19 Burst results for "White House Transition Project"

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:34 min | 10 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Eastern, an interview on leadership with James Baker, who served as secretary of state under George H. W. Bush. And as Ronald Reagan's White House chief of staff and Treasury secretary, then at 8 P.m. on lectures in history. Eastern Connecticut State University professor Thomas Pal Sarah's key on the close and rumored relationship between two prominent mid 19th century politicians. James Buchanan elected the nation's 15th president in 18 56 and William Rufus King, who served briefly as vice president under Buchanan's predecessor, Franklin Pierce. Sunday at 6 P.m. eastern on American artifacts. We explore JFK assassination records from the National Archives, including iconic artifact such as Lee Harvey Oswald's Rifle, the So called Magic Bullet and the original eight millimeter film of the assassination taken by Abraham Zapruder. And at 8 P.m. on the presidency, a virtual tour of the Ronald Reagan presidential Library located and see ME Valley, California. Exploring the American story Watch American history TV this weekend on C SPAN three. Bitch bitch on this episode of C Span's the weekly. Our guest is Martha joint Kumar, the director of the White House Transition project. She joins us to talk about the history of presidential transitions and how Congress could step in to smooth out future.

Ronald Reagan Martha joint Kumar White House James Buchanan C Span Eastern Connecticut State Univ James Baker Lee Harvey Oswald George H. W. Bush William Rufus King Abraham Zapruder Thomas Pal Sarah vice president chief of staff president Franklin Pierce JFK Congress
"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:56 min | 11 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"More likely to vote intensive care. These researchers have suggested that structural inequalities and not genetics are the key differential. So how will the prime minister redress structural inequalities as the vaccine is rolled out? Mr. Well, the one of the best raises a very important point on and way are thinking about this issue in government right now, A Z nose in response to the early data that we saw me about the impact on black and minority ethnic groups way have brought forward enhanced testing procedures. But even the Russos for exposed to heavy viral load passing, of course, is there Their work on board. There are the fact is is he knows that prey in the president's with these marks that market ethnic groups? I'm sure Porky makes will be. Among the consideration Is that the job committee on that station and immunization? It takes you to the count in the closest that decided Hodja to roll out the backseat. Where the disease you making important one, but I'd like to do is just put a big thank you on record to the broadcasting team for making today happened, Yeah. In order to allow the safe, thanks. It's valuable members participating in this item of business and the safe arrival of those participating next of spending the house for three minutes Order. Which bitch bitch on this episode of C Span's the weekly. Our guest is Martha joint. Kumar, the director of the White House Transition project. She joins us to talk about the history of presidential transitions and how Congress could step in to smooth out future transfers of power. When they were writing the law. They thought that ascertainment would be something that would be an administrative decision. They didn't see it. It's a political decision. They thought you just look at the votes and figure out how many electoral votes followed from the popular vote. And, uh and, uh, provide their resource and they didn't see themselves is declaring Who's President? Hear more of our conversation with White House transition Project director Martha Joint Kumar on this episode of C Span's the weekly Find it wherever you listen to podcasts. Coming up next. On Wednesday, the Senate Rules and administration committee held a confirmation hearing for three nominees to the Federal Election Commission shall number SARD, Sean Cooksey and Alan Dickerson. The senators asked the nominees how they viewed the role of the FCC and what their approach the job would be. None of the nominees said that they had any reason to death and legitimacy of the 2020 election. Have confirmed the FCC would once again have a quorum with which to conduct business. The hearing starts with rules Committee chair and Missouri Republican Roy Blunt. This runs about an hour and 20 minutes. The Committee on Rules Administration will come to order good morning of two. I want to thank my colleagues for joining us today. I'd like to welcome our nominees to today's hearing. Shown up charred Sean Cooksey and Alan Dickerson of the president's nominees to be members of the Federal Elections Commission, as our witnesses are joining us remotely also understand that their families and friends are watching today. And so I welcome them as well. This is a big responsibility. It's a significant, uh, presidential nomination and significant to the work of this committee on duh. I know you're proud of your family members. They have moved forward to this opportunity. Let me say a little bit about a couple of the nominees number one turned another committee member, Senator Cruz to talk about third nominee. Uh Alan Dickerson's The Knot isn't Not the nominee to be a member of the Federal Elections Commission for a term expiring on April the 30th 2025 Mr Dickerson's been practicing law for 20 years, primarily in the areas of First Amendment and campaign finance. Since 2011 Mr Dickerson's been the legal director of the Institute for Free Speech, a nonprofit organization that Little Gates First amendment and campaign finance cases in state and Federal courts. He's also a captain in the judge Advocate general's Corps for the United States Army reserve. He and his wife, racial, have one child really up and are expecting a second child. Miss China. Broussard is the nominee to be a member of the Federal Election Commission for a term expiring on April 30th 2023. Ms. Bouchard was born at Vandenberg Air Force Base in Santa Barbara, California, but she truly Hails from Louisiana, as was clear with my visit with her. This week, she graduated from Dillard University in 1991 and Southern University Law School. In 1995. She has had a 25 year legal career. The past 12 of which she's worked at the FCC, first as an enforcement attorney in the office of the general counsel until 2015 and then his executive assistant for commissioner. What Author since 2015. Ms. Bouchard also worked at theater Internal Revenue Service on in Louisiana as a prosecutor for the attorney general and New Orleans Paris district attorney and it's a clerk of the second Circuit Court of Appeals. I'd like to recognize sender Cruise to introduce our third nominee, Mr Cooksey. Thank you, Mr Chairman, Very proud today to introduce John Cooksey is a nominee to the Federal election Committee. Aziz, the chairman, knows he's from Missouri and who currently works for the junior senator from Missouri. But I'm going to go ahead and claim him anyway as an honorary Texan. Not only did he clerk for one of the most respected appellate judges in the country, Jerry Smith in my hometown of Houston, But he also worked on my staff as deputy chief counsel serving the 29 million people of the Great State of Texas. Shawn's impeccable credentials, impeccable educational credentials. Include graduating silicone Lottie from Truman State University and receiving is J D from the University.

