18 Burst results for "White House Fellow"

"white house fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:20 min | 8 months ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Jimbo talks I'm going to be talking tonight about a novel but it is anything but pure fiction This is in fact a look at what might happen What is plausible It is shall we say a chance to take events that might become real and place them in a fictitious setting which therefore gives a certain freedom to the authors who are retired navy admiral James staff reedus who could not be with us tonight He was the former supreme allied commander at NATO a columnist and author and our guest Elliott Ackerman former White House fellow a marine and author They have the combined to write something called simply 2034 And thank you for being with us tonight mister Ackerman Thanks so much for having me Jim Absolutely 2034 that refers to the year I'm sure and that's 13 years from now What do you folks posit in a novel that is subtitled by the way a novel of the next World War published by penguin press go ahead Well the novel begins with an altercation in the South China Sea which is a segment right now of open ocean which the Chinese have long claimed as territorial waters and which the United States as long as with several other nations conducts freedom of navigation patrols in the South China Sea So we suppose an incident sort of similar to the gulf of tonkin incident And stemming from that incident are a series of escalatory decisions between not only the Chinese and the Americans but also the Russians the Iranians that basically lead all parties into a World War kind of like a guns of August scenario We lead up to the First World War in 1914 Of course in the case of comparison I suppose in terms of looking for the time that the early part of 1914 had rolled around you had massive armies that had been created in some cases massive navies that had been created You had alliances that were formed You had in other words basically you had let's say oh teenage boys whisky and car keys And it was inevitable and sooner or later somebody would drink the whisky and start up the car Do you think we are in a situation now that is at all comparable to 1914 Well you know the famous saying is that a history doesn't repeat it right And looking back through the prism of history it would seem as though 1914 in the First World War was inevitable But if you look at a lot of the conversation that was happening at that time there was a really active debate around the idea of whether or not in fact the European powers were even capable of going to war again based on not only the economic interconnectivity between the European powers but also frankly the cultural interconnectivity the fact that the royal families were all intermarried and interrelated actually led many people in the opening of the 20th century to believe that war in Europe was impossible And you hear many of the same arguments being echoed right now particularly with regards to the economic interconnectivity that exists between China the global economy and the United States So I think it's important to do the work to imagine these scenarios so that we can avoid sleepwalking into what would be a war as cataclysmic as what we saw in the opening of the 20th century Although of course only as cataclysmic of course by the standards of the time there were no nuclear weapons in 1914 only the very beginnings of air forces no satellites no intercontinental ballistic missiles So it was cataclysmic by the standards of the time but something of that nature occurring among the major powers of the world in 2034 would dwarf in all likelihood If in fact it really got out of hand would dwarf what happened in 1914 through 1918 Well I think that's a really great and important point which is the one thing humanity has proven throughout the centuries is our ability to imagine and then execute even greater cataclysms So that is very much to be avoided at all costs And we are writing this book and having this book in actually a literary tradition books like the Bedford incident or films like if you remember the television special the day after which in the Cold War there was this very active process of imagining in great detail what a nuclear war would look like And in many ways the rigors of going through that exercise is one of the contributing factors that allowed us to avoid that war because both parties the United States and the Soviets were pretty clear eye when it came to understanding the consequences of such a war And right now as the United States and China are increasingly placed at odds with one another particularly in the context of the pandemic it is important to think about what conflict would look like Really so that we can that we can avoid it and try to steer clear of that One thing you said I said I suppose I would do a little nitpicking with that And that is the necessity of avoiding something like this at all cost isn't that really the basis by which aggressors push things beyond the line Is that they assume that anything they do could lead to a war that would be avoided at all costs I mean that's what pretty much emboldened Hitler back in the 1938 39 and 1940 I don't know that it's terrible as the events are of 2034 you're talking about without giving away I guess the basic plot of the book you're talking about pretty much organized aggression You're talking about a double ambush of the United States and I don't know that there isn't a point beyond which it could not be avoided 20 or 34 of the book also deals with some of the universal themes of warfare Myself am a veteran of our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan And one thing I learned through those experiences is that hard baked into all wars is a miscalculation on the part of at least one side It is both sides enter a war believing that it will be advantageous to them and they can win it And obviously both sides can't be right So miss calculation goes hand in hand with warfare It always has it always will One 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo is our number one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 As we're talking with Elliot Ackerman former White House fellow marine and author he has written a number of previous novels in again he served a 5 tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan He received the silver star the bronze star for valor and the Purple Heart which is to say those are big metals and the Purple Heart goes to those wounded One 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo is our number one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 and with the retired admiral Jim staff readers who could not be with us tonight Elliot Ackerman has written the book 2034 a novel of the next World War It is a scary scenario All the more so because it is quite plausible Back.

James staff reedus Elliott Ackerman mister Ackerman Jimbo United States penguin press gulf of tonkin South China Sea South China NATO White House navy Jim China Bedford Europe Elliot Ackerman Hitler Afghanistan Iraq
"white house fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:06 min | 9 months ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Mark When Leo brainard worked at the council of economic advisers under president Clinton the head of the council was Laura Tyson as doctor Brenner put it in an interview It was her first woman boss Lori tell was also by the way the first woman to head the national economic council and chair the council of economic advisers Doctor Tyson is now a distinguished professor at the Berkeley Haas graduate school of business and we welcome her now back to Bloomberg So doctor Tyson thank you so much for being here I want to talk about Jay Powell but let's start with lail brainer because I was you know her She gave you credit in part for her career Tell us what you know about her Well she's a brilliant economist She's devoted her life to public policy She could have been a brilliant academic economist I first ran into her as a White House fellow I was she was a White House fellow I was chair of the council and economic advisers She worked for me in her White House fellow position And then she wanted to stay and I wanted her to stay So we made a pitch to get the rules adjusted in a way to allow her to become a member of the council of economic advisers at the end of her White House fellowship And I've stated I followed her career since then I hope she thought I was good female boss I certainly think she's a great female economist Well she certainly taught glowingly about you in interviews No doubt about that Let's go to one of the issues that she will confront along with Jay Powell Something you have written about And that is the question of full employment Because we've had very accommodative monetary policy for a good long time and we had fiscal stimulus And yet we're having a fiendishly difficult time getting everybody back to work who have been working before Unemployment rates down but there are a lot of people sitting on the sidelines Is there anything the fed can and should do about that I'm not sure the fed itself can do anything I think the issue here is the fed maintaining a stance of expansionary monetary policy to continue the recovery process And the recovery process of GDP we're now back unlike the other advanced industrial countries We are back to pre COVID GDP We are back to trendlines of personal consumption growth pre COVID There has been a dramatic economic recovery The labor force participation rates staying down is a surprise It is a surprise And frankly labor economists are a little uncertain whether that will be a structural change in the labor market that you will actually see certain groups what they responded to the pandemic have decided that they you know the retirees Maybe you don't want to go back to work as much as they might have otherwise People who have child care or household care responsibilities Maybe not going back to work as much as would have been the case pre COVID So I think we don't know The challenge for the fed is they have this maximum employment target And there's some uncertainty about how to measure maximum employment Has the labor market changed in a way post COVID I don't think we know the answer yet It's a little too soon It's a little too soon Is there another question about how much we're willing to pay if I can put it in those terms in inflation in order to try to get the incremental jobs hired Because that seems to be what's going on right now So let's keep it running hot We've got inflation really high right now in part because we're trying to get the last people in off the sidelines Well I think that that misses the reality of what driving the inflation rate right now And I don't think it is current monetary policy I think it is a series of fiscal and monetary actions during the recession the COVID recession And that's effective the demand side of the economy But we also have very very significant ongoing supply side disruptions So this is a bit this inflation can't be understood just by looking at traditional demand stimulus measures or the demand side of the economy It has to be looked at in terms of supply So you mentioned earlier the issue of oil So that market globally is being manipulated right now by the producers who are holding back supply They are holding back supply as the demand for oil picks up because growth around the world is picking up that's driving up price You need to look at the supply side of this as much as the demand side And I would say I would argue even more How urgent a problem do you find inflation right now How badly do we need to address it And if so how do you address it Okay so I do think there's a lot of angst about inflation I would say it's a bit hyped in a discussion I do not think one of the tech CEOs recently called it hyperinflation I don't we're dealing with by one measure the highest inflation rate in 30 years But that is a recent number And I think a number of us believe but there's risk around this belief that that rate will start to come down And it will start to come down because the supply side disruptions in the production of goods and services that people want to buy with their income Those supplies will ease perhaps the oil producers of the world will sort of get it together and say you know wait a minute we can't really manipulate hold back production Just to get the price up Well they've done it before and they seem to be doing that right now But I do say the optimists the non those of us who feel I would not call us pollyanna We feel that there are a number of transitory elements to the acceleration of inflation And that those will dissipate over the next year The risk those who are concerned say well what if you've got it wrong what the fed is going to have to do at some point sooner rather than later is step on the brakes to step on the brakes And I personally feel there's no evidence that that the fed will need to do that There's some debate about whether they will pick up interest rates next year Second half of the year end of the year 25 to 50 basis points People have debate that but not massive They can't accelerate their tapering They can accelerate tapering Let me sneak in one more on oil You raise the question of oil And the story is that The White House is about to maybe this week maybe even today And that's a release from the strategic petroleum reserve At the same time OPEC plus is that if you do that we'll just cut back more on production Is this a fool's errand I mean this sounds like a basic game.

