34 Burst results for "Whaley"

"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

"For a raise it pays really think like an attorney right The argument from university of Baltimore law professor Kim Whaley In her brand new book how to think like a lawyer and why This morning Whaley says there's a time to make a quick judgment And a time to kick back and think about it for a while When there's an emergency for example our limbic system kicks in our amygdala the part of our brain that does fight or flight and that's helpful in a lot of situations but when it comes to complex ones where there's various factors involved there are different people involved and it's not a black and white scenario that's where legal skills come in because as I teach my students what lawyers need to do is look for questions and not answers It's very rare that a legal question is black and white So the book attempts to bring those skills to regular people and their everyday lives And I see that the first step is break down the problem Precisely break down the problem So somebody asked me recently what do you do about sending your child into school when there's a question as to vaccines or masks That's just a big issue something that people have strong visceral reactions to But that's a great example where you could break it into different pieces One might be your health concerns Mine might be educational elements Are they better at on Zoom or in school for that child One might be their social acclamation if they need to be in school or it's better for them at home And the last one might be sort of your political or ideological beliefs around the issue If you break it down into those pieces you can sort through it in a more thoughtful way that's tailored to you and your family and not sort of reactive because when we get reactive sometimes we gloss over really important things and this is what lawyers have to understand because if you gloss over important things if you miss the potholes in your thinking you're going to lose your case So lawyers are incentivized to be very methodical And I just realized maybe everybody could benefit from that Not just law students and lawyers Does thinking like a lawyer Kim mean you're almost totally risk averse that you wouldn't dare get married without a prenup you wouldn't go skydiving you maybe wouldn't go hiking in a dangerous mountainous area No that's a great question I think honestly the title is a bit misleading in that there's a lot of stereotypes associated with lawyering that lawyers are aggressive and you kind of go for the jugular no matter what or the alternative for non litigators is that you're just so careful No I mean this gets back to values Part of your value system is risk-taking as spontaneity is being joyful through the adventure That's a really important thing to know And imagine you're in you're in a relationship say a married you're a married couple and you have different values on that when it comes to raising kids for example Putting those on the table early on one might be more risk averse might be less risk averse You kind of know what you're dealing with and then hopefully the other goal the book is to get people a little bit out of this black and white polarized entrenched thinking that we're in at least in a national political level and also in some of our day to today lives we do it automatically And just understand okay this is what we're dealing with Let's put it on the table and we can be less reactive about it and more methodical and thoughtful But absolutely not I mean there are plenty of lawyers that understand how to take risks but they're very careful calculated risks where you know where the downsides are where the potholes are And so you can tread with a lot more confidence University of Baltimore law professor Kim Whaley on Skype with our Dimitri soldiers her brand new Reed is.

Kim Whaley university of Baltimore Whaley Kim Skype Dimitri Reed
"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:22 min | 10 months ago

"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

"Like buy a house or ask for a raise and pay really think like an attorney right The argument from university of Baltimore law professor Kim Whaley In her brand new book how to think like a lawyer and why This morning Whaley says there's a time to make a quick judgment At a time to kick back and think about it for a while When there's an emergency for example our limbic system kicks in our amygdala the part of our brain that does fight or flight and that's helpful in a lot of situations but when it comes to complex ones where there's various factors involved there are different people involved and it's not a black and white scenario That's where legal skills come in because as I teach my students what lawyers need to do is look for questions and not answers It's very rare that a legal question is black and white So the book attempts to bring those skills to regular people and their everyday lives And I see that the first step is break down the problem Precisely break down the problem So somebody asked me recently what do you do about sending your child into school when there's a question as to vaccines or masks That's just a big issue something that people have strong visceral reactions to But that's a great example where you could break it into different pieces One might be your health concerns Mine might be educational elements Are they better on Zoom or in school for that child One might be their social acclamation if they need to be in school or it's better for them at home And the last one might be sort of your political or ideological beliefs around the issue If you break it down into those pieces you can sort through it in a more thoughtful way that's tailored to you and your family and not sort of reactive because when we get reactive sometimes we gloss over really important things And this is what lawyers have to understand because if you gloss over important things if you miss the potholes in your thinking you're going to lose your case So lawyers are incentivized to be very methodical And I just realized maybe everybody could benefit from that Not just law students and lawyers Does thinking like a lawyer Kim mean you're almost totally risk averse that you wouldn't dare get married without a prenup you wouldn't go skydiving you maybe wouldn't go hiking in a dangerous mountainous area No that's a great question I think honestly the title is a bit misleading in that there's a lot of stereotypes associated with lawyering that lawyers are aggressive and you kind of go for the jugular no matter what or the alternative for non litigators is that you're just so careful No I mean this gets back to values Part of your value system is risk-taking is spontaneity is being joyful through the adventure That's a really important thing to know And imagine you're in you're in a relationship say a married couple and you have different values on that when it comes to raising kids for example Putting those on the table early on one might be more risk averse might be less risk averse You kind of know what you're dealing with and then hopefully the other goal of the book is to get people a little bit out of this black and white polarized corner of entrenched thinking that we're in at least in a national political level and also in some of our day to today lives we do it automatically And just understand okay this is what we're dealing with Let's put it on the table and we can be less reactive about it and more methodical and thoughtful But absolutely not I mean there are plenty of lawyers that understand how to take risks but they're very careful calculated risks where you know where the downsides are where the potholes are And so you can tread with a lot more confidence University of Baltimore law professor Kim Whaley on Skype with our Dmitri sodas her brand new Reed is.

Kim Whaley university of Baltimore Whaley Kim Skype Dmitri Reed
"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

"Did you know female doctors actually make less than their male counterparts and it starts apparently right when they begin practicing medicine That's not a appearing in health affairs shows over the course of a 40 year career of the pay gap adds up to at least 2 million bucks The survey of more than 80,000 doctors the largest analysis on doctor salaries in the first two estimate the cumulative impact of pay gaps in medicine This boring WTF used demetri soda speaks with lead author Christopher Whaley a health economist at the nonpartisan Rand corporation The pay gap really starts on day one of practicing and from day one women earn less than male physicians And then really increases for the next ten or so years and then stabilizes after that But one thing we did find it did notice that the pay gap never rebound And so the permanent difference in pay across the course of a career for a female physician We know the pandemic has knocked a lot of women out of the workforce currently Women in all kinds of fields of course because of burnout among doctors during the fraught time of COVID could these pay issues only get worse I think that's absolutely true We know that just in general women have born a disproportionate role in taking care of kids and dealing with a lot of the extra burns of the COVID pandemic And so it's likely that a lot of the paid disparities that we found in our study will actually increase during the pandemic More men tend to become surgeons than women do and surgeons generally make quite a bit of money Is that the reason for the disparity I presume it's much more complex than that No that's a really good point And so in our study we actually looked at differences in compensation between male and female physicians within the exact same specialty So for example we carried a primary care doctor to a specialist and did not look at differences across specialties And for that reason I think our study results actually may be underestimated So if there are systematic disparities or reasons why female physicians aren't becoming high paying specialties like orthopedic surgeons cardiologists or neurologists then our findings would actually understate the true gender pay gap What about bias and discrimination in the system I think absolutely And that's probably a contributor to the differences in compensation And both differences in practice style and work life balance What can be done to close this pay gap and does what works for doctors maybe also work for people in other professions I think the lessons that we found here looking at a doctor certainly do apply to other professions There really are three main things that can be done So one is just to improve pay transparency and to essentially allow for benchmarks until if you're a physician and maybe think you're being underpaid If there's a benchmark out there and you can essentially say look I'm not getting a fair salary relative to my male counterparts then that's something that can lead to narrowing of the pay gap Another way would just be to have better paid family leave policies We did know that many of the pay gap issues arise women are starting families and enabling a better return to work in the easier return to work Could be something that narrows pay gaps And then finally unique to medicine many physicians are essentially paid for what they do And so if you're a male physician in many cases you spend less time with your patients and provide all of us high quality care with your patients and female physicians And so instead of paying physicians based on the volume of things that could do Instead paying them on the quality of care and about the high level care that you provide might be one way to narrow the pay gap Chris Whaley with the Rand.

demetri soda Christopher Whaley Chris Whaley
"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

"App Did you know female doctors actually make less than their male counterparts and it starts apparently right when they begin practicing medicine A study appearing in health affairs shows over the course of a 40 year career of the pay gap adds up to at least 2 million bucks The survey of more than 80,000 doctors the largest analysis on doctor salaries in the first two estimate the cumulative impact of pay gaps in medicine This body WTF used to be tree soda speaks with lead author Christopher Whaley a health economist at the nonpartisan Rand corporation The pay gap really starts on day one of practicing and from day one women earn less than male physicians And then really increases for the next ten or so years and then stabilizes after that But one thing we did find it did notice that the pay gap never rebound And so the permanent difference and pay across the course for career for a female physician We know the pandemic has knocked a lot of women out of the workforce currently Women in all kinds of fields of course because of burnout among doctors during the fraught time of COVID could these pay issues only get worse I think that's absolutely true We know that just in general women have born a disproportionate role in taking care of kids and dealing with a lot of the extra burns of the COVID pandemic And so it's likely that a lot of the paid disparities that we found in our study will actually increase during the pandemic More men tend to become surgeons than women do and surgeons generally make quite a bit of money Is that the reason for the disparity I presume it's much more complex than that No that's a really good point And so in our study we actually looked at differences in compensation between male and female physicians within the exact same specialties So for example we create a primary care doctor to a specialist and did not look at differences across specialties And for that reason I think our study results actually may be underestimated So if there are systematic disparities or reasons why female physicians aren't becoming high paying specialties like orthopedic surgeons cardiologists or neurologists then our findings would actually understate the true gender pay gap What about bias and discrimination in the system I think absolutely And that's probably a contributor to the differences in compensation In both differences in practice style and work life balance What can be done to close this pay gap and does what works for doctors maybe also work for people in other professions I think the lessons that we found here looking at a doctor certainly do apply to other professions There really are three main things that can be done So one is just to improve pay transparency and to essentially allow for benchmarks until if you're a physician and maybe think you're being underpaid If there's a benchmark out there and you can essentially say look I'm not getting a fair salary relative to my male counterparts Then that's something that can lead to narrowing of the pay gap Another way would just be to have better paid family leave policies We did note that many of the pay gap issues arise from women are starting families and enabling a better return to work in the easier return to work Could be something that narrows pay gaps And then finally unique to medicine many physicians are essentially paid for what they do And so if you're a male physician in many cases you spend less time with your patients and provide a little bit less high quality care with your patients than female physicians And so.