Federal Elections Commission Alan Dickerson Sean Cooksey president director FCC Missouri Martha Joint Kumar C Span John Cooksey Mr. Well prime minister Martha joint Truman State University Ms. Bouchard Louisiana Roy Blunt China
"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:50 min | 11 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"THUMB. This episode of C Span's the weekly. Our Guest is Martha Joint. Kumar, the director of the White House Transition project. She joins us to talk about the history of presidential transitions and how Congress could step in to smooth out future transfers of power when they were Of writing the law. They thought that entertainment would be something deputy, an administrative decision. They didn't see. It is the political decision. They thought you just look at the vote and figure out how many electoral votes followed from the popular vote and and Provide their resource and they didn't see themselves is declaring Who's President Hear more of our conversation with White House transition project director Martha joined Kumar on this episode of C Span's The Weekly Find it Wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to C Span two's book TV Every weekend. We bring you 48 Hours of books on history, biographies and public affairs by nonfiction authors. Now. Book TV begins with a look at the Great Chicago fire of 18 71 that left close to one third of Chicago's residents homeless. His virtual event took place on October 8th hosted by the book Stall Bookstore in Winnetka, Illinois. Good evening and Welcome. I'm Robert McDonald and the events coordinator here at the book Stall. Our Special Guest this evening is Professor Carl Smith. And we're celebrating the publication of his new nonfiction book, Chicago's Great fires, the Destruction and resurrection of an iconic American city. Before we start. Let me just share a few features of crowd cast this platform were on. It's a little bit different. If you're only used to seem so let me just explain a few things. You'll see a chap over to our right crowd. Castle instructs you say something nice, but that's something if you know Carl Smith and want to say hello. If you recognize someone else in the room and want to say hello. That's the place to do that. If you have a question at any time during this evening, you will see below our speakers here of the Ask a question button. Simply step on that button at any point. When our question occurs to you, you can type in that question. You're not disturbing anybody else. They're not seeing what you're typing at the moment on do you'll have that question in the queue, and we get to the Q and a portion of the evening. Another interesting part of that. Ask a question button issue can look and see what other people have asked if you like the question, they asked, You just tap a little like thing, and that sends the question of higher on the cute So have a lot of people are interested in the question. And they've clicked on. That will be the question that will notice first to ask Professor Smith at the end of the evening. When we get to the Q and a portion. Finally, one other button here. That's important to us that the book stall it. Z by the book. Here, you click on that and again, it Any in the evening or even after this event is over. That's a button. You can click that takes you right to our website where you can purchase a copy of Chicago's great fire. Big box stores like Amazon and Target and Wal Mart are all doing really well, well right now, in this pandemic, the places that aren't doing so well in a really struggling or small indie bookstores, So we're really grateful to you and your book purchases to keep us going and keep us able to bring you this free programming, which is especially if it's Important always, I think especially important Now, when a lot of us are feeling kind of confined and stuck, we can at least explore all sorts of regions and places and fax with our minds. So thank you both So much for being here. One more thing if you run into trouble with your screen it all if, for example, the video freezes or the sound gets a little wonky What we found we recommend to people has just hit your refresh button on your browser. I was a viewer and not a participant last night in our crowd cast. And I was going Tomo and all I had to do was hit that refresh button and my video that had frozen came right back up. Fred has a question. Do we have signed copies of the book? We do not currently, But we will work with Professor Smith to get some signed book plates from him so we can get you a signed copy. All right with that. I'm going to turn things over to our very own John Grand. John Grant has been with the bookstore for many years, and he's our nonfiction guru. All the booksellers go to him, So I'm going to take off the screen and give it over to our guest. Thank you, John and Carl both for being with us this evening. Thank you. Thanks for ever. Well, good evening, and welcome to our discussion of Chicago's great fire are our author as well known as an expert on American urban history and particularly Chicago history. He's the Franklin Blessed Snyder, professor of English and American studies and professors. History Americus at Northwestern University. It may come as a surprise to many of you that until now, there hasn't been a truly definitive history of the Chicago fire. Why is that? Well, I think we're about to find out so please join me in welcoming Dr Carl Smith. Welcome, Carl. All right. Glad to be here. We'll let Zor jump into this. It Z worth noting that the Chicago's fire started on this very day, October 8 18 71 149 years ago. Uh, sometime between eight and nine PM, So keep an eye on the on the horizon if it turns red history's repeating itself, But for almost that long, this is hilarious. Poor cow Daisy has been blamed for it. And I thought we begin by exonerating Daisy and looking at where and how the fire really started. Well, they this is O'Leary was blamed again and again and and then, But she was exonerated even at this early as December or should say, least cleared by early December, Within two months after the fire by the official inquiry by the fire marshals on Daisy is Just the name somebody after the fact that sign was it to Norman Rockwell did in a painting off his Mrs O'Leary milking Daisy. But there have been other names assigned and off and song on days. He was one of four cows, a calf and a horse off way. Hope definitively And finally. They were absolutely exonerated by the Chicago City Council in 1997, But legends die hard on what? We also gets forgotten in all this, that those cows and the horse, not the CAF, where the first victims of the fire.