council of economic advisers Jay Powell fed Leo brainard Laura Tyson Doctor Tyson Berkeley Haas graduate school lail White House national economic council Brenner president Clinton Tyson Lori Bloomberg labor force Mark strategic petroleum reserve OPEC
"white house fellow" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

"Our entire family lives on a small farm in the city of tucson arizona together so when i leave my office which is about a five minute drive to my home. I have nineteen grandchildren. Play with an our seven. Children are there and so it's all fun. It's just great. They've all built homes hair. Which is terrific. I was a white house fellow through a nationally. Competitive process ended up working for the vice-president the united states and then the president of the united states. So i spent about four years in washington. Dc and then went back to the private sector and by been the ceo of six companies ranging from relatively early stage startup to multibillion dollar companies and taken three of those companies public. We've had a lot of fun. Life is challenging. But good your story and Coming from poverty and from a farm. I grew up on a farm to and then the in the white house. How did you get your head around that because that would have been a complete mind shift. Well it is and i think probably christine. You have similar experiences in that as we have our dreams and as we reach for those dreams want to fulfill those dreams we find ourselves achieving new things in new heights and having new experiences along the way and each experience i believe builds on other experiences. So it's an aggregation if you will and so. I ended up the white house at twenty nine years old. A very young to be in the white house. I was the youngest member of the senior team. And if you think about the senior team in the white house at that time and i'll drop these names just to impress those listening to this okay christina so if i were to give you some names it was dick. Cheney don rumsfeld brent scowcroft. Jim baker bob gates henry. Kissinger colin powell. That was the senior team with me in the white house so they had tremendous experience..

white house united states tucson arizona washington christine new heights Cheney don rumsfeld Kissinger colin powell brent scowcroft christina Jim baker bob gates dick henry
"white house fellow" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Is with us. He's an entrepreneur, corporate leader and the author. Of a book Life by design, selected as a White House fellow, which we'll talk about that in a minute because it really set the flavor for his life. And you were on to, um, I was asking you What the traits were. Why? Why you're you're so philanthropic. Why you are who you are today and you were sharing that part of it was being one number one was being an entrepreneur, and you were about to tell us number two. Well, number two is that I've I've always been interested in the welfare of other people. But it really was accentuated when I married my wife and she gets up every morning with a smile on her face goes to bed every night with a smile on her face and works all day long just to serve people. And she's an amazing woman. She's led. All kinds chaired all kinds of committees raised seven Children is a wonderful grandmother in 19 grandchildren, but her focus is always Service, and she's always said if you're having a bad day, go serve someone who's really having a bad day. You know, it makes you feel better to be able to help someone else. And so she's engaged in service every day. She's oriented our family that way I give her complete credit for for my success and our success. She's a wonderful woman. I've been blessed. I was asked one time We've been married 56 years I was area asked one time. What would you do over again in your marriage, and I said I'd ask her to marry me sooner. But I think that we were just blessed to have such a great marriage and such a wonderful relationship with our Children and grandchildren, So I've really fortunate, but I think we have to learn how to serve others. We have to give of ourselves to others and in the end We're all just walking each other back home. Yes, absolutely. And And it's not about the money and it's not about What you have and what? You don't have it. The end is it not about that at all? So how do we get people know? How do we get people that are listening to this that are Saying, Yeah, but I lost this and I lost that and because of Cove it and now financially and and Ah, and I understand these are very, very strange times and difficult times for so many people. And the fear has taken over and so What do you What advice do you give to people to shake that fear? And Begin again. Well, Frank. It's a great question. I think for your listeners, my advice and counsel is that for every crisis creates opportunity, and we need to focus on the opportunity, not the crisis. If we get so tied up and thinking about what we've lost What's happened to us how hard it's been how difficult we're really focusing on the past, and when we focus on the past, we get trapped in the past. Focus on our current situation and the future. Let's develop our plans for the future, and you're absolutely right. Ends of thousands of businesses have closed right families have lost everything. It's been exceedingly difficulty over the last 12 months. But we can rise again. We were really injured in 8, 2009 and 10 with the financial crisis. We were hurt by the tech bubble that burst in 2000 the real estate crisis of town 86 89 90. We've had these Recessions. These dips these trumps our entire life. This is a severe one. But we will be okay. And we are smart. We're resourceful were committed will be all right. And while it seems, has difficulties one can imagine. We only have to think back to something you mentioned a while ago. And that is the Holocaust and the disaster and difficult and harshness of that. And yet, people rose again. Country rose again and we can do this. We're strong. We're a great people, right? And if we are united in our thoughts and serving on another, we will be just fine. Your book. Is, um, a very powerful book Life by design. Do you think that People listening. Can become leaders is leadership, something that you can learn. Is it inherent? What? What's the deal about being a leader? Think leader. Leadership is an acquired skill. I think we sometimes have natural genetic tendencies or abilities had come with our package when we're born that sort of thing, But I think for the most part, it's an acquired skill and I think each one of us Has a leader within us, and that's why I titled the book the leaders because I think each one of us has that colonel of leadership. It just needs to be developed. And sometimes the first chance we get toe lead me. Nose is coaching that little league team er Helping something in the union organization in the community or leading our own family to success and happiness. I think each of us has that leadership and we have more and more opportunities. I mean, Was born on this isolated farm. As I said, and I should still be on that farm. But I made choices and made decisions that allowed me to emerge from that into a bigger world. And I kept trying new things risking in taking these new chances, right? And as I did that, I found that I could have more and more success. And no one would have seen my life as a young kid on the farm in poverty and would have thought he's gonna work in the White House someday. Galli he's gonna have a multi billion dollar company. That's just not How someone at program my life. But the fact is that we all could make choices that allow us to get to our highest level, and I think that's important. There's a quote that I made up Frankie a few years ago. Only 20 years ago now because I think we get caught up in comparing ourselves to others, and that's a big mistake. We shouldn't compare ourselves to others. We should compare ourselves to ourselves into our potential. So I said One success in life is relevant on Lee one, measured against one's own potential. I'll never have the fastest car, the biggest house the most money, you know, That's not my lot in life, but I could be the best person I'm going to be the best version of myself. And if I do that I've helped the world just a little bit and getting better. Yes, I love that. That's a great quote. By the way, that's a really great quote. This White House experience really changed your life, didn't it?.