Christopher Whaley
"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on WTOP

"Did you know female doctors actually make less than their male counterparts and it starts apparently right when they begin practicing medicine A new study appearing in health affairs shows over the course of a 40 year career of the pay gap adds up to at least 2 million bucks The survey of more than 80,000 doctors the largest analysis on doctor salaries in the first two estimate the cumulative impact of pay gaps in medicine There's already WTF used to Beatrice soda speaks with lead author Christopher Whaley a health economist at the nonpartisan Rand corporation The pay gap really starts on day one of practicing and from day one women earn less than male physicians And then really increases for the next ten or so years and then stabilizes after that But one thing we did find it did notice that the pay gap never rebound And so the permanent difference and pay across the course for career for a female physician We know the pandemic has knocked a lot of women out of the workforce currently Women in all kinds of fields of course because of burnout among doctors during the fraught time of COVID could these pay issues only get worse I think that's absolutely true We know that just in general women have born a disproportionate role in taking care of kids and dealing with a lot of the extra burns of the COVID pandemic And so it's likely that a lot of the pay disparities that we found in our study will actually increase during the pandemic More men tend to become surgeons than women do and surgeons generally make quite a bit of money Is that the reason for the disparity I presume it's much more complex than that Yeah that's a really good point And so in our study we actually looked at differences in compensation between male and female physicians within the exact same specialty So for example we cared a primary care doctor to a specialist and did not look at differences across specialties And for that reason I think our study results actually may be underestimated So if there are systematic disparities or reasons why female physicians aren't becoming high paying specialties like orthopedic surgeons cardiologists or neurologists then our findings would actually understate the true gender pay gap What about bias and discrimination in the system I think absolutely And that's probably a contributor to the differences in compensation And both differences in practice style and work life balance What can be done to close this pay gap and does what works for doctors maybe also work for people in other professions I think the lessons we found here looking at a doctor certainly do apply to other professions There really are three main things that can be done So one is just to improve pay transparency and to essentially allow for benchmarks until if you're a physician and maybe think you're being underpaid If there's a benchmark out there and you can essentially say look I'm not getting a fair salary relative to my male counterparts Then that's something that can lead to narrowing of the pay gap Another way would just be have better paid family leave policies We did note that many of the pay gap issues arise women are starting families and enabling a better return to work in easier return to work Could be something that narrows pay gaps And then finally you need to medicine many physicians are essentially paid for what they do And so if you're a male physician in many cases you spend less time with your patients and provide a little less high quality care with your patients than female physicians And so instead of paying physicians based on the volume of things that they do instead paying them on the quality of care and combat the high level kids that you provide might be one way to narrow the pay gap Chris Whaley with Iran corporation on Skype with our Dmitry sodas read more about the pay gap between male and female doctors a click away at.

Beatrice soda Christopher Whaley Rand corporation Chris Whaley Iran Skype
"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"But now know i would say that one of the highlights of for me. I wrestled a guy named rowdy. Roddy piper a like thirty years before his our thirteen i. I don't know what date that would make it but You know a long time. Since i've worked against him and then his career took off. You know he was just Internationally known he piper's pit on the wwf and And then if you imdb him you see all of these of things that he he did. Movies were john tv programs. I mean here's a cult. Following in that movie they live and so they were telling me all of the people that were going to be in the movie mash saying. Of course i was. I was just thrilled with the diane carol dying. Carol had the very first Program for an african american woman And a had some great canadian actors there who are really really well known. But then i shaw. Who's gonna play the promoter that it was. You know rowdy. Roddy piper. I just i was just so surreal. Because he was always One of my heroes. Roddy piper loved his family. If you ever youtube him and see any of his matches you'll notice that he has his wedding ring on a never took his wedding ring off because he loved his wife and he loved his family. And so you know Having the opportunity to see your book made into a movie and it was an award-winning movie. It it won a best picture to south fifteen international christian film festival and so That's something that's gonna live on after me. I mean when. I'm grow when i have graduated to heaven Let the movie still gonna be around. Still going to be shown and So that's just an amazing thing that you know you're from out somebody's gonna look who's the guy at the end there. Oh that was the original mash site. Yeah that's kind of neat. Yeah absolutely yeah. That's that's a lot to be proud of. And and it's i think again a good lesson for us all is that you know you're never too old near never too young to go for your dreams. Just just if you've got an idea for something figure out a way to do it and you can make it happen. Absolutely never give up. Yeah well i appreciate you being here today. And i'll if someone listening to this and are watching it to learn more about you and the wonderful things you've done in your life that's the best place for people to get in touch with you the best way. Of course i'm on facebook Sometimes i have five thousand fringing a friend me but you know yet people. That don't like something you say. They unfriendly so obviously You know you want a friend me on facebook. You can do that but if you go to my website The mash saint dot com. And if you if you want one of the books which i.

Roddy piper diane carol piper Carol shaw john youtube facebook
"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"That's right up there with it and and and have a wonderful woman who Has stayed with me For forty six years of marriage started. Dating when i was sixteen. And so you know we've been together. Since we were sixteen years old and we went to college together we graduated together and she has put up with ten years of wrestling and thirty years of being a pastor and so she's gonna have stars in her crown absolutely Because you've had such a very life an and and a blessed life and being able to fulfil your dreams and and and also be such a leader in in your community and being able to people what What advice would you for someone out there listening to this. That is maybe maybe. They're struggling with. Maybe they've got an idea that they want to do something but maybe they're not sure of that they should go forward or You know what what would you say to someone like that i. I would say that. I have been in the same positions that that you're in right now. You know. One of my favorite passages in the bible is founding jeremiah. eighteen Wonder six where god told jeremiah to go to the potter's house and he would teach him a great lesson and he saw the power working with clay on the wheel the wheel was going around and around and he was making that vessel and when he got through with it it was just filled with raw and the word shows that it was marg in the hand of the potter. And so what he did. Was he squished. That clay back together and he put the same piece of clay back on the wheel and he made the same piece of clay with all of its falls into a new vessel. And then god said cannot do the same with you as the potter gun with the clay or if the play is in the hands of the potter sewer you in my hand and so that. That was my story. When i had finished with things. I really had messed up and made a lot of mistakes but god squish me back together put me back on the wheel and made me into a new vessel so if you attempt of entrepreneurial things and they failed you know you continue working. Don't give up you. Just keep getting back on the wheel even with the flaws and continue to allow god to make you into a new vessel. I love that story about You know the guy. That invented the lightbulb. Thomas edison as the. It said he a thousand times. She's pale thousand time. Doctors found a thousand ways not to make light bulb rate. It is it is called never ever ever ever give up now absolutely good words of advice. Is there anything else that we haven't talked about that you really that i should've asked you that you'd like to leave our listeners with today a great job i love listening your podcast. Because you're such a great interviewer..

jeremiah wrestling potter Thomas edison
"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"Whenever he was about to fight he he would picture in his mind what he was going to do That's why i love that movie because that's exactly what you have to do. And i'm saying what am i going to do and i'll say will disguise going to be talking and extremely high boys. The sky's going to have a busted nose a come walk with a limp and and then all of a sudden boom. It just happens and then all of a sudden i you know. I'm in a room Handcuffed and i'm thinking about being on the six o'clock news Might even make national news How am i going to explain to my church. And then more than that. How am i gonna wind to my wife and And then you know. The state trooper comes in and says stand up. And i stood up and he takes to cuts off and search your free to go. And i'm like what and he said he should. I said those guys are nowhere to be found. And he said nobody's going to press charges so you're free to go and so i came that close to really losing it and it was just a stupid stupid thing to do. But you know i. I made a lotta mistakes in my life and that was one novel. Yeah well you know. It's just proof that you're only human and you did the best you can and thankfully had a good outcome. Yeah so that's that's a relief. And i just want to let folks know that there have been occasional pauses. Unfortunately my internet is not behaving itself as well as i would like it to. But i think we've gotten pretty much all of your. Your answers have been okay but so please be were air with us. If that happens again.

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"I was in and out of the hospital mostly with pneumonia In the grade. I had polio and viral encephalitis. All at the same time. I was in the hospital and winter haven hospital for three months and i just could not get well and i had a wonderful god late dr matter of fact i mentioned him in my book author raymond l. route. That was his name and where haven his kids are. I think most doctors. Now i papa. His sunset said but he refused to let me give up He just encouraged me and challenge me and He finally found out why it continue to get sick. It was my immune system was not building up and It was through to my allergies. I found out that. I had hundred allergies and so they started me on medication for the allergies and i took that up until i was a junior college and But he's the guy that got me going to the gym. And so i started going to the gym and working out and my body started to grow and While i was growing up i i was just a big wrestling fanatic of you know when you're in a hospital that much get your days and nights mixed up and The only thing on late at night was a professional wrestling. And so i. I got hooked into watching all of those great wrestlers from that generation. Eddie graham right best aid of the great milenko johnny valentine and all of those guys and so I was in great shape. My wife and i graduated from a palm beach atlantic. We were back in central florida. My wife was a high school math teacher. And so she's working at her alma mater and i was waiting to be called To church youth pastor. Because you know when you're twenty. Three years old is not a lot of churches to pastor. So i was trying to get some experience or the master and i was reading the tampa tribune one day in his sit There was an ad. Big ad said wanted professional wrestlers. Like so excited. I jumped up. I took it over my wife. And i said look at this jewish grading of grading papers and jews. She looked up and looked at. It rolled her eyes and kept grading papers. And so i got back together. And i drove over at tampa and i walked in and the stem and there was a great malingco who i had watched growing up. And so i was trained by one of the The great milenko. He trained a bunch of guys that are were w. w e stars and He he was just the best and so i. I was hooked from the moment that i walked in and So i got the opportunity to russell from nineteen seventy eight to nineteen eighty-eight. That was my dream but my calling was to the ministry. And i knew that that green was going to be short lived and so when i was Thirty four i graduated from south western seminary and I retired from professional wrestling. And i went to my first church It was a big change from store. You asked about your. It was a big change. I didn't get stressed out when i was wrestling. Because you get to work with stress out get.

viral encephalitis hospital and winter haven hosp raymond l Eddie graham milenko johnny valentine wrestling palm beach atlantic polio pneumonia tampa tribune florida tampa russell
"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"And that was the thing. I noticed too and i was looking at your website and it was like. Wow you've got you know someone really famous somewhat i. I grew up watching. I think she was she. I think she played julia. She was like yeah. Back in the sixties. I remember seeing that. She was a nurse on television. Very impressed so how. How did you have as you get in touch. I mean how did producers you know. Find your book and how. How did that whole movie come about it actually. Too big dream of a lot of authors actually started here in orlando a movie producer. That lives here in orlando so kids actually went to school at a school where my sister or and when my book came out She gave a copy to his wife. Who should french with and the wife took it home. This is the guy. That was the executive of the executive producer for the first three blockbuster. Teenage mutant ninja turtles. How he did those He did The movie a stroke of genius The bobby jones story that had store jim caviezel and then he did a baseball movie. Call letters to gog. And he started going in the faith based and so he had me come to his office in downtown orlando actually kept me on the hook for about a year and changed his mind but during that time i met other people in the movie business and i had a producer from toronto canada that flew down and met me at disneyworld and he was very interested in making the book into a movie. Talk to me for a while. I didn't hear from him and then february two thousand thirteen on on driving to the gym to work out and he called me and he said are you sitting down. I should matter of fact i am. I'm driving he said okay is that we're gonna make your book movie and i was just flabbergasted i couldn't couldn't believe it and they started immediately on a screw of scripts finished in october. Two thousand thirteen and they started filming the movie on november the four kazakhstan thirteen and it was just amazing. How how quickly. Things started the move after that. Well that is quite the story for sure. And it's it's estimate to I think when something is meant to be that. I'd sort of connects you with the right people to make things happen and so there was reason that that story needs to get out there. Sir god god showed up and showed off separately absolutely now. Let's talk a little bit about your life. i mean how. How did you manage to What was it that prompted you to change from being a rustler to then deciding to. I guess obviously you must have gotten a call from from god as they say but how. How did that happen and was there. You know some challenges that came along the way with that yet because that's of radical radical. Change that you're making in your life right rustling was a dream When i was growing up i was i was child..

