court ruling allowed San Diego County restaurants and strip clubs to remain open. A Superior Court judge issued that ruling here. CBS eight out of San Diego captured some sound from an attorney, Jason Said duds. Oh, arguing the case for strip clubs to reopen There has not been a single Kobe case that's traceable back to either the plaintiffs establishments. There's no apparent reason. White people cannot gather for live adult entertainment either indoors or outdoors, but they can shop in indoor malls until they drop. We have big box retail stores, grocery stores, airports, Hollywood production houses, cannabis dispensaries, so money other Activities being allowed, but no live adult entertainment. There's an idea and outdoor strip club, Okay, whatever the country you're in, So apparently, the judge's ruling is a little bit confusing to some. This is Chad Klein. He's the co owner of Waterfront Bar and Grill he was talking about whether or not his restaurant could reopen tonight is not really sure, he says. While the kind of says it, restaurants can reopened, But the caveat there. Maybe that someone has to be stripping. Which seems so wild to me, If that's what it takes for us to reopen our business, taking off our clothes, I'll do it. That's Chad Klein. He's the co owner of the waterfront bar and

San Diego San Diego County Superior Court Chad Klein CBS Waterfront Bar Jason Hollywood
Barack Obama clarifies his criticism of 'Defund the Police': 'Not the point I was making'

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

05:13 min | Last month

Barack Obama clarifies his criticism of 'Defund the Police': 'Not the point I was making'

"Nothing made me more optimistic. During a very difficult year than the activism that we saw in the wake of george floyd memorial and black lives matter and i have consistently believed that their courage activism media savvy strategic resolve a far exceeds anything that i could have done their agent. I think has shifted the conversation in ways that i even imagined a couple of years ago so throughout this this slew of compliments i then said well what do you think about. Be particular slogan defunding. The police and i said well that particular slogan i think the concern is that there may be potential allies out there that you lose and issue always is. How do you get enough people to support your cause that you can actually institutionalize it and translated into laws rights and so forth or two or three brighter. Who i admire. Who wrote out obama's making an admission to chastised black lives matter and you go what hold on a second. I just spent the whole summer. Complementing remember what are you talking about the reason it caught attention. I suspect is there. Were some in the democratic party. Who suggested the reason we didn't do better in the congressional elections. This time was because of this phrase that people assumed that. Somehow i was making an argument that right. That's why we didn't get you know. A bigger democratic majority. That actually was not the point. i was making. I was making a very particular point around if we in fact want to translate the the the the very legitimate belief that how we do policing needs to change and that if there is for example a homeless guy ranting and railing in the middle of the street sending a mental health worker. Rather than an armed untrained. Police officer to deal with that person might be a better outcome for all of us and make us safer right that if we describe that to nudge us white folks. But let's say michelle's mom that makes sense to them but if we say defunding the police not just white folks but michelle's mom might say if i'm getting robbed who am i gonna call and is somebody gonna show up right so the issue here becomes at any given. How are we translating and using language not to make people more comfortable quote unquote right because that's always a strain and historically all the concern in these debates is also as often or are we just trying to make white people comfortable rather than speaking truth to power right. that's the framework. We tend to think about these things right yet. The issue to me is not making them comfortable. It is can we be precise with our language enough that people who might be persuaded around that particular issue to make a particular change that gets a particular result that we want. What's the best way for us to describe that and basically saying is we should workshop all of our slogans with michelle. That's what i that probably would be wise. It would probably work. But but i wanna go back to something you said earlier which i think is really important and i said this in the wake of of some criticism i said look. Part of this is also. Everybody has different roles to play an activist movement. Leader is is going to provide a prophetic voice and speak certain truths that somebody who is going to be elected into office will not be able to say i reread james. Baldwin's a fire next time this summer. How is it that something written fifty years ago fifty five year. Yeah yeah applies directly today. Despite everything that's happened to me that is as honest a portrayal of the the gaping wound of race in america.

George Floyd Michelle Democratic Party Barack Obama Baldwin James America
Some Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

Coronavirus Daily

04:05 min | Last month

Some Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

"Health. Experts are worried that some people who are skeptical of coronavirus vaccine or the people who need it the most including latinos and african americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covid nineteen but there are efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Here's correspondent adrian for ito who reports on race and identity for npr. Maria does not intend to get vaccinated. At least not right away. I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know in the beginning players. She is not generally a vaccine skeptic. A discipline since this new i am not comfortable of getting it surveys. Show that kind of skepticism about the covid vaccine is widespread. Nearly forty percent of latinos told pew researchers. They would probably or definitely not get the vaccine more than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy but the reluctance among african americans and latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's it's a major concern dr keith. Norris's among an army of people ramping up efforts to ensure latinos african americans and other people colored. Trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns. Many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research concerned about being a guinea pig concerns about pharma and federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for ucla and is leading california effort funded by the national institutes of health to build vaccine trust. The strategy is to get clear. Concise information to black and brown communities with help from so-called trusted gers people with existing relationships in communities with high covid risk. People like tony. Wafer a longtime los angeles-based hiv educator in may he lost five close family members to covid. He's talked about that a lot as he's encouraged black friends and neighbors to volunteer for vaccine trials and now to take the vaccine is hard to say. Get getting this trial and these were people gonna help you win. These are the same white. Have been kicking your ass alway. You know what i mean. He says he acknowledges people's skepticism and meets them where they are. I tell people what are you. Won't they say well. I'm all blood pressure medicine. I'm taking central cholesterol. So you know before you've taken that pill clunk child out of thin air then they go really yeah. It was the clinical shelters. Ucla's keith. norris says this outreach. We'll take many forms in person on the airwaves and in virtual town halls. He says researchers will track. What messages about the vaccine. People respond to to see if there are certain areas that tend to have a greater impact moving people from being reticent to being willing. I'm not gonna go. Set is with sonny seattle health san diego clinic that serves a large mexican and mexican. American population fears about vaccine. Safety are compounded by language issues and concerns about immigration status. The clinic trained community outreach workers to answer questions about the vaccine the reason why this is working is because people are not relying on a government entity posed information especially due to the last four years. People rather i hear from someone that they already have a relationship with. She expects the vaccine to gain acceptance over time but she also says many of the clinics patients are already eager for the vaccine because they've spent months risking themselves in essential. Jobs have lost friends and family. Don't wanna see anyone else. Any other loved one. Have to go through that for these people. The vaccine means being able to continue to provide allies for their loved ones and to be there for them in the long run. She says that's the message. She intends to keep driving home. That's npr national correspondent. adrian florida.

Dr Keith Norris National Institutes Of Health Ucla NPR Adrian Maria Pharma Guinea Wafer Sonny Seattle Health San Diego Federal Government Tony Los Angeles California Keith Jobs
U.S. hospitals at breaking point amid COVID-19 surge

KYW 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | Last month

U.S. hospitals at breaking point amid COVID-19 surge

"As covert cases surge hospitals are facing a breaking point. Here's CBS Is Lilia Luciano. Health workers nationwide already straining to keep up 25 States and Puerto Rico reporting record hospitalizations. Southern California hospitals with ICUs more than 85% full. Expect the worst. We've seen it, white people fold. Increase in are hospitalized patients. Dr David Marshall, senior vice president of Cedars Sinai Medical Center. What are you seeing different from back in March, the adrenaline that fueled the heroism the selflessness at the beginning. Is waning, and its people are really running a marathon like a sprint, a Staten

Lilia Luciano Dr David Marshall CBS Cedars Sinai Medical Center Puerto Rico Southern California Sprint Staten
Fire devastates world's largest sand island

TIME's Top Stories

05:16 min | Last month

Fire devastates world's largest sand island

"Gladys boo knows firsthand. the devastation climate change is already visiting on the world. The twenty five year old has vivid memories of kale island a tiny islet in the solomon islands archipelago where she used to swim and barbecue on the white sand beaches. It's also where her grandparents used to live decades back but kale island no longer exists. It was declared lost in two thousand sixteen after it fully submerged beneath the water a victim of rising sea levels. She worries more of her home. In the south pacific could share the same fate if global temperatures continue to rise at the same pace and just decades. My country's map has changed drastically. She says boo and others who have personally experienced the worst effects of climate change took center stage at a two week. Summit for youth climate activists. The virtual event was organized out of frustration at the postponement of the twenty twenty united nations climate. Change conference also called cop. Twenty six meeting between nations called mock cop twenty six. The summit was attended by more than three hundred fifty delegates from one hundred eighteen countries and included speeches from activists and stakeholders from around the world including the uk government minister in charge of the original cop twenty six in a year dominated by pandemic related disruptions. The mockup to six may be one of the largest international meetings focused on climate change. Even if it lacked official status but another goal of the event was to elevate the voices of those most affected by climate. Change it's a conscious decision. Based on consensus among youth activists that people in the developing world and other marginalized voters are not being represented in the climate movement which has largely focused on activists from developed nations. Be a greta tune. Berg's fridays for future or extinction rebellion which was established in the uk. The climate movement has been often inaccessible and is generally dominated by middle class. White people in the global north says a mercedes rodriguez richer to an activist from the uk student climate network. We can't stand up to this challenge without listening to the people whose voices matter the most in an attempt to be more inclusive. The virtual conference says granted more delegates. To what organizers call most affected people in areas or mapa including the philippines and bangladesh these countries and others were granted five delegates as opposed to three from most developed nations. Giving them more speaking time. More than seventy percent of the delegates represented at the summit or from developing countries. Having more delegates also gave these countries more representation and say in the wording of the final statement from mockup twenty six many behind. Mock cop twenty six. See this as a first step toward changing the emphasis of the youth climate movement. Several studies have shown that a warming planet will disproportionately affect developing countries more than developed nations however mainstream climate movements of faced criticism for not being inclusive of the most vulnerable nations earlier. This year. vanessa. Nakata a ugandan. Climate activist was cropped out of a photo in which she posed with four activists from europe including gratitude berg. It felt like i had been robbed in my space. Nicotine told time in july if climate justice does not involve the most affected communities than it is not justice at all. The photo was later replaced by the new agency that published it when we include everyone. You realize how a lot of the problems are. Common across countries says mitzi thanh a twenty two year old activists from the philippines who has been volunteering at the summit and is one of the speakers representing her country. Thanh has lived through extreme weather events in her native manila which has witnessed progressively more powerful typhoons with each passing year. She says activists like her who have seen the life altering damage. Climate change is already inflicting can go beyond being just sad stories and statistics and take an active role in creating a global solution. There's evidence this approach might result in more effective action to a twenty nineteen report by the united nations development programme found that vulnerable developing countries are leading the world by enacting ambitious pledges on emissions and climate resilience so the narrative. Necessarily isn't we are drowning. We need help says samira sarala a climate change policy expert at the united nations development programme. But rather look how we have seen the consequences and taken the destiny into our own hands. Abu the activist from the solomon islands feels that amplifying stories like hers will help people understand that the climate crisis is already a reality for people in many parts of the world when people who don't believe in climate change. Listen to our stories. They will hopefully empathize and engage she says.

Gladys Boo Solomon Islands Archipelago Kale Island Student Climate Network UK South Pacific United Nations Philippines Berg Mitzi Thanh Rodriguez Nakata Bangladesh Vanessa Thanh
A Call For Equity In Genomics Research

Short Wave

02:58 min | 2 months ago

A Call For Equity In Genomics Research

"So before the break we talked about. How do i noticed. A lack of diversity into nomex. He was working with these databases and noticed a lot of minorities communities were left out and as he began to interrogate that he made two key rations. One of the reasons is more around comfort and convenience. It's like if you are Western european ancestry. Doctor it's much easier to for you to recruit white people within your network right and then on the other side of the coin. It's really hard to recruit communities of people who have historically been exploited exploited by the medical and scientific community traumatizing experiences with lasting impacts. Like what happened to the have a super tribe from arizona so back in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine researchers at arizona state university and the havasu by agreed to partner up to determine if there was a genetic reason behind the really high rates of diabetes that have plagued the tribe for decades but when arizona state turned around and question to have a supine nations origin. Story tried to look for genetic associations with schizophrenia. And getting mutations that are associated with interbreeding it naturally pissed off the community. Because that's not the arrangement and the consensus that they built not only to the researchers not get consent to look at those things some of those questions in themselves deeply disrespected the tribes most sacred beliefs so that resulted in the sort of ripple effect or domino effect with many other tribes in the united states of america pudding a moratorium on genetic research which stands to this day. Here's the other thing. It's become more and more clear but a lot of times. These health disparities like diabetes and have a suit by tribe aren't really even because of genetics. They're more about socio. Economic factors like access to healthy food and healthcare a lot of the times when an indigenous populations or brown black and underrepresented populations that people are recruited into studies. It's under the guise of reducing health disparities and sort of pandering towards this narrative that there's an innate nece to why our communities have higher rates of common complex disease right and that's highly problematic and i have sold that grant narrative in so many grants and papers and that's how i've kind of come to this position of questioning it and being skeptical of what the actual benefit