Professor Carl Smith Chicago C Span Martha Joint Kumar director Great Chicago exonerating Daisy Chicago City Council Stall Bookstore Congress Robert McDonald Mrs O'Leary White House Illinois Winnetka President Norman Rockwell
"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:11 min | 11 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Director of the nonprofit White House Transition Project, which has been in existence since 1997. Dr Kumar. What is the transition project was its role. It is the group of scholars and thank you very much for Having me too, And it is a group of political scientists who were scholars and have written on the White House and on the presidency and The idea informing itwas that we all study the White House and we all are committed to having government workers effectively as possible. And that we think that our work has some benefits or does coming into a White House and So we have started, Um with a grant from the few 1000 few charitable trust for the 2000 transition and Our idea, Woz to interview people who have held positions as directors of White House offices and deputy directors about how their office works. Because they're a lot of people when they come into the White House. Have no idea what their offices but what we do is we interviewed people and then we write about the functions of the officers over time. And the responsibilities of the directors and the consistency and the changes that occur over time. And then we have organization charts that go back to the Reagan administration that give people a good idea of how the individual offices work. And Ben. We also now have organization chart of the White House is a whole and we put the head in the context of of how many of the most important positions there are in the White House. How they are sprinkled out among the various offices and then people can see if they're coming in when they're putting the White House together. How have things changed over time? What has been consistent, for example? And what offices Um I tend to change and their organization and don't have the same priority. So, for example, the office of Legislative Affairs Have the same organization. It's divided into a Senate, the House side and it is always at the very highest level. The person who's the director, and that's called assistant to the president. So we hooked in the offices. On what continuity There is, um, so that office and chief of staff will counsel they're all at the assistant to the president level, so that Because those options is Um are the titles are limited to 25 to the assistant to the president. You really get a nice idea of the priorities presidents have placed on certain functions, so that's the kind of down in the weeds. Work that we do, but it's very useful for people coming in because there are no such a chart. While we're talking about staffing a White House how many persons who does a White House typically employ how many are career and how many are appointed by the administration? Yes, well, that's a very, very loosey goosey administrations Don't really like Tonto face up to that. How many there are and so some of the things they can do is bring people from other pay agencies and departments and have them on what's called detail. Uh, There and then also one of the things they can do, and every administration does. It is see what other budgets they can What people on rather than having him on the central budget, which is the White House office. So in administration could say they have, you know, maybe, um 300 people, but they're a lot more out there. So I usually think of 4 500. The, uh, the office that has the most detail eases the National Security Council because they bring people from the intelligence community. The State Department and the Defense Department as well. We thought in inviting you into the program that you might be able to provide a little bit of historical context for presidential transitions. What the current transition operates under is the presidential transition Transition Act of 1963. I was wondering, and it's of course, been updated a number of times since it was first enacted and 64 Before that existed, How we're presidential transitions conducted the transitions. Um Well could changed over the years with with Roosevelt's second election. You have a change in the point of which the president comes into office because it used to be that they would election has always been in November. But that they inauguration would be march forward. And that change of in during Roosevelt's here and because a transition became, um, a shorter operation after that, one of the first president to really want of focus in the modern period in the post World War two period. On transitions. Woz, Um, was Harry Truman When Truman came in, he told his staff. After he decided in March of 1952 that he was not going to run again. But they after announced that Jefferson Jackson Day dinner that he wasn't going to run. Then he gathered his staff and talked about the transition and how they should start providing for it. Developing information because, he said he came in UN briefed and UN prepared so it was less in two weeks in when the secretary of war, Henry Stimson, came to him and told him About the Manhattan project to develop in atomic gone and he was unaware of that. And so he wanted to make sure that that wouldn't happen so in with his Administration. After talking to his staff in the summer after the party nominating conventions, the Democrats of his nominated as Light Stevenson and the Republicans, Dwight Eisenhower, he wrote both of them and told them That he would like to bring them into the White House. And this was during the summer, bring them into the White House, and that he would Have been the morning CIA briefing, and then he would have lunch with the Cabinet. And then after that, Um, They would, um Plus because then they would need the White House staff. And that they could ask whatever whatever questions. They wanted. And yes, so Um Eyes and.

White House Um Eyes Director president Roosevelt Reagan administration Dr Kumar assistant to the president Dwight Eisenhower National Security Council chief of staff Legislative Affairs CIA Senate State Department Light Stevenson UN Henry Stimson
"white house transition project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. It's a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February off this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond could because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but Um, And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice Francis and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what of the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is the person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, in most situations, you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? Electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or President elect Biden hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the.

president Biden Biden Administration President Bush President Trump President White House Transition Project Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus University of Virginia senior fellow Miller Center research director United States FBI Burbage GSC National Security Division Mark Meadows
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 11 months ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
"white house transition project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:08 min | 11 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at.

president Biden President Trump President Bush Biden Administration President White House Transition Project Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus University of Virginia research director senior fellow Miller Center fraud United States Department of Justice FBI GSC Burbage
"white house transition project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:50 min | 11 months ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