orlando jim caviezel bobby jones julia baseball toronto canada kazakhstan Sir
"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"Well this the bressler turned pastor character Actually sort of acts like a superhero in a way because he is kind of like batman and way because he's out there writing the wrongs the injustices of people that he sees. And that's sort of where this mast saint comes from soaking tell. Tell us a little about that. Absolutely did the first thing that happened When i went to my first tour a precious young lady who would drop her children off at children's she was usually the last person to walk into the sanctuary of the morning service and then she was usually the first one to lead. You would leave very quickly and go get her children lee So i i did not have the opportunity to get to know her and then one particular sunday. She showed up with sunglasses on. And when the service was over always started the front shook hands with people as they were leaving and on this particular day she was last personally and which came up to me. She reached out and she took my hand with both of her hands. Jack had down. I could she. Tears rolling down underneath glasses. Separately reached over and picked her glasses up and she had two black eyes. And when i saw it just it just enrage me I any man that would hit. A woman is a complete gert bag and any man that would hit the mother of his children I have no Separately for anybody. Likes that. And so i i told rush. I'm going to go see your husband. And she got upset. Should know you'll hurt you. And i shall not worried about it. And so i went to his house and i invited him out and i should came by just to see how you would do against someone who is able to fight back and he got belligerent. With me which was really good. Because i had the opportunity to to dancing around his front yard and he never hid his wife again and that was a that was a great thing. So that was actually the beginning of the mash sane. And i just seem to have story after story after story of those incidents matter of fact i'm going to amass saint to and i've still got some more stories so i'll i'll add those on there but of course that was a lot younger well but it's it was. It was a really great read and i loved. It was wanna just wanna kinda keep going so you did a very good job with it. One one other thing. I want to ask you about there was one of the characters in there. Is miss edna who offers you a lot of really great advice so did is that based off of someone like that that you had in your life as well absolutely. She was from my childhood and she was just the most precious precious lady to full of wisdom. Usually when i was a little boy. And i got home school every day. And i change my clothes. I would beat a path over to their house. I walked down there long driveway and go up to Those days we didn't have air conditioning and she had to cheer sitting in the Carport and usually we got a nice breeze and we would sit out there on a carport and talk and shoot just a a wonderful wonderful godly lady and just about every chapter at my book has lesson sh That i learned from her and in the movie they changed a lot because they bring her up to real time in the movie and but diane carroll place miss edna in the movie and she did a. She did a wonderful job very did. That's that's wonderful..

bressler lee Jack rush edna diane carroll
"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

"Of our podcast so i am streaming live on facebook but for those of you who are listening and watching on youtube later on. I'm happy to be here and just understand that You know we're doing doing some new things here on the podcast and and shaking things up mostly. Because i want to be able to bring you some amazing guests and and i've got such a wonderful backlog of people i wanted to give people a chance to be able to get onto show more in a more timely fashion. So that's what were doing today. So i am going to be bringing up to the show here in a second hour. Lustrous guests today. And you're going to want to definitely stick around for this Edition of live langauge. Because i've got an amazing gentleman here who has lived several lives already. So i'm gonna welcome to live. Love engage right now. Dr chris waylay said. Welcome dr chris all miss. Gloria is such a pleasure to be on your show and you know. I feel honored because the other one. I think you're booking into the spring of twenty twenty two so to get on this early i just feel really blessed. Thank you so much for having me. Well i am delighted to have you as well and let me tell you just a little bit about this gentleman because like i said he has done some amazing things in his career and yeah i'm just let's just get right to it so first of all This this kindly looking man Used to be a professional wrestler back in the late seventies and eighties and then he decided to change careers. And what you think. He decided to be well. He decided to become a minister so he went to attended the southwestern baptist theological seminary in texas graduated from there and he's been a pow At some various churches since that time. And if that's not enough. He's you know in his spare time which i'm sure he has you just a little bit of He's also the author of two books..

Dr chris waylay dr chris youtube facebook Gloria southwestern baptist theologic texas
"whaley" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Fluids and tube socks on the streets of manhattan in there. I am in this room. And there's burt lancaster and they put me across from burt lancaster at the table and in costumes they're in and everybody's really nice phil robinson and the the part leading up to my first line. Which is when. I introduced myself to them in the end when on the side of the road and i was really nervous because i knew my my time to speak was coming up and i said i said i delight to something like. I'm archie graham and burt lancaster. I said the line burt. Lancaster stopped reading so hold on. Hold on hold on boy and let's the wrong. That's the wrong pronunciation and i was mortified. That and he. He explained that it was gray on just sort of three syllables. Instead of graham. Which is run away i was at the my upstate with your slang. And he he correct he he worked with me like three times on saying just wasn't getting it because i was so nervous volleys i'd just keep on night sat there the rest of the you know the reading mortified in idiot. You didn't think you were lose. The job did of course You always feel like you're gonna lose the job no matter what and But you know. I the that whole. I think that was the beginning of everybody. Sort of being annoyed with me. I still to this day. I believe kevin costner Really annoyed he was annoyed with me from the very beginning. Why because i was a wise ass and and you know he not what not was the. Yes yes I began very early. And and i think there was a there was a couple of incidents on the set where i crashed a A golf cart into the side of a camera truck. There was all these golf carts around. And i had a lot of time and i was always speeding around to on Slammed into the side of this camera truck and and i remember that was one of the earliest moments. Where costner's like he like. Zipping was his camera truck. He was was really important for me. I was like what you don't have insurance. Should they have insurance. Which was the wrong approach. But i mean that was sort of my you know i was kid running around. Yeah he's frank. Whaley the actor film director screenwriter. And he of course was in a build. A dream sivas archie moonlight graham. The the younger version of archie. Moonlight am graham. Amfar apparently pulp fiction the doors. Jfk you've worked with brando. Costner samuel travolta. Val kilmer tom cruise. Who is the most intimidating actor out of that group. Probably samuel l. Just because of that. The context of that scene was pretty scary. He do he was so good. I mean is. He's a sweet wonderful man but the in that in that in that scene filming that scene he was pretty scary. So let me let let me play portion of the of that scene to let people revisit that that anger. That was their out the big brain on brad. You're smart how many takes in that That see many many many many case. tarantino Perfectionist and there was. There was a long couple of days. And i remember the gun gun shots. Which are these like electrical. It comes squids these electrical charges. They put all of you. We did that a number of times. I ended up with all these bruises on my on my chest and there was some question about how close they held a gun to my. You know the Guns to my fate. The samuels gun to my face. Because there's you know there's a certain standard to which the stuntman will allow tarantino's now it's time to closer closer so it was all pretty pretty wild and scary but fun but it since the scene is basically you and samuel. Do you do talk about the scene. Just you two. Between takes. It was fine. It was just a. It's when somebody's that good in that in that charge and impassioned in their in their work in their acting. It's it's like you know you kinda you kinda really feel it and so you now but but other than that he and travolta we you know we. We laughed and frank coughing and talked. Did you understand how big that scene was going to be a in a moment. Now and people ask you know The same field of dreams. I mean it. It is hard to know that. I mean you kind of feel the sense that there's something you know kind of big going on and you know there there's a there's a sense of that in the air but it's hard to predict you know i i was i was away in both. In both instances. I was away working on something else when those films were released and and i got kind of peripherally notified of you know like this is great to have you seen it. Have you know. And i i was i was when pulp fiction was released. That was actually in europe on. I came back. I was living in new york city at the time suddenly was recognized on the subway. People are like looking at me talking about me which which was frightening for me. Did they call you brad. They they were. They were they were. They were saying they were quoting the film. And and just kind of people in new york the kinda discount look at you and which is a little bit you know for me at the time was was frightening and and on because it hadn't happened up to that point and so but there was quite a bit of that after that dumps release. I mean is quite a resume that you have here with pulp. Fiction field of dreams. Jfk you were in the door. You're robby krieger in the in the doors. Right the freshman is with brando born on the fourth of july with tom cruise. These these are these. Are all high movies there. You still get you get residual checks from all of these there at this point like six cents three Three dollars eighty four cents. Or you know. I i will often like you know get Checks from like films like little monsters. That i did like minus three cents like i owe them. You have to send him. My wife was like okay. We all we all seventeen dollars. Did you keep anything from the set of any of these movies. Yeah field of dreams. I have. I have a whole bunch of cool. Stop like It was with. The film is obviously called shoeless. Joe actually have a shoeless. Joe cast and crew t-shirt.

burt lancaster phil robinson archie graham archie moonlight graham Amfar Costner samuel travolta Val kilmer tom cruise graham tarantino kevin costner golf Lancaster brando manhattan costner samuel l Whaley Jfk frank archie
"whaley" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Positively in the support and you're bringing up. It's kind of like you. Same bolt trains for four years to run ten seconds. Todd spins hours on twelve seconds. Ten thing it's okay bowl twins gold medal really we're to do. Todd's like that that Hurdler that we had from haiti in sixteen where you think. I can even jump that high to get march that obstacle couldn't get into the mid portion of that thing that's this video that seat and brought out or and brought out. His twenty mclovin did the olympics in rio twenty sixteen. And they're doing the one hundred and ten meter high hurdles or something and there's this guy who's in the ninth lane. He's out of haiti and he's like pointing to his wrist like it's my time and he's putting up number one and he looks like he he walked onto the track and he was an impostor and he didn't even make it over he made it through up to half of the first hurdle he didn't make it like the just clipped it. He he went right into it. A flipped over for a second. I thought he didn't see her for something. Had a vision issue that lay sick or something. He couldn't see the hurdle. It's it's just where you're going it it it's it's awesome. It's so great. I mean thank god. He wasn't hurt but it just so much fun it. We laughed. we. I just keep playing play it again. Play it again. Great stuff all right. We'll take a break when we come back. We'll talk to an actor. Frank whaley who was in field of dreams also pulp fiction. He's in the famous scene with samuel jackson. He's brad and Samuel jackson is not happy with brad and some of his roommates in this apartment and of course he was in field of dreams. And we'll talk to him about the both of those roles when we return coming up on eighteen after the hour. This is the dan patrick show. Discover the discover card and you will discover a lot of different things. How amazing is this. Discover will match all the cash back on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically no limit on how much you can earn amazing even more amazing because of all the places where discover is accepted ninety nine percent of the in the united states that take credit cards take discover which means when it comes to discover get used to hearing the word yes more often learn more. Discover dot com slash. Yes twenty twenty one. Neilson report limitations. Apply thanks for listening to the dan. Patrick show podcast be sure to catch us live every weekday morning nine until noon eastern six to nine pacific on fox sports radio and you can find us on the iheartradio app at fsr or stream. It live on the peacock out. The workout app on apple watch is tracking lie running workouts sensors checking. How false my heart is beating algorithms accounting. How many calories. I'm burning and the gps being a satellite in space to see how far gone to his one aboard. The future of health on your wrist iphone six s on require. Is everyone owl. Roker here as a guy with his own catchphrase. I appreciate that. Smokey's only said only you can prevent wildfires but on villain in because there's a lot more to report like when there are parched or windy conditions out there. You've got to be extra careful with things. Like burning yard. Waste after all wildfires can start anywhere even in your neck of the woods. Doda smokeybear dot com to learn more about wildfire prevention. Brought to you by the us forest service. Your state forester and the ad council. I want to get back to being a community group. I want to continue having soccer season. So i can throw parties again so i can go to her. Party's it really be nice to dine in instead of getting delivery for a change so i can feel safe and protected for myself and my students we have our own reason for why we're getting vaccinated against cova. Nineteen what we are spe- visit get vaccine answers dot org for information on the cove nineteen vaccines. It's up to you brought to you by the ad council. We are up on the show. The nascar cup series heads to the brickyard to take on a road course for the very first time witnessed the start of a new tradition sunday at one eastern on. Nbc field of dreams. Last night in iowa kevin. costner was. They're coming out from the corn. You had the yankees. The white sox was great tv. And paulie goes. We need to get. We need to get frank. Whaley on my buddy. I go all right well. He of course played the young archie moonlight graham infield dreams. Of course he was in pulp fiction as well been on the show a couple of times. Good to have you back frank When people bring up field of dreams what did they ask. Can i spare a few dollars. Oh yes Paid for that role it was it was many many years ago. Probably i was I was young. I was probably paid the screen actors. Guild minimum weekly And those days Few hundred dollars. But i was happy to have the gig. What were you told in the audition. I i i remember not They didn't give me the script they just had this Some pages from the scenes that i was in. So i had to kind of deduce Myself but they just told me you know to be to keep a natural recall. And you know it's hard to remember. That was many many years ago. But i was a lot of actors in my age range at that time. Wanted that role because it was. You know it was talked about you know. Wouldn't you think though when you read the script. I mentioned it yesterday when you look at that and you go okay hey. This is the premise for the script. You're going really like they're gonna make a movie on. And i mean kostner said. It's the most dangerous movie ever made. Because he didn't know of people are going to laugh at it and spit it back out at him. What did you think when you you heard the premise for i felt the same it was. It was a different obviously different kind of sports film. That than we're used to. Although i guess the natural head that sort of same same kind of feel to it but yet i wasn't sure what to make of it at all And i felt the same way it was hard. It was hard to really know how it was gonna come out although it was a really good script and obviously had a great cast so there was. There was some high hopes for it from my perspective. When do you meet consular. We all got together before we started filming in california for for re through and it was it was it. Was everybody in this in this loft on hollywood boulevard Assembled around this table and i was a nervous wreck. Burt lancaster was there. James jones damn couldn't believe what. I was not not long before i was. I was selling.