White House White House fellow Frank Lee Galli Frankie
"white house fellow" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is biz talk radio and joining us today is Is Warren Russ Stand and Warren Resting is that Incredible leader. But he also is a husband, father, grandfather and entrepreneur, corporate leader and educators, speaker philanthropist. And ah, an all American basketball player in 1973. He was selected as a White House fellow Through a nationally competitive process. He was appointed as a special assistant to the secretary of commerce, where he led Colette, the first ever executive level. Trade mission to the Soviet Union. I mean, the list goes on and on and on. And he has been CEO of 10 companies. Chairman of many others who have served he served on the board of directors of 50 for profit and nonprofit for profit organizations. And He was CEO of Providence Service. Corby $2.1 billion company, Another $800 million company. The list goes on. And for 30 years, Warren let a public policy conference in D C called public policy and the private sector. And we're so excited to have him with us because You know, this has been a rough year for everyone. No doubt about it. And Appear stuck in that fog of 2020. And you really can't see the future. Then listen up to our businessman, also author and his book is out. It's called the leader within us mindset, principles and tools for a life by design. The book is a life right design. And Mr Warren Rusted. Welcome to the program. What a pleasure. Thank you. Thank you so much. I'm really delighted to join you today, but I'm exhausted by what you just said. I should be really tired. I know. I was thinking the same thing. Oh, my God. This man has done so much. And I left off the part that you were involved in the President Ford administration. But anyway, love me. Let's go back to You want us to think of this word clarity. And explain to us Is it that we're lacking? Clarity that we're not taught about clarity? Why is this word so pivotal for you in the work that you do? I think it's the foundational element of being able to understand where we're going and how to get there and I first saw it with my dad. I was born on poor on an isolated farm in Minnesota near the Canadian border. I always recall my dad when I was a young man before he would start any project plowing a field shoveling manure out from the barn from the cows feeding the animals. Wherever was, he would always pause and say. How do I want to do this? How do I think about this? What is the outcome that I want, and I learned it in early age that that pausing, creating time and space to really think about what it is. We're trying to do and how we want to do it. Gives us clarity and also gives us greater success by having that clarity. So I think that as we come out of this pandemic, which we will over the next year, or so we'll we'll get vaccinated for those who want to be vaccinated will have a better Understanding of where we are. It's really critical of each one of us pause a bit to say, Okay, fresh start. What are the outcomes that I want? What's the vision I want to create for myself And can I get clarity around that and if we do, then our chances of being successful and having a good time are much better. You know, it's not just in major projects. I just want to share with you that before I went on air, we're doing a field of hearts in my neighborhood on the waterfront in snowy Boston. And it's going to be All of these beautiful sayings in the shape of hearts that are going to be posted. On this walkway that everybody goes up and down And there will be 60 plus hearts that we've all written things on. And I mean, just really fun, fabulous expressions and sayings and things. And I did it so quickly. Didn't take that time to plan out. How I was going to do this one particular sign. And I didn't think I didn't think And I spell compassion wrong. And These air, not replaceable. I didn't have an extra and I had to paint over it. Went to do it again and again. I was sidetracked, and I didn't think that I made the same mistake twice. Shame on me. And I said, Okay, this is a lesson. I am going to really and truly not do this project until I have the time to do it so that I can get it done correctly. And that was my little lesson that I had today. That's a good lesson. You know, my dad always used to say, And you've heard this thing before. If you don't do it right the first time. When will you have the time to do it again? So why not do it right The first time really think things through. I do that with every little and small thing that I do If I'm asked to chair a committee if I'm asked a coach Little League if I'm asked to do something by one of our grandchildren are Children We step back, and we say Look, you know, what do we want Accomplish here? What are we trying to achieve? What are we trying to do? For instance, For Christmas? We adopted 23 families really, really desperately needy families who had really been hit hard by the pandemic and everything else and so are our large family. Went out and bought all their clothes, all their gifts all their food, their Christmas tree there, lights there everything but we step back as a family. So what are we trying to achieve here? What do we really want to do for these families? And we had a very clear view of that. And then it was easier for us to go out and do what it was necessary to make it a great experience for those families. Yeah, I think probably Frankie. You and I are the same and that we live in a world principally because of social media, But we live in a world where people are just too busy. And everybody feels like they're under stress, and everybody feels like they have so many things to do, and we've confused business with productivity..

Mr Warren Rusted CEO Warren Russ Stand Warren Resting basketball Soviet Union White House fellow Colette Chairman us Boston executive Ford administration special assistant to the secre Minnesota Frankie President Providence Service
"white house fellow" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And I know that one of the things that you know I have to credit where I am now is both the fact that I did I had what I always say that I think one of greatest gifts that God gave me was the fact that he has joined more to my mother. And I will always be grateful for that. Also for other family members and mentors, coaches, that's everything. But I know there's also one thing that kind of service initial prerequisite, and that's luck. And look shouldn't have to be a prerequisite in order making in our society, not a real meritocracy. And so I think one of the things that really fuels so much of how I think about Justin both my relationship with West for then also, how I think about Work that I've been asked to do, and we'll continue to do on this planet. It is eliminating luck as a prerequisite in order for people to make it and its understand our own larger. The larger conversation that we all must have in order for us to be able to do just that. And so on. So I absolutely I absolutely can can not only imagine it with thing I spend more time thinking about it. Had it not been for a serious of decisions. Some of which West had nothing to do with that. I don't see a scenario. Why West should not be right here next to contribute, But that's the dynamic. That's the challenge that I think we have to short. Why did you move back to Baltimore? Uh, you know, it's for a beautiful reasons. You know, it was after I came back from Afghanistan. I had a chance to work in Washington and I worked as a White House fellow, which is a ah, yearlong, nonpolitical, nonpartisan fellowship. But you worked as a senior adviser through capital level Secretariat was an amazing experience. And then I start working in finance. And I was working in finance there and doing well, You know, I've gotten promoted a couple times and and I was kind of, you know, really finding finding a real role in finance. And you know, and the way my mind works, my mind is actually more quantitative mind inequality to finally notice come easier to me. Then words. I had to work a lot harder than that. Which is kind of ironic that I decided. Um, but I also knew that wasn't fulfilling. I also knew that something was really missing. I knew that I wanted to spend my time being able to really focus on the things that made my heart beat a little bit faster. And that wasn't finance. It wasn't it wasn't banking And so I remember actually going and having a conversation with my my old boss of vomiting, McGuire, who's still see and I told myself, I think I wanna I wanna do something different, and he said he said, You know, you just have to understand. This is not like, you know, there's no way you can help out back in nowhere. This treadmill kind of keeps moving. And so if you make this decision, it's a pretty big decision. I told myself I've thought about it. I got it. And I still thought it was it was. It was the right thing to do. I will. And then he said, I get it and he said, you're ready. And so that's what I've been decided That part of my journey meant moving back home. Um, I look, I think it's an amazing place filled with amazing people. It's quirky. It's complicated, but it's also a place where its story is still very much being written right now as we speak, you know this is A city that used to be a city of of close to million people. It's now a city of less than 600,000, with the exception of Cleveland and Detroit City of Baltimore, has lost more citizens than any other major American city over this two decade long period. It's a city that that is the home ofthe Thurgood Marshall and is the home of a roof. It's also the home of red lining and some of the most discriminatory policies, housing policies, transportation. Policies that this country has ever instituted on its populations and particularly popular. It's a place that is no while at the same time way were celebrating the rebirth off of the Baltimore Orioles and no nice good streak run, But the orders were having at the same time we're celebrating the Baltimore Ravens bring the title back home was around the same time that we also had and learned about. The main's off Anthony Anderson, Chris Brown and entire own West and eventually, so it's a city that is, It's still very much healing from its past. It's a city that is still very much trying to search and determine its own future. It's a place where I think people from Baltimore take the fact that their volatile mornings very, very seriously, and they take a real pride in the fact they're Baltimore no matter where they happen to be now. Fact that I'm still very much living down here and raise my family here, But I know people who have fallen on their roots were no longer here who just is proud to call themselves Border Morning design. But I also know that it's a place where our story is being written as we speak, and the chance to actually be one of 600,000 authors of a pretty great American story is exciting to me, and so I thought about the place. Is that I really for me and bite community for me embodied ownership. Uh, for me, then it became a pretty easy decision that our families go back to. Where were you living on Saturday, April 12th 2015 living in Baltimore at the time. What hand What happened that day? That was the day that Freddie Gray may Attack with police and I say that because that was his crime that he made eye contact with police and ran, and it's important. You understand that I say that because that's not a crime everywhere. It's a crime and distinctly labeled high crime, high poverty areas where if you make eye contact with with police and run, that's enough to trigger probable cause and you can then be chased and arrested. Had that been done in another neighborhood have been done in a neighborhood that was only a mile and asked two miles away from where Freddie Gray Wass. He could have done the same exact thing, and he would have been going for a job, but he did. He did in Sandtown Winchester. He did in all, and so when he made all kinds of police he ran, he was eventually you know, he was eventually arrested. And an hour after he was arrested. He was in a coma when he finally made it to the University of Maryland Medical Center. It was deemed that he had three broken and a crushed larynx and crush Voicebox and he never made it out of the cooler. He never recovered from his injuries. He died a week later. And so we spent a coma trying to survive but eventually was not able to. And so that was the day. That the world first started off West Baltimore and then eventually Baltimore and then eventually the world. That was the day that the world would first learned of the name Friday, and from your book, five days the reckoning of an American city you right? There were reasons Freddie's death was different that it's so quickly turned into a galvanizing moment, instead of passing into painful silence, like with others. Portions of Freddie Gray's final moments were caught on camera capturing video of police encounters is commonplace now, But Freddie's death in 2015 coincided with the emergence of smartphones and social media as tools of citizen journal. It was it was. It was one of these things where I think I thought about what was the thing that made us he didn't know who Freddie Gray Wass or what his name was. Anything about where in the two years before Freddie Gray. There wasn't just Freddie Gray right into for Freddie Gray. There was Anthony Anderson, and there was his brown and there was Tyrone West, similar incidents. Similar situations where you have.