Arizona Arizona State University Diabetes Schizophrenia United States Of America
Caring for Aging Parents

Los Compas Lounge: a PSA for Brown Men

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Caring for Aging Parents

"Welcome to us now a pse for brown men we are your host. This is known this year. My name is elvin and this is a podcast about brown men talking about issues that matter to you we talk about things that we don't usually talk about in the brown communities we're just three regular kompass sharing our experiences to inspire positive chains pool. We have one ready for you are. Our parents are getting older. You know my mother's Just around the corner from turning eighty and you know we had the serious talk a while back about The possibility of her moving in with me you know and You know the enrolled. And i started talking about this use of aging parents and roll. You know it's interesting you know we're talking about an lo and behold. It looks like you know you. You know you're you're in the same situation as well. Yeah exactly it was kind of a funny. That you started talking about your. Would you did over the weekend and whatnot. And unlike like dude. I'm in the exact same situation and the situation really centrally is taking care of our aging parents and that's really a topic that for today's purposes we really want to jump into talk about Not only our culture our people and you know is it an obligation. What are we doing. Is it traditionally for women of the or three Brown men and we are seriously considering this stuff and at least two of us. This is reality within the next six months to a year To take care of our aging parents so with that. Let's go ahead and jump into this topic about aging parents. Havi do you know what do you think about the growing up in terms of traditions. While you know what Let me just lighten up the mood. A little bit by repeating joke. That i had heard once From a comedian noah She comedian and he's just said that. You know like that white people. They plan their 401k's their retirement and the mexicans. He's like yeah. He's we have a bunch of kids that that's our retirement plan. You know one of them has to be able to support me when i get old. You know and it's neat because Like with my parents. Like i saw that with my dad might dad He has They're nine siblings and when their parents got old. I mean they get in. All of them would contribute lake on a monthly basis. That that that that was their social security you know like for for the grandparents elected they just said okay everybody give like i don't know fifty hundred bucks whatever it was. I don't know. I don't know what it was but it was just and that's the way that i saw also offer for. My momma was a little bit different because they were only three siblings from my mom but the helped out that helped their parents actually ended up happening was that they were living in the same house for such a long time. That my grandparents my mom's my mom's parents that then when the owners when the owners died the kids were gonna salman. They were going to visit my my grandparents and Luckily my parents Had the means at the time to they were. They ended up Buying the house. So i just saw i just the way. I grew up just seeing my parents that they were taking care of their parents. You know yeah you know. It's somewhat similar with me but not a it was just my ability. You know my other set of grandparents passed away when i was fairly young so it was just a mayawati. Tough from my mom's side and she basically helped raise my generation. You know all seven of us all seven of us Cousins and she lived with With mighty se live with us and she basically rotated amongst Amongst two of her two of her daughters and that was just my norm. You know so. I didn't think anything of it when it came time for me to basically come full circle with my mom full circle in the sense of now. It's tough for me to take care of her.

Kompass Elvin Brown Mayawati
An African-Centred Approach To Mental Health

Mentally Yours

05:30 min | 2 months ago

An African-Centred Approach To Mental Health

"One and welcomes mentally os fat and stay on chatting to dr erica mcginnis she's a chartered clinical psychologist and the director of nubia wellness and healing. We're going to be talking about. An african centered approach mental health. So can you tell us a bit about your work festival. And what is an african sentence approach to mental health mcnicoll psychologists and i trained in two thousand one environment. You're centric approaches. But as i continued with monterrey realized that a lot of the things i was experiencing some of the clients who have african ancestry back brown's exposing the m. The approaches that was about wasn't really helping to understand their problems and to find ways of engaging them so i got involved in african psychology. Jay With the best of african culture and in conjunction with a modern day culture and to kind of find ways to improve wellbeing. So how does that does that. Work in practice will for example. I calls sofas in the presence but lockdown One of the things. We use things of african culture intensive using music as a wave engaging people using african cultural principles like libations pouring libations. I'm bringing your ancestors into your everyday space calling out their names thanking them for the gifts that even heritage from them and understanding of south in the concept of trying to continue the genius that on incessant so my parents came from jamaica and the came to england with a particular purpose in mind and afternoon. See myself how can i continue that peppis. I'm actuate an interpreter in a modern day. Context is african psychologists you've experienced as patients as well or it's purely as a psychologist. I received some supervision from an african sunset responsive and that was really helpful at a time. Mark career intensive helping develop my own sense of well being connected to find the best african culture and because at the time i was very much denying my african ancestry and i really thought that appreciating that helped me to be able to cut up like developer confidence in myself. But i haven't actually eight spending stem thelma pay. I'm from that perspective myself. Now can you tell me a bit. More about spam. How different to the european approach and also how the difference So even yes. Civic until an african centered. Perspective is famous spiritually based. So you're looking at your relationship with south relationship with your ancestors your relationship with the creator. All universal got whatever concept that you have. Spiritually based is strength space in terms of seeing that the environment that women can often contribute to the difficult we find ourselves in as opposed to it being inherent in oils. So we look at things. Such is the influence of the transatlantic slave trade and shuttle enslavement. And how got can cause trauma and which is passed down through. The generations even gets into generational trauma additive that everyday form of living wild black shopping bar black seeing black people being mistreated such as a flight. George when you look at the newspapers on the over television which can reach formalizes the game and it kind of like m. involves some of those aspects of our being and the lived experiences of black people particular mental health issues that you think is particularly people with whether exhaust repression anything in particular or is it across the board. I think it's puck across the board really because it really talks about a mind. Temptation of as it talks about self knowledge knowledge of south being really fundamental to wellness. And say that quite often black people only know by themselves what white people have told them. And when we have a ritchie straight of our own culture looking at the egyptians looking got am african culture prior to colonization because they must have had wellness practices or when colonize canes for africa. That wouldn't have been able to get people to do anything because of it had been walking around quite mentally unwell spiritually strong had a lot of abilities which is why people took been enslave them so very much looking out who will be before we were. Enslaved what would our wellness practices and how we can continue them. And even looking at some of the things like proverbs or nancy stories all sayings familiar in many families and using that as a resource for wellness a resource for healing.

Erica Mcginnis Mcnicoll Monterrey JAY Jamaica Brown England George Ritchie Africa Nancy
Top 5 High-Concept Horror, Bad Hair,  The Wolf Of Snow Hollow

Filmspotting

05:33 min | 2 months ago

Top 5 High-Concept Horror, Bad Hair, The Wolf Of Snow Hollow

"Welcome to film spotting Josh we grew up in the eighties we were blessed with a lot of things including the Golden Age of the high-concept movie but I know there are some people listening who are wondering what this phrase really means. We will certainly defined in more detail as we get into our top five here in a little bit but our producer, Sam has a good thought. If the premise of your movie is right there in the title. That's pretty much dead giveaway that it's a high concept movie snakes on a plane there. You know maybe the platonic ideal of high-concept movie, right? That's it right there. If all you gotta do is tell someone the title and they understand everything the movie is about it's probably using a high concept. Yes. Snakes on a plane maybe at times scary in its own way, not exactly a horror movie a longtime listener on twitter Charles Canzoneri was following a similar line of thinking he said invasion of the body snatchers night of the living dead. The. Those titles kind of say it all too. Don't they Josh Yeah. We'll. We'll kind of get into exactly the way you and I at least defined this, but you could make an argument for those for sure we will get to our picks here in a moment but first we did want to spend a couple of minutes on the movie that inspired the list Justin. Simians new bad hair. So yeah the bad hair of the title here is A. Bloodthirsty, we've that the star, the movie L. Lorraine's Anna She unwittingly submits to as part of plot her attempts really to get ahead at this black entertainment network sort of an MTV style network she works at this is set in nineteen, eighty nine we should say so she's been there awhile she's been overworked underpaid largely ignored and and sees a new look as perhaps a way forward. Now, Simeon directed two thousand fourteen dear white people and he created the TV spinoff to he takes the college set racial identity satire of that earlier film and amps it up here Yes. There are some really gnarly murders to this definitely counts as a horror film. He layers in some observations about assimilation and authenticity in that era late eighties, early nineties. Let's clip. Anna. Does your hair. No. We. Aren't you tired of it. All the stairs you get walk into the army lobby everyone wondering why you're here. If you went to any other floor in the tower for job interview. You wouldn't get past reception. And you know that. Sisters get fired lesson every day. have. Music people have certain expectations and my girls need to flow freely. Wonder. You want to be one of my girls. Yes. that. Is L. Lorraine's Anna with Vanessa Williams as her CEO. Zora Josh you did like Dear White People Justin Simians debut film as you mentioned in fact, nominated for a golden brick here on film spotting back in two thousand fourteen. What did you think of that? Hair I kinda loved it actually Really Yeah it's it's pretty insane and you know not a perfect film by any means in some in some ways an experiment in genre for Simeone, you can tell feeling his way and having some fun with the horror comedy elements here, but you know what? I really wished. Adam. Is that I. I mean obviously nowadays, we wish we can see anything with a full theater, but this thing really would have benefited from a very loud a very lively audience preferably like maybe around midnight something like that I think then you could get into the vibe of the film a bit more easily than say just you know watching it on Hulu at home but I still had fun with it. I think what Simeon does in terms of some of the extreme camera angles and the slow zooms there. That are a little insidious There's a great scene where Anna is at the salon getting. About to get the we've and she's kind of walking through this hallway of hair samples that is probably going to haunt my dreams. I think not only the way it's filmed but remember that old seinfeld bid about like when you find hair and things something about like if it's on our heads everyone, you know it's completely normal everyone loves it. But the minute it's removed from your head everyone freaks out that seeing like totally captured that for me So yeah, I think this works as horror I think the main performance here's pretty strong by lorraine and I think there's a lot of fun comic performances going. On along the edges here from people like Jay Ferrell Lean Awaith James Vanderbeek of all people who really doing a Don Johnson Miami Vice era performance I think the setting the eighty nine setting added a lot for me. Just kind of remembering that I don't know if it's like Yo MTV raps I'm sure there's a different countdown show around then the capture, the vibe of that really. Well, I think here even give us a music video and original music video with Kelly Rowland playing this. Pop Star. Hip, hop star who's kind of a mixture I don't know tell me what you think I was getting like. Janet. Jackson slash. Paula Abdul feel from that music video. So that was fun. There's a lot of fun stuff here. Yeah.

L. Lorraine The Golden Age Of The High Charles Canzoneri Anna A. Bloodthirsty Josh Simeon Zora Josh Simeone MTV SAM Vanessa Williams Justin Army Hulu Jay Ferrell Lean James Vanderbeek Lorraine Don Johnson Miami
Reparations: How Could It Work?

Science Vs

04:56 min | 2 months ago

Reparations: How Could It Work?

"On today's show reparations. Okay. Well, My name is Ebony picket I am a wife and a mother of seven. And four bonus children. So that's total of eleven. You'll hear some of those kids in the background. And Ebony is one of the few black folks in the country is actually been given reparations. It was because decades ago family was the victim of a horrible massacre. It happened in a small town by a lot of black people lived called Rosewood in Florida. And it all started on. New. Year's Eve in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two. So. It was a happy time. It was a time when they were celebrating and they were cooking and they have fireworks little sparklers. Enjoying another. A group of white people in a nearby town had become convinced that a black man attacked a white woman. And over the next few days, hundreds of them poured into Rosewood in a frenzy. Nobody really was expecting it from what we know. They just started shooting up the house from outside and that's what they did for seven whole days and they didn't stop until everything in the town was burned down. Every house was burned down to the crown. Some of our family members were lynched. One of my cousins Sam Carter, his ear was cut off they will keep it in the jar the white mob killed him, and then kept this man's Lia in a jar. Souvenirs, but it was very brutal. The local police just let all of this happen and many Rosewood residents ran and hid in nearby forests and swamps. There was there was no one coming to help for rescue and? That was in the data winter so they were in the cold swap. For seven days. Hundreds of people were forced to leave the harms and at least six black residents were killed. None of the black families went back they had to stop their lives ova. And Today Basically nothing is left of this town. No one was ever charged for the murders or the destruction of homes and businesses. Ebony said it was so traumatic that for years the families were afraid to even talk about what had happened. But in the nineteen eighties, the younger generation decided to speak out. Ebony family took the story to the media to politicians to whoever would listen and they hired a law firm who took their case to the state legislature asking the Florida government to acknowledge what happened and to pay restitution for by the survivors and their descendants. In other words. They asked for reparations. And they got it. Producer rose ramlet talk to ebony about this. Yeah. I read about it being passed as a bipartisan effort, which now seems like a miracle. Yeah. Right. That doesn't really have much anymore in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four when this bill was passed they would just nine survivors still alive and the state gave each of them up to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. What did it mean for the survivors the direct survivors when the bill was passed full of emotion. A lot of there were crying some of them were still afraid really even then. Even then. And for descendants like Ebony, they set up a scholarship fund it paid for her college. Education. I was able to actually get a bachelor of science degree in Occupational Therapy Kinda. gave me. You know kind of like a new life a new hope I was a books to actually go into a major that I could actually excel in and into well then. So yeah so it was great. It's great for me. While this reparations plan wasn't Pathak and some of Ebony relatives couldn't benefit from the program. This story shows us that use possible for the US to recognize when it's done. Something wrong. And pay up. So what would happen if this played out on a much larger scale? Because we're not just talking about one horrible attack in one small town. The idea here is that reparations would make amends for something much bigger. Slavery. More than two hundred years of enslaving people and using their free Labor to build the US economy. And while this idea might feel like a political nonstarter. It's starting to get some real attention. Almost a third of Americans polled lost yet said that they were in favour of reparations and a bill to study. This has more than one hundred and fifty signatures in Congress right now. So for us we're wondering. How on Earth to academics calculate how much reparations would bait? Like how do you put a number on that kind of suffering? And how would the US actually pay for it?