samuel jackson Frank whaley Todd haiti Hurdler brad us forest service dan patrick fox sports radio olympics rio Neilson Roker archie moonlight graham Smokey cova Patrick frank
"whaley" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Memory. I have of my childhood Poor thing that is sad though so sad when who stays. What's your favorite thing about ohio. That many people may not know about it. Okay so my favorite thing about ohio is about dayton is that the wright brothers are from dayton at invented the airplane here and i know that my friends in north carolina tried to say that they invented the plant. They had really good wind. So the brothers went down to north carolina to catch the wind to make it fly but the airplane was invented in dayton. That's my favorite fact about ohio. I- love add a little ohio. North carolina rivalry. So let's say. Joe biden is in town. And you're going to get ice cream together because we all know that joe biden loves his ice cream. What flavor of ice cream are using so. Ohio has some of the best ice cream in the country. And i think that's why joe biden visit us so much meat. He's been here now three times in three months and so it depends on what city island. So if i'm in cleveland i go to mitchell's and i get some mint chocolate chip if i'm in columbus. I had to jenny and get some salted caramel. And if i'm in cincinnati. I go to graders and get this black chocolate raspberry so i have different kinds for each city because we are so about our ice cream in ohio and the local ice cream folks to such an amazing job. It's like a fierce competition in ohio. About who has the best ice. And now i feel like i need to come to ohio. You do some testing of using ice creams. All right so if you could choose one. Hollywood celebrity to service your lieutenant governor. Who would it be tina fey. I love her. I love her i just want. I just want her to be within a governor because i think she's super smart She so quick witted and like just if she was my lieutenant governor. I get to hang out with her all the time right. That would be fun. That would be probably amazing governor. Lieutenant governor team thank you. Thank you gentlemen all right. So that's it for a rapid fire questions. Thank you so much for joining me today. It's been a pleasure. So where can people find you online. So check us out at nan. Whaley dot com. You know we have our some of our policies there some videos. You can also follow me on twitter at nan..

ohio Joe biden dayton north carolina North carolina mitchell Ohio cleveland jenny columbus cincinnati tina fey Hollywood Whaley twitter
"whaley" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"To be. The first woman elected governor of ohio As you've mentioned. Ohio has never elected a governor. A woman governor let alone. We've even we've never even nominated one to run in the governor's race in ohio. So you're a little ahead of us in georgia around that but look as we keep doing the same things over and over again and putting forward the same type of candidates over and over again. Guess what we're going to get the same results and that clearly isn't working for everyday ohioans. I think we need to have a fresh new kind of leadership And i think it's time it's time to show that in in the state of ohio so You know. I i am. I'm excited about this opportunity. I know. I know it's a little harder but it's so important and i honestly when i talk to people jasmine. They're amazed that we have never even run anybody in ohio yet. It's been a woman so the time is clearly pass. And it's time to change that here in ohio definitely. I agree So when i had to run for office here in georgia. I ended up running both times against the prototypical. Like family man and all of his campaign material made sure that it featured his wife as well as children have really big family. And that was jackson. Juxtaposed next to me you know a single woman And so. I realized very quickly. That wasn't just running against him as an individual on our merits as who would be the best for the position. But i was actually running against him as a man. Doing what men quote. Do you know looking at your race. It looks like you are also running against someone who's very similar to the guy that iran against that family guy you know persona. How are you approaching the race from the lens of like gender roles and expectations about demeanor. Well i'm done this. Before as mayor of dayton right You know the top two hundred cities in the country. There's only about Forty of us. Maybe a little less than forty of us that are women trying play. I'm quite used to having to show a different kind of leadership that or different vision of leadership than what people are expecting. And you know like you. Jasmine were younger right so a lot of the women whose shoulders we stand on. We're actually women that had raised. Their children had like had their whole careers and then they ran for office in. What's really exciting right now. Is you have women that are younger. That are doing all of that and running which is berry. I think just a really exciting time for leadership and look. I think what i'm trying to do..

ohio georgia Ohio jackson iran dayton Jasmine berry
"whaley" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"whaley" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Coming up next week rachel interviews. Her husband retired lieutenant colonel alexander victim and defended and hear matters. Rachel and alex will discuss his decision to do the right thing and testify against trump. His brand new book here right matters and a lot more. Don't miss that interview next week on the suburban women problem our guest. Today is a phenomenal woman who has been committed to public service. For many years she has served as the mayor of dayton ohio. Since two thousand thirteen and she's now running for governor of ohio nan. Whaley welcome to the suburban women. Problem is so great to be on. I've been watching a jasmine and listening to this for awhile time. It's a huge honor to get to be on today. Thank you out. So you and i are both in public service and i told my story on the podcast about how i decided to run for state representative in georgia in order to bring a science voice to policy making To the table. So can you tell us about why you. I decided to get into politics in into public service. Well jasmine i have a science background. I was actually a chemistry major in in college. I'm a first generation college grad. And you know when you're first generation college a lotta times. Your parents say like okay. You know business or science background like you need to go get a degree that you can put right to work. And so that's why i have that major. It was a great experience while i was in college. I decided to just start volunteering. At the lake headquarters democratic headquarters of the of dayton. And i took a bus down. Organiz the college democrats than got active But when i think about it my parents really drove this decision for me because the like the very first memory i have as a child. I'm told the story around. Ohio is actually of the reagan. Carter debates. I was born in nineteen seventy six. The reagan carter but debates were nineteen eighty. And i remember my mom being very upset. And you know i can remember the The couch that was like a plaid one thousand nine hundred seventy s couch in the living room. And i think my first memory because my mom was upset and i said you know what..

lieutenant colonel alexander ohio dayton Whaley rachel Rachel alex Organiz georgia reagan carter reagan Carter Ohio
Police: 4 Dead, 4 Hurt in Shooting on Chicago's South Side

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Police: 4 Dead, 4 Hurt in Shooting on Chicago's South Side

"U. S. mayors asked president Joe Biden for help to curb growing gun violence in their cities it is getting worse Dayton Ohio mayor nan Whaley the new president of the U. S. conference of mayors twenty seven mayors have signed a letter to president Biden calling for federal help as mass killings another gun violence continue to climb Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot every day in America needlessly yes we do need Washington to wake up to this reality Tuesday's online conference came hours after four people were killed and four others wounded in a shooting at a home in Chicago several mass shootings over the weekend in several cities still concerns about a spike in gun violence heading into the summer I'm Tim McGuire

President Joe Biden Nan Whaley U. S. Conference Of Mayors Twe President Biden Lori Lightfoot Dayton Ohio Chicago America Washington Tim Mcguire
US Court Says 'Ghost Gun' Plans Can Be Posted Online

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

US Court Says 'Ghost Gun' Plans Can Be Posted Online

"A federal appeals court in San Francisco's ruled that designs for three D. printed ghost guns can be posted online without approval from the state department a divided panel of the ninth circuit court of appeals reinstated a trump administration order that ghost guns could be taken off the munitions watch list that require state department approval before that type of weapon could be exported twenty two states and the district of Columbia has sued the administration last year but according to the San Francisco Chronicle the appellate panel found federal law prohibits courts from overruling state department decisions on the munitions list the lone dissenting judge Robert Whaley argues making ghost guns more accessible presents a serious threat to public safety noting that type of weapon has been linked to several mass shootings I'm Jackie Quinn

Ninth Circuit Court Of Appeals State Department San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle Robert Whaley Columbia Jackie Quinn
House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 2 years ago

House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

"Trillion coronavirus Relief bill will go to a vote this week. Republicans in Congress say it is too much money. Here's Congressman James Comber from Kentucky. Congress already appropriated $150 billion in the cares act for state and local governments. And not all this money's been spent. So the Biden administration is looking outside of Washington, D. C to build their case. Here's NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith. When Mesa Arizona Mayor John Giles looks out his window at City Hall, he can see the convention center. It's become a hub for those seeking help in the pandemic. And on alternating days it is people that are there too. Up there drunk and get £50 of food, putting their trump or its people. They're waiting in line to get the vaccine. So it's a pretty sobering view from the mayor's office. His city got $90 million in relief funds last spring spent it all and Giles says they easily could have filed receipts for double that. Sobering view from his office window explains why this Republican mayor is pushing hard for the $350 billion in funding for state and local governments in the bill. You know this is it's just too important to engage in silly partisan debates. Most cities and towns didn't get direct help, like Mesa did. They had to wait for it to trickle down through their states and counties. The deadline to spend it isn't until the end of this year, so some are trying to make it last as they manage strapped budgets. For months now, a bipartisan group of mayors has been pushing for more. In July. We called ourselves July or bust. That's Dayton, Ohio Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democrat. Her city's budget has been slammed by the pandemic so much so that she isn't sure they'll be able to train a new class of police officers or firefighters. This year. We're not like the federal government, we have to have a balanced budget. So if we don't get a federal money, no fire class Dayton is recruiting new firefighters and police officers but may not be able to bring them on board without more money. When it comes to the schools. It's a similar story. Congress has approved about $68 billion so far for K 12 schools. Well, not all of the funds have been spent. Education officials say the money is spoken for, and they need more. In Pennsylvania Palisades School District Superintendent Bridget O'Connell says they were able to reopen in the fall. And that meant hiring more teachers to reduce class sizes and to teach online So it is a staff intensive endeavor to educate kids during a pandemic Staff aren't paid up front, which is one reason why it may look like funds or unspent. And the bulk of the money Congress approved for schools last year is just now going out. Superintendent Sean Record from Pema, Arizona on Lee found out last week how much his district can expect to get. I have a list of all you know of things that we need in order to be able to You know, provide better social distancing more safety for teachers, more safety for students. They've been open nearly full time since the fall making do with the money. They have his message to critics who point to unspent funds and say schools don't need more. It isn't a light switch. The money doesn't get approved one day and spent the next And that's why President Biden and Democrats are pushing ahead with new funding and say they can't wait for Republicans in Congress to come around tomorrow. Keith NPR news