Baltimore Freddie Gray Freddie Gray Wass Freddie Anthony Anderson Baltimore Orioles Baltimore Ravens Justin coma Thurgood Marshall Washington Afghanistan senior adviser McGuire Tyrone West University of Maryland Medical White House fellow level Secretariat Cleveland Sandtown Winchester
"white house fellow" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"President Johnson set up a task, force But half dozen people which I was the junior member. and. Two things. Impacted my like because of that one trip which. was to be an ordinary trip of. Going, and visiting with our minister technology with our friends and western Europe and their ministers of technology and Minister of Finance. and. Instead. Two things. happened. One of the. Members. Of the task, force was A. Guy Named Bill Hewlett. He van was running what people consider to be a small company called Hewlett Packard. And we had become friends in the course of the year because he was a member of the present site advisory committee. which would meet monthly and as a White House fellows I was shook societas with that committee. But what solidified our friendship? Was We were in Italy and bill. Asked me if I wanted to join flora and himself to take a drive down the Amalfi coast. He rented this. Volkswagen Beetle. And Flora was sitting in the passenger seat and I was living in the back. And my life was in his hands for the good our two we were driving I've never been driven so fast in my entire life, it was probably the most harrowing experience I ever had. Became really good friends. Then we were all Germany. And there was a gentleman of Minister of Technology I believe his name was Stoltenberg. And he got up and said. You know we here in Germany. We train unskilled people. To operate and maintain the most sophisticated technological weaponry in the world. And I that sentence hung in the air he continued to talk but I didn't hear the rest of what he's That was just a huge idea. When I went back to Washington I sat down with Willard words who was secretary of Labor, President Kennedy and Johnson the point into that position and needless to say as the Secretary of Labor, he was very interested in manpower training. And I came in and told them the story. And then I told the same story to Bill Moyer's who had become a very good friend an oral Freeman Secretary of agriculture bill moyers was President Johnson's press secretary and special assistant with having even more important position because of his..

Bill Hewlett President Johnson Secretary of Labor Flora bill moyers Bill Moyer Hewlett Packard Freeman Secretary secretary press secretary President Kennedy Germany Europe Volkswagen Amalfi Italy Stoltenberg White House Beetle A. Guy
"white house fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"So what do you know about Eric Greitens? He's been on the show before he's been in studio before he's the 56 governor ofthe Missouri. People know a couple of things about him. They know he's a former seal, lieutenant commander. They may not know he's also got PhD from Oxford University. Wow. I'm impressed for the White House fellow recipient of the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart and he's on the line right now, Lieutenant. Come on the governor, Dr Eric Greitens. Welcome to America first. Sebastian. Great to be on with you again, Man. Thanks so much for having me alright, next time im going to get you in studio because we know as a former CEO view on us No Flake and you'll come in studio, but we're glad to get you by phone. You have been very active in the last few weeks talking out about the McCloskey's as former governor. Tell us your take on what's happened to these individuals? The latest news we have Of that This man and wife thes. Two lawyers who defended their home is the handgun that she was holding. When those those rioters broke into their property wasn't even operable. It had been made inoperable and was used as a prop in a court case and S O. That's another twist to the story. But give us your take his former governor about the The travesty that is the McCloskey case. Look at the one thing that your listeners know is how dangerous these George Soros funded Prosecutors around the country can be. And it's important to remember that Kim gardener who's going after the McCloskey's is a George Soros funded pro. Hang on, Hang on. You're going to get me in trouble. Now this people get counsel for mentioning that name. So let's tell the world About your experience with this woman Kingdom Kim Gardener and who backto to become that prosecutor. Let's talk the fact Eric in light of the millions of people who are listening and watching right now. The facts are out there these air in public documents he payed for over 70% of her campaign in 2017 and No, that crew at just the news. John Holliman stayed just broke a story just broke a story that a they again so responded Entities put another $75,000 into her reelection campaign. And in Kim Gardener, the radical left is getting what it paid for their agenda is clear. Kim Gardener letting looters loose with no charges. In Missouri. We had black lives matter. Activists, attack and assault people who are engaged in prayer. He was caught on video and no one was charged. Four police officers shot one night businesses are being burned. Arson is happening and no one is charged. Tired. ST. Louis police captain David Dorn was murdered. Last Monday. Sebastian I was out on the streets of ST Louis, 15 to 25 semi automatic gunshots went off. We know now that there was one FN 57 pistol, Another air, 15 type rifle that was used My buddy and I, my buddy. That's really That's interesting. The FN 57 that's like a $1100 handgun. That's not a Saturday night special. That's a serious piece of equipment. A serious piece of equipment you had. It was at least 15 maybe 25 shots rang out. My buddy who's a special operations, Fire department Medic. We grabbed our weapons and our med kit. He jumped in my passenger seat. We drove up about 70 yards were first on the scene. He started performing CPR on the first casualty. We worked there eventually worked on the second casualties Well, and unfortunately we saw that night to other lives were lost. And these were good kids. Sebastian, 20 and 21 years old, not a parking ticket between them murdered in the city of ST Louis at the corner of Lindell and Grand, which would you you've got a national audience. Millions of people across the country hearing this they might not know Lindell and grand were that Killing happened. Is one of the nicest corners in the city of ST Louis. But what does Kim Gardener the ST Louis Circuit attorney spending her time on? Is she going after murderers if she going after people who are assaulting people in prayer? Is she going after arsonists and people who are burning down buildings know what she does instead is that she spends her time and her resource is charging people. For defending themselves. She's the absolute embodiment of the lawlessness of the left, and, unfortunately, unfortunately what that leads to is lives that are lost. Young kids who were killed on the street because of this lawlessness. So what is your message of those people who are politically active, but but who need to understand who these people are? What? What is your message? In the last time you were a Democrat? You'd like, Churchill said. You know who is not a left wing when Young has no heart who is not a conservative older has no brain. You made that transformation. We have 102 days until the election. What's your message in the last 60 seconds? We have to the American people Listen to you right now, Governor. Look the messages that you have to get out there and you have to vote for law and order. You have to support President Trump you've seen and everyone has seen the ludicrous liberal leftist logic of defunding the police that is being pushed by Joe Biden and so many radicals on the left. It is endangering our communities. It is a threat to our country. We have to get out there. We have to support our police officers, and we also have to support Those leaders who have the courage have the courage to actually get out their support our police officers and stand up for our communities. Eric Greitens. Follow him on Twitter, Eric Greitens, G R E E and S on Eric Greitens Dotcom. Thank you so much..

Dr Eric Greitens Kim Gardener Sebastian I McCloskey Missouri ST Louis George Soros prosecutor Oxford University White House fellow America commander Lindell and Grand John Holliman Twitter CEO Joe Biden Lindell Fire department Medic
"white house fellow" Discussed on The Gospel of the Kingdom

The Gospel of the Kingdom

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on The Gospel of the Kingdom

