35 Burst results for "West West"

Robert Byrd Vs. Joe Manchin

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:12 min | 1 d ago

Robert Byrd Vs. Joe Manchin

"Now, let me ask you senator in terms of Robert bird versus Joe Manchin. If Robert Byrd had passed the bill that just passed, the 87 IRS agents would be taken up offices in West Virginia. Is there anything like that in this bird in this bill? Not that I know of and, you know, listen, we've all been on, I've been on our show crazy Joe for keeping the filibuster into that. Let's now work on a bipartisan infrastructure Bill. And I thought it made sense. I worked on the chips act. It was probably too expensive, but it still makes sense, trying to develop chips that we need for our military and domestic consumption in America, not relying on China and other places. So it's not like I can't work with a guy. Here's what happened. This is the same Joe Manchin who voted with the Democrat and march of 2021. Just imagine every Republican voted no. What does that tell you, Susan Collins? Ted Cruz, Lindsey Graham, all of us saw this bill as being hurtful to the economy and Joe Manchin was wrong in 2021. He's wrong now. And I think he's done a lot of damage to the people in West Virginia. That's at least what the goal will say.

Robert Bird Joe Manchin Robert Byrd West Virginia IRS JOE Ted Cruz Susan Collins China America Lindsey Graham
 Ukrainian resistance grows in Russian-occupied areas

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

Ukrainian resistance grows in Russian-occupied areas

"In a growing challenge to Russia's grip on occupied areas of southeastern Ukraine guerrilla forces loyal to Kyiv have launched a campaign of resistance As military forces have reclaimed some occupied areas west of the knee pa river the guerrilla activity has increased The campaign includes killing pro Moscow officials blowing up bridges and trains and hoping the Ukrainian military identify key targets This spreading resistance has eroded criminal control of those areas and threatens its plan to hold a spate of referendums as a move towards annexation by Russia and dry a guerrilla coordinator in the southern Persian region tells the AP our goals to make life unbearable for the occupiers and use any means possible to derail their plans I'm Charles De

Ukraine Pa River Kyiv Moscow Charles De
Why President Trump Shouldn't Care About the Past

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:39 min | 2 d ago

Why President Trump Shouldn't Care About the Past

"I was interviewed by The Wall Street Journal, you are certainly free to look at it. You can read it or hear it last week. And they asked me, they believe that the election was fair at The Wall Street Journal editorial page. And I am still agnostic. The I don't have proof that the election was stolen, but I have very strong arguments that there was massive fraud. I also believe, as I believe the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. That the left would cheat in any election that they felt they needed to win and which was in which they were able to do so. My colleague and friend Hugh Hewitt wrote a book many years ago. If it isn't close, they can't cheat. He was referring to the left. He Hewitt is considered a moderate Republican. And he wrote that book. In any event the president's preoccupation with the past election, I said on this show, over and over, there is only one thing you have to concentrate on mister president, and that is the Georgia election two runoffs. All we needed is to save this country, was one. To be decided in favor of a Republican. But instead he preoccupied himself with the last election. And kept saying that this would be a fraud. The Georgia elections, to which many of his followers said, well, if it's going to be a fraud, why should I vote?

The Wall Street Journal Hugh Hewitt Hewitt Georgia
Pres. Trump Is Confident Manchin, Sinema Will Lose in November

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:22 min | 2 d ago

Pres. Trump Is Confident Manchin, Sinema Will Lose in November

"Coming. Actions have consequences too. Will Joe Manchin pay a price? For betraying his constituents, we'll Kirsten cinema, pay a price. The two Democrats who could have gotten the moon. I mean, they could have gotten whatever they wanted if they would have just held firm and stood up to the antics of Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, will they? Well, president Trump was at cpac over the weekend in Dallas. And he made a promise what happened to Manchin and sinema, what happened, we're trying to figure out what the hell happened, where did this new philosophy come from? All of a sudden, 48 hours. I think if this deal passes, they will both lose their next election. I do believe that West Virginia and Arizona will not stand for what they did to them. So maybe this speech can stop them because when Manchin hears me say he's going to lose West Virginia and I'll go down and campaign against them as hard as anybody can. Huge roar from the crowd at cpac with Trump promising to campaign as hard as he can against Joe Manchin.

Kirsten Cinema President Trump Joe Manchin Sinema Manchin Chuck Schumer Cpac Nancy Pelosi Dallas West Virginia Arizona Donald Trump
Haaland nets twice on EPL debut as City beats West Ham 2-0

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 d ago

Haaland nets twice on EPL debut as City beats West Ham 2-0

"Erling Holland scored twice in his Premier League debut as Manchester City opened its latest title defense with a two nil win over West Ham Holland put city ahead with a penalty kick in the 35th minute and tallied in the 65th City had difficulty breaking down the hammer's defense before Holland scored after being hauled down by goalkeeper alphonse areola He's the first city player since Sergio Agüero in 2011 to score twice in his EPL debut Areola entered the game following an injury to Lucas fabianski in the 29th minute I'm the fairy

Erling Holland West Ham Holland Manchester City Premier League Alphonse Areola Sergio Agüero Hammer Holland Areola Lucas Fabianski
Will Smith, Max Muncy drive Dodgers past Padres again, 8-3

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 4 d ago

Will Smith, Max Muncy drive Dodgers past Padres again, 8-3

"The Dodgers roll to an E three one over the Padres giving LA 7 straight victories overall and 16 in its last 18 meetings with San Diego Max Muncie crushed a three run Homer as the Dodgers extended their lead in the NL west to 14 and a half games Will Smith homered and had three RBIs to help Los Angeles clinch a 6th consecutive series win over the Padres The Dodgers own the majors best record now at 74 and 33 Andrew heaney lowered his ERA to 0.66 while pitching four and two thirds innings of four hit ball in his 6th start of the season for the Dodgers I'm Dave ferry