Congressman James Comber Biden Administration Tamara Keith Mayor John Giles Congress Mesa Mayor Nan Whaley Dayton NPR City Hall Arizona Kentucky White House Giles Pennsylvania Palisades School
Some Mayors Sound Alarm About What Happens If Federal Relief Falls Short

All Things Considered

05:16 min | 2 years ago

Some Mayors Sound Alarm About What Happens If Federal Relief Falls Short

"Down to the wire on Capitol Hill. After a months long political tug of war with very real consequences. Consequences, like whether jobless Americans facing hunger or eviction will get any more relief whether businesses will have more help to stay in business. And whether cities and states get federal dollars to help a police, firefighters, teachers and other crucial employees. Dayton, Ohio's Nan Whaley has been one of the mayor's sounding the alarm about what happens if federal relief fall short. She's a Democrat, and she joins us now to talk about her concerns. Welcome back to all things considered glad to be with you all today. So tell me, what do you see happening specifically in Dayton, Ohio, if, as it looks to be the case, aid to state and local governments just Doesn't make it into this package. Lawmakers are negotiating on Capitol Hill. Well, it will have a direct effect on city services this past year to get through 2020. We had 102 employees take a voluntary separation program, so we have huge holes throughout the organization that we haven't re aligned yet. For example, housing inspection. You know, the number of folks retired in housing inspection. And so that makes housing inspection pretty much almost non existent right now And then for our 21 budget, which is balanced because we are a local government, we must always balance our budget. We have no police class for 21. No fire class either. So that will mean you know as people retire, You know, we have. Ah, pretty, You know, robots. Attrition rate that one class equals the people coming in. We will have less police officers and firefighters in 21. We ask you. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has often called the relief that you are waiting for that is state and local relief. He calls that a blue state bailout you know, sending money to places that haven't managed their budgets well, is how he has characterized it. What do you say to that characterization? Well, Iet's so off base. He just has no sense of what's going on on the ground and what's happening in normal people's lives. The fact of the matter is is when the first care package came The top 38 cities in the country did receive significant relief. The thousands of other communities that people live in did not receive any so we're talking about small towns, Cities cities much smaller than Dayton. That haven't seen any sort of fiscal help. And this is where the rubber meets the road in the frontline workers are so that's what's so frustrating about this, you know is it has nothing to do with the facts on the ground or what we're seeing in our communities. It just has everything to do. With the political football game of the D. C. Beltway that said, politics aside, some jurisdictions have actually seen their tax revenues pick up since the start of the pandemic. So the urgency to help those particular jurisdictions isn't as great right now. What is the case? For Dayton. Well, we've We've lost millions of dollars this year and expect the recovery to be very slow in 21. I mean, we still don't have the vaccine in the city of Dayton this week. So you know, we aren't one of these big cities that has all the assets and access to those kind of things. So so your front line health care workers, your senior citizens? They're not getting vaccinated right now. Right now. No, we're not going to start until Christmas Eve is my understanding. If we get the Madonna vaccine, we have got no Fizer vaccine in Montgomery County or in Dayton. So There are lots of places across the country like Dayton that is still waiting. And still, you know, mired in a very slow economy. You know, when this Senate was negotiating they had revenue loss is part of the decision. Absolutely, you know, put put it population and revenue loss. But at the end of the day, the vast majority of small communities and local communities are hurting. And what do we do? We provide police service We provide fire service. We pick up your trash. We fill your potholes. We move the snow. We provide your water, these air, not fancy things we're doing and it's not something that's a Democrat way or Republican way of doing this work, and that's what's so frustrating to me is You know, the D C Beltway has gotten so out of touch that they don't even understand the work that local governments do every day for everyday citizens. So let me ask you as this debate in Washington over coronavirus relief has gone on and on on on. How have you been explaining it to people in Dayton? I think people you know, definitely. Local community leaders have been watching this for months and months, and, you know, I think that's what people are saying they're seeing a D. C Beltway mentality that is so out of touch of what's going on and everybody's lives on the ground and And you know that's hard for me, too, because I believe that you know if they stopped playing games and would just do what the American public needs, it would help and still trust in our government something I really want to have to just give us what we need to get through this pandemic. It's not You know, Cities faults. It's nobody's fault. We're in this situation. The federal government needs to step up and do that. Nan Whaley is the mayor of Dayton, Ohio. Thank you very much for joining us. Oh, it's great to be on thank you so much for caring about our local communities.

Dayton Nan Whaley Capitol Hill Ohio Mitch Mcconnell Senate Montgomery County Football Washington Federal Government
UnifyID: Biometric Authentication with John Whaley

Software Engineering Daily

04:22 min | 2 years ago

UnifyID: Biometric Authentication with John Whaley

"John Welcome to show. Hey, great to be here. You work at unify ID a company CO founded and you do biometric authentication is that mean? So, there's all these things that are very unique about each Each of us the most common type of biometric authentication. You know about these things like like fingerprints you know everybody essentially everyone's fingerprint is unique and then record that and then know that that is that whether Jew or not I mean. So what we do something called behavioral biometric, which basically incentive looking at something static like your fingerprint will look at your behavior like this dynamic behavior, you do things like. The way that you walk or the way that you hold your phone or you know there's this millions of other little Ideo little habits and idiosyncrasies that you have, and then use that for authentication and by doing that, we are able to get something that's very seamless that just doesn't require you to require any conscious user action. You can just be yourself and there's enough that's unique about you. We can actually indicate you based on that and it's continuous so you don't need to. Get up. Walk away from a computer you put your phone down. You know somebody else picks it up things like that. We're able to detect that that change and then know whether it's you in a very seamless way. I feel like biometric authentication has been a thing for a while there have been a lot of companies that have tried to do this. Why is unify different? Yes. So the biggest differences is the type of factors of us. We've focused entirely on passive factors. So things that that don't require any conscious user action to do I. think that's always been the challenge with any form of authentication is the users as the the the human beings just human nature I mean people are naturally lazy and they like they don't want to go through these additional authentication steps because it adds friction to the user experience I mean if you look at the way that people choose passwords, I, mean there's been plenty of information about. You know with Patrick Breaches and how to choose a good password, etc. You know if you look at every year, the list of reach passwords, it's always the same traditional, one, two, three, four, five, six, or the word password these those type of things, and so you know get changing human behavior is really hard. Now I, mean if you look at just historically across technology like there's always been a shift where initially human beings have to adapt to the limitations of technology and eventually technology reaches a point where humans where it can adapt to humans and the way that they are and so authentication is not a new problem in it. I mean it goes back to. Prehistoric Times in any social creature needs the ability to then identify and authenticate like are you who you say you are is this. Are you part of group or not? You know that's the this goes back a longtime y'all before technology existed and the way the people had always did in the past was you know you'll get their face you hear their voice you see that you know the context under which you see them maybe possessions things like that. But it was always very natural thing and then passwords came along around four hundred and fifty years ago now, and so this was very much of adapting to the limitations of technology. Let me enter these know these sequence of of symbols and numbers and letters, and that's how you know whether it's going to be it. It'll be me right but that's not the way that that people had traditionally identified themselves in the past. and. I think it's about time that no. Now Technology has now reached the point where individuals can be themselves, and then there's enough sensors and people's lives as well as technology reached the point that you can identify people just for better natural behavior rather than having them do something explicit. So you know the difference is because we're doing this completely passively it opens up a lot more different use cases where you don't really have to change the user experience. You have a much more seamless user experience like opening a door, for example. You, know with our technology like you, we make Sdk you can link into any IOS or android APP. We also have components are Web Java script as well but you know you walk up to a door and you have the APP installed, and then the door already knows that it's you and then the you know the the the doors unlock-, you don't need to take out your phone and do something extra and so for use cases where you have security concerns but you also care about these or experience that's that's where. Our technology really comes to play.

Now Technology John CO Patrick Breaches Prehistoric Times
Dayton's Road to Pandemic Recovery

WSJ What's News

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Dayton's Road to Pandemic Recovery

"We've been taking a look around the country at how different cities or dealing with the fallout from the pandemic. Today we head to Dayton Ohio unlike other places Dayton hasn't been a hot spot for the coronavirus and the death toll has been low but the pandemic is just the latest in a series of struggles. The city has faced in the past year our reporter Doug Belkin visited the city recently and joins me now Doug Dayton Ohio has been through a lot in recent years even before the pandemic from natural disasters to rising numbers of deaths the OPIOID crisis. Can you tell us a little? Bit more about the position Dayton was in before the pandemic it. It's a fascinating town. It really punched above. Its weight for a long time. Many years ago it was a home of a lot of innovation. The Wright brothers came from there there are a lot of major manufacturing companies and engineering companies that really employed thousands of people and built a Beautiful City in the early twentieth century. The housing stock is really lovely. But it fell on hard times. A lot of those companies moved south to chase cheaper labor and the revenue into the city declined significantly and then they had really hard shock. The financial crisis in two thousand and seven and eight pulled a lot of jobs out that didn't return and then the opiate crisis that was really ground zero. It's a lot of highways going in and out of Dayton and it made it a kind of a pitstop for these drugs and they were just hundreds and over the years. Thousands of people who overdosed from opioids. So they were very hard and then last summer they had a string of horrible tragedies. They had a tornado that wiped out part of the town and killed people they had A mass shooting in downtown shopping district that killed nine people and injured another twenty people and they had a Klu Klux Klan rally Which really hard for the people there so last year was very difficult moment for them and all of that brings us up now to the pandemic and Ohio responded to the coronavirus pandemic with one of the nation's strictest lockdowns how has the corona virus now impacted Dayton and our elected officials grappling with it so the virus itself has not taken deep root there the shutdown or have been very effective or at least the pandemic did not make huge inroads. There's been about fifteen people who've died in Dayton of a city of one hundred forty thousand six hundred confirmed cases so the sickness has been. You know it's the specter has there but the fear was a major problem in the shutdown and the economic implications of the shutdown have been dramatic. And what we wrote about in the story was a lot of of what that's done to the economy to the people in the town to the churches in the town and even to the revenue of the city. And how they're gonNA deal with it and how they're sort of handcuffed because they will have less revenue to keep their social safety net strong so we spoke to the mayor of the City Nan. Whaley WHO's trying to lead the community through this and this is what she had to say. And when since we all become mayors because you can see directly the impact you make you get to make decisions and you have this control but the more you do it the more you realize the less control you really have. So what she's talking about here is the fact that these these tragedies that happened last summer in the pandemic it's going on now are all national and international issues. The handgun issue is a national problem. The racism issue that the KKK was part of is obviously a national issue tornadoes. That came through As part of the change in climate and this pandemic as part of a global problem and one thing that they all have in common that the mayor belief is that the federal response has not been robust enough to help cities and towns and they are ending up dealing with these problems by themselves with much smaller resources than the federal government. Has IT Doug? You also spoke to members of the Dayton community. What did you hear from them about how they're coping right now? So a lot of folks were really knocked back on their heels by the shutdown A lot of business owners you know. Obviously they shut down their businesses and they were concerned that they wouldn't be able to restart them and a lot of folks were laid off from their jobs. I spoke to one woman named bridget. Hadn't who has had to dig into her children's college savings account to get by these last few months. And here's bridget. I think this is going to Their their futures. They're gonNA come out of this with a lot of debt Things that they shouldn't have to endure at their ages. I planned for this. I planned in plan for this so that they wouldn't have to do this and now I'm giving into their college funds just to be able to survive day to day and we know that the people around the country are digging into their children's college savings account to get through these periods of unemployment. This is a national issue. And it's it's playing out in Dayton along with everyone else and a big question that all of us are grappling with now is what happens next when the pandemic is over and and what does our new normal look like. Here's mayor naturally again in what she had to say about that. I do think during the tragedies of Dayton last year I did feel the region really come together to support the city. The city center which was very special. I worry that that could go away. Because of the WACO vid puts people in their corner really fast both politically and like literally in the corner. You know in their home. Dave chapelle lives in that area. The wonderful comedian and he gave a show after the the mass shooting to help bring the community together and to heal the community and one thing that the mayor said was that that's not possible now. People can't gather here show so she asked. How do you heal a community? That's gone