"Not Anything you like age. Natural from. Those have been injured desserts Zeno. How. Bad that The dust. Dust? Out. That tees, but that is nothing in partisan to this coaching. Will be appalled out by the angel. Yet Still not. Of Pablo. Mum. Wiz teaser yet not repent. We did that. Doesn't fall to the ground. On the law down the sudden lawn forgave US Lord Save me. Why are you want money do like? This phone across. Under daughter forgave that. lasted. Minutes is about to die. The load before gave without you. Just realize that we desire what we are receiving. Wonder Grocer said Wayne is what we are receiving, but to this man is innocent. Then he requested the Lord Lord. Remember me when it out. Commission Dykema That was. On the he, M men were. Bench this fight today eat the scorching heat each God God. Whole mine, They gotta have. Mercy We bring it down to their level. What to kind of vanishing. Widow Cosio Tatan what kind of He'll walk. You start. One of these have not evident business is it goes down to business. GOES DOWN EVERY BUSINESS NEAR? Yes, continue combining I. Don't know why God. Bless me I. Don't know whether I'm there was. Everything I touch goes down. Evidence Guy do goes down. My mind was seem wartime amount of suffering or to mountain of sickness. You wander that a gun because you. When we did this. As Serie Allies. Travel. We are told this group. Guest, Dallas. Has not the supreme from the ground? It costs. Close to this. Shanmugam. My God. When you go to the way this, this will be quick to come. Look at heat heat scout team in undiminished guess cost. There want to defend. US. US describe this time in the vocal luke. That's time that. His ahead vice. Described it. Liberal Luke. Chopped up into one. Squad says. Current and five. On the six. On the show be signs in the Sun, the moon owning this styles. Honda Phone Diaz. Distress of nations where the pop elect St. This E. underway. Raleigh. Men So hot fraley them. For fee. For looking after those seas. which are coming? On the US! For the powers over heaven. Shelby Shakin. Men's hot fade then. Flow Fin. On Four Lewke of those seas. which are coming on? Those how Christ. described. The names that will be. Always to win to be. The Andrews. Operating out. Pointing out, told these flags. We will be on for time. Brad attorney wartime. Even this. Side over these. Soon trusting that even Marcus. prophesied. Oh these. WE'RE GONNA turn to. Your autonomy. Your. Engine Fall. Tony. Tran Fall. Was Is. To to into fall. into. The Oh. Not to change, for. Nine so. You'RE GONNA meet to nine. Granted to. Printed fall. The scripture says. Earned that's. A whole new Honda Zero. He's greenstone. The Salt And burning. That? He's not. Nor bad as. No in a green. nor Any grass grow. Is there in? Like the overthrow of saw. Go Maura. was dating. Odham. Harm which the Lord Overthrow in his Ongo? On the knees rough. Even all nations to say. Where for full House the lauded down. On the lund. Or to mean this. or to mean this day age. Or were these great Anga. Prophecy. By Moses. Why people were to say, why are we bring you? said all of that White House fellow down this to the Wong. How can be out? Kind of people be barbecued by automobiles each. What we've done. Why all these. It'll be tenable time. This gret drought. Might even be the result of the US being moved out of each normal of it. Might, be because the answer we're..

US Lord Lord Honda Cosio Tatan Shelby Shakin Anga White House fellow Wayne lund Guy Moses Dallas Raleigh Brad Wong Christ. Marcus. Maura. attorney
"white house fellow" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And we're back with our American stories in the final portion of the life story of David Rubenstein we've learned a lot about how you can leave it is wealth what he cares about let's return to the last part of this story so I've gotten to the point where I'm reasonably satisfied with the life I've led nobody can be completely happy with it I'm now seventy years old today so I thought family you're ready for nursing home it's not something worse than that but I'm still pretty good shape so vibrant my brain is still working the body just recently okay no artificial parts yet or anything like that so I I don't look back on my life and just wish I had done some things better than I had done but on the whole on recently happy with where I am since David brought it up my **** what could you have done better well as a young man I always thought maybe I could be a better athlete I wasn't a high school all American athlete I wasn't a great athlete anywhere I could have been a better scholar was never first in my class nobody said this person as Albert Einstein coming along and and new form as I tell students when I talk to them all the time use the if you divide life into three parts the first third is when you're getting educated and getting ready to be a productive citizen the first second third is when you're really you're building your career you're really making some real difference in whatever your career might be the third third is when you see the benefits of what you've done I would say the first third of life is not something I am one first serve a life is one I would say sometimes by people that are Rhodes scholars Supreme Court clerks White House fellows presents the.

David Rubenstein David Albert Einstein White House Supreme Court
"white house fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

12:03 min | 2 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Guest Dr Richard gray the CEO the Mayo Clinic in Arizona and I asked him to join me because once a year or so I like to just do all good news I think medicine is where the most good news it doctor gray welcome great to have you on the program thank you I appreciate it it's wonderful to be with you this morning how long have you been with the Mayo Clinic I have been with the male clinic for twenty four years I actually started here as a surgical intern so sort of the the American dream I began as a surgical intern I had a career as a surgical oncologist and have more recently stepped into the CEO role in Arizona where it's really an honor to help lead does very special place doctor gray yesterday at lunch for the White House fellow who tells me there are six doctors among this White House fellows class I was kind of astonished unless they go into medical administration unless they go into health care management systems because that fellowship is about management how did you prepare to leave Mayo Clinic Arizona you know Mayo Clinic has a rich history of physician leadership and we really feel that it's important that those people that are doing the work of healthcare also provide the leadership for that health care we have a wonderful partnership model here at Mayo Clinic where we have administrative experts that partner with physician leaders but our core value at Mayo Clinic has always been that the needs of the patient comes first and we really have the philosophy that position leadership helps us make sure that we keep the needs of the patient at the center of everything that we do now Dr great the best book I have ever read on health care is the innovators prescription by Clayton Christiansen of Harvard Business School any running years ago before obamacare came along he said everything will change in medicine in the next twenty five years I was probably ten years ago is he still right he is still right and we do think that a lot of the things that Mister Christensen put forward in his book are have come to be and will continue to come to be there's a lot of ships that are happening in healthcare and we're seeing a lot of those paradigm shifts but some of it has been come as quickly as many of us whole ten as maybe he outlined but we are on the cusp of paradigm shifts in health care with the technology that's available the bass to amount of data that we're now able to process and apply things like artificial intelligence to were really excel in reading those things and well there's plenty of challenges in health care we at Mayo Clinic are really excited about being able to apply these and again I complex field like ours really be able to accelerate jurors on behalf of patients with all of that and not only xcelerated cures but improve our patients experience in healthcare if you think about the conveniences we've gained in recent years and things like the way that we bank or even how we how we book our travel with airlines healthcare has been improved those conveniences that address wrap it up a rate and we want to put a lot of effort into that patient experience that we hold so important at Mayo Clinic as well doctor gray if you've listened to show and and I'm flattered that you have in the past you may have heard I've I've been a visitor to in speaker at the neighborhood Christian clinic in Phoenix which is sort of an innovator in helping poor people get access in the community and here at the other end of the of the medical chain the Mayo Clinic well it serves many and that people who are just indigent it's this vast network of excellence is there any way that those two not Jules bridge is is there some way for American health care to get back to the public health care model of the of the early part of the last century plus this extraordinary model of Mayo in Cleveland Clinic in an MD Anderson and USC and UCLA yeah I think yeah you you point out something that's very important that we have to think about the entire spectrum and I I will give you an example that are male medical students in Phoenix actually spend a significant amount of their time along with our faculty volunteering in such clinics as you described and Mayo Clinic really sees its mission in not just providing healthcare to those who walk through our door but also facilitating the healthcare system and and while we do some of that directly as you referred to it you know many millions of dollars in charity care that we that we provide a lot of it is our time and effort and creating systems that allow that but you're right that a lot of the the model that has been in the healthcare service based reimbursement paying for a service just like any other service has held back some of those efforts and as we move to more value based care in in terms of our payment models that'll be important but I I think it's important for everybody to know that that male clinic and and doctors and nurses really have certain car and they want to be able to serve people and find a way to do that and a lot of it is through those clinics a lot of it is through charity care and we want to connect with patients and make sure that everyone has access to health care that's very affordable talking with doctor Richard gray CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona now doctor gray it's the holiday season and most people are full of good cheer but a lot of people are sick and people are sick sometimes wonder if they're going to see the next year and the year be on it do you ever sit around and just blue sky where healthcare is going and what medical innovation is that of us because I read the Israeli news and you think that cancer was cured if you read some of the stuff that comes out to Israel how they fast of a of a blue sky arise in is there out there well what we have made incredible progress in the health care and many of the challenges I think in in US healthcare is around many of the systems and helping people to navigate and access health care but within the U. S. system there are incredible carers in progress that have already occurred occurred but yes we absolutely blue sky things and and again I think applying technology allows us so many more opportunities to not only have more in innovative cures but to have ways of preventing health problems and disseminating those two more people I'll give you an example of our cardiologists have much data from the EKG is kind of an electrical tracing up your heart and have relatively common tasks that many of your listeners have probably had but a very dangerous aspect of heart disease and heart failure where the heart doesn't pump well enough to get the blood and oxygen around to where it needs to be and that is diagnosed on a less common task called an echocardiogram or an ultrasound of the heart using artificial intelligence and machine learning taking vast amounts of data within Mayo Clinic are cardiologists were able to determine algorithms from that common EKG past that can help indicate who is at risk for heart failure before they ever manifest any symptoms wow so applying that kind of technology and then being able to disseminate that widely is just one example that shows how the technological innovations that we now have can help diagnose things earlier provide interventions earlier that can really improve health and and then again that's just one example of many of how we can do this and and those types of of innovations can be spread widely through digital means now to help more and more people as we were talking about to access that kind of expertise last question doctor grass spent a lot of time this time of the year helping salvation or because they take care of people rejected and we're in the middle of an opioid epidemic that claim seventy thousand live two years ago I think it's slightly down this year is there a a breakthrough in addiction science I had is there some way I mean this is beyond the aids epidemic in many ways that you're dealing with I'm sure you're dealing with it at the Mayo Clinic what's ahead in addiction studies so there are a lot a lot of innovations happening in addiction studies behavioral issues including a Texan are some of the most difficult issues to have breakthroughs on a lot of our work in terms of in me Mayo Clinic has truly been leading and and particularly even statewide programs add to our locations in Arizona Florida and Minnesota in addressing the opioid crisis right now we're addressing that by lowering the risk in many cases in terms of how doctors and patients interact on opiates because unfortunately many people do either become addicted to opioids through a legitimate prescription as a starting point for gain those medications from someone else and so programs to match the right amount of opioids to the rate patient in the right way and use non opioid interventions are really important and that's been an early focus to decrease the risk of addiction in this incredible crisis that we're seeing buddy an addiction science not just opioids but other issues there's a lot of work being done but there is a lot of work still to go but it's very important to to us and to our country last question doctor gray in Alzheimer's and dementia studies here in Arizona it's an older population than a lot of places although my friend Doug Ducey likes to point out a vibrant economy as lot of people are are concerned that will never get there are we ever going to get there we will get there I am I am an optimist and we continue to have break throughs and and I I I think governor do see what what actually like to point out that a couple county the county in which we set here at Mayo Clinic is actually younger than the national average we have an aging population we have we have more people that are at risk for dementia and Alzheimer's specifically but we are discovering more and more some of the causes an underlying mechanisms and I did have a patient recently asked me that very question why haven't we cure at this yeah and the answer is that we find as we dig further into this even as we learn more that there are more pieces to this very complex puzzle but the fact is that the puzzle pieces will get put together we don't have all of the pieces in place yet but we have many of them there and I'm very optimistic of the track that were on to provide a lot of soul for those that are that are facing this disease and a lot of hope for those that are aging and hoping to not have to face this disease in the future great place to end doctor Richard great thank you for joining me this CEO of Mayo Clinic Arizona some good news for everyone out there a medicine in America there's never been a better time Albert to be in need of medical services in America that right now because a place like the Mayo Clinic but in the other great hospitals but American it's really the.