Dodgers Max Muncie Padres Homer NL LA San Diego Andrew Heaney Smith Los Angeles Dave Ferry
David Goldman: China Is the Most Formidable Strategic Competitor

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:07 min | 5 d ago

David Goldman: China Is the Most Formidable Strategic Competitor

"David, I want to play to you a couple of video clips from the man who sadly bears the title of commander in chief first was from the campaign for election and then the second one is from actually the Oval Office. So this is Biden before he was president. China is going to eat our lunch, come on, man. They can't even figure out how to deal with the fact that they have this great division between the China Sea and the mountains in the east. I mean, in the west, they can't figure out how they're going to deal with the corruption that exists within the system. They're not bad folks, folks. But guess what? They're not competition for us. Not bad folks not a competition, then I guess he was mugged by reality and this is what he had to say a few months later. Our last night, I was, I was on the phone for two straight hours with Xi Jinping. And you all know as well as I do. These folks, and it was a good conversation I know him well. We spent a lot of time together over the years. I was vice president. And but, you know, they're going to get moving, look at these lunch. Not competition, or they're going to eat our lunch. You're the expert you've literally lit a written the book. Which is it? Tell us China is a competitor or somebody who's going to take it all away from us, David. Well, China is the most formidable strategic competitor. The United States has ever had. And it's ascendance to a place of dominance in the world where bankers poor, less secure and generally quite miserable. So I'm against it. The thing to remember is that 40 years ago, excuse me. The average Chinese was making $200 a year in U.S. terms. Now it's closer to $20,000 a year. No other country has brought so many people up the income scale so fast.

Oval Office China China Sea Biden David Xi Jinping United States
AP correspondent Walter Ratliff has the Religion Roundup.

AP News Radio

02:09 min | 5 d ago

AP correspondent Walter Ratliff has the Religion Roundup.

"And this week's religion roundup an AP investigation and covers abuse reporting failures in the Mormon church a Christian flag flies over Boston and Iraq's Yazidi community commemorates a tragic decade on stage Three of 6 children who accused their father of sexual abuse are suing the Mormon church for not going to authorities and letting the abuse go on for 7 years It didn't stop The eldest daughter of Paul Douglas Adams says when she reported abuse on a phone helpline it was kept within the church It didn't go away They just let it keep happening AP investigative reporter Michael resendez says the Arizona case follows a pattern found in other states The Associated Press has received nearly 12,000 pages of sealed records from another child sex abuse case in West Virginia which show that the helpline stands at the center of an elaborate system to divert child sex abuse complaints away from law enforcement And instead send them to attorneys for the church who may cover up that abuse leaving children and victims in harm's way Attorneys for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints say church officials feel they were constrained by confidentiality rules To lay at the feet of these bishops the blame for that is absurd and it's wrong Arizona's child sex reporting law says anyone who reasonably believes a child has been abused or neglected has a legal obligation to report the information The Christian flag that became the focus of a free speech legal battle that went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court has been raised outside Boston city hall The flag raising took place about three months after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the city unjustly discriminated when it refused to fly the banner in 2017 Artists from the Yazidi community of Iraq commemorated their tragedy during a stage performance in Iraq's Kurdish region It has been 8 years since the lives of the Yazidis were torn apart by Islamic State militants The United Nations has called the attacks a genocide I'm Walter ratliff

Mormon Church AP Paul Douglas Adams Michael Resendez Iraq Arizona Boston West Virginia Boston City Hall U.S. Supreme Court United Nations Walter Ratliff
Tyler Bowyer of Turning Point Action Unpacks Last Night's Elections

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 6 d ago

Tyler Bowyer of Turning Point Action Unpacks Last Night's Elections

"I'm joined by Tyler Boyer. Runs turning point action is a great job. He's also the committee man for the state of Arizona. He were up to like 5 a.m. last night. It was a long night, but it was a fun night. Boy, there's a lot to unpack, but let's start with just the top line news. First, let's go from east to west. Michigan Tudor Dixon won, two open doors. Very exciting candidate. Yeah, tutor, we actually know pretty well. She's actually been a big supporter of turning point for a long time. So we're really excited to form a rap host. Former Rafa's wonderful. And yeah, I think that you saw some of that carryover too. I mean, Michigan is a Trump state. Clearly. Because John Gibbs. This is the other one we want to talk about. We had absolutely on if you looked on paper 20 years ago and you saw a candidate like John Gibbs, you'd be like, the guy has no shot, right? Yep. And today it's a different world where the electorate is paying a lot more attention. And Peter Meyer and his whole gang of like just do whatever you want and don't care about the Republican Party. Those days are over clearly. Well, they are over. He lost. Yeah, and so Peter Meyer and voting for impeachment. Super snake. It's more than that though. I mean, some people are talking about, we'll talk about Meghan McCain's tweet today. We'll get to Arizona. We're going to get to what we'll get there, but the establishment, what they don't understand and what they are really dealing with right now is they haven't worked with the Republican Party for years. They haven't cared about the Republican Party. They haven't cared about the grassroots. And what we're seeing is this whole revival of this real grassroots movement, something that you saw, you know, like in the 70s, really start to cause the Reagan revolution. And I think that's where we're at right now,

John Gibbs Tyler Boyer Peter Meyer Tudor Dixon Michigan Arizona Rafa Republican Party Meghan Mccain Reagan
Caller: Why Don't We Make Arbor