Ebony United States Florida Rosewood Sam Carter Congress Pathak Producer Rose Ramlet
Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

05:47 min | 2 months ago

Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today. We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. Pleasure. To be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? Okay. I'm aged fifty, two currently and as a child, my parents were in the US foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. and. So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools. Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. Well I left. CHICAGO. Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. Or newly integrated, and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, sixty, eight, I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently, all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was because I had never been to. Before and it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my cub leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, asked him, I, said, why am I being hit why they're doing this? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. Just keep moving. and. So they never answered the question. At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. were, fixing, cleaning the UP, putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. That same year nineteen, Sixty, eight. On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism.

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King United States Chicago Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

Unreserved

05:50 min | 2 months ago

Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

"You don't have to look very far to find Examples York region Ontario was named after your can the UK Regina is named after Queen Victoria Regina being the Latin for Queen and well British Columbia obviously. For Christina. Gray reclaiming those place names is vital and it's personal. The Simpson and Denny lawyer is one of two researchers behind reclaiming indigenous place names. The policy report was released in October of two thousand nineteen by the Yellow had institute at Ryerson University in Toronto. I've reached her at her home in Prince Rupert BBC. Welcome to unreserved thanks for having me. So you are a CO researcher with Daniel Ruck and you looked into naming practices and the erasure of indigenous place names. What did you find? We really wanted to do a cross section of the history of settler colonial renaming practices from indigenous place names to places that are an English or in French, or there's also note anglicised version as well and none look at what is the practice of reclaiming indigenous place names that is happening in various places are ranging from like the Northwest Territories, Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Manitoba to give. People a different idea of what's going on across these places and territories, and so how do original place names get changed? You know from from the original indigenous words into you know the things that they become how does that happen? Basically what's happening as a result of mostly white people or settlers who were? Changing the names to suit their whims, our desires or values when places were being changed from indigenous place names, saedtler place names like we have to remember the population of Canada at that time was a lot lower than it is now yes. There were indigenous peoples on these lands and territories, but there is also a different perspective by settlers at that time as well, and so they I think they wanted the the places to reflect. What was going on in their life for different ideas that were important to them. I can think that Greek in Vancouver I was looking into the two sisters, which is now called the lions and a lot of people go heikal lions in in Vancouver, and they kind of overlook how sound and you can see them pretty much any point in Vancouver. But before they were called the lions, they recalled the two sisters and it relates to an oral history. Of The squamish nation and it's an oral history that also relates to northerners like myself because the oral history it's it's about making peace offerings between the northern and the southern people's. used to war with each other and so that has much significance to me as a simpson person who used to live in Vancouver the two sisters in Vancouver is definitely one that I've heard about Are there any other striking examples of renamed places that you found y'all like almost makes me want to cry actually there's a place that was called Lake Squat Kit. It's like near Kenmore, but the word squad specifically, Drago Tori term to refer to indigenous women and. Terrible. Stereotypes associated with it as well, and those are based off of how some settlers song about indigenous. and so you can just think about like it's a Grayson, deeply misogynistic but. People like had such a personal connection to the place name of squash it and like didn't want it to be renamed and. But like that I think has such a affect the way that you call places. And think about there are so many missing murdered indigenous woman in Canada and how you referred to that something that. So awfully in calling squad like those have affects real-life affects on people it's not just about placing. And is renaming more. Can it be more than just a symbolic gesture you know on how is renaming more than just a symbolic gesture i? Guess I think we always hope that naming practices or the revitalization of indigenous place names will go beyond just symbolic gestures who also have substantial effects as well and sue. Enrich policy really wanted to also look at like what are some of the mechanisms. In which indigenous people are. Using policy and Law to revitalize indigenous place names and so we looked up land use planning conservation co-management. Events and also modern day treaties and self government agreements in which indigenous peoples are using these different mechanisms available to on to re attribute and revitalize indigenous placing you know this work is being done by indigenous people. So think it's really important to attribute that recognition to them.

Vancouver Lions Simpson Queen Victoria Regina Canada Prince Rupert Bbc Christina Examples York Uk Regina Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Mani Ontario Daniel Ruck British Columbia Toronto Researcher Lake Squat Kit Ryerson University Drago Tori Yellow Had Institute Kenmore
Co-founder of Black Lives Matter releases new book on organizing movements

Larry Elder

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Co-founder of Black Lives Matter releases new book on organizing movements

"Book by Bishop Aubrey shines. He is the founder of conservative clergy's of color. It's called eight questions about race it arms conservatives with rebuttals to black lives matter are all white people racist. Is the judicial system unfair to black people. The book is a must read for anyone who cares about their country churches and their Children to get your copy. Goto eight Questions about race dot com. The word eight is spelled out and while you're there by copy for your friends, neighbors and fellow churchgoers. That's eight questions about race dot com. Again. The word eight has spelled out eight questions about race. Dot com.

Bishop Aubrey Founder
"white people" Discussed on Sway

Sway

02:09 min | 3 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Sway

"What government is in what is Republicans we lose sight of that. That that this is a collective of individuals that should have equal say equal play equal push in matters of the state and we're not. We're quickly giving our power over to the state absolutely grew up in all black ark lays in a city that is virtually all black and I never had to worry about white people. I don't worry about what they thought of me. I didn't worry about thought about my grandparents version of Christianity. I. My stores weren't owned by white people as we went to department store the gas station was on by. Black. School was named for Frederick. Douglass our rivals were Benjamin E. mays. So my entire world was engulfed in blackness. All My heroes and villains were black I got a chance to understand it is the character of someone. It isn't just the color of someone. So I understand a white kid from Illinois or ISLA or upstate Michigan and New York they may have never had any. You know black people at all not understanding. But what I wish to invite is the ability to say why Indian to find understanding now they're all are other people. That have simply been hypnotized on news or comfortable in their own opinion or have been told they're like that because it's like that they understand and that's a willful ignorance. They've gotten an image exactly that image that image makes them feel better in a never have to challenge themselves. Right is it makes you feel better to say, well, those people are just like that because then you never have to challenge the fact that teachers in Georgia who taught schools for schools become test-taking centers and were forced into changing tests they went to prison. Mothers in California who are white in of means, live trip the college system into getting their kids in and they get to choose a prison they go to for two weeks right? That's a hell of a insult you have to save yourself. Have got some chances that I know I wouldn't have got. Yeah. Have you walk down the street with we'd in your pocket and new you're going to Ski Starts Elsa fucking locally you have. So so what what we have, what we have to do is make it not less comfortable for white.

Benjamin E. mays ISLA Frederick Ski Douglass Georgia Illinois New York California Michigan
"white people" Discussed on Up First

Up First

07:43 min | 7 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Up First

"McBride racism in this country has been a disease as been the cancer that is has been killing us, and now we want to address the problem. I mean you can't address the cancer until you know you have it and these people are seeing the cancer. James McBride on protests, a pandemic and his new book listen to. It's been a minute from NPR sharing gene codes which. So before the break gene. You said that you were going to introduce us to someone who basically predicted. That, we were GONNA. See all this political energy erupt in one way or another. Yes, in that person's name. Is Nicole Fisher she's a social psychologist policy advisor on Capitol Hill She runs. A company called health and human strategy. This piece for Forbes back in late March headlined. History and psychology predict riots and protests amid coronavirus pandemic lockdown. Nicole said that a lot of the stuff that people told me. My DM's basically lines up with what we know about how our brains respond to stressful circumstances beyond our control. A lot of people think this is what we often say, the fight or flight response. And, so basically what's going on there? As you're sympathetic, nervous system kicks in immediately and that's the stuff. You can't control, so your heart rate your pupils dilating blood pressure. So what is fight or flight have to do with protesting racism and police brutality? She told me that human brains. Love the status quo like even when the status quo was not helpful, when is not beneficial? We just don't like the interruption of routine and so quarantines and lockdowns. Those are things that are imposed on us, so there's interruptions of our routines. They're not voluntary. They may be afraid and frustrated. Just like you see often in prison populations when placed in lockdown, we go through very predictable set of responses and adrenaline and stress hormones like Cortisol. Kick in. Wing people are scared when people. Have feelings that they are very uncomfortable with It often leads to disorder. So what I'm hearing is if enough people get scared if they get uncomfortable. All the same time you know you're GONNA see a lot of tables. Getting flipped exactly and right now we have all of the necessary conditions for civil disobedience in spades, for example lack of trust in government or authority check. Yes, people are definitely frustrated with how everyone from the president and the federal government down to their local elected officials, and even maybe their bosses have responded to the covert outbreak exactly and she said it's also helpful if people have the county. I'm a Tarheel. Anyone hates. Do we're friends? We're good I. Don't need to know anything else out you. You don't like Duke I don't do. We're on the same team essentially. Like we rally around. Having a common enemy so the Guy Wearing Jersey number forty five perhaps. Exactly. The next thing is shared grievances. In, this one I think makes a Lotta sense people. In similar situations and I can be financial. Political Sexual Racial whatever it is that uniting factor gives people a shared identity and assured purpose it can only be one issue that feels very related to the common enemy thing it does, and that is related to shared intensity. You can have very strong feelings. But when other people around you have strong feelings, they start to feed into each other. Yeah, everyone's mad. and. They're all mad on zoom together or on. You know what's up. Texts threads. Everybody's venting and all of these various ways and this anger anxiety. It's spreading, and it's multiplying right in the coal said that multiplying is actually a big factor too because. Their safety in numbers. The more people who are upset about something alongside you, the more being outspoken or angry or being unruly doesn't really stand out which is what people were saying to you about. Peer pressure and permission. If all your friends are posting ways to be anti-racist on instagram if they're all out in the streets marching, you're less likely to be the one in the spotlight right? Everything is collectible. And, plus when it comes to public protest right now, there's even more anonymity out on the streets because people are wearing masks. I think there are. A lot of white people who? Whether it's. They didn't have free time off of work or they weren't. Really fired up, or they didn't feel like they had permission. Maybe it wasn't their space. All of a sudden. You have an introduction of a lot of white people who are also angry with the government for angry with authority. Now you're forced to wear a mask. You're anonymous and. Away we go, and if these are the conditions that help create protests energy. Nicole said that pandemics throughout history have helped supercharge. In Moscow back in Seventeen, seventy, one much of that city was placed under quarantine after an outbreak of plague, there were civil unrest and riots in the eighteen hundreds. She says there were six different cholera pandemics around the world, and at least seventy riots associated with those outbreaks in Milwaukee, in eighteen, ninety four. There was a smallpox outbreak, so the city went under lockdown and let me guess. Unrest and riots Yup. In two thousand fourteen, there was the Ebola outbreak in the capital of Liberia I think about seventy thousand people woke up one morning, and basically found themselves blockaded in, and it was very poor area, and they created buffer zones and checkpoints. And then what happened is not only. Do you have all these scared people? You have a disease. People don't understand. the thin a government official who in the area was escorted out. And, so that was really the eruption adjust people's outrage and violence, and inevitably led to the spread of Ebola. Because people took to the streets what they saw was. Someone being extracted, which wasn't injustice. It was saying we're going to prioritize this person's safety. Their health over everyone else's. Nicole says all this stuff, all this context that right there is the kindling, and the match is usually something that people perceive as an injustice, so in this moment the magic especially for white people was that video of George Floyd with a white cops neon, his neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds. But for so many black and Brown communities in the United States. Most of this can link is almost always in place. The police make sure black and brown people can't move freely in their own neighborhoods. So this idea of being locked down. It's not new. It's not a new thing and let the next communities. There is constant fear of ice raids deportation, which goes hand in hand with police abuse, and it explodes in those communities because they're always.