President Trump George W. Bush President Bill Clinton George Florida Congress Biden
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 11 months ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:58 min | 2 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The beginning when I first heard about it because I I have not got one of these he he calls reporters he will call them and he knows reporters he knows who he wants to talk to he will pick up the phone himself I don't think he checks with the soul and and call up or he will be on the receiving end of a particular reporter wants to talk to him and he'll be and he will he'll talk to them you know and so you know sometimes to go off the record and talking to them but he does it his way whereas previous presence when I've covered they wouldn't think of doing anything like that without talking to their chief of staff for their communications oppressed people because it could bollocks up something that they were trying to work on we also tell you as somebody who writes about the hill Capitol Hill not too crazy about this let me just tell you because the what they like they like predictability they want to be consulted first they don't want to hear about it first on Twitter they're driven is and saying you know on time and in the presence of party there it driven about as insane as anybody else trying to follow this so he's he's unusual but also he's calling them all the time too he comes comes from Alexis Herman the girl of the hill yeah right but sometimes after since our first yeah like I'm thinking of nominating so and so you know and then he doesn't call them first and then it gets all the blowback I think that's a kind of with the hill that's like the hills personally chopper talk yeah yeah you know I think he mixes it up he gave you a lot and I I mean I I am of the view that you know I I next thing again stage managing kind of this this president is is not ideal that there should be a little bit more I kinda more more opening up a little bit more radical transparency to some degree that that I think would serve ultimately would serve I think the White House well I I do think a lot of folks justifiably have their guard up because it is the killed all the time in a trance unfairly anything from rush gets the last word unfortunately we've run out of time can't thank all of you anon thank you Dave PSA and C. span in our audience and and there were Germans she's been radio live coverage of the American political science association on this panel discussion of the trump administration and its relationship with the press the principal here Raj Shah is a former deputy press secretary for the trump administration now part of the fox corporation comments by Alexis amending or of the hill curry was press secretary for the Clinton administration camera Keith NPR and Martha cooler director of the White House transition project moderator David Cohen university of Akron political science professor this is a repair C-SPAN radio programming from pride WCS beautiful March some of your thoughts and phone calls this morning on the Washington journal we asked you about former FBI director James calmly we'll go to in bellflower California Republican good morning Greta good morning I was not surprised by a **** which is determination here because I remember turns fast and furious when he was sitting by Eric holder was kind of the same thing and when he came up to testify it was kind of like the same kind of cobra because a blind men are dark room let's see what was going on with fast and furious and it's kind of the same thing here we're covering up for the swarm fast and furious the Obama administration was after border state gun store owners and they were hoping to attack the second amendment using them and as it turns out these customers were honest people who call the ATM and the ATF said no just go ahead and let this happen and I would love the wasn't for a handful of whistle blowers at the age yeah it would work so this determination by war which is no surprise to me at all so Michael referring my you're referring to Michael Horowitz these Spector general correct so do you think that Mr call me should have been prosecuted all right absolutely sure I mean just what you would you play that short take where he said he he wanted that stops leaks and when we look at the end game here they were obviously trying to get trump out of this out of the out of the presidency a it's just it's just very clear that it was it was a rigged game or the the inside ball game people in the in the department of justice and the FBI they he wasn't their Cup of tea and they were after you don't then believe that he had that concerns and that these were honest concerns of the way the president was conducting himself asking for loyalty and asking him to let the flame matter go you don't think he had on his concerns about that and or before he actually takes the oath of office D. looking at the dot CA and following up on that do you think the FBI should not have done that well the issue of bought investigate it but if if they could see and we can all see that that doctor a was very flawed I don't know how they ever got this far I mean it's because I mean a mower really look kind of bad when they did this and it it just it just seems strange all the all the effort that's been going forward to all this and all this stuff keeps falling by the wayside so they just keep moving the goal post to try to get this president okay talks there and I'll fall flower California do you agree or disagree Robert in Savannah Tennessee independent hi Robert hello hello good morning to you your thoughts on IG report yeah comic counselor criminal action what was the robber he calls her the election Robert good morning going yeah yeah should be comical sure we're clear Alexian but after a match on all right rather you got it you got to turn that TV down one more chance here turn the TV down talk and listen through the phone all right so call me because Hillary Clinton the election by Manson Avery Maria open investigation ten days before the election Hey done more to hurt her in any get dropped then it gets a nine times out trumps a jacket and I am a license your arm to the country so you just to give you my out that's true but you know I only justice altered body on both sides so I don't think you ever been prosecuted out no okay all right Robert William Miamisburg Ohio Democrat William what do you think well I think it's a shame that we go through this because only one cover up for trial I live in west Palm Beach trip the biggest crowd ever walked on two legs I think it's a shame the country has to go through this he's a racist relate this idiotic biggest moron if the country stands it'll be a miracle and then you got Moscow me rich who is a stupid he couldn't have been better and he had let's stick to the IG report and now the name calling what do you think well I I think only done a good job myself he may he wouldn't cover up for trial only in people the pardons and all this stuff he's just a corrupted all right William starts there in Ohio democratic caller the response reaction from Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill Doug Collins who is the ranking Republican that's the top Republican on the house Judiciary Committee tweeting out I'm grateful to inspector general Horowitz first characteristically thorough and professional work this report confirms that James Comey violated the F. B. I.'s own standards of conduct and was dishonest about how we handle classified material this further cements the need for us to get to the root of how the Russian investigation began sound restore americans' confidence the federal law enforcement is committed to justice and free from political gamesmanship and Jim Jordan tweeting out now we know why call me didn't want to prosecute Clinton he didn't see a problem is handling sensitive information after clearing her he did it to call me like Clinton thinks he's above the law and Lindsey Graham the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee the inspector general's report is a stunning and I'm pressing a review of the former director of the FBI your thoughts this morning Greg Leander Texas Republican Greg do you agree with those Republican congressman yeah inspector general though you know he just turned over information he uncovers but he didn't really prosecute but always prosecutions coming later because he got a lot more and what are you referring to well the leaking not to the media but to his buddy US illegally Jeanine Adam and the fact that he authorize Faisal reports as legitimate and that he knew they weren't and thanks very what was named all gone okay yeah that's right he is a very with two or three of them I mean they all backed all certainly knew it was not right and you know how do people do this in this day and age with electronic coverage everywhere what you think you're not gonna get found out this is the service I have ever heard of behind it that will only Greg he testified about it I mean he admitted it to it in in public testimony under oath yeah right so you are you don't care about your testimony under oath none of them had what about Lois Lerner in the IRS scandal you know they they don't use them on our Congress truth they've been doing it for years and get away with it all right Greg also on that testimony that we showed you earlier when he's asked by senator Susan Collins about leaking or or or releasing leaking memos to his friend this is what the IG the inspector general sad about that call me told the office of inspector general that he did not tell senator Collins about sharing for of the memos with his three attorneys this is beyond his friend Daniel Richman because call me was quote trying to answer the question that he was asked and not reveal confidential communications with my lawyers when we told the O. I. G. they refer to Richmond as his friend rather than his attorney in the Senate select committee on intelligence testimony because call me quote didn't consider what he asked rich men to do privileged and call me then intend to assert any kind of privilege about the direction to Richmond so that from the the in office of inspector general's report on that top on that testimony and why was asked by senator Collins did you give these memos to anyone he says yes a friend but he does not say they gave memos to his attorneys as well you can find this report if you want to read it yourself if you go to C. span dot org Joseph in Spotsylvania Virginia independent high just off thank you I'm a retired naval officer and I know that up by hitting the meeting with the senior naval that roller flag person if I had release that information to a third party or to the public I've been crucified been fired same thing happens with a career civil servant the personal servant had done the same thing had revealed a conversation they would have been disciplined possibly fired so I think the white you report this correct is saying this is not acceptable behavior for somebody to leave an agency to reveal information that they should not have done so okay and from the report commies actions violated department or F. B. I. policy or the terms of calm is F. B. I. employment agreement as described in this report we conclude the commies retention handling and dissemination of certain memos violated department F. B. I. policies and the employment agreement this is the relevant statutes and policies the statutory definition of federal records is broad and it includes all recorded information regardless of form or characteristics made or received by a federal agency under federal law or in connection with the transaction of public business and preserved or appropriate for preservation by that agency as evidence of the organization functioned policies decisions procedures operations other activities of the United States government or because of the informational value of data in them this definition includes from the ID report any act of creating and recording information by agency personnel in the course of their official duties were cart regardless of the methods for the medium involved working files such as preliminary draft notes may also qualifies official agency records if they were circulated or made available to other employees for official purposes and contain unique information that assist in the understanding of an agency's policies decisions or actions and the former director tells the O. I. G..