CEO Mayo Clinic Arizona Dr Richard gray twenty five years twenty four years ten years two years
"white house fellow" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Cole was the main form of heating at that point especially for New England and there was a union in the coal industry of the miners that was on strike against the cold parents who they thought were not giving them the right working conditions the right wages so they went on strike and the strike went on month after month after month show as the full approach hospitals are closing schools are closing it really was a national crisis that was beginning to develop so teddy Roosevelt at that time never had a president sat down with a business group any union group together they never negotiated a deal so he had to make a precedent so we invited the two had a cold barren and the union guys together to the White House and and through that process of dealing with both of them it went pretty shakily at first call guys wouldn't even talk to the union guys in the same room a teddy had a stenographer take notes down any it asking if he could do that many published the notes and eventually they worked out a deal where they be a presidential commission to look at both sides and figure out the grievances and then the call strike ended and they settled in but it was one of those things that had it knocked on right it was considered the biggest industrial strike in the history of the country it was possibly going to become a nationwide strikes it was pretty at a time and it was great to hear you talk about how masterfully president Lyndon Johnson took over the reins of the presidency in a time of crisis and how he managed to get the civil rights legislation passed but then he got bogged down in the Vietnam War how could the same man with the same skill set have such a great success and such an epic failure it was one of the things that really was so haunting especially for me because I had known him when I was twenty four years old I've been a White House fellow working form in the White House.

"white house fellow" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Three. W. Back to the chicks on the ratio where the chicks mock daisy. Hello this rap KENDALL. Also here. We've talked a lot, there's been so many examples of outrage against Chick-fil-A for. For back when the CEO was there and believed in traditional marriage. And that was apparently offensive to people. So now, there's so many stories about airports getting, you know, not allowing chick fil A's to open up in their establishments college campuses. It's constant than wanting a chicken biscuit right now. Don't say that I know right hungry. And it's out of control. And the head of Chick-fil-A charity charity foundation and the VP of corporate social responsibility did an interview with business insider earlier this week. And he basically just in not anything close to the words. I'm going to use said to all of the critics GTS GTO. Yes, he definitely didn't say that this guy worked. He served as a White House fellow under the Obama administration. I just like to point out. He seems like a really nice guy. He said, chick fil, A's mission in helping others is bigger than the partisan attacks or the culture war in general, and we will not be deterred in our work. And that's the thing is that there they do so much. They they've gotten backlash for donate into Christian organizations, even organizations like the Salvation Army, which we support ever might best. Yeah. What how if you're? A person who gets butthurt about the salvation army's mission. You have serious problems. Yeah, they, they help kids. They helped low income youth and, and economic inequality. This is the kind of stuff that Democrats, you think would really like no, not if it not, if there's any kind of aspect to it that they can misconstrue as being anti LGBTQ, it's really interesting how that works. So in any case, he is saying that the company's charitable mission will not be slowed by any criticism and said, and I quote, for us, it's a much higher calling than any political or cultural ward, that's being waged. This is really about and authentic problem. That is on the ground that is present ever present in the lives of many kids who can't help themselves. They give back so much. So, you know, by people boycotting them and people taking money away from them are saying, we want to take money from them. You're, you're essentially saying, well, we don't want to give back to communities. We want to give back to local fillet does. Yeah. Congratulations. And this is why took will continue to be so popular because a lot of people go just out of pure spite for the idiots who try to boycott that Joey.

Salvation Army Chick-fil-A White House fellow CEO Joey Obama administration VP
"white house fellow" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:07 min | 3 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Servants of makeover. Excel the right on ninety three w y. See. Welcome back to the on the ratio where the chicks on knock named daisy. Hello, kindle. Also here we've talked a lot. There's been so many examples of outrage against Chick-fil-A four. For back when the CEO was there and believed in traditional marriage. And that was apparently offensive to people. So now, there's so many stories about airports getting, you know, not allowing chick fil A's to open up in their establishments college campuses. I mean it's constant than we're hearing these wanting a chicken biscuit right now. Don't say I know right hungry. I know. And it's out of control, and the head of Chick-fil-A charity charity foundation and the VP of corporate social responsibility did an interview with business insider earlier this week. And he basically just in not anything close to the words. I'm going to use said to all the critics GTO. Yes, he definitely didn't say that. You guys worked. He served as a White House fellow under the Obama administration. I just like to point out. He seems like a really nice guy. He. Said, Chick-fil-A mission in helping others is bigger than the partisan attacks the culture war in general, and we will not be deterred in our work. And that's the thing is that there they do so much. They they've gotten backlash for donating to Christian organizations even organizations like the Salvation Army, which we support every bash. Yeah. What how if you're a person who gets butthurt about the salvation army's mission? You have serious problems. Yeah. They help kids they, they helped low income, youth and economic inequality. This is the kind of stuff that Democrats, you would really like no, not if it not, if there's any kind of aspect to it that they can misconstrue as being anti LGBTQ really interesting how that works. So in any case, he is saying that the company's charitable mission will not be slowed by any criticism and said, and I quote, for us, it's a much higher calling than any political or cultural ward, that's being waged. This is. Really about an authentic problem that is on the ground. That is present ever present in the lives of many kids who can't help themselves. They give back so much. So, you know, by people boycotting them and people taking money away from them are saying, we want to take money away from them. You're, you're essentially saying, well, we don't want to give back to communities. We want to give back to local communities. That's what Chick-fil-A does so. Congratulations. And this is why Chick-fil-A will continue to be so popular because a lot of people go just out of pure spite for the idiots who tried to boycott them. Also. Okay. Cupid is one of the many dating sites that exists today. I mean match dot com is like that's your grandma's dating site. And the harmony, there's a harmony, I don't know where does oak what sets. Okay. Keep it apart. I don't even know because I'm so married. Yeah, I don't know what rob because he harmony of to take. What I can you've been married less than two seconds ever ever. This sauce God's truth. I never used a dating site. Really? The only place on the internet, internet. I met people was Facebook. That's, that's okay because there is like, the, the Tinder is the swiping, then that's for hookups. I think give it. That's how my boy met his girl from together for three years. That's true. And then and I saw. Oh, I don't exactly know. Church grinders really make all the choices on bumble. So it's like a Sadie Hawkins website. Okay. No, I said over here in my moral. Purity mock say Sadie Hawkins is like when the girls asked the voice dances. That's like what that is. That's like the. He never got a Sadie Hawkins dance. That was house. Super Bowl back in the fifties. Shut up. Oh my gosh. Well, in any case, okay, cupid is just one of obviously many and I don't know what sets them apart. I don't know how they're different than all the other ones, but apparently, they're needed and used and whatever, so, and they're also very, very left leaning. In fact, they actually have teamed in the past with Planned Parenthood to create an a whole vetting process that I know it sounds crazy, but it actually will identify whether or not your potential match supports abortion rights, so they have this button on your when you create a profile, there's a button there that allows you to select whether you would prefer that the government de-fund Planned Parenthood. And if you choose that then it will trigger a little icon to appear on your profile that shows that you support, and I, quote handing over millions and corporate welfare to a middling healthcare organization that exists, primarily to end pregnancies. Oh my so now that. So, so this they team up with Planned Parenthood. And now they're saying in light of all these, these new laws like Georgia with the heartbeat law. They're saying on their Twitter account. Their official Twitter account says it's extremely okay to skip the small talk and get right to their opinion on Georgia's abortion ban. So they're suggesting that anybody that uses their site to find a potential mate, ask that question immediately, like, who cares? If you have kids or if you like dogs. Yeah. Or whatever, just whatever what your job is who you are as an individual. This is the most important thing. That's gotta be your number one out of the gate question. I forgot I were single I would be on farmers only dot com. What in the World Series league you don't have to be lonely? I. this is parade it's nuts but this and that's why there was some backlash i mean there were some people who are like whatever happened to just living without politics getting in the middle of ruining everything now it just people can't do it and i know that they're they're conservative websites out there concert conservative dating websites out there i just don't know what they are because again i assume here so very out there so people can share them like on our facebook page chicks on the right well we've we've been asked for a long time like as a part of our website that's a huge undertaking is it's it's work it's just extra extra works at somebody i know that there are some out there i just don't know how successful they are because obviously we don't know of them right so somebody needs to you need to create more of them there needs to be probably four or five of them that are competing against each other that's how great they need to be so something needs to get on that yeah But there are a lot what are we talking about? Well, we need to talk right now about you Bernie. Oh, bring me in west westbound chilly. Why I'll tell you why. Because you're an.