Nicole Fisher James McBride NPR Cortisol policy advisor instagram Forbes United States George Floyd cholera president Liberia Ebola Milwaukee Moscow official
"white people" Discussed on Misfit Stars

Misfit Stars

08:06 min | 7 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Misfit Stars

"Our system is not just. Violent racial way. It's violent healthcare way. It's economically violent it's violent or mental health. It's just as violent. It's all. This is the system we've gotten used to living in. You. Know and we it well wait in the reason. Why is the people who who perpetuate it do so wrapped in the flag right like? As long as you can say that America's the greatest country on earth. Then you know then you can justify almost anything. It's just absolutely wild, but all of this stuff that we're talking about is papered over with patriotism and nationalism. You know it's not that you have. It's not that we have a health care crisis in America. It's the Mexicans are taking your healthcare. That's happening. On actually saying, but it's a thing that millions and millions and millions of people believe well and I think. That's a really lake. clownish example of what the of what patriotism does like because not everybody is like. Blaming our problems on Mexico. But in a much more insidious personal way, I think that a lot of us are raised. We're raised in schools. The teachers US history that like America's great. It was you know the enlightenment, and all the our founding fathers were like gods and we are taught. We breathed this air. That like America is the? You know the light of the world. You know American exceptionalism. and. That's the that's the air. We're breathing in the food that we're eating. And at the same time our air is polluted in our waters bad and we don't have good healthcare and we're barely hanging on economically, and that's that like cognitive distance. You know it's we live in a system that is not doing it's the system is not doing well by us. And, yet we are we are. With an immense pressure to engage in the raw raw America's the greatest sure. Because that makes. It makes it somehow palatable, and also what it does is it helps you re angry yourself in a grounding of something that feels okay. You know right and it goes back to the whole abuser mentality thing that were talking about like personal one like looking at a list of four hundred videos that she could look at with her own eyes to see examples of police violence concrete on video from the last week I mean. Uncontroversial like accurate just like this. You can't argue about this. Just the way things are right here on video for you to look at and just you know to to look at that and go. That that's not true. That's not my reality. It's exactly the same mindset as to look at the way, our country is and to go. Our country's great right. It's objectively demonstrably not great for the vast majority of people, even people who are living in relative comfort. There's still there's still like. If one if one link in the chain goes wrong in that scenario that they're living in, that's relatively comfortable. It could all come down and we're all living with that that eventual possibility hanging out just. Always, and the amount of emotional psychological stress putting on all of us, all the time is immense. Sure you know we can do better, but we're going to have to get to a place. We're going to have to get to a place of acknowledging that. That that, our system was. Was Not founded in a just and equitable way like we, we know all the quotes you know declaration of independence, and all like all manner granted equal. That was just words. At the time when it was written, because they clearly didn't consider women people, they really didn't consider. People Black people people. Native Americans yeah, so I mean it was a bunch of hogwash. We need to recognize the hogwash before we can create a system that does work. It is possible for us to create a system that works for everybody. This this idea of a media that's been going around about defending. The police is an example to me of what a couple of weeks ago seemed like A. Radical impossibility that's now gaining a lot of attention. And the people who've been studying why this is a good idea for a long time or getting read you know and people are discovering. Oh, you mean there's an alternative. That might be better and give us all better outcomes. Then the current police state Oh my gosh. Let's explain the fact that the the the Minneapolis city council is going to disband their police department and start again. Like tells me that there is opportunity to do something better when we can acknowledge how broken or not really broken, the system's not broken the systems working as intended to. So we need to. Tear down that bad old system and start again. the the and that there are ways to do things better but it's GonNa require us to get really. Uncomfortable it's going to require us to get. Comfortable with the idea of undoing. Stuff. We've just come to accept as. Yeah? And that's hard work. It is and is going to be like hard. Work! That's going to go on for a long time to you. I mean it's not going to be like. Oh, it's going to be a tough two months. You mean like the pandemic. That's over. starry I joke. Pandemics. I mean to hurt the pandemics feeling. Yeah Hey could conversation to lake, not easy conversation today and thank you. To! All right people hey, Thanks for hanging out with us for this you been listening to the misfit stars podcast. We hope you've been enjoying it. It's been a good time right can't. Miss Stars five guests? The horses for Courses Ripe, so here's the deal. If you already supporting member of me and Shannon vis-a-vis. Be This podcast. Thank you. We really appreciate and it helps us a lot especially in this time if you are not supporting member and you're not able to be just keep hanging out with us. We love you and we're happy you're here if you're in that third category of people who would be able to supporting member of us via this podcast, but Have not yet done so. To Oh my gosh with open arms, the big the big thing you get, it's it's not a quid pro quo thing. It's going to send you a bunch of stuff. You'll get a sticker sheet. That's it but if you If you do join, the misfit stars community. We'll invite you to the Mr Starr's private facebook group, which is the best place on the Internet? It's just it's a place where people you. It's a place for people who want more out of their lives who want to have more intentional conversations in a safer more vulnerable way with other people who also want to explore the world, and that intentional way so You know if that describes you, we would love to have you join us. go to misfits dot com slash, join and get signed up. It's easy and inexpensive for thank you. Thank you Thanks for spending some time with us today. If you are in the group, we'd love to hear your thoughts. About what you're dealing with, maybe some reactions to this conversation here today so we'll hopefully see you in there. And we'll be back again next week with I'm sure a whole hijinks with. With a whole more like years worth of stuff to process in a week. It'll be. It'll be good times, but we will. We'll see that until then. Take care of yourself. We love you guys by but..

America US psychological stress Minneapolis Mexico Shannon facebook Mr Starr
"white people" Discussed on Misfit Stars

Misfit Stars

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Misfit Stars

"And you're right. Those those are my better angels. Right. However, yeah, there's also an angel on the other shoulder, and that angels going back him up. Right. To Middle Fingers up Angel doesn't win as much as it used to in my life. Yeah, right? Yeah, but it's still there yeah. It's a process you know. Yeah, I generally. You know am more sensitive than it used to be toward idiots. But I'm not all the time I get it and you know we're just going to have to take that. As a comes do my best. I think it's generally pretty good. It's not as good as you. But. Through, your amazing at that, but that's your default setting the thing you have different default setting. Default settings to be extraordinarily sensitive to what other people might think might default setting is not that. My default setting is much more new England Irish than that. You know it's a sarcastic worldview I. It's a you know. Come Adam quick with something, snarky point of view I'm not saying it's the right way right. I'm just saying it's where I come from you know. And you can take the blood out of Vermont and all of that you know well I just want to say I really do appreciate you working through this Oh. Sure on a hot Mike. None no less I think honestly. No I embrace going there with you and I thought about that as we were doing it, but like this is the kind of in a weird way I think. This is modeling exact kind of discussions that we need to be modeling more of what I mean like I think people need to hear a couple of a couple of responsible adults like. Are we those? Oddly maybe. By my tables, keyboards, machines, responsible adults, and I don't know. I don't know, but you know I. Think it's important to model this kind of behavior for people, because like a little bit of foreshadowing for the second half of this episode but like. All of us are GONNA be having a lot more uncomfortable conversations when I say us, I mean white people. You know what I mean. If you're listening to this and you're brown or black, skinned just sit back and listen because. You know just. Go. To a cold beverage seriously. Because you already know yeah, but yeah, no white people. We gotta get our shit together and. Like talking with the people we love about how to frame this stuff so that we can help bring people along a huge part of the work. and. Here's me and Shannon. Modeling that for you in real time for about fifteen solid minutes, so expected an unplanned manner. Welcome to our world, and by the way we only do this on. Our life is all of the damndest. Great with us now. We've processed stuff like this all the time. Because you know one of us often me will just go off half cocked and the other one. No, no honey. Right. It just goes like that. You know, but we both are committed. I think. It's interesting. Right you. You make different commitments you. Everyone makes a commitment to your partner. Right Lake in the most cliche fashion that takes the form like vows at away right, and it's all you know, and you can do. The default setting vows, know love, honor, cherish death. Do US part Blah Blah Blah. You can do that. That's great. But there's I think a much more serious way that you can conceive of the commitment you make to your partner you know and I think that for for both of us the taken as accountability certain way. holding ourselves to account, but also our partner. Yeah, you know and much chanted with me on a hot mike ten minutes ago, like Hey. I don't think you're doing this type. Let's talk about this, you know. And, that's fine, and you might have noticed that I didn't respond particularly defensive way because I'm used to this. This is not the first time this happened. I'm not unused to it and. Whatever well I think the advocating for my point of view, okay is different than being defensor. I tried as hard as I could to advocate from my point of view in a non defensive, Casey and I also do still leave space in my life for the idea that sometimes sarcasm zingers just do have a place. Sometimes satire is is the most effective mode of communication. Sometimes, you just need to do a little slap, you know. Yeah, yeah, sometimes. You need someone Zinger to be like Oh. Yeah, I really think and then you come back to back off from there. It's a wake-up I understand. I'm just feeling like this moment. Gosh, this is everybody is. Is Tinder Dry right now? You know yeah, and so a spark like that can really just set by SORTA here that you weren't expecting or hoping for you know, and so I think that may be in this particular moment in time. Maybe it's just a time for more inflatable hugs and Kitty. Probably. All right so listener if you were I. If you're one of those tinder-dry people and you're currently inflamed because of my spark, please forgive. Wasn't my intention. It was my intention generally not to use specifically. You know what I mean. Sometimes zingers are general in scope, certainly shouldn't be applied or take on board and personal fashion. Yeah, you know what I mean. It's just a little. Talk about something serious here. Cheney's little bit mad. Heads up who isn't mad. Who isn't bad? So why don't we take a little break we're. GonNa come back. Ransack about white people. We're GONNA talk about Just really, we had an opportunity this week to navigate. Some difficult conversations. That it was really challenging, and I feel like this is a a little slice of what every one of us who decides to be actively engaged in the process of working toward an anti racist system. Is going to be confronted with over, so we're GONNA. Talk about some of what that felt like to work through those things and some things we learned, and some realizations who made and We're going to do our best to stay tuned. We'll be right.

partner Right Lake Angel Vermont US Shannon Mike Adam Cheney Casey
"white people" Discussed on Misfit Stars

Misfit Stars

08:21 min | 7 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Misfit Stars

"Other day we try to take a in the midst of all being. We were really getting to the point like serious burnout. Yeah, and so once the album was done. We're like okay now. We can actually take. A night off, you know, and so we're like. Let's watch a movie and Sora. A cartoon cartoon. Let's watch an animated feature. Just a lighthearted feel good, you know, take our mind off of everything happening in the world kind of moment. And so we picked spies in disguise which. Will Smith and plays like an animated James Bond Yeah exactly. And it was super great I loved it, but we accidentally ended up watching a film about de-escalating state, violence. That's what the movie's about like. Replacing my grenades and guns with inflatable hugs and glitter. Anti, wow. Happened feels a little on the news. Good though it was great, it was very enjoyable. Be The best sort of next gen weapon that this genius scientists kid advances like this thing is like it's sort of a flash bang, but instead of lake, making concussions and blinding lights. It makes glitter and images of cats and goes. and gets mostly disarmed and you can get away. Emotionally disarmed. Speaking of disarmament. So Hey. Good news locally. well first of all the bad news which Tacoma are home are adopted hometown here. has had a police killing. It happened about a month ago, but it only came to light like ten days ago. The very significant upside is the early similar to joy. George Floyd's yeah the whole thing. Yes, it was. trinet COPS suffocating people to death. It's a weird thing. Yeah statement so. Do. I mean. It seems unproductive to say that cops likes suffocating people to death. It seems unnecessarily inflammatory. We noticed. This update to keep. Its. You can say that there's a pattern here. Obviously choke holds and kneeling on. People ought to be banned nationally. That yeah, in in the effort of being impeccable with our words, because it reflects on the 'cause. That's why I said something. Okay, that's very earnest. You and I appreciate well. That's my job. Totally. So. Ernest police. Yeah, it's so true. Yeah, and you know in that spirit. I feel I. Feel now I feel more than I was thinking I had a minute ago for all these poor officers who against Shirley, their better impulses and desires just find themselves somehow suffocating people to death. You Know Oh my God. Really It's not helpful. It's not helpful. Okay, listen. It's a real problem and we're going to talk later in this episode about like some of the barriers to actually addressing the problem of racism in our system and in our policing specifically. But like just like we know we're going to talk about how silence is a is a a tool of oppression right I, honestly feel like. It's not like. Resorting to sarcastic blanket insults and statements jokes isn't helpful like. I respect what you're saying. I can understand the impulse to do that. It helps you deal with the discomfort of of the reality, but you know like if we're. I. Don't know I think I think it matters I. Think it matters that. We, Talk about all humans as humans. You know and it's tempting to just hurl insults at police and there's there's a lot wrong with policing, and there are a lot wrong with a lot of police officers. But I don't think that it helps the cause for justice to make Blake at jokes at their expense. Okay. It's specifically in a public forum. I respect what you're saying. I disagree okay and my disagreement is because I think I'm just more plainspoken, and I tend to call things I. See him, and this is sure thing that happens, and as for sure thing that people demonstrably on video can be seen to be enjoying doing and I think it's really important to name things for what they are, and not to tiptoe around and not mollycoddle people. To step back from describing things bluntly in an effort, not to offend people, I that people should be really offended. They absolutely should be and like. Absolutely we should name exactly what has what happened to George. Floyd entered the countless other people who have been killed by. Police And I'm not. I'm not mollycoddling anything. I'm not not speaking plainly I'm saying. That it isn't helpful to the cause to make blanket statements about all kinds of people in one lump. Like, yeah, we need to attack the system we need to. We need serious change. We need to uproot things and start again. Okay, not disagreeing with that at all. But I think in terms of making. Making jokes that are. At the expense of own. Entire Group of people. To be clear by group of people. You mean cups in this particular case yeah? I. Don't think it's helpful for the cause to. To make to make inflammatory statements like that like. Say what you mean, but like to say turns out cops like to kill people. It's not helpful. It's just not okay. It's true. I don't think it's true. Well I have a lot of video evidence I could show you. That would you can't. You cannot tell me that you know. Every single cop enjoys killing people. That's ridiculous. That's ridiculous, okay? I mean the the would agree with you that there's a system that allows for that to happen and that that people who were involved in that system who have allowed that to happen have complicity Okay, but it's not helpful, and it's not right to say blanket Louis. COPS are people who enjoy killing people know not all of them, but a lot of them some of them. Okay, but that's a different statement than what you're saying. It turns out. COPS like killing people turns out. Cops like strangling people. Well, that's just not helpful. Okay? Unless the people who are the people who need to be convinced that there is a problem in the system is going to hear that, and that is the only ticket they need to be like. I'm out of here. I'm out of this conversation It doesn't invite conversation. I suppose that's fair. You know, and this is what we're gonNA. Be Talking about later in this episode to like. This is the time and we have to be talking when white people need to be talking to white people. And we have to use every single tool that we have come to learn. That invites conversation with people that doesn't shut it down. To do that, it's our responsibility, you know. Yep! That's fair. Okay cool! I still jokes. But, I appreciate you sharing that. Okay. Yeah, important! NOPE! I got it I think it is important and I don't I don't disagree with you and I. Don't think you're wrong. But sometimes. People just need to blossom steam absolutely, and that's all that's all there is to it. You know what I mean. Obsolete solicit like people do need to blossom steam. You and I are on a podcast and we're talking microphones we're. We're going to publish this onto the Internet people listen sometimes apparent that to me confers an extra layer of responsibility with our words. Yeah, that makes sense. You know you can make jokes to me in the privacy of our home. Whenever you'd like to. But I think that that in terms of what we the kind of public discourse that we encourage, it's a different story.