ten days
"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hi, my name's Samantha Bain. And I'm from Drake university. Thank you so much for being here. I just was wondering about the number of agencies the positions that were never even filled by the Trump administration is that also abnormal. And then what are the long term consequences of positions just being left unfilled? Right. Okay. So you talking about the vacancies. And I would say that's largely the vacancies in the executive branch where they need Senate confirmation. So the people who are under secretaries the secretaries are various departments. There's a wonderful organization called the partnership for public service and max Dyer runs the partnership for public service. And he in the Washington Post have a running tally of the appointments process. And how many people have confirmed and how President Trump compares to his predecessors? It's not good. You know, it's another example where they're way behind the staffing curve, and I can say even in my small sample of White House staffing, the president still. Does not have after two full years. He does not have a director of Owen Owen DC, which is the office of national drug control policy. And if you think about the opioid crisis that the country is currently experiencing you would have thought that would have been a position that was filled in the first six months. He did nominate somebody in March of two thousand eighteen that person did not get confirmed. So has to be renominated. So that's a vacancy that still exists. So I talk about the Trump administration in terms of their vacancies on top of vacancies on top of vacancies because we've had multiple turnover. But I think it's worthwhile to go to the partnership for public service, the White House Transition Project also Teri Sullivan, professor Teri Sullivan, also has a different way of looking at how Trump has performed in terms of filling vacancies in the executive branch. But I think again as I mentioned before I think he's undermining his own efforts to achieve his goals. If you don't have people in the departments in the agencies, you have people who are considered acting individuals, and they simply don't have all the power that confirmed individual would have. So therefore, they can't implement the policies and the programs that the president wants one other point to pay to make that I think is important that a lot of people don't understand. And I didn't for many years is that the White House it self can't. Really do anything they can promote they can coordinate, but they can't implement policy. It has to be done in the agencies and the departments. So what the White House is. What is really good at has become really good at is having people in the agencies in the departments that work together in synchrony, synchronized with the White House in order to implement policy. So if you have vacancies that just limits your ability to pursue your goals. Thank you. Thank you. Honolulu harbor exemption. Things are coming today. So the pres prejudice presidencies, look, I'm assuming when White House Jeffers were fired. Negative impact on like the career after the White House. But. Under the Trump presidency since he's so like prone to firing people is it not as bad. This is a good question. We've been trying to examine where they go after and sort of tried to assess the quality of the jobs because in prior administrations if you could say that you worked for the White House for one or two years, and you had this expertise, and you understood how it works. You could really parlay that into an important job. You could be sort of the general counsel at PepsiCo or something really tremendous. And I'm not really seeing that as much in this administration. I'm seeing that people are oftentimes going back to their old law firms. They're going back to their old think tanks where they were before their universities instead of sort of moving onto other things. And then there's even more unique circumstances like I think Ryan's previous now is joining the navy which is something unique. I haven't really seen that kind of that's not a typical career path. I'm actually in the midst of another study about career paths where people have before where people have been before they work in the White House within certain offices and where. They go after because I think that will be enlightening. So I would say that generally speaking working in the White House was a ticket to success, and you can get a great job. I think in this case it's a little bit. It's a little bit more of a risk. I think because you don't know if you're going to be publicly criticized I think also that some organizations and law firms might be a little bit leery of people who will work for the Trump administration for fear that their clients will care. So that could be another issue that limits people's employment options, there was another good part to your question. Do you? Remember what that was? There was something else that you wanted to know I was asking because the Trump presidency desert-like negatively impact negatively, or does it not matter. It depends. What you're go. A lot of the people who are leaving the White House. Now, we're going to the reelection campaign. So that's that's an easy job to get. I'm not really sure I don't have comprehensive data that is comparative, but I can say anecdotally, I've heard that some of the junior staffer having trouble a harder time finding jobs the other point that you sort of. Have drawn attention to for me is that this is a small subset of individuals. Like, I say sixty to sixty five of the team, but it's also important to note that in some ways my data actually understate turnover because when rights previous John Kelly leave they take several of their deputies with him because the incoming person in this case, Mick Mulvaney, wants to be able to staff a chief of staff office the way they want it with the people that they want. So I'm only tracking sort of the top tier turnover. But there's also when a principal leaves. There's also even more turnover than those junior people have to find jobs as well. Katherine Dunn tempests of the Brookings Institution times. There's a lot of vibration between Capitol Hill and the White House Republicans staff members, but because of the elections in November those options have decreased to some extent as well. I think it's a tough. It's a tough time. And it's I think people now have to think one of my examples of how I think that there might be a problem with recruiting in this administration is that in the past. If there had been a chief of staff position open people would have been jumping for that job. I mean who wouldn't want to be the chief of staff to the prince of the United States. But I don't know if you noticed in this most recent episode, there was a lot of stop and start. You know, maybe Nick Ayers. We'll take it. Oh, he's not gonna take it. Oh now, what are we do? There was a few days in. There was nobody. And then the person who ultimately took it, Mick Mulvaney, took it on an acting basis, which is very it's striking to me because if you could fill it with somebody who really wanted the job there would be no acting print parenthetical around their name. So that also makes me a little bit weary. Yeah. Thank you. Good questions. Lazy from Harvard extension. You've talked a little bit about the impact of turnover on the implementation of policy goals. I was interested. Whether and to what extent not actually spreads out to the agencies because policy stalling Marshall might not be a bad thing, depending on your point of view. But in terms of the running of the country, and the running of those agencies is there a sense of lead listeners about them old or do they function almost automatically right? I would say I hope you have the chance this week to talk to somebody who's worked at an agency or department for many many years, but what you'll find some of them will tell you that it doesn't matter who's president that my job doesn't change that. I keep doing what I do day after day after day year after year after year, and sometimes they'll be small policy changes at the top. But generally speaking, it doesn't, but where it matters is sort of program radically. And if you think about what a president can do it's hard to make dramatic changes in this country. We're very much prone to the status quo very conservative type of government. So all the president can really do is sort of shift in steer the ship of state. In a slightly different direction. And so that's what the secretaries and the undersecretaries in the political appointees are sort of charged with doing at the various departments and agencies. The problem is there's not a lot of them. There's lots of vacancies there's lots of agencies even within the realm of ambassadors. US ambassador across the country. So I think that there are some jobs in the government that will not change a lot with President Trump has president. But then there are some that are affected a great deal. So for instance, if you think about the civil rights division of the department of Justice, or if you think about homeland security with the whole immigration they are. So I would say it kind of depends where you work in the government how much you're affected by the Trump presidency. It also depends how many vacancies there are at the top levels. In terms of how much that will affect your job. Thank you. This is air. She's brand radio programming from Monday WCBS from Washington. Hello, Dr Tampa's. Thank you for being here today. I have a very simple question. I appreciate your research model. My question is more. So it's the. The way you define pressure for resigned under pressure. If you could briefly explain to me, how you define and if possible how you measure it, right? So I defined resigned under pressure if the individual appears to have left the White House, not on their own volition. So for instance, rides Priebus, I think was left on a tarmac somewhere and had to get a ride home. That may have also something like that may have happened to Sean Spicer. I'm not sure clearly John Kelly didn't really leave on his own terms. And so I basically look at news articles context, what is the context in which they depart. There's a man by the name of Andrew Bromberg who's the head of the domestic policy council who is. Has been nominated for you in job. So I mean, that's it's a promotion. He's leaving for a promotion reason. There have been some individuals who have left on their own volition, probably for other opportunities deputy D staff member named Paul Winfrey left and went back to the Heritage Foundation in the first year. So yes. So I basically look at news articles at the time. Twitter feeds. And that's how I determine it. It's pretty pretty conservative with it though. There has to be kind of a blatant. In a short period between the tweet in the departure things like that. The thank you. That's a good question. Hi. My name is Jocelyn McGrath student from Harvard extension school. I advocate question about staffing in general, not necessarily hiring firing process. But I know on the hill we have this thing called legis forum where we keep track of all the staffers know their salary how much we're making which offices. We're working for. And so on is that something that the White House could potentially half maybe in the future. Maybe not as this..