Chick-fil-A Sadie Hawkins Facebook Salvation Army Georgia Twitter kindle CEO White House fellow VP Obama administration Bernie rob official ninety three w three years two seconds
"white house fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:25 min | 3 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Years at McKinsey and to Lazard he became a White House fellow where he spent a year working with Treasury Secretary. John snow he then returned to banking spending five years as vice president at Goldman Sachs. And as then president carry cones chief of staff. But in two thousand twelve he co-founded real estate tech disrupter, compass with partner and technology expert or how long starting from a single downtown Manhattan office compasses raise one point two billion dollars from investors including soft back and is now valued at four point four billion dollars. He joins me now for a closer. Look, Robert you had solid career at Goldman Sachs. Something many dream of when you change course to start a real estate technology company. Tells the story of how this started how you met your partner on Alan and what he brings to compass. Yeah. Absolutely. I what my background actually grounded in real estate. My mom's been agents my entire life. The first half as a life insurance agent actually in the second half as a real estate agent. And so I had seen her to move from firm to firm to firm hoping that you'll get this report and tool to realize your dreams as an in in really an entrepreneur running a small business never got that. So that's gonna wear. I saw the the opportunity to build a company that can improve the quality of life in the potential potential agents in the country. And when I was at Goldman Sachs. I saw how thousands of people on the technology their billing tools for bankers and traders and just thought if we can we can create a company that can take the kinds of resources and build build for real estate agent. Now, what that could do for people like my mom in Oriole loan has sold one company. Google another company or Twitter, and I met him when I was looking to White House, and we just became friends over the years, and that's the person that John. Company when you serve eight agents. What were the main concerns that was holding them back from better efficiency? The average agent in the country long into Lebanon companies do their job every day. There are over five hundred software providers that are selling to agents given parts of the the real estate experience from valuation tools to scheduling open house dares to open house sign on, sir. CRM goes on and on marketing -til personal websites. There's so much part. There's so much of the actual workload agents. The main problem that I heard over the years when serve agents is happily take all this friction and fragmentation increase in Christly in harmony, bring everything you took one end to end platform. You said that really differentiated you from most other real estate companies was the diverse experiences of your colleagues. Is this why you think your initial fundraising was so successful? And providing something that investors really liked the woman in the second. We'll take the largest segment of the global economy. The value of feeding the world is two hundred seventeen trillion dollars four times every public company combined. Literally real estate defines are are sick the economics of our physical stays defined really working. So. Is the largest legacy business that has not been intrigued by software. So I think. Had a sense that there are very few industries laughed that having been improved healthcare being one real estate being another which is larger one. And then they were also inspired by that we were building for agents them damage the customer where all the other major software companies real estate. Weren't really viewing agent in the key stakeholder. Could you give us an example of a problem that your technology solve for agents? I would think a problem that it solves is. Marketing for one are likely the largest group of marketers in the country. They're sending digital newsletters, postcards, mailers social media every single day of marketing themselves as the great agent work with me and marketing their properties on behalf of their salaries to sell the properties, we created something called marketing center, which is a tool that allows them to have the power of professional designer using Photoshop it in the Palmer hand since of having to hire designers to do that work for them. Power to do it themselves. To do are singing and platform, which connects to all of the lifting and next to this is the way that compass deals with agents and commissions significantly different from other. Brokerage firms are coach to to commission splits is we we go into gem market, and we take the same schedule as one of the largest two players. And then we give a small infant here to the earliest people that come on. We'll continue this conversation with Robert ref can co founder and CEO of real estate tech platform, compass in a moment,.

Goldman Sachs John snow partner White House fellow Robert McKinsey vice president Manhattan president Lazard White House Lebanon chief of staff Google
"white house fellow" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on Kickass News

"And it's it's one of the most beautiful stories of a cross generational mutually beneficial relationship. And and also a tradition in music, and in in Jasbir, older musicians do nurture the next generation and has so many fundamental insights about how we can actually do that. Well, yeah. And this is something that we see a lot in entertainment. Don't, you know, people get all warm and fuzzy about those relationships when they see it in movies like on golden pond or books like Tuesdays with Morrie. So why don't we pursue those kind of relationships in real life as much I think we've lost our way. And it goes back to one of the things you were saying earlier about longevity. First of all we've we focused so much on adding years to life JFK in nineteen sixty three not too long before his death got up in front of congress and said, we'd added years to life. Now, it was time to add life to those years. So that's over half a century since that point we've added two months year on average to the American lifespan. And as you say, we're we're still trying to figure out what to do with all these years, and they're not years that are big tacked on the end the really being added to the middle of life their vital years or the the late middle. But people have described this period that's grown as a season in search of a purpose. And we I think in human nature that perp. Is actually evident. But it's something that that we've lost over time, and it's captured and films like keep on keeping on one of the things that you say is that people who have good mentors when they're young are more likely to want to pay that forward later in life and be a mentor to someone themselves. Now, you've had several great mentors that you talk about in the book throughout your life talk a little about them in the impact they had on your life. What probably the most important relationship a mentoring relationship. I've had in my working life is with a guy named John Gardner. Who was a remarkable person? He won the presidential medal of freedom in nineteen sixty four you know, that ultimate gold watch. And then he he went on from that point to create the White House fellows program to run health education and welfare under Lyndon Johnson..