George Floyd Tacoma Smith James Bond Ernest Shirley Blake
"white people" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

06:53 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"Hey? You're pretty fucked up times right now, so we normally record our podcast on Mondays and they air on Thursdays and last. Friday is mostly all know. Is when nationwide protests started so today's that of our traditional episode. We wanted to sit take time. To have a tough very necessary conversation or have some silly. Should for you listen to next week? We promise. But today, let's talk about racism as you guys know were foul mouth scrappy passionately pissed off. People and we just didn't see that anywhere in food. So when we created kitchen in two thousand twelve, the voice and the brand was totally authentically us like including our use of the word thug on the idol, unfortunately in the following years, the original intention implied in our name has been twisted particularly by our current president who has repeatedly used the word thug in a weaponized and racist way. Right now we're taking time to reflect on how we can best move forward to have our brand name better reflect our actual values, and we recognize as white people in. If you're white, it's really crucial, but you understand this white people don't get to decide what is or isn't racist. None of us. Know what it's like to be black in America unless you're black in America, and while we disagreed with some of our critics narratives, we understood where they were coming from. We took the criticism seriously. We listened a lot and we re evaluated that. The. Silly fucking blog restarted was now a platform with this large audience. And what responsibility did we have to that its creators we've always agreed. There needs to be regular conversation about race and food policies accessibility in economic justice. I feel like everyone says we need to have a conversation. We this is good. This is going to be solved by one fucking. Sure One fireside chat level solve racism. No, this needs to be an ongoing regular conversation, so we created this podcast, not just the skewer, the food industry by we do love doing that. We do enjoy it, but also to amplify voices and experiences other than our own, and to get the word out about great people in organizations that are working to make this world a better place. We don't talk about our nonprofit work because it feels fucking tacky to do. Yeah, it always feels like I would you see other people? Do it I'm like. Are you doing it for the credit or you do a? Screen shot or because you believe it's a good and right and just thing to do. Yeah, and that's not. That's not why we volunteer timer or donate like that's why we do it, but then again. Maybe if we shared it, then other people might be encouraged to get involved, too. We're still trying to figure out that balance, but it should be obvious by now that it's not enough to say that you're not racist. You have to be actively speaking out against racism whenever you see it like. When our old podcast platform gave a show to a white nationalist, we Terminator Agreement and left as soon as we could like. That was fucking ridiculous. They, they had a schedule shows that we were never in the same building at the same time. It's going to get violent. We were very outspoken on our feelings about that to the company and all of its employees and look. We know everyone's tired. Twenty twenty has been an exhausting ride in every week. That passes somehow shit here the week before. Black communities are especially tired of seeing this happen in. They've been peacefully protesting for fucking years. It was just weeks ago. The white community stormed Capitol buildings with rifles because they couldn't get their fucking haircut, there were no rubber bullets. There were no curfews. There was no tear gas. That's fucking ridiculous I. Mean What other examples do you need? Jaws happening. And all of this is happening during a fucking global pandemic is disproportionately hitting black and brown communities harder. They're fucking tired, and it's not their job to educate us on why we should be treating them and protecting them. Equally white people have to step up because we're the ones with the fucking problem. How long before we see another video of a scared white women calling the police because black person's near her. Just existing are worse A. A new video where we all witness another murder, it's infuriating and if you're not mad as hell congratulations, you're sociopath also influencers. Knock it off with all this disingenuous shit. I'll at saga if you're staging Sophie's your out here for the wrong reason, go home donate, and then you can have your fucking heart out to whatever ineffective bullshit makes you feel better? If you're going to protest, would you absolutely should because it's your lawful right? Right when you see injustice in this world where a mask were still in a fucking pandemic, plus this will help protect you when the cops inevitably start pepper, spraying or launching gas or try to identify you on social media, all goes will help, too, but you know if you don't have that, just cover your face safety first for all the reasons in stay together, police tactics to divide and conquer the break-up larger groups of protesters. Protesters, will start making arrests and watch out and speak up when you see an agent provocateur like an undercover cop, you know they're there to incite violence, which gives the police on the skirmish line the green light to engage if you see somebody doing something that is not in the spirit of protest, Lamont right down in there, the people around you will agree all about and as much as we love seeing people loot giant corporations. Couldn't people like Oh fuck. No! The target is like who who what? But look remain peaceful in. Remember why you're out there. Don't distract from the original reason that people are protesting and finally film everything capturing and sharing footage of heinous shit is exactly why everyone is so pissed off at the police right now. It's not that the world got more racist. We just started capturing yeah. And men. The cops are definitely showing their cards. It's almost like cops her as violent as they're accused the being and if you're weren't capturing all this sharing it, all of it would be denied, and if you're not going to, or you're unable to protest, we get it. You can still help. Here's some great organizations you can donate to act. Blue is a flexible. Flexible.

America Twenty twenty president murder Sophie Lamont
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

03:47 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"I know what you're saying but yeah now I just laughed because I think that's very sweet that that's the part that gets you the most and you're just like no no I was. I was really triggered by that comment because I knew how much that comment triggered you and triggered everyone else. That's in my life that is in fully is in full of white or is fully black but had later skin Yeah while appreciate you commenting back to some of the people on my posts trying to tell me. I'm not black enough to talk about these things and appreciate you using your platform and I hope that this isn't a one time only situation and I know we'll continue to have these conversations within our friendship but also hopefully more publicly just not at one thirty in the morning your time. Thanks for joining me. I need to go to bed and I. I need to allow Josh to come back into the room. Joshua's very supportive of this recording happening. Like go get on. Oh Yeah and Josh. Is the one that got me in contact with people from the Montreal? North community like Josh. I'm very lucky to have someone who's just fully supportive of Of all colors all religions. Well he's very like wants to advocate for all of the. I can't even say this sentence because you're adjusting your pat. What's happening here? I wear that goes from my belly button to the back of my abstract. I love that as talking about your pad going out with your ass. Crack is going to be in the same episode as the fucking amazing Robin Diangelo. Ngelo this is. These are the two The two ends of my life right like the contradiction the reality this is the the authenticity of it. but yeah. Josh is A. I'm very happy that you have manure life he advocates for like literally everyone And I think he's definitely influenced you to speak up more about all those things and also help to educate you on a bunch of different things to snaps to Josh. Give him my love and I love you. Think Taylor joining me. Thank you for having this discussion. Thank you for hat for holding this discussion in for having it on your podcast and for allowing me to be a part of it all right. Can I love you? Goodnight move? You're probably reading. I can't even. You're probably GONNA listen to this this morning. So it's very confusing for you. But it's almost to a N. Y. Time now right in the bedroom. So we're going to go to bed but I love. You love you all right. Bye Bye all right. That does it for today's episode. Thank you so much for making it all the way through and keeping your ears your hearts and minds open. It would mean so much to me if you could take a second or two after listening to this episode leave a review on Itunes and let me know what you're enjoying about the show. I love reading. You know what your favorite episodes are where you guys listen And definitely feel free to share this with a friend. I mean part of how we break down the stigmas around these topics is by talking about them right and sharing them with more people so definitely share the podcast and again really wanting to include all of you in this podcast. So if you have questions or you weren't share thought or experience please sending a voice memo to ask dot. Let's talk about it at g mail DOT COM and I'm really excited to keep having his conversations and Breaking down these stigmas so thank you all so so so much. I hope you have a wonderful rest of your week and I'll talk teaneck time..

Josh Taylor Joshua Robin Diangelo dot Montreal
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

06:03 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"He on why I love I say no. This is your work. You GotTa go do the work and I hope to that also I mean I might have had a little bit of like. I don't even WanNa say over sharing but I definitely shared vulnerable. Melman this week on instagram. Like excuse me with all of this stuff coming up and I'm leaving the Bourbons Gerbert. That's a traditional. That's her signature. Burp the Kermit BURP. Yup and I hope that like white people listening and following all of this stuff in the news and I hope that people of Color share in their actual pain and then it's like I hope that may be really authentic and actually sharing that vulnerable moments after I had watched the George floored video. Actually thinks and you're like I I am starting to this. GotTa be exhausting for people of Color so I am going to go do my own work now because I can't imagine having to carry that that emotion on a day to day basis on interaction interaction basis like there are certain spaces that I- legit don't feel safe in. There are places of this country that I don't feel safe going to that I intentionally avoid But what I meant by asking questions. When I was in my call today I asked her. What what else can I do? You know I posted about this. I'm like what else can I do? I asked you the same question to and you give me great suggestions and I'm working with the Montreal community and I WanNa do right by them and and you know I'm working with them to figure out like what else can I do I'm going to end off with this. I was afraid to have this conversation because the Hannah Brown Situation. I was afraid to just like deep dig into a Bachelor Bachelor conversation. Yeah after having posted what I posted. I wanted to have the conversation with you. I called you in the middle of recording and jumped on and I'm happy that I did because every person that stands up every per every white person that uses the voice to end this to become anti-racists to help tell ragweed he's full exactly to be an ally is like one person helps another helps another another so it's just it's a domino effect and we need to do our part so I'm ending it off on Bat Because it's one thirty in the brain is turning and can't count sentences together right now. Well I'm glad to get came on. I'm glad that you came on as well. And I also hope that this serves as an example that these conversations don't have to be perfect like I don't expect you to come to the table with like a just. The woke is shit ever like. It's never been a part of your experience. You have to unlearn a lot of things. You have to learn a lot of new things and that's going to take time so like I don't think any person of color is expecting for people to just rope. Switch is flipped and white people. Totally get it. Now we're fully anti-racists and breaking down the system like no. It's going to take time but like they just being open to these conversations and you know giving yourself grace to even have them in. The first place is super important. So and I'm not coming on here to say that I am perfect and I have a figure it out and that you know I I I to get there. I want to get to the point where I can help out more than I am doing right now. Yeah while I mean you've been friends with Tunisia. For how long is this the first conversation you've had with her about her race. We've been friends for how long four years now for God. Well not so long but so long since then that part of our lives. Yeah but I would say this is like the first real time that we're having conversations about race really. Yeah it's came up and listen. I've dated people who are not white and I've had many of these conversations than's with them And a lot of you know. Some of them were not fully white and Knoxville yeah awfully white and did experience a lot of heat because of the color of their skin. And you know something that you have gone through and if you watch the bachelor and you watched her Taylor's intro package you talked about how you never really felt like he fit in in you. Why are you laughing? I'm laughing because that part got to you so I was trying. I was crying because my ex went through that Taylor. He moved from the states to Canada. Because of I mean not that it was only happening in the states but he was going from school to school to school to school because they kept calling him dirty because he was wasn't fully white he was fully black and up. Just the amount of He at he went through and now he's doing so much for the black community and I'm so proud of him brain fired..