White House president President Trump Mick Mulvaney chief of staff White House Transition Project executive United States Washington Post Drake university John Kelly Samantha Bain Senate Trump max Dyer Twitter Nick Ayers Katherine Dunn
"white house transition project" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Who will tell me what I need to know. And tell me what I don't know. And I think when you have this situation in which you have all of these temporary acting officials who are effectively. Nobody's you have. None of those inputs going into the president. That's what made FDR great. That's what made Lincoln great. All right now. Cacho? Thank you so much for taking time. Thank you for more. All this joined now by Chris Lewis county secretary under President Obama and Lynn sweet Washington bureau chief the Chicago Sun-Times I want so there's there's two aspects sort of constitutional governance problem. That's presented by all these. But I find this fascinating as a rendering of judgement about where the Washington Republican professional class things sees things going, Chris there is there's there's a voting with voting with one's feet Lynn sweet that is happening here, you sometimes see this at the tail end of the ministrations. It's very hard to staff your seven or eight of say the Bush administration, but Lynn having covered Washington as you have have you ever seen a situation two years in where they're basically trying to run Craigslist ads to get people into the White House. Well, let me by for Kate the answer. And that is first of all when President Obama took office. There is a whole there are two streams of people ready to fill positions. One word the campaign veterans, and the other one were the scores of very seasoned government appointees from the Bill Clinton administration who had been in exile for many years private practice, think-tanks academia, and so there was a. Stack of people is unsure Chris will tell us a moment that they had who had experienced and that they could choose from, but were willing and able Democrats the other thing when you say is unprecedented. This is not a question of what is my opinion because people keep track of it and the Washington White House Transition Project keeps numbers President Trump is the highest turnover of top tier of any recent president at the seventeen month, Mark, his number is the highest of Clinton Bush Reagan and Obama so it there's compounding the vacancies is that he has churned turnover. So he has to fill the same multiple times. And we should we should put a list of those departures, which to me are are pretty staggering. When you see them all in one place, all the people that have been sort of bounced out scandal fallen out with with the man atop and Chris what was writing to me was the chief of staff hunt. You got a guy named Nick Ayers, who is maybe the. Most ambitious political operative in the entire country. This is a guy who's like been doing jobs, very big deal jobs from very young age who walked away from being White House chief of staff which said to me something about how he's assessing the political future this presidency, and how other Republicans are the White House chief of staff really is one of the most important jobs really in the entire world. It's the pinnacle of anyone's career, and it's the kind of job that you would want whether you've been in politics or you've been in the private sector, and the fact that Nick Ayers didn't think this was worthwhile. I think quite telling and that lack of interest in serving this administration, really cascades, all the way down to the most junior level political appointees Iran Obama's two thousand eight presidential transition one month after election day in two thousand eight we had three hundred thousand resumes sent to us by contrast this administration. You'll recall had to do a hiring fair on Capitol Hill. In June because they couldn't find enough people to work for them. And in it's not surprising, given the chaotic manner in this way, this is Ron people don't want this on their resume right now. And especially if you are a high level person seeking a cabinet position, you run the risk that your reputation will be smeared if this can happen to Madison Tillerson, it can happen to you as well..