Dayton Doug Dayton Dayton Community Bridget Ohio City Nan Klu Klux Klan Doug Belkin Reporter Dave Chapelle Doug Wright Specter Whaley
Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 3 years ago

Word Of Faith's Pattern Of Abuse 'Got Worse Over Time,' Says 'Broken Faith' Author

"Jane Whaley was not satisfied with being a pastor's wife she believed god had bigger plans for her so she pushed against all the norms that kept her from the pulpit and found the church and spend their North Carolina called the word of faith fellowship the church's website shows people singing and smiling Jane Whaley at center stage from the outside it looks like a community of pious believers but some former members say the dangerous cult these people believe that Jane Whaley was their path to salvation and that if they did anything that went against her wishes they would get cancer and die or they would become drug addicts these are things that Jane way we would tell them it was Holbrook more he and Mitch Weiss a fellow AP reporter have been looking into abuse allegations within the church for years our colleague Rachel Martin spoke with them about their new book broken faith and just a note here the story does include descriptions of that alleged abuse there is two sides Jayme wellies yours that's sweet southern grandmotherly type and then there's the Jane that nobody sees except church members the one who screaming at the top of a longs congregants warning them that the devils have to come out it's like the Jekyll and Hyde right Holbrooke can you describe what people saw in her what was bringing them to this church I think that in the beginning when people would go to the church they were selling a lot of love yeah the members of this church they live in nice homes they drive nice cars the children are well mannered they have a Christian school so I think when a lot of families first go there everything seems great but over time Janeway Lee and her other ministers they take more and more control of your lives in fact a lot of times they'll remove children from their families home it and place them with ministers to be raised and what that does is over time sometimes those kids care more about the minister's than their own parents so it makes it difficult for families to leave so it's not a quick thing where you just walk in the door and they say Hey come on in you can come in you can never leave we're gonna take your television magazines radio all that away from you an institute all these rules it's a slow progressive thing and Mitch she when the other church leadership they would use family members against one another I mean hobar talked about how they would separate children sometimes as leverage but they got family members to serve as informants almost absolutely you have to realize they believe that Jane well it was a profit that god spoke to her and everything she said was the gospel and one of the techniques that she used what she had everybody informed on each other it was in a way she would have them tell her their deepest darkest secrets and then she kept the file of those secrets and if they threatened to leave or did something wrong she had all the evidence she needed there to keep them in line so it it was a range of emotional and psychological abuse but from interviews you did with a hundred or so former members you were able to reconstruct a pattern of a violent physical abuse can you just a lay out for us some of those more extreme examples of that yes it was something that that really got worse over time and you have to understand what her philosophy is the doctrine is is really pretty simple doubles a real and if you're a drug addict it's because you have this drug gavel if you know your alcoholic the same if you're having an affair it's the same thing there are there lawful devils and so what she would do is it was called devils and deliverance where they would have people surround you and scream at you at to get the devils out get out double yeah and and it will go on and on and on perfect example is with the baby if babies cry it wasn't because they were hungry or they had a dirty diaper it was because it was a devil inside them that was making them cry so you would have groups of people surrounding a you know in a fan and screaming until that baby would just get tired and finally you know go to sleep and not to scream it just it just to be specific this method call blasting they are they're right in front of the subject's face right there screaming into the baby's ears enter a like inches from her face exactly and that's how she started at the beginning with her congregants over time it became more and more violent it wasn't enough just to screen to scare the devils out of people now you had to punch people you had to hold them down to restrain them you had to choke them you had to do everything possible to get rid of that devil and that's when it became extremely violent that's where the people who who recounted their stories would break down to us they would tell us about their injuries and they couldn't go to doctors they couldn't be treated because they knew what would happen so they had to keep it secret but it's those beatings that that really it's still seared into their planes now they can't get rid of those images those nightmares there is a lot of suspense in this tale but it's it's not fiction I mean this is this is a real life accounting of how the church destroyed these lives but you're you're so specific I mean it reads like fiction though you could you've you're recreating dialogue how did you do that we tried to talk to as many people as we could about any particular incident that we wanted to write about let's not often interviewed him together multiple times over a period of five years really we look for please reports department social services child welfare investigation documents we have recordings from inside the church videos so we just tried to to use all the resources that we could find to tell this story in the most compelling way that we could several lawsuits have been brought against the church and its members over the years has anyone been held accountable for the abuse there are five people currently charged with assaulting a former member of the church Matthew Fenner he says that he was beaten to expel his homosexual demons back in two thousand thirteen but so far nobody's been convicted in that case and Matthew fenders waiting for justice the fact that you have the sheriff you have the district attorney all these people who have looked the

Jane Whaley
What Clinton's Impeachment Can Teach Us About Trump's Upcoming Trial

Morning Edition

05:44 min | 3 years ago

What Clinton's Impeachment Can Teach Us About Trump's Upcoming Trial

"Lawmakers lawmakers will will come come back back to to Washington Washington DC DC next next week week and and the the next next phase phase of of the the impeachment impeachment process against president trump will start senators are still debating how the trial in the Senate will work and since we don't know it makes some sense to look back at the trial of president Clinton twenty one years ago here's Clinton talking just after his Senate trial I want to say again to the American people how profoundly sorry I am for what I said and did to trigger these events then the great burden they have imposed on the Congress and on the American people Clinton of course was impeached but acquitted so was president Andrew Johnson and it's likely to be the same with president trump constitutional scholar Kim Whaley wrote an essay in the Atlantic about why this matters she's in studio with us good morning good morning so you have raised such an interesting question is impeachment really attack on presidential power if a president has never been removed from office well it's really sort of a a matter of human nature if we are concerned about consequences for certain behavior then we check that behavior so in this moment it's still exists as a means of basically conveying to future presidents listen there's a red line and if you cross that red line they'll be consequences on to ensure that the president stays accountable to the people and not to him or herself you are concerned about what happens if they are not consequences in your racing another really interesting point you're saying the important thing is that Bill Clinton and Donald Trump when peach for different reasons Clinton was impeached for lying under oath perjury which is a crime and president trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress which at the moment no one is calling a crime right right so so president Clinton some of the critiques of that impeachment process war that what he did was not about abusing his office to the extent to which he sort of took advantage of a young intern that is an abuse of office but in the same way that any sort of senior person in an organization with but he was acquitted not withstanding that he was basically charged with perjury which is a crime an internal justice system for president trump we have an abuse of office but we don't have him charged in the articles of impeachment with a crime so the kind of different sides of the same coin if you cannot you you commit a crime no abuse of office your quitted you don't commit a crime at least charged with a crime and there is an abuse of office and your quitted the question becomes what's left of impeachment what what in the future is impeachable may I ask you what you think the answer to that question might be you know I eat arguably it's something like bribery treason causes are specifically listed in the constitution it's difficult to imagine even in this moment the Republican Congress convicting president trump had he then actually impeached for bribery of course obstruction Congress itself is a crime so I think going forward that's a question for Americans if because of the D. O. J. memo that you can't indict a sitting president did you just a branch is not available to base as a check on the presidency impeachments the only thing left other than an election if impeachment is basically treated as a nothing burger because nothing is impeachable then we have an office of the presidency that's really above the rule of law and then what do we do you know I'm into the constitution is he is my only guess but well amending the constitution the constitution does have an impeachment clause but a you know like anything if you don't enforce a rule if there's a ban on speeding but use but there's no consequences for speeding people were speed and we see this with the constitution we as Americans in understand if parts of what it exists are not in force we can take out our black marker and cross it out and I think impeachment in this moment is one of those questions future presidents could say at impeachment doesn't really mean anything nothing's really impeachable anymore it so political and that we have to understand means whoever's in that office regardless of party has more power and ultimately the framers understood it's human nature to abuse power if you have it one major argument against both the impeachment of president Clinton and also president trump was that it's just too partisans what people said back then they're saying it now do you think impeachment as a process is inherently flawed because it is political it in this moment it is and I don't think the process is flawed but the way it's playing out is flawed because we've got the Senate Majority Leader saying listen I'm in lockstep with the presidency we don't have Republicans in this moment in Congress committing to independent sort of measured thoughtful oversight of what's happening in the office of the presidency I'm to your prior question I think one possibility would be to create another means of checking the presidency through the criminal justice process basically passing a law that would override the DOJ internal memo saying you can't prosecute a sitting president that would probably be challenged as unconstitutional I I think in this moment the rationale for why you can't prosecute a sitting president doesn't really hold water but of course for the same reasons despite this sort of partisan Congress won't impeach this particular man I it's it's impossible to imagine that there be legislation that would come through both houses that would actually operate as a check going forward on on the presidency and with us with an account of a presidency we all are safer we every American regardless of political party needs to make sure that there are two tickets issued for speeding in the White House because that pot that office just has so much power you are a constitutional scholar and a couple seconds we have left room for optimism reason for optimism well reason for optimism if we can see you know in a in the Senate trial a thoughtful measured process that's overseen by the the Supreme Court justice the chief I think that will make it more meat meaning fall but we'll just have to see I I wish I were more optimistic to be quite honest Kim Wheatley constitutional scholar thank you