Taylor Bourbons Gerbert Hannah Brown Situation Tunisia George Montreal Canada Knoxville
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

07:00 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"White person that has been arrested for suspected. Bad check writing it like like I know the whole thing like you said everything sounds so ridiculous that you kind of feel like you have to put the puzzle pieces together because it doesn't make sense that it got the point that it got to Yeah and this is where I want people to zoom out an understand that this is where this system is at play like. This is where the fact that our entire system is based in white. Supremacy comes to light because that is only irrational part of all of this like that is where that comes through and for me. It's just like it's so exhausting. And it's so heartbreaking and it's like I just I I don't even know where to begin honestly because you think about it as if like you were there right and like what could you even done like I as I watched that. I'm like Oh my God. This officer is literally his knee pin down on this man's neck. He's repeatedly saying he cannot breathe. There are people yelling into like. Can you check his pulse? Like he's now stopped talking. He has now stopped trying to move trying to do anything like can you please check him and to me. It's just there's zero regard for human life zero regard for human life as a Black Man. He has been completely dehumanized and is just a criminal. The one Asian Officer. Who's like standing by? Keep saying like this is why you don't do drugs or like don't get into drugs and I'm like what the fuck are you saying? Yeah one of the officers was just like Whoa this way. You don't do drugs or like this why you stay away from drugs and then have a person on drugs. That person needs help and second of all this man literally. His pulse was checked and he was dead yet. This officer did not even remove his knee from his neck. He remained on top of him after he literally murdered him. Yeah I think E- When you said you don't need to watch the video but I think people do. I think people need to see how things like. This continue to happen and the stories that we do know of. We just only know about them because they have been recorded and they have been you know talked about in their part of headlines. But there's so many other stories that we don't know about and I mean I hear you on that I think I don't think it's something that people of Color Need Watch on. No I'm not. No I'm I'm talking about all I you know. I'm still thinking of the video that I posted and how that Is a subject to we retaliate. A subject that I never had to talk about this is something that I never had to witness And so I think by watching something like that. It really does something to you. It makes you. It does something to you and It makes you realize how much of a voice you do have as a white person. How much change needs to get done in? Even if you feel like you don't have the followers that we might have. You have a voice you matter and you have influence Yeah Yeah it just I mean it literally takes me back to like being in middle school learning the shittiest fersine of black history and just hearing the stories that happened during the time of slavery and even afterward and it literally feels like. I'm living in a nightmare. It literally feels like I'm living in a part of history that I will look back when I'm a grandma one day and my granddaughter will be in High School right in a paper on some fucking. I don't even know and have to come to me and be like my mom. What was it like like when you know black lives? Black lives matter movement started and when the Kovic pandemic happened and like what was going on like I think about that and I'm like wow this is all going to be so significant to our history and our history really hasn't changed that much. I'm not a history buff. I really don't know ton on it but this doesn't feel very different from shit that we heard about in history class. It has a different uniform. is presenting itself in a slightly different way. We got prisons now. We got mass incarceration. Got Police brutality. We still have. Black men bain murdered for no reason like there's so many conversations that needs to be had and. I hope that this whole episode sparked some conversations. I do hope that the Hannah Brown situation sparks a lot of conversations. And I hope that why people are opening their ears and their eyes to the lives of people are calling. Yeah would do you want to say to White People. Switzer what I want to say to white people is go. Talk to your white people. Go talk to your other white friends if you have friends that are people of Color. Listen to them like if they tell you somethin' about their experience as a person of color You better I'm sorry. Shut the fuck up and listen And but also ask right. 'cause I'm some I I ask questions that may I mean I ask you questions? I'm like I don't know like I don't know enough about this or I don't know about that. It's important also ask the question because you do i. What do I say when you do.

White People officer Asian Officer Hannah Brown High School Switzer
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"But don't want you to let that stop you from having them. So that said. Here's my conversation with Vanessa Right. Welcome Vanessa to the show. You WanNa tell me what time it is your time that we're recording this right now. It is currently twelve fifty six an eastern standard time. I'm in my bed with my dog. Have Cleared Yep Yep wearing a massive pattern now. Yeah Yeah were here. We're here and yeah. Yeah so we talked about having this conversation. All Week End of last week. This came up and we've had many conversations about race about racism about the situation with Hannah Abou- things overall in general. You've asked a lot of really great questions about you know my experience of things. I feel like I've challenged you in some ways and you've been very open to that You just did a post on your instagram today. Call in white people to action to open their eyes to some of the staff So you know. We're going to talk a little bit about all the stuff that is happening and again. This is safe space. I Love You. You are my dear friends partially hate me right now as we're recording. I mean as long as my faces not recorded because I will take a Goblin right now but this is definitely a conversation that we need to have like. You said it is something that we've been talking about for a while. It is a subject that I main beside the whole Hannah. Be thing in the whole situation. That happened with her. It was really what struck a chord was what was happening on social media and the responses from people would. I was reading and what I know the comments in messages that Rachel was getting in that she was saying in How how can people think this way? And how can people act upon this? Hate that they have in twenty twenty and actually just read a a post today and they said that racism has not ended just being recorded now while yes and also that. I don't know if you've heard this before. But that slavery didn't really and we just transitioned it to look a different way. I think the new Jim Crow. I think people as a white person I think it's easier to Because we don't live in a black person shoes. I don't live in a black community. I don't you don't live in a community where there are black people either. Well exactly so. I don't go through the everyday life. That a black person goes through the video that I posted on my instagram was something that really made me realize like Holy Shit. I never had these conversations about how to act around a police officer. I never had my parents had to talk to me about that and a really just made me realize how I have not chosen the color of my skin. I was born into the color of my skin that I'm born into and so I did not choose to have the privilege that I have but I do have it and there was something that you had posted and that really hit me and I'm like only if this is what Taylor might think of me or any of my ex boyfriends aren't late might think of me or any of my other. Best friends might think of me. I don't remember the exact quote but you posted. If you're white friends don't can you actually say what if you're white friends aren't anti-racist you don't have any white friends Yeah Yeah? I had a feeling actually when I posted that I was like. She can read this.

Vanessa Right instagram Taylor Hannah Abou Rachel Jim Crow officer
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

09:17 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"You know that that we have the answer that we can instruct you in that. You're wrong on it. All of its far navigating so this is always slightly uncomfortable. Because I'm white and I WANNA I wanna a practice my own form of humility but what I would offer you as a couple of things to choose not to take it on is actually empowered choice. Then that that is an option right you know what I gotta get home. I gotTa Take Care of my family. I'm not throwing my pearls today. I'm not risking. I'm not giving all that energy album at work so rather than see that as you know I sold out. It's like given the white people I'm giving them enough. This you know. So that's one of Nazi on. No I totally and people actually have like Jazzmen who was also on my season. A black woman has received a lot of hate for not speaking up about it. Like people's are shaming her as a black person not speaking up and for me and my post addressing it it did feel really empowering because I was like you know what this is an opportunity for all the white people here that are progressive progressives and want to be antiracist step up. Because I'm not. I don't need to be doing this. That yes they might post and it felt very empowering your little damned if you do damned if you don't I mean were this person who's choosing not to kind of not today I. You know it's not no. I'm not giving you that. That is to look at either one of those a choice that you're making it because that would feel more empowering than draining another option is just what you're doing is like White folks. Go Talk to your people you. WanNa say that you're progressive than you. Do it used speak up. You're not going to be dismissed in the same way that I'm going to be dismissed was so when so much of what I can articulate about the things that I am right now. A come from years of brilliant mentorship from people color. You all have been saying this. For centuries if not decades and there is difficult tension where white people are less likely to dismiss me as oversensitive are biased or playing the race card or way that I can name it. That they can't deny right is a little bit of that. Hey you know I know we come on you guys. You can't get away with that as well so the key is to use that you know. It may not be fair that I've been given a platform and credibility when I say these things that are different than people collar get when they say these things but since I have gotten that platform I need to use it so sometimes I think you can gather the white people say you know what I'm not gonNA. I'm not GonNa say anything about what just happened in that meeting. You do it or you take those people aside so those are some things that can help you navigate it yeah well and hopefully sharing this episode also helped navigate it and people can can learn from from all of this. I'm going to wrap up here so I can let you go but curious if you have any other thoughts or things that you feel like will be important to share with the whites predominantly female listeners of the podcast and also fans of the Bachelor I would highly recommend. Of course my book I've been recommending that. Thank you Leyla Saieed. Has a book called me in White Supremacy workbook? It's just really excellent is actually a practices like you. Each each section is something that you would do or reflect on. That can really help you unpack this. I can't say enough be willing to grapple with the reality that there's something going on that you don't understand and be open to trying to understand it until you get a little further along Listen more than you speak. Be Curious you can listen without a green. We don't have to agree with the rental in order to listen here. One one another I would also inservice of that. Humility racism is the most complex nuanced politically charged social dilemma of the last several hundred years. You don't know everything you need to know about it. You can't possibly in your entire lifetime. Yeah so so begin to look into it begin to study and read and Engage with it. Yeah Yeah and also I mean this is a. This is a system within our society that hasn't really impacted you. Listen to the people that it is impacting greatly. Ask Yourself and I. I don't know how people to people identify as feminists or if that's sadly a bad word nowadays but as a feminist What I would offer the women is draw from your understanding of sexism Ask yourself what you would want from a man who who wasn't understanding. Why the way that he talked to you or the way that he touched too was disrespectful on her full. And then see if that doesn't help you around something. You're struggling with around race so when I can't figure out a piece of feedback maybe I've been given about my racist my unconscious racial socialization and I feel defensive. I just changed the roles in my head and I imagined that a man is saying to me what I'm thinking about. Say to that person of color and usually I'm like ooh K. I get it in maybe enclosing. Racism is not a rare thing that only happens in some moments. It's it's always happening. All of us have absorbed the messages in my case. It's the message of superiority in your case. The message you've been given us one of inferior so the work we have to challenge races in this different But we all play a part and I would say ultimately race. Racism is a white problem. Created it We will build it and we ultimately benefit from it whether we want to or not. There's no neutral place. Wow thank you so much. You're welcome all right. A huge huge huge. Thank you to Robin for taking the time to chat with me. I hope that you're able to take away a lot from that conversation. Go researcher listen to her other interviews. Read her book. There's also a workbook that she's created that I have linked episodes as well. Just think you overall so much robin for the work that you're doing And I know that we've talked about Hannah a little bit in the interview to and again. This episode is not specifically about Hannah Brown using that word K. Hannah doing that is simply a vessel at which this issue of racism is being presented to Bachelor Nation K and it is not something new for the people of Color in bachelor nation. I remember when I first got off the show. I literally got invited into a facebook group that was titled Just Colored. Enough to be on bachelor. So it's not something that is new and it has been particularly disappointing to see other Non People of Color in bachelor family not use their voice. There have certainly been a few and for that. I think it's a step in the right direction. However there are so many people most of the people that watch the show that are predominantly white so I think using your voice as a white person especially in a position of power of having some influence of having a platform of being somewhat on TV that it is even that much more important for you to speak up and that is going to transition us here into my conversation with my lovely dear friend Vanessa. Gremaldi you all recognized from the show Who's been on the podcast several times and this conversation with her was reported very very late. Her time. So definitely we'll talk through that you'll understand why But just hope that it is able to represent a way of having this conversations and you know her and I've definitely had many previous conversations to this one but did want to make sure that we got in some of our conversation in this episode. So that you all could hear from someone in Bachelor nation who is a white woman who does struggle to have these conversations to some extent even with a very dear friends myself Who is a person of color and these conversations can be difficult to navigate?.