President Obama Chris Lewis Lynn Clinton Bush Reagan president White House chief of staff Nick Ayers Washington White House Washington bureau chief Washington Bill Clinton FDR Craigslist Lincoln Madison Tillerson Ron
"white house transition project" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Fourteen resigned under pressure. Eleven were promoted to other jobs and six resigned voluntarily. And that's unusual. That's very unusual. Katherine Dunn tempests is a non resident, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a senior research director for the White House Transition Project. I've actually been studying White House staff turnover since around nineteen ninety-five or so not just outright departures, but also people who were promoted. Because the idea what I'm trying to capture is the level of disruption. Catherine has kept extensive data on the arrivals and departures of all top tier staff of every presidential administration going back to Reagan. And one thing that we noticed was that generally there is usually not too much change in the administration in the first year or so. And then there would be an uptick toward the end of the year two in and that was because a lot of close advisers were going to work on the campaign. There were general sort of patterns that you could see, and there was slight variation there were highs and lows, but nothing that was off the charts that was true until the one year anniversary of Trump's inauguration at year. One President Trump was at thirty four percent turnover, and I'm still gather. During the turnover rate within his administration, and he's added additional fourteen percent and just about two months. So cumulatively were at a turnover rate of forty eight percent. And just for the sake of comparison after two full years President Obama's turnover rate was twenty four percent. George W Bush after two full years was at thirty three percent. And again, Catherine's turnover rates for Obama and Bush near were measured after two whole years. Now, we're just fourteen months into this current administration. And Trump's turnover rate is already a good bit higher than bushes and double Obama's. The only other president to come close to Trump's rate of churn is Reagan. Well, in the first year, the highest turnover was Ronald Reagan with seventeen percent after two full years. Ronald Reagan was at fifty, seven percent, but President Trump right now is at forty eight. So he's nine away from that. So you can see that the level of Trump turnover in what I call the a team or the most senior level of staff is. Extraordinary. It's not just high, it's extraordinarily high. So what do you think is going on in the White House? Like, why are all of these people moving through so quickly? Right? He claims to hire the best any hire people that were loyal. He definitely put a premium premium on loyalty over experience. One of the risks of doing that is that if you don't have people with the requisite experience, they're not going to perform well. And so it may be performance at some of these individuals are being fired. It may be they spoke out of turn, and so President Trump deem that to be disloyal. And so he fired them, it's it's not entirely clear, but this president definitely does not tolerate any sort of performances deemed to be subpar you're out. Couldn't you argue that there's a benefit to that right that that this administration moves more nimbly than you know, maybe Obama or or the younger Bush, and that they are more quick to kind of identify subpar performances and move fast to correct those issues. What would you say to that. That that idea that that this is actually the sign of of a well-functioning White House who I would say that, you know, looking back historically, there's always turnover in the first year, there are always missteps, so you know president can Trump can say that this turnover is fine. It just means that I'm identifying people people who are not performing well in rooting them out. But I would say while some of that is okay, it's clearly good to root out the bad apples. But at the same time you have to understand the cost of turnover. For instance, you're losing the expertise, you're losing all the institutional memory that that person had, and you're losing all the personal contacts and in Washington DC, personal contacts are sort of the coin of the realm, the context that you have with the media with Capitol Hill staffers with advocacy organizations with executive branch agencies, you can't put a price tag on those. They're invaluable. And when someone leaves the White House, they can't readily pass those onto their successor so bike by firing people. So frequently he's basically undercutting his ability to advance his agenda. What are the implications for federal agencies and people who work inside these agencies because of all of this change and and kind of tumbled at the top? Well, it creates a lot of instability and unpredictability. Typically, what has happened over the course of the twentieth twentieth century is that the White House has internalized. Expertise and control has moved from the cabinet departments into the White House. So many times these people who are out in the departments as Trump political appointees are receiving orders from the White House or receiving, perhaps commands but cues about what to do, what to pursue, what to prioritize. And so if there's a lot of turnover in the White House, then that means individuals that they've relied upon to get their instructions from or to get their duties from. Now they have, there's somebody new that they have to meet with that they have to develop a reporter with and it just, I think it makes their jobs more complicated. Having some sense of stability makes it easier

President Trump White House president Ronald Reagan Obama Trump White House Transition Project George W Bush Catherine Katherine Dunn Brookings Institution senior fellow research director Washington reporter executive thirty three percent forty eight percent
"white house transition project" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

03:49 min | 4 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Nah labuan may is true ann god lab lawn of means to not easy evan legit so much shit than happened that is sought to talk about semenya nauseous them at nine central talk of bone sad rigi big lagging walkabout his mrs dury share and her because i have my own nath lost not vain davis really getting home nath ajez as macy's so please assessment please exactly miletic no do and everything that assad lab venues so please accept my thumb the exact monroe at you then you man n donna vaughan mees bad vaughn of meters your service ludwig avenue a bradley win no this look gay blamed mud is very uneven because batted sharing is famous for being big mob pride don't ha madam that is ongoing oh let me let me grab it exactly valladolid i'll do everything that on and me is zero zilt pain either as said his bears no may who with manner in downtown phnom malai amazed drew and i'm now lawn be no ann dowd labuan millions true dowd that bonn peace through in dad lab baen is true dr diagnoses michelle obama confirms our worst fears michelle obama has been making the rounds spreading doom and gloom about how a miracle has no hope since barack left office one word for you lady talk about delusional give us a break we are thrilled to see you scumbags gone and have a real leader donald j trump but why is michelle suddenly appearing so many places trashing the country now that trump is botas warner todd houston at biz pack review reports that dr laura knee right phd who is director of investor relations at ten v five global incorporated and a member of the white house transition project recently wrote a book entitled on behalf of the president presidential spouses and white house communications strategy today right diagnosed mrs obama's recent behaviour she has become an attack dog in an effort to help obama build his leg.

director white house michelle donald j trump bonn ann dowd assad evan president labuan dr laura knee todd houston barack michelle obama phnom malai monroe macy davis
"white house transition project" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:49 min | 4 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Nah labuan may is true ann god lab lawn of means to not easy evan legit so much shit than happened that is sought to talk about semenya nauseous them at nine central talk of bone sad rigi big lagging walkabout his mrs dury share and her because i have my own nath lost not vain davis really getting home nath ajez as macy's so please assessment please exactly miletic no do and everything that assad lab venues so please accept my thumb the exact monroe at you then you man n donna vaughan mees bad vaughn of meters your service ludwig avenue a bradley win no this look gay blamed mud is very uneven because batted sharing is famous for being big mob pride don't ha madam that is ongoing oh let me let me grab it exactly valladolid i'll do everything that on and me is zero zilt pain either as said his bears no may who with manner in downtown phnom malai amazed drew and i'm now lawn be no ann dowd labuan millions true dowd that bonn peace through in dad lab baen is true dr diagnoses michelle obama confirms our worst fears michelle obama has been making the rounds spreading doom and gloom about how a miracle has no hope since barack left office one word for you lady talk about delusional give us a break we are thrilled to see you scumbags gone and have a real leader donald j trump but why is michelle suddenly appearing so many places trashing the country now that trump is botas warner todd houston at biz pack review reports that dr laura knee right phd who is director of investor relations at ten v five global incorporated and a member of the white house transition project recently wrote a book entitled on behalf of the president presidential spouses and white house communications strategy today right diagnosed mrs obama's recent behaviour she has become an attack dog in an effort to help obama build his leg.