Donald Trump Washington President Trump
Buffalo Clinches Playoff Birth

ESPN Daily

08:16 min | 3 years ago

Buffalo Clinches Playoff Birth

"Your namesake team is in in the play offs. The bills I mean. I don't WanNa Brag Bill. Barnwell is a senior football writer at. ESPN he has consulted with NFL teams. But the bills are not in fact named after him. So tonight the buffalo bills beat the Pittsburgh steelers seventy ten clinching a spot in the postseason and bill. What's amazing about this team? Aside from being named after you Is that for most of the two thousands. They didn't even have a winning record but but now they have made the playoffs in two of the last three years during this rebuilding process. Where does this recent success begin in your mind? I think the simplest place for it to start is just hiring Sean McDermott. This is a coach. Who really seems at odds with with a lot of what? NFL Teens tend to do when they have head coaching opportunity. Pop Up Sean. mcdumber forty two wasn't like he was old but let's face face it every coaching opportunity. That's popped up over. The last three years has basically been. Let's try and get a offensive minded coach or someone who is particularly close to. Sean McVeigh and correct defensive minded coach the panthers weren't even coming off a good season they were six and ten and ranked twenty six points allowed the year before so the bills really took a shot on shark dermott top of that. The bills gave McDermott some level of personnel control. which teams are really it? Really Loath to do it. First Year head coaches but it worked. The bills had an excellent free agent period in two thousand seventeen and they earned their draft totally differently that year their previous previous GM Doug Whaley had repeatedly traded up in years past regrettable move. Sammy Watkins. Being the most notable one but damage first move was to trade down and and the first player he drafted was Davis White. WHO had a big game against the steelers? Last night tonight again squirts out of bounds around the twenty yard long. So why headed early picked in fact. We'll before McDermott joined the team in two thousand sixteen they had the twenty seventh best defense in the NFL according to football outsiders after that they started taking up up in now bill. It's one of the best units in the League. How did this defense gets so good so quickly? I mean just to keep it simple. They got rid of everybody pretty much. I mean. The fifty three players were on their roster for the final game in two thousand sixteen before Mcdermott arrived. There's three guys left in the Renzo Alexander Jerry News and Shack Lawson all front seven pieces. I mean everyone else. Fifty other players on this roster Aurora ellsworth point and the bills have drafted well. But I think what makes this team so interesting as they really go out of their way to get veterans from other rosters and saw seemed to get more out of those players in their previous teams games in their first free agent period Jordan play Mike Hide Jordan Philips for example comes to mind in recent years where he was a second round. Pick washout of Miami. The bills brought him in. He has nine and a half sacks this season as defensive tackle. That's really impressive. There's just a lot of players on this roster who either were good somewhere and have become great in buffalo or who really weren't playing very well at all or almost out of the League who have become regulars on this really talented bills defense so last year the bills. Roll the dyson Josh Allen in the draft trading up to take him seventh overall despite his lack of college production in his rookie season was pretty underwhelming warming. Bill Fifty two point eight percent. Completion percentage just five point four adjusted guards per attempt. It seemed to me that they approached this off season with a really concerted strategy to build around him in free agency. Signings worked out for the team. It's been really good. I mean it's really the same philosophy sophy we saw on the defensive side of the ball. Those have had fifteen players. I not on offense for at least twenty percents of the snaps. Twelve of those guys are new into the roster. It's both running backs. All three of their tight ends five of their six top offensive. Lineman you know in a League where so many times you hear here that a team should sign a player or they actually do sign a player because they know the system quote unquote the bills. Sort of realized. Hey we have coaches who we pay to teach each player's the system. We should just go get those guys instead and so many of those players are playing in a high level and I think. It's really been perfect for Josh Allen Alan who even going back to Wyoming. He had to play hero ball. He had to sort of make big plays for his team to win. And we've seen a totally different quarterback this shear. I wouldn't argue. Allen is finished product but he's been productive quarterback this year a using his legs to create opportunities. He's hitting a lot of intermediate passes when he didn't do that last year. And he's avoiding turnovers man after throwing four interceptions in that really frustrating loss the Patriots week for this offense. Turn the ball over four. We're times in nine games. That's incredible for an offense that really just turn the ball over at will last season and they turn the ball over twice against the steelers last last night but they still did enough on offense to victory the snap just gonNa keep it off. He will sail. into the end zone touchdown touchdown buffalo. Josh Allen from one yard out and the bills are on the scoreboard early in the second quarter. Do you think there are any lessons. That other teams can take from the bills rebuilding process. Yeah I I do think so and I'm GonNa make a comparison that I'm sure. Bills fans are not really gonNA love but there's a lot of patriots in what the bills have done in their philosophy. The bills have been great at Pro Scouting and they've really found a way to bringing those players like I said who were struggling elsewhere. who were just guys elsewhere and turn them into much better contributors with Buffalo? They've done great work with undrafted. Free Agency have a couple starters in their secondary from there as well. They built their scheme scheme to really accommodate their players. And that's not just the Patriots thing but also way ravens thing where we're seeing that with Lamar Jackson and all the great stuff they've done on offense The bills don't have a scheme that throws the ball up fifteen times a game downfield. Just because Josh Allen has a strong arm they create better throws for him that that play to his arm strength as opposed to just trying to hit a big play because Josh Allen has in his arsenal I think in the big picture. There's just this idea that you shouldn't blindly follow what the NFL does with their trans so the bills are in the playoffs. Most likely as a wildcard team and bill while the defense is he's one of the best in the league offense has been up and down they really didn't produce very much against Pittsburgh. Do you think that that's a formula that can and work in January. I do not. I think they're a team. Nobody's GONNA WANNA play this postseason. It's very different from twenty seventeen eighteen where I don't think it's fair to say. The bills sort of meant the playoffs by accident that year. When they benched tyrod Taylor Nathan Peterman in mid season and kind of just rent a hot streak into the playoffs over the final month of the year? This team is way better on defense. They have more faith than Allen and I think the playoffs actually line up pretty well for for them as a five seat which is most likely where they're gonNA fall. They're terrible matchup for the Texans who they really really gave a tough game. Two in two thousand eighteen only for Nathan Peterman the throw too late interceptions to hand the texts victory and then they gave them our tax and Fitz. When they played last Sunday? I don't think this is going to be the last time the bills are going to be in the playoffs with this court. They're really opposition to be the best team in the AFC east. If the Patriots slip any further. And I am. I don't think I think it's too far to say that I'd be the best team in the AFC east right now

Josh Allen NFL Patriots Sean Mcdermott Pittsburgh Steelers League Football Josh Allen Alan AFC Bill Fifty Espn Allen Taylor Nathan Peterman Barnwell Mike Hide Jordan Philips Sean Mcveigh Doug Whaley Nathan Peterman Sammy Watkins
Mayors urge Senate to return to Washington for gun bill vote

Bloomberg Markets

01:03 min | 3 years ago

Mayors urge Senate to return to Washington for gun bill vote

"Set pressure is building on Congress to act on gun legislation following the mass shootings over the weekend in Dayton and el Paso is is about getting Mitch McConnell of pass this legislation the Republicans are held by the throat by the NRA another is enough democratic presidential candidates Tim Ryan and Elizabeth Warren and they're not the only ones more than two hundred mayors of cities hit by mass shootings have signed a letter urging McConnell to call the Senate back to act they include Dayton mayor man Whaley we're seeing bipartisan support for this set congressman Turner who has a ninety three percent voted in a in or a record a call for an assault weapons ban so we're seeing movement in Ohio Whaley says she'd like to see movement from president trump as well now the president has said he endorses expanded background checks but does not see the political appetite as he puts it for an assault weapons ban gun violence prevention nonprofit every town for gun safety is funded by Michal Bloomberg owner of Bloomberg radio parent Bloomberg

Congress Dayton Mitch Mcconnell NRA Tim Ryan Elizabeth Warren Senate Whaley Congressman Turner Assault President Trump Bloomberg El Paso Ohio Michal Bloomberg Ninety Three Percent
Trump visits mass shooting victims

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:36 min | 3 years ago

Trump visits mass shooting victims

"On a tour of cities that saw mass shootings over the weekend this afternoon the president and First Lady melania trump went to el Paso and earlier visited with recovering victims and families at a date in hospital ABC's Ryan bro joins us on the company's line from Dayton Ohio and what can you tell us about his visit there and how he was received Brian well you know it's interesting because he didn't make any real public appearances she landed at the airforce base got into a vehicle with Ohio politicians the delegation and then went to the hospital play went to Miami valley hospital you went inside but with that some of those victims met with some of the staff the doctors the nurses who have been working on those victims also but without first responders while he was there with the First Lady with the Ohio delegation they took some pictures while they were in there but there was no media contingent that went in with them so we don't really know the discussions that were had the conversations out afterwards after they had left the mayor and U. S. senator Sherrod brown eggs told some of their experiences during and they said that the president was cordial that he met with the victims that he said all the right things the First Lady said it all the right things and this is what president you they're supposed to go in and be the a grief counselor and cheap if you will now what he interesting though is what they said they push the president on in their meeting they said they want the president to force Mitch McConnell to have a vote on the house passed legislation on background checks for gun they think that this isn't a good time to do that do it for the people of Dade do it for the people about that so get this done now they didn't really get much response you ma'am and now on the flight to all paths of the president's weeks out that the things that were said by a the fear the mayor and the the senator I did not represent what happens at the door at the hospital at all soul was disputing what it is that they said kind of interesting remark from the president what was interesting too because he even tweeted that there was enthusiasm tremendous enthusiasm even love and then he says quote saw failed presidential candidate Sherrod brown a mayor Whaley totally misrepresenting what took place in any colder news conference of fraud of Saudi and it's interesting because as we go back and listen to it we're trying to think what it why is that was false that they said they said what they told the president they complimented him so we're trying to figure out what it is but he that that isn't sitting well with and it may have been the fact that Sherrod brown said that the president offered to have some kind of a ward for those first responding police officers ensured browed said something the fact of five Mister president they don't want to ward they want you to take guns assault rifles off the street so they can be safer at their job hi that could potentially be what what kicked him off what we're not exactly sure politicians aside how are the victims there in Dayton Ohio do we have any update from the hospital now we have to get an update from that we only had a few in critical condition still as of the last update which was two days ago I believe followed so hopefully well on their way to recovery that doesn't sound like we're gonna run into situations like we have seen it out Paso where unfortunately some people succumb to their injuries days later that being said investigation still ongoing the FBI now in charge of the motivation trying to determine this violent ideology what supported on behalf of the gunmen and see if they could work out what happened between him and his sister and how she ended up being a victim and all of that that is a B. C.'s Ryan borough thank you Ryan joining

President Trump Two Days
White House insists Trump was warmly welcomed at Dayton hospital

All Things Considered

03:57 min | 3 years ago

White House insists Trump was warmly welcomed at Dayton hospital

"One of the people the president spoke with is the mayor of Dayton and Whaley who joins us now thank you for taking the time today thank you very before the president arrived in Dayton you said that you were planning to tell him that his comments around gun violence in mental health issues were on helpful did you give him that message yes I did I really talked about what he could do and you know that the people of Dayton we're hoping for some action and you know I said to him that you know I thought he was a person of action so he could make some action on gun legislation have you respond so that was he said he would do something I didn't get the sense that he was like at a plan of like yes I'm for red flag laws yes I'm for assault weapons are yes I'm for straw purchases six cetera but you know well let's hope he's not one of these all talk no action politicians that sort of thing ahead of his visit you were skeptical that he would be able to bring anything positive to be Frank I'm now that he has come and gone what's your sense of what his visit it it did what the impact was I think the victims that that were in the hospital were super grateful for his visit and our first refer sponsors into the present the United States that if they were happy to see him but it was tough in this in the city you know we had some skirmishes in the Oregon district of pro champ anti trump I mean really the minute he announced that he was coming we saw the rhetoric in the community just get really heightened and before that there was really a sense of people coming together do you blame him for that I think that's something for the past three years that you know the hyper prior partisan nature the into Donald Trump is just makes that happen and it's you know as as an elected official who likes to think of ways that we can build together we're seeing that in Ohio you know we saw governor to wind take action yesterday we saw congressman Turner call for an end to assault weapons so we're seeing that in the state so when he comes in it and it stretches it out to make a hyper partisan yes I think some of his his tweets and some of his zero sum game politics isn't isn't help for democracy well speaking of partisanship on Twitter White House a dance casino accused you of mis characterizing the visit he called you and senator Sherrod brown disgraceful politicians doing nothing the politicizing mass shooting or white house press secretary Stephanie Grisham on Twitter accused you holding a dishonest press conference in the name of partisan politics do you wanna respond yeah I mean I I don't really understand what they're talking about and this is the same kind of you know hyper partisanship that comes comes away we we said in the in the press conference that the victims were grateful to see him and we we mentioned Pat and it but you know we were very serious about wanting to have some real movement on gun legislation and you know senator brown called on him to have bring Mitch McConnell back you know we had a healthy conversation about the outside weapons ban and Hey maybe he could get this done and we were very you know honest about that and you know for him to be upset that we had a press conference while he did no press in Dayton I think that's really what this is about you know I I have I mean I want him to take action and you know I've been very clear about that I was clear to him and clear to the press today you and the people of Dayton have been at the center of intense tragedy and scrutiny for the last few days now where do things go from here what happens to your city now well I think we want to get a get on with the business of grieving and bringing our community gather certainly we are heartened by governor to wind action around some common sense gun legislation in the state house will advocate have you for that we still hope that president trump will you know take action on some common sense gun legislation will continue to push for that but in the community it's about the grieving process and bringing our community gather and that's my job as mayor that will continue to keep on doing N. Whaley as mayor of Dayton Ohio where a gunman killed nine people on Saturday mayor Whaley thank you for speaking with us and my condolences for your city has been