K. Hannah facebook Jazzmen Leyla Saieed Vanessa Wan researcher Hannah Brown Robin
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

10:02 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"Do you experience moments? Almost on a daily basis of white people making racist assumptions saying and doing things subtly are not. That are racially hurtful. Do you experience that on a daily basis the up and Do you tend to bring it up and try to talk to us about it sometimes. Yes and how? How often does that go well for you? Rarely okay now. Why people listen to that. I've I've asked questions for twenty years. The number one responses never have I experienced if I was a person of color. Never have experts at going well and the second most common is rarely so most of the time. You just don't bother because it tends to get worse not better. That is the power white fragility. My upset might hurt feelings. My umbrage might you know functions almost to punish you for having even tried to talk to me about. This is a great irony is that I think for the average well-meaning white person we would never want to say or do anything racist or racially hurtful and yet how to respond. When you let us know that Hey I know you didn't mean to you but you just did. Oh how dare you your pretty tough setup isn't it yeah and I've even. I've tried to explain that piece to people sometimes to saying you know. It is emotionally exhausting amount of emotional Labor that I've tried to put in as a person of color to try to educate white people when they do. Ask Me these questions when these statements do come up that it's just met with so much defensiveness so much like then attack on to attacking of me that it's like it's a lot of emotional labor but then even just the fact that I say this emotional labor gets attacked. And then it's like okay. I'm done so so one of the things that I have tried to echo very strongly not only would this with Hannah Brown. But in general is that white people are the people that need to be having these conversations and in discussing how. I wanted to cover this episode. A lot of people were saying you know. Oh you got people of color from the show you know get other black men and black women on from the show and I was like no because we've already talked about this. We get this like there's not much more that we need to say about this and the people that need to understand and received this information aren't really going to receive it as well coming from us. So can you talk about how you've gone about the Silla taking The workshops that you do with white fragility and just kind of being in this space as a white woman having these conversations isn't that people don't resist mice in it but it's so so vastly different. It doesn't trigger a lifetime of hurt and invalidation so there's a very liberating premise. That we could start with which is simply. There's no way that I could have been raised in this culture as a white person and not internalized sense of racial superiority. There's just no way It's it's twenty four. Seven everywhere in the culture is the message. That white is the ideal. I think that's so hard for people to admit very a lot of guilt. But if we do it just a little bit of studying open her eyes to it. It's so loud and so constant and so when you start from that premise. It changes your question from if I'm races to which most white people will say no a now. What further action is required of me if my answer? That question is no. I'm not racist. No further act if we we understand that it's inevitable that it wasn't our fault that we didn't choose it but we have to take responsibility for four having been conditioned into that superiority then our question becomes. How is that manifest in my life in my work in my relationships in my responses and so that just stops all the defending deflecting denying ended opens up actually in incredible lifelong journey of discovery. That is painful at times but fantastically a stimulating and I have relationships today with people of Color that I was never meant to have or would not have. If I hadn't done this work I it's it's actually quite quite beautiful but we cannot get there from the current had. I'm that says only mean bad people wearing white hoods could ever be racist. Abram kindy makes another point that I find really useful which is virtually any racist act. Even the ones that that defensive white people will acknowledge are racist. The people that have committed them. We'll say they're not racist so saying I'm not racist actually becomes fairly meaningless. And that leads us to you. Know either racist or you're anti-racists which is actively challenging racism and a few other threads that go into white fragility is not just individualism right. We're taught that we're special and unique and different. And so you know you can't say anything about me or know anything about me and let me just say that that's true. I don't know all the listeners stories By the fact that you're white we could literally predict whether you and your mother were GonNa Survive your birth. That's deep. There is a collective shared experience to be in a member of this group called White people that we have to be willing to look at and grapple grappling. So for me just came when I took a job I wasn't qualified for but DOT O. Open-minded this is all about open. Mindedness and so it was for diversity trainer And there were two parts to that process. The actually changed my life and the first one is. We were doing these trainings in the workplace in interracial teams so. I was working side by side with people of Color often. They were the only people of Color in the room And they were challenging. The Way I saw the world in my place in it no could be that far in life college educated all of that professional and never have had my racial world challenged and certainly not by people color in any sustained way white people who feel so confident. They're in their opinions. You must recognize that we can get through graduates you can get a PhD in this country without ever discussing races. You get a law degree. You can get a teaching certificate and you have never been taught a thing about racists so that was part one. Is these relationships being challenged by by people of color and then the other part was trying to talk to white people about racism and the hostility is jaw-dropping at e. You you read the comments. These are younger people today. This was back in. The nineties is the same dynamic but it was so predictable that I eventually I mean I. I was like a deer in headlights but eventually I began to say so. What's happening here? What is the underlying framework of meaning? These people are coming from that. Would cause them to respond this way and this kind of leads to. Oh only mean intentional. People can be racist so that helped me begin to speak back to that in a way that people could hear and understand and twenty years later. You've got the book and since you've wrote the book I'm wondering just kind of how that changed your life at all personally after reading the buck and If there's things that you would do differently with the book now that's a great question Well I think I'm hoping that what I would do. Differently is leading to the book. I'm working on right now. Which is called? Niceness is not courageous. How WELL-INTENDED WHITE PROGRESSIVES UPHOLD? Racism ask why focusing on particular in particular white people who really see themselves as progressive and talk about intersection. -ality the minority myself I I'm spiritual you know on the spiritual plane. We're all one. I just take on all those kind of precious narratives that he white quarterback of a better word liberals. I don't mean this politically but From Understanding Racism Yeah wow there was A. There was a message that I had had from someone specifically asking a question and and starting off with progressive white person so attempting attempting to see that now. But I do want to answer a few of these questions specifically related to this Hannah Brown situation but first curious just kind of from your perception of Reading Through the Commons. What thoughts came up for Yale and watching the video? What what your thoughts were. Yeah I mean. I saw a mix assan mix of people who understood what was inherently problematic and I saw all the classic forms of defensiveness and denial and minimization. I think there's some key things that people don't understand that would love to speak to which is why. But it's a song on the radio. She was only singing what she heard. Why can't she use that word in?.

Hannah Brown Abram Yale
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

03:35 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"Fit for any need allowing women People Volvos to enjoy themselves however they choose whenever they choose and can also be used for partnered sex as well but if you're solo me during during all of this Then definitely you know for your own for your own pleasure. They are actually launched now in Canada and Walmart. You can go to. Www dot walmart dot ca to find your plus one and they're also in target The already popular air pulsing rouser. Who I've named. Jill is one of my favorites but they also have things like Lube and toy cleaning wipes and they'll have a one so definitely be sure to check them out. Pack that self care. Masturbation is a valid form of self love. All of that said let's take a deep breath and we'll get back to the show. This defensiveness that we're talking about is is a symptom of white fragility. Can you talk a little bit about what white fragility is? Kind of how how people can can identify that. Yeah I want to back up a little bit essay. Something I wanted to say at the very opening. I can't imagine there's a single white person listening right now. Who doesn't have an opinion on what we're talking about. Everybody has an opinion. You cannot grow up in this culture not development opinion on racism. But I'm going to stay another controversial saying that doesn't make it informed. I have an opinion on virtually everything. I have an opinion on the bachelor and I don't watch it. I I an opinion on you know what you know. Doctors should or shouldn't be doing. I'm not a doctor. You can of course in do develop opinions on topics you're not informed on and so white people listening white people commenting. Of course you have an opinion. Please please please reach for humility and considered that there. Something you simply don't understand and hold back that opinion and begin to listen and in fact you don't have to ever fully understand it. You know if you if you are if you identify as a woman you probably get that there are certain things that men are simply not going to be able to understand But you hope they try you hope that they listen. You recognize that they're not in a position to dismiss your experience out of hand when they don't know it in fact that that dynamic has helped me a great deal understand racism so white fragility when I coined that term the fragility part was meant to capture. How little it takes two 'cause white people to melt down and as you noted for many white people just preceding as if you know something about them because they're white generalizing about white people will cause a meltdown. They get very upset. Yeah but the impact of that meltdown is not fragile at all. It's very powerful because it marshals behind did the weight of that history that power the lifetime of you as a as a woman of Color being invalidated and silenced talked over and having your experiences explained away. Minimized right fill. The impact is really powerful and it functions conscious or not intentionally or not as a kind of policing because I got two questions for you. How.

Walmart Canada Jill
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

07:07 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"I don't think you understand the gravity of it I don't think you actually understand the impacts of white people using the N. word in any capacity I will echo things that Rachel has also said here where you know. She said this on Instagram live. Get back on and show your face and actually have a real apology to me. She's hiding incident in a place of privilege not having to actually face the things that she said out of embarrassment. Meanwhile bar people are killed on a regular basis for just being black Which socks and I also think in this apology that she didn't actually cover or take accountability for any of the things that she actually said in her instagram live. She says she's not going to justify it. Okay but she's also saying. I see the hurt I have caused. Okay well what hurt how do you? How do we actually know that you understand why what you said was wrong And that she promises to do better. I can't get I can't get behind them how you haven't. What exactly are you promising by saying? You're going to do better because we haven't seen anything and said you've head and I know a lot of people are like. Oh well you know what Tyler Cameron said. We should lift her up right now. No I'm sorry but now like like I really can't wrap my head around it and I'm sorry all. I wished that I was more in like racial educator mode here and could really put this in a nice pretty package for you but like absolutely not. I don't think that she needs to be lifted up whatsoever. She's been incredibly lifted up. She's been incredibly privileged an incredibly blessed if you will for majority of her life. I think it's Ok that she struggles with this. Am I saying people need to attack her? No of course not that is not my hope. That is not my goal. That is on my mission here. I think taking actual accountability coming. That was Mingo shaken off high bubba. I need animals around me at all times for pet therapy but I think that the the I promised to do better I own it. All is empty words. That didn't speak. She said the n word to sing along to Thong. That wasn't even playing and then it's going to type out this apology and put it on her on her story. That goes away in twenty four hours so to relieve think that she's taking accountability here. Do I really think that. She is expressing to her followers. Who will defend her at any cost? I don't I I just don't buy it and I don't think I frankly don't believe that you should just be let off the hook and adjust be well. You didn't mean to or while you didn't understand because guess what it is twenty twenty. We got podcasts. We got books we got the Internet. You can do some fucking research to understand why that's not okay to understand the actual pain et does cause and I'm I am going to address this. Her Brother has came out. There are not came out but it has came out all these tweets. Her Brother has said where he is using the N. Word left fucking so. Do I really think that within her family household that there is accountability that there's understanding of how that word should actually be used by only black people. Now I don't even in the edgy lives. She says oh no. It was probably Patrick. Well really if that's what you're going to. Then how can you sit here and say on your life? That's I've never said that word before. I've never called anyone that I can't I really I can't get behind it. The politics me feels very very Ama- G and I hope that you can understand that I hope that me explain this maybe not in the clearest way possible but I hope that I hope that you can start to understand that So now for someone who can explain this in a much clearer way than I currently am. I WanNa play a short clip. Five minute clip here that I shared on my instagram story to explain a little bit deeper. About why words That don't belong to everyone exist and why that even is a thing. I received a ton of messages from you. All about how helpful this clip was that you shared it with your parents who struggled to admit that they're wrong and that they were able to get it and that this video this clip really helped click for a lot of you in terms of how to respond to people's defence of well if they don't want us to use it then they shouldn't put it in the song or why don't we just erase the word from all language and then the problem is solved if in such a bad word. I can't So I'm GONNA play this clip despite Tana Hashi Coats and it is on words. That don't belong to everyone This is on a book tour. He's speaking at a high school here. so let's take a listen last week. Northwestern is concert with LIL BOOSIE FOR US. Last word profusely like a ton and there was an email sent out to students who went to this concert. Saying you don't have a right to use word which is hundred degree with I as a white person. I don't have any right. I haven't until reparations eight until there's some sort of giving back there's no brain of what you say I don't know what to do when I hear my friends using this word in a song. I don't know what to do when it's just it's all time don't have meeting without my wife refers to me as honey that's accepted and okay between us. If we were walking down the street together and a strange woman referred to as I'm.

Instagram LIL BOOSIE Rachel Tana Hashi Coats Tyler Cameron Thong Mingo Patrick
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

04:44 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"Like you need to be an anti-racist so the fact that you know she comes to defend herself would just saying. I'm never called anyone that well the the point And then to say well maybe I sat it just acknowledges to me that it's it is something that she has said before that. That was not the first time that she's saying along to a song and said that And I'm sure many of you listening to this podcast right now can think back to times where you were singing it in a song and used it but if you were around a black person while that happened you probably wouldn't have thought it. I don't know that she would have still wrapped that along if Matt James was there. Who's friends with Tyler Cameron? And they all hang out. I don't know that she would have still continued that on. I really don't. I've never met Hannah. I'm not friends with Anna. I have no idea but my gut here saying that she probably would not have and many of you. Listening probably probably wouldn't if I was in the room with you and you might not see the harm in using the word. But that's where I really want you to zoom out and really open up your eyes and your ears and listening to this episode. A lot of people have been using this defense that if black people don't want white people to use the word then they shouldn't use it themselves. Why are black people out to say this word white people are not I I WANNA ask you? Why do you want to say this word in the first place? Why is this important that you use this word? Have you considered the history of white people's usage of this word? Have you considered the implications and the consequences and the suffering that this word has had on people of color throughout history? Is that what you want to be associated with as a white person? What is it mean for you to think about the fact that there is? Maybe this one word that you can't use or that you shouldn't use. There's very common saying that equality only feels like oppression when you've had privilege and I want to echo here that I'm when a white person is called out is know misspoken when they have used a term like the N. word and are called to have some kind of accountability like what we're experiencing here with Hannah Brown That that accountability only feels like attacking only feels like shaming only. Feels like canceling when you've had privilege so I really want. You ought to think about that. Now I've been asked a lot of times that. What would it actually take for her to apologize? Why is the apology that she gave not enough? What else do you want from her? You're not accepting apology. She gave. Therefore you're just trying to cancel her I'm not part of cancel culture. I don't cancel people again. Asking someone to be accountable for their words and the impact of their words is not cancelling. The canceling is a cop out. It's an excuse. It's it's a defense to actually happen to take any kind of accountability. So this apology that Hannah gave six inches. Which again is doesn't I'll get to that. She says I owe you all a major apology. There is no excuse and I will not justify what I said. I read your messages and seeing the hurt I have caused I own it all. I am terribly sorry and I know that whether in public or private this language is unacceptable. I promise to do better now for those of you that feel that. That was a sincere full apology..