director white house michelle donald j trump bonn ann dowd assad evan president labuan dr laura knee todd houston barack michelle obama phnom malai monroe macy davis
"white house transition project" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Dr diagnoses michelle obama confirms our worst fears michelle obama has been making the rounds spreading doom and gloom about how a miracle has no hope since barack left office one word for you lady talk about delusional give us a break we are thrilled to see you scumbags gone and have a real leader donald j trump but why is michelle suddenly appearing so many places trashing the country now that trump is bonus warner todd houston at biz pack review reports that dr laura knee right phd who is director of investor relations at ten v five global incorporated and a member of the white house transition project recently wrote a book entitled on behalf of the president presidential spouses and white house communications strategy today right diagnosed mrs obama's recent behaviour she has become an attack dog in an effort to her help obama build his legacy she's in legacy building mode she doesn't have to worry about the implications of her remarks for months to come right said this is the time she's most free to say what she feels what she believes and what she wants the message to be for the public i think what surprises and upsets people most often is that first lady's give more public remarks and vice presidents and that's been true over the last three administrations she wrote reid appeared on breed bartsch radio with host alexandra marlow i love how michelle obama says baruch was successful in inspiring hope in the nation then why do you think we just voted trump pen michelle obama you have world fame protection for life and five houses and no hope see a doctor unita antidepressants so michelle is out there claiming that we are all races and with trump taking the white house the nation is i must state.

michelle obama barack dr laura knee director president reid alexandra marlow baruch donald j trump michelle todd houston white house
"white house transition project" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Dr diagnoses michelle obama confirms our worst fears michelle obama has been making the rounds spreading doom and gloom about how a miracle has no hope since barack left office one word for you lady talk about delusional give us a break we are thrilled to see you scumbags gone and have a real leader donald j trump but why is michelle suddenly appearing so many places trashing the country now that trump is bonus warner todd houston at biz pack review reports that dr laura knee right phd who is director of investor relations at ten v five global incorporated and a member of the white house transition project recently wrote a book entitled on behalf of the president presidential spouses and white house communications strategy today right diagnosed mrs obama's recent behaviour she has become an attack dog in an effort to her help obama build his legacy she's in legacy building mode she doesn't have to worry about the implications of her remarks for months to come right said this is the time she's most free to say what she feels what she believes and what she wants the message to be for the public i think what surprises and upsets people most often is that first lady's give more public remarks and vice presidents and that's been true over the last three administrations she wrote reid appeared on breed bartsch radio with host alexandra marlow i love how michelle obama says baruch was successful in inspiring hope in the nation then why do you think we just voted trump pen michelle obama you have world fame protection for life and five houses and no hope see a doctor unita antidepressants so michelle is out there claiming that we are all races and with trump taking the white house the nation is i must state.

michelle obama barack dr laura knee director president reid alexandra marlow baruch donald j trump michelle todd houston white house
"white house transition project" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Dr diagnoses michelle obama confirms our worst fears michelle obama has been making the rounds spreading doom and gloom about how a miracle has no hope since barack left office one word for you lady talk about delusional give us a break we are thrilled to see you scumbags gone and have a real leader donald j trump but why is michelle suddenly appearing so many places trashing the country now that trump is botas warner todd houston at biz pack review reports that dr laura knee right phd who is director of investor relations at ten v five global incorporated and a member of the white house transition project recently wrote a book entitled on behalf of the president presidential spouses and white house communications strategy today right diagnosed mrs obama's recent behaviour she has become an attack dog in an effort to help obama build his legacy she's in legacy building mode she doesn't have to worry about the implications of her remarks for months to come right said this is the time she's most free to say what she feels what she believes and what she wants the message to be for the public i think what surprises and upsets people most often is that first lady's give more public remarks than vice presidents and that's been true over the last three administrations she wrote reid appeared on breathed bar trade deal with host alexander marlow i love how michelle obama says baruch was successful in inspiring hope in the nation then why do you think we just voted trump pen michelle obama you have world fame protection for life and five houses and no hope see a doctor unita antidepressants so michelle is out there claiming that we are all races and with trump taking the white house the nation is i must state of hopelessness this.

michelle obama barack todd houston dr laura knee director president reid baruch donald j trump michelle white house alexander marlow
"white house transition project" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"white house transition project" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Dream correct dr diagnoses michelle obama confirms our worst fears michelle obama has been making the rounds spreading doom and gloom about how a miracle has no hope since barack left office one word for you lady talk about delusional give us a break we are thrilled to see you scumbags gone and have a real leader donald j trump but why is michelle suddenly appearing so many places trashing the country now that trump is bogus warner todd houston at biz pack review reports that dr laura knee right phd who is director of investor relations that ten v five global incorporated and a member of the white house transition project recently wrote a book entitled on behalf of the president presidential spouses and white house communications strategy today right diagnosed mrs obama's recent behaviour she has become an attack dog in an effort to help obama build his legacy she's in legacy building mode she doesn't have to worry about the implications of her remarks for months to come right said this is the time she's most free to say what she feels what she believes and what she wants the message to be for the public i think what surprises and upsets people most often is that first lady's give more public remarks than vice presidents and that's been true over the last three administrations she wrote reid appeared on breathed bartsch radio with host alexandra marlow i love how michelle obama says baruch was successful in inspiring hope in the nation then why do you think we just voted trump pen michelle obama you have world fame protection for life and five houses and no hope see a doctor unita antidepressants so michelle is out there claiming that we are all racist and with trump taking the white house the nation is emma state of hopelessness this.

michelle obama barack dr laura knee director president reid alexandra marlow baruch donald j trump michelle todd houston white house emma state