Jasbir Lyndon Johnson golden pond Morrie JFK John Gardner White House congress two months
"white house fellow" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"white house fellow" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I'm Deb Lawler. Checking our top stories, we begin with a wild scene in Charlestown fires break out at a boat yard constitution. Marina, and that's where we find WBZ's Chris foam. Good morning. Chris morning debt. This fire is now completely extinguished, but the efforts to contain it will continue as the coastguards environmental cleanup route will assess the situation because these few less at the party stalemate where a contributing factor. According to the deputy fire chief blaze broke out sometime after eleven o'clock last night spread across three boats of varying sizes at Tudor Warf, just blow the Charlestown bridge. What woman was aboard one of the vessels? But she escaped without injury. Now, the same cannot be said for the water craps to sank in the third which charred remains folk here right in front of me are all considered total losses. Back here at the scene, but the boat fire the frame itself in the pungent, aroma, revert fiberglass, wood and fire retardant vote, which was used to battle the blaze in Charleston WBZ. Boston's new station. Chris thank you five thirty one two and a half weeks now into the partial government shutdown President Trump making a prime-time pitch for border security funding, CBS's Natalie brand is at the White House fellow Americans. President Trump took to the airwaves to make his case for a wall along the us Mexico border. All Americans are hurt by uncontrolled illegal migration. The president's first Oval Office address comes two and a half weeks into a partial shutdown of the federal government. The president did not declare a national emergency over immigration a crisis has developed at the border, and there's a local reaction to the president's address. WBZ Sheri, small joins us with more on that. Good morning. Sheri, good morning, Deb. Well, as federal employees are now going. Without their paychecks. The pressure is on lawmakers, and they're speaking out after last night's presidential address. Congressman Seth Moulton says he's here to help the government shutdown continues through January left a lot of federal workers will start missing their paychecks. If you are a federal employee who's going to get furloughed, you should know what resources are available in. My office is here to help. Congressman Joe Kennedy tweeted in part, President Trump clearly won't choose to end a crisis. He created. So the GOP Senate must and Senator Elizabeth Warren tweeted, quote, building a border wall won't make us any safer. What will ending this ridiculous Trump shut down and making sure vital agencies like the US coastguard TSA in federal law enforcement have the funds they need to maintain our national security end quote. Thank you, Sherry the partial government shutdown is in day. Nineteen hundreds of thousands of federal workers will not get paid on Friday. Sarah, Waterson is one of them. She's a furloughed office manager at the EPA in Kansas were trying to cut the grocery Bill is just down to the necessities. We we don't live extravagantly. So it's hard to cut out any bills, some eight hundred thousand federal employees are working without pay or have been furloughed coming up. We'll tell you about a ban officially in the running for worst roommate ever five thirty three now, traffic.

President Trump president Chris foam WBZ Sheri Deb Lawler Charleston WBZ Charlestown bridge Congressman Seth Moulton office manager Congressman Joe Kennedy government Tudor Warf Boston Senator Elizabeth Warren Sherry CBS Mexico EPA
A look at the Trump presidency

The Economist Radio

07:22 min | 3 years ago

A look at the Trump presidency

"Is the pow that Donald Trump tests. I think what Donald Trump is testing. Now is that he's been able to get the Republicans in congress to do the things that they wanted to do, and perhaps he is well, the tax cut the deregulation, the supreme court appointments, but he's testing a power. That the public themselves in the end are the ones that are the big biggest check on the congress and on the courts and on the presidency and right now the approval rating of Donald Trump is is the lowest any president has been. And I think it's in part not because he hasn't accomplished many of the things that a lot of people feel are good. But because there has been a toxic culture created people feel anxious people feel the moorings are being undone that traditions norms are being violated and after a while the people will speak. I mean, they spoke pretty strongly in the midterm elections. I'm even though he kept the Senate which most people assumed he would given the structural balance. The Senate had he lost pretty big in the house. And and he hasn't accepted the loss really in some ways. Which is a problem. If he did he might say, how can I change now? So that I can reach out to the other side. And maybe he will maybe we'll get infrastructure. Maybe we'll get something for the dreamers. Maybe we'll get this criminal Justice reform. And I'm hoping that I'm hoping that that will will make the two sides come together in a better way. I wonder if if you don't reading the midterms wrong, I'm just going to make you flat-out challenge on that won't turn out was high. You could argue his reinvigorates is the electricity. We had happen to democratic stress just into lake on his show not long ago saying yes, Democrats took back the house. But if you look across the races, it doesn't look like the Trump machine is coming to a standstill in any way. Indeed. The take way might be Donald Trump is now definitely gonna go on all things behavioral and run again in twenty twenty rather than this being a great mid Tom's or you show, you're not trading too, much to woods wishful thinking possibly possibly. I might be. I mean, it's hard to predict anything when you know. I like everybody else never assumed that Hillary Clinton wasn't going to win. So it makes you much more vulnerable to making predictions. I think that the most important thing that happened in the midterms, and this has nothing to do with party necessarily is that the fact so many people came out. I mean young people voting five hundred percent more than in the previous midterms more. Women running for election from all sorts of parts of the lives that had never been in politics before. That's that's a really hopeful sign is that thanks to Donald Trump at possibly could be. I mean, I think the interest in politics has been increased because of Donald Trump, and that's a very good thing. Whether or not it produces him again or whether it produces somebody against him when the citizens get awakened. That's when things happen in the country. I mean when I look back at the times when change happened. It was the anti slavery movement that did it all Lincoln said not his leadership alone. It was the progressive movement in the cities and states long before FDR an and teddy Roosevelt became president that allowed that some of the regulations that could deal with the industrial revolution. And of course, it was the civil rights movement that allowed LBJ to do the civil rights Bill in the voting rights Bill. So we need a political revolution in our country. Something's not working well with the system. The congressional lines are being drawn gerrymandering this too much money in politics. There's a sense that as. Teddy Roosevelt said the rock of democracy will break when people in different regions and different parties and different races begin to feel themselves as the other. So somehow that's been happening long before trunk the polarization in the country people in the rural areas feeling cut off from the city's people who are working class people feeling that the elites haven't handled them. Well, they don't have the right educational system. They haven't had mobility those are deep cultural problems that he hasn't created that were there. And so the question the question will be will leader rise that can heal those divisions. And so far, he hasn't healed them. The question will be where does the country go and twenty twenty if such a leader arises, we don't know who that later will be I must ask you about impeachment who spectra of postal impeachment hanging over the presidency. Not least because you have a sort of strong personal echo. Here. Think is a young stone for you route two piece in the new Republic and Johnson entitled how to dump Lyndon Johnson. I understand it. Career impeaching president the autumn of put you off impeaching another will. Well, no what I meant by. That was that. I was hoping this was written in nineteen sixty seven when I became a White House fellow and I'd written an article for the new Republic with a friend of mine, and we were simply saying how to remove Lyndon Johnson. From office was to create a party that would run against him in nineteen sixty eight rather wishful thinking, it would be made up of women minorities poor people and. Opposable strategy fool the Democrats on the left. Do you recognize that I do indeed? But I think that in some ways I think it would be a big mistake for impeachment to start. I mean, the Democrats have to know that whatever Muller comes up with the Senate will not go along with the impeachment. And I think it's much better to just educate the people, let them feel and change their mind about him suppose Muller comes up with obstruction of Justice or even collusion. Then you just let the people absorb that information. It would be a big mistake for them to move in an impeachment direction. It'll just fire the base of Trump, and then he will be able to say this is a witch hunt. So that I think they should just keep their heads down. They should do their investigations, but they should try and get as much done as they can even if it contributes to the benefit of the Republicans to get some of these things pass it'll be good for the country. So that's changing your thinking of fifty years. I think you become a little bit more practical. But no, even then I was wanting them to re unelected him not necessarily impeach him. Fair point just a closing from you what kind of presidency regardless of who runs. Oh gets elected. But what cut presence, you do you think will result from Donald Trump having been in the White House while the question will be does the next president have to have that kind of celebrity entertainment value. So that he becomes a figure who's part of your lives. I mean in some ways if I thought about who could come back now that could most challenge President Trump. It would be teddy Roosevelt because he was a person who people would follow him when he was on stage as he was in center stage. I mean, they said about him. He wanted to be the baby at the baptism and the bride at the wedding and the corpse at the funeral. He hungered for that stage as Trump does. And there's something charismatic about that people are drawn to that. It's like a kid drawn to a circus. And the question will be doing need that person today in our social media entertainment world, or could it be Oprah presidency? That's. Wrecked. How you feel about it? Well, I think not only Oprah. But now, there's also it's a sports stars and movie stars think, oh, I can become president. If this person became president without political experience. I think it's a problem to get into public life without political experience, or at least leadership experience. I mean, I can see a big businessman whose really led hundreds of thousands of people in a company overseas coming in and having had the experience of building a team and all those human qualities, but to just pop in from some other field where you haven't been a leader. But you've simply been a celebrity. I think would be a problem if that's the lesson taken from this doors. Thank you very much. Joining us. Thank

President Trump Donald Trump Teddy Roosevelt Senate Lyndon Johnson Congress Hillary Clinton FDR Muller White House White House Fellow Lincoln Twenty Twenty Woods TOM