Hannah Brown Tyler Cameron Anna Matt James
"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

08:18 min | 8 months ago

"white people" Discussed on Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk about it. This is Taylor your host and this episode is for White People. This is an episode that I hope is a white listener. You will share with your white friends. I hope that as a white listener you will open your ears and be prepared to get a little uncomfortable and do so with open arms and jump right in to the uncomfortableness that you're most likely going to feel listening to this episode. We are going to get into several different things in this episode. We are going to have Robin Dangelo. Who is the author of IT White Fragility that? I've shared so many times on Instagram as a resource for you. All we are going to have a conversation with major friend Vanessa. Gremaldi to share a little bit of how we've been navigating these conversations as a white friend and a person of color friend woman of color friend and then we will also briefly here touch on some of the news happening and that doesn't include this situation with Hannah Brown that has reached bachelor nation and as many of you are Bachelor. Nation participants members friends fans as many of you. Follow the Bachelor. This is pretty relevant to the culture. Right now So we'll definitely be given my unfiltered thoughts on this and I will be honest with you. All A lot of this is emotional for me. A lot of this is triggering for me personally You know there have been a few other people in Bachelor Nation speaking out and I echo those things those people have been saying and I just hope that all of you white people that are listening. Do take some steps here after this episode and also now that you are taking a step by even exposing yourself and listening to this episode so thank you for being here or member that all of this conversation is not an attack on you so if you can try to put down any defenses. That might be a defenses. That feel like they're coming up around me even just using the words white people We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA chat with Robin I after I share this Hannah Clip and then after Robin we will talk with Vanessa. So here we go all right here is the actual audio from the instagram. Live of Hannah Brown. If you have not heard it yet here it is. Have you ever seen that saw? Throw IT I. I'm so sorry wasn't you? That was I was thinking this. I'm sorry I don't I don't think I mean brothers Patrick Burke anyway so that was the video and I'm going to say a few things about this. That are frankly. Just very honest and me coming from a place of you know being an educator or even a position to teach anything this is just me personally And I gotta say it's not surprising at all. I won't be surprised if you know next week in the coming weeks. This is totally dropped. I won't be surprised She as I watched this video. You know the fact that she skips over the word. Fuck but then proceeds to say the N. Word In with a slight hesitation the slightest of hesitations tells me that she knew she was saying that she may be shouldn't be saying but that it would have been more unladylike would have been less pageant. Queenie. Chu have said the word fuck than it was for her to say then word that she felt she had enough power or entitlement to use that word. But that saying we're faulk would have been continually tainting for her. Was the impression that I got When people brought it to her to her attention and afterwards is kind of smiling and say no I didn't. I was singing the song will maybe I sat it and then she also goes on to say can think whatever you want about. Whatever I said or didn't say and in that moment like in those in that clip when she's actually on her lives me says a whole lot more than her. You know four sentence whatever it was quote unquote apology. And it's what she said in that live after she said the N. Word is what she's not taking accountability for as well in her apology and in that she's saying oh I was just saying the song which is what all of a large majority allowed majority. I'll say allowed majority of her followers are saying to defend her as she attempted to defend herself in. That live That it's just song and why not? Why can't she just say the words? In the song it's innocent and Very much defending her usage of the word and I. I'm not going to ECHO. The things that are in Rachel Lindsay. Live that live. Please take a listen to it Everything that she said I support and I stand by and I'm also still disappointed with the lack of people in Bachelor family. That have not came forward supporting her. Because with that lack of reinforcement unfortunately people feel more apt to apt is right word here but they feel more inclined. They feel more empowered to stay. She's being an angry black woman. She say she's just trying to create drama The more that people support an echo the statements that Rachel said in her live Damore age of support that she has general which is needed but also be the less that I think people feel that they can use those. I'M GONNA say bullying tactics really And I think especially when we watch that live and her response after. It's called her attention that she used the word. She is then also saying. Oh well maybe I sat it and I don't think it was in this clip. But she also said No. We don't use that word. I I've never called anyone that word. Which again is to defend herself right that she's scared. That people are going to now. Say She's a racist. Which again as echoed here. Something that Robin Dangelo has also pointed out in her book. That we will share. Is that if you are not being anti-racist then you're racist that always people as we've been brought up in our society under as system that is based in white supremacy. You are racist and it's not something personal it's just that though that's what you've been raised in nothing to take personally but also to just acknowledge that that is the system and unless you are actively being anti racist there's not just your race history.

White People Robin Dangelo Bachelor Hannah Brown Vanessa Rachel Lindsay Taylor Hannah Clip Patrick Burke faulk Chu
"white people" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

13:47 min | 10 months ago

"white people" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"Twelve and the economic scene columnist from two thousand twelve to two thousand eighteen. His book is called American poison. How racial hostility destroyed our promise? It is not an uplifting read. I will just let that be no. It isn't important. Read and we talk about why and in the end. I think we get somewhere where at least we're facing towards the light. If not actually feeling it so coming right up. Edward reporter Eduardo. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me. I really appreciate a your patients normally. I might not say that on the air but I feel like we just need to. Everyone needs to appreciate each other's patients these days. So let's make a practice of it. Yeah that's right you know. This is a weird world where nine and patients would be very will be a valuable asset. Yes so I'm excited to talk to you about your book. My first question for you is. How did you come to write this because you come from a very much? A news background right like you wrote for newspapers. You Root for the Wall Street Journal. You're at the New York Times and this is a. This is a book. That's not straight news. Let's say no an interim curious. If have you could tell us sort of your journey to coming to it okay. That's interesting it's it's more of a personal and a professional journey in a way I've been thinking about this book in some way pretty much since I moved to live in the US I grew up in Mexico. I lived outside of the United States until twenty years ago or so when I returned to live here to work for the Wall Street Journal and I remember that you know in a I remember feeling really big shock. I mean I was. Let Me Backtrack. I was I. Was He the Journal? Hired me to write about Latino issues it was. There was this enormous excitement about the growth of the Hispanic population and they thought well. Here's his Mexican guy. Let's hire him to write about you. Know this growing Hispanic population and what it means for businesses and so I went down to l. a. and started writing about that stuff and one thing that struck me in my going about reporting but more just living. There was this sense of how rigid the borders of race. Ethnicity seem to me and that struck me as kind of unique And and and and I couldn't help but think that that had something to do with what I perceived to be a very weak social safety net. In the United States I had lived in Belgium and England and Japan. I was used to the notion that rich countries bill kind of like pretty elaborate sophisticated safety nets and I was suddenly in the US which is really you know the richest country on earth. And the you know the apparatus to protect kind of like the the unlucky the downtrodden. You know The less fortunate seemed pretty threadbare by comparison and so I kind of thought about those two things way back then you know and and so when when the twenty sixteen election came around and Big Fast forward there I when I heard the rhetoric coming out of the presidential campaign when you know which was a lot about you know bad Mexicans coming over the border and the need to protect ourselves from these outsiders that was very prominent in President Trump Rhetoric this came back to me. Like in a in a in a rush. You know this this idea that you know these kinds of thoughts these barriers that we've built to separate you know ourselves from the people of color from the others of color are really doing a lot of damage. Because they're being used to build a state that has no space for empathy and sort of. That's when I decided to write this book the way I did because I had been thinking for like three years of writing a different book about how the safety net in the US was so bad but you know it was more an amorphous kind of thought. And here's suddenly I got this. We'll no no this is a book about what's motivating that and what's motivating that is deep and pervasive and I don't think it sufficiently acknowledged in this country. Sorry for the long answer. Oh no I appreciate that. I feel that you sort of describe your journey in the book because you talk about being a binational And having grown up in Mexico and also with your grandparents and it seems like your experience with your grandparents actually forms a real core of the book too. Because that's that's they introduce you to the American way of life right? Yeah yeah they exactly because I left the I I was born in the US. But I left very young when I was six. And so I'm you know I. I don't really remember those early years very well. So most of my earliest memories of the United States are through the prism of my grandparents life and they were working class on an electric and she was librarian. They lived in Phoenix. They were on social security. By the time I was around and retired and so their life represented for me the American life and it looked like a pretty cool life. You know these guys were warning last and they had a really neat house. I mean again. It wasn't the greatest neighborhood you know but it was a really nice solid house with air conditioning. And all sorts of gadgets in a car and a pickup truck and a trailer that they would drive up the Sedona the spend the summer. It was a really you know where I grew up. Mexico electricians. Don't get that life. You know retired literature. Sure do not and so there was something kinda exemplary or superior That I sensed in the way that the United States had built this kind of enormous middle class that allowed such Such you know Commodities that such wellbeing for working class people and in some ways The difference between your grandparents way of life and the way of life of a white middle-class person today is one of the parallel stories in the book right because this book is about race. Edit is as much about people of color and it seems to me that your grandparents experienced what you had with them. What you're able to see that very kind of like solid middle class lifestyle Throughout the book you talk about how Middle Class White People Today. Struggle in this book is as much about white people is. It is about people of Color in. I also want to just pinpoint or bookmark. The idea that we should probably dive into that phrase people of Color because also in this book you talk about how that is also a place where we can look for racial divisions. Yeah but the struggle of the white middle class is a really important part of this book. Yes for sure I mean in a in a sort of nutshell. I'm arguing that the sort of racial divisions to put them in a really mild and open way That that's kind of stopped. The creation of a more robust welfare state Hurt not only blacks and Latinos and native Americans and and and you know other minority populations. They also hurt a lot of White Americans that were struggling that would have also benefited from a more robust welfare state. And so yes. I think this book is very I? I really hope that White American workers read this book because I think it's important to their their future wellbeing is. I think it's important for the future well-being to understand these dynamics. And let's let's talk about those dynamics the history here that you kind of untangle. We won't go all the way back to the sixteen nineteen date but maybe we should start with a FDR because we are in the middle of a moment which seems like. We're going to need the same kind of government intervention. So maybe you can talk about how that moment in history. This big government intervention to help save. Let's just say America in quotes maybe Kind of set us up for where we are today in terms of resentments between white people and people of Color I mean the the Ark as I see it very schematically is you know. The shock of the of the Great Depression Opens Political Space for President Roosevelt. To build the basically the first social safety net this country had seen you know to deploy the government In the service of the well being of the govern you know they were married? Probe Programmed housing programs work programs of Social Security. There was Be unionization became legal and then well the fair Labor Standards Act you know allowed for for unionization and collective bargaining. There was a A A host of programs designed to better the lives of working American men and women but in that but designing that Required a kind of like a political coalition that was reluctant if not like adamantly opposed to include African Americans in the deal and so at every turn you have Like different rules for African Americans and for whites or you know tweaks in the design of the program that essentially limited to you know the white Americans I mean one of the biggest would be the fact that in Social Security at the onset excludes both domestic labor and Agricultural Labor which happened to be the sectors that employed two thirds of African American workers. So the as a package when you go back and look. It's like the the the whole new deal program had very kind of like a narrow borders. Those borders kind of like invited in whites-only and then you know in the nineteen sixties thirty years after The Great Depression when President Lyndon Johnson tries to open up this concept of the of the welfare state to invite people of Color. And there's you know there's civil rights legislation than there's Johnson war on poverty and all the programs designed there to try to specifically help Poor African American families. Then what I argue is at. That's when the consensus for a welfare state just collapsed a consensus. It had been built by Roosevelt. Just wasn't ready to admit non whites into the tent because it wasn't really a consensus. That's the tricky part right is that it was a consensus of white people by white people for White people it was this. Illusion of consensus really I think about that a lot when we romanticize the past and Romanticize ways that people got together and made compromises between liberals and conservatives It's easy to make a compromise if both of you are white. Let's say I like and I gotta just to just returning to my to my this this image of my grandparents life. I did not think about that at the time but as an adult returning to the United States. One of the things that hit me was this kind of like exemplary. Life that they lead was also pretty much reserved for whites. You know this wasn't the life of the Working Class Latino even back then or the working class African American and certainly it is not the experience of the working class writ large now and let's stick with history for the well longer because I I learned a really huge fact from from your book. Which is there wasn't just a southern strategy for the Nixon Campaign. There was a northern strategy. And that again Plays out today. Tell us about Nixon's. Northern Strategy will the idea is to essentially drive a wedge between organized labor. Which is predominantly white and African Americans and those are two or were at the time now. I think it's it's more ambiguous but at the time those were two very important pillars of support for the Democratic Party The Way to do this.

United States Mexico President Lyndon Johnson President Roosevelt Wall Street Journal Working Class Latino New York Times Edward Northern Strategy Democratic Party Eduardo Phoenix reporter Nixon Campaign Nixon l.