President Trump Dayton Whaley Three Years
Sen. Sherrod Brown Urges Trump to Push for Vote on Background Check Bill, Assault Weapons Ban

Barsky Radio

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

Sen. Sherrod Brown Urges Trump to Push for Vote on Background Check Bill, Assault Weapons Ban

"Ohio senator Sherrod brown says he pleaded with president trump today to take us all weapons off the streets of America both the mayor and I asked the president to call on senator McConnell to bring this back in session this week to tell the Senate that he wants the background checks bill already passed the house that he wants it on the floor talking to reporters today along with date Merrin and Whaley following the president's visit the how Democrats that Republicans have been in bed with the NRA for years Whaley says she told the president there was a time strengthening gun laws used to be a bipartisan issue but now Washington will not

America President Trump Senator Mcconnell Senate Merrin NRA Whaley Washington Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown
Dayton mayor: President Trump's 'rhetoric has been painful for many in our community'

America in the Morning

02:14 min | 3 years ago

Dayton mayor: President Trump's 'rhetoric has been painful for many in our community'

"Dayton is the first stop as the president visits to city shattered by weekend mass shootings Jerry bowed lander reports president trump will be greeted by mayor Ned Whaley when he arrives here in Dayton she's been critical of the president saying his rhetoric is painful for many people in the community here she also believes his statement in the wake of the week and shootings here and in el Paso fell short comments were very helpful to the issue around protesters are expected during the president's visit and Whaley encourage people to stand up and voice their displeasure with the president's visit meanwhile investigators say they're learning more about twenty four year old Connor bets who gunned down nine people in the Oregon district this is F. B. I. special agent Todd wicker half we have uncovered evidence throughout the course more investigation that the shooter was exploring violent ideologies worker ham didn't provide any specifics Dayton police chief Richard bill meanwhile says investigators now have a better sense of Betts's mindset materials reviewed thus far reveal that individual had a history of of session with violin ID Asians do include mass shootings and had expressed a desire to commit a mass shooting meanwhile a woman who dated bets for a few months earlier this year said their relationship started off in a strange way he showed me the one video of the mass shooting on our first date until your Johnson said bets was fascinated with tragedy had suicidal thoughts and violent urges at Sunday night's candlelight vigil here governor Mike DeWine's remarks were drowned out by people shouting do something the governor yesterday unveiled a series of proposals to deal with gun violence including background checks for almost all gun sales he's also pushing for a red flag law which would restrict access to a weapon if somebody's considered a threat we have to empower people to get help for family or loved ones who may be a danger to themselves or danger to others last year then governor John Casey proposed a red flag law but the GOP led legislature never acted on it whether the dynamic changes as a result of the weekend mass shootings remains to be seen Jerry bowed lander Dayton

Mike Dewine Todd Wicker Oregon Connor Jerry Bowed Lander Legislature GOP John Casey Dayton Johnson Betts Richard Bill HAM El Paso President Trump Ned Whaley Donald Trump Twenty Four Year
Dayton gunman killed 9 people in 30 seconds

Morning Edition

09:04 min | 3 years ago

Dayton gunman killed 9 people in 30 seconds

"Thirty seconds that was all the time it took for police to take down a gunman in Dayton Ohio and they're being praised for that swift action as they should be but it's also important to note that in those same thirty seconds that same gunman was able to kill nine people nine lives taken in half a minute just thirteen hours before a similar scene unfolded in el Paso Texas Saturday when another white man opened fire on a shopping center killing twenty both communities are grieving we'll have more coverage from el Paso this hour but right now we're gonna focus on Dayton and were joined by Montgomery County commissioner Judy Dodge thank you so much for for being with us this morning in our condolences thank you thank you for having me on I understand that you spoke at the vigil that was held last night to honor the victims of the massacre and Dayton you just describe what that was like share a moment or a scene that stood out to you for now yeah it was overwhelming and I'll tell you I'll never ever forget it when I got up on that stage and love far as I could she in all directions or people and people were crying hugging each other it was extremely emotional and I think that the mayor mayor Dan Whaley put it together very well and she had different speakers and everyone basically just talk about the fact that we're grieving today we've got a very difficult several months here in our area because we had a tornado that touched down Memorial Day and we're still recovering from that and then you know on a beautiful Saturday evening a lot of young people were downtown enjoying themselves and what's called our Oregon district which is an extraordinary record with a lot of bands that play and restaurant channel open on that just a lovely area and everybody was having a good time and then much tragedy happened and I think we're still trying to come to grips with that on nine lives were lost and the shooter was also killed and I don't know if you saw that he evidently killed his sister well I can imagine what that family is going through end of our hostages breaking for everybody I'm a what can you tell us about the district where this attack happened I mean the police were able to respond very quickly yes there is always a police group good is there a day state police and usually in the evenings especially on a Saturday night you know sometimes are that the students come down from the university of Dayton and you know they're always having a good time and perhaps you know when it's early morning hours they may be asked to perhaps go home it gets to be too late and so they're usually as a dove is a very you know it isn't a huge presence but they're usually for five days police officers but sort of walk around just to make sure that you know everything's going okay and I'll tell you these gentlemen are are our heroes today because they didn't even call and immediately they just ran to where the noise was and when they were able to take down the shooter before he was getting ready to go into a bar and we know that there were been massive killing stand right the prevented all kinds of carnage we can imagine they were able to prevent that yet it still took less than a minute for the shooter to killed nine people I know I know I know and that's it's something else where I think we're still trying to get our heads around it I think that the last night was a wonderful grieving process for our community they have the come together and do that and so hopefully now the sun's out today I'm looking at it's a nice sunny day here so now we're going to get together and you know take out of the box here and get our community back together as president trump is set to address the nation later this morning what would you like to hear from him I don't know if I can repeat it on on ratio but I'd like him to take some responsibility for his tweets and the way that he calls people out and down perhaps we can get back to more normal city here and I don't know if he's capable of doing that but I'm gonna try to listen to rap this morning and I see what he has to say commissioner Judy Dodge of Montgomery Montgomery County Ohio Dayton is the county seat this is where the massacre took place over the weekend a shooter who killed nine people there thank you so much for your time this morning well thank you for having me thank you we're gonna turn L. too NPR's reporter Bracton Booker who is in Dayton covering the the shooting the investigation in the aftermath Bracton thanks for being here thank you for having me we we ask the mayor of Dayton about dot vigil what can you what can you tell us about it what did it look like sound like what was the scene well there were there were tons of people is it impossible to count because everyone was on fifth street in the work in district not far from just couple steps away from where the shooting took place less than twenty four hours earlier from when visuals held at at eight o'clock Sunday evening now I will tell you reach I've been to more visuals that I can remember sparkling in Pittsburgh and a couple of months ago in Virginia beach this one there was singing there was prayer there even ten delves that were released the one for the survivors in the other nine to represent the lives lost early Sunday morning now one thing that the mayor did not mention was when Ohio's Republican governor Mike DeWine addressed the crowd now when governor up when that may wear a dress that crowd she got a standing ovation win the Republican governor dressing crowd he was received politely at first but as he began talking he eventually got shot it down here's what it sounded like we do tonight why this amazing route is this saying that well if you here are very very deeply about the crowd was shouting shouting do something new something and a not to you know past some stricter gun laws in the state of the officials have said the shooter was a twenty four year old white male he was heavily armed we heard of the mayor described the weapons that he was caring what more can you tell us yeah please pick a picture of someone who was intending to inflict maximum damage as as the mayor said you know the gunmen had a two twenty three caliber assault style rifle in it had a hundred round drum attached to it which she didn't mention was that he was also had a bullet proof vest he had hearing protection and a mask all these things that show that he was ready to inflict some really devastating pain there officers responded within seconds within thirty seconds and at least six officers reportedly fired on the gunmen now about the gun she did say it was obtained legally it was purchased over the internet it originated in Texas and it was transferred to a gun shop in Dayton and please say nothing nothing in his record whatever would have barred him from obtaining those weapons the only thing that showed up in his record were a few minor traffic violations what do we know about the victims so nine people lost their lives in all of the youngest victim was actually the gunman sister her name is making bets she was twenty two years old and ages range from twenty two to fifty seven now six of these victims were black and the police chief Richard Beal was asked if race played a factor in the shooting and here's what he said we have no evidence suggests that there is a bias motive in this crime at this time but Bracton his his sister his sister was one of the victims do we know yet if that if she was a target what what that is not clear at this point what please did say is that of the gunmen his sister and another person around arrived at the downtown area at the same time at some point they got separated and please say that the that she was one of the initial victims but not the first victim that that lost their lives early Sunday morning okay so obviously the investigation is ongoing and we will be covering details as they emerge with and peers Bracton Booker who is reporting in Dayton this morning Bracton thanks we

Ohio Dayton Thirty Seconds Twenty Four Hours Twenty Four Year Twenty Two Years Thirteen Hours Five Days
Dayton Ohio prepares for KKK rally

On the Media

00:53 sec | 4 years ago

Dayton Ohio prepares for KKK rally

"Officials Dayton, Ohio preparing for playing Lalli by an Indiana based KKK group today, April Leslie of member station. W Y SO reports that the offensive expected to draw hundreds of protesters to the city officials have been preparing for this since February when the so-called honorable sacred nights were granted permission to demonstrate in Dayton's courthouse square. They've agreed not to carry assault weapons, bats or shields, but they will be permitted to wear masks and carry legal sidearms. He were than twenty members of the group are expected to attend the rally the likely be exponentially, outnumbered by counter-protestors, a large police presence is expected in a video message earlier this week, Dayton, mayor NAN Whaley condemned. The hate group, there are many ways to show this opposition, but for public. Safety? We are encouraging people to avoid downtown during the rally on may twenty fifth streets around the rally site are closed and businesses in the area have shut their

Dayton Lalli Nan Whaley April Leslie Assault Indiana Ohio Twenty Fifth
CDC Study: Guns Used in Self Defense by 2.46 million adults last year

The Joe Walsh Show

01:11 min | 5 years ago

CDC Study: Guns Used in Self Defense by 2.46 million adults last year

"Are you ready grow up be free this is the joe walsh program congressman joe walsh publican joe joe walsh on the salem radio network yellowhammer news i'm jay holland dothan police sergeant jonathan ueli was arrested april seventeenth on charges of unlawful possession of a controlled substance and theft of property dothan police said whaley was fired friday he was tested for drugs and his patrol car searched police found zanex tylenol and codeine they believe he stole while responding to a medical call the national weather service or nws confirms at least three tornados in alabama from sunday's storms and surveying other parts of southern alabama and the florida panhandle a storm overturned five rv's near foley after three pm in wsf's three people were injured a second tornado hit nearby alberta causing minor damage a third twister hit the us army's fort rucker after one pm control withers thirty two of alexander city was charged with sexual abuse of a child under the age of twelve and two counts of sodomy was found not guilty friday.

Alexander City Alberta Florida NWS Dothan Theft Jonathan Ueli Salem Congressman Joe Walsh Joe Joe Walsh Fort Rucker United States Foley Alabama Codeine Whaley Jay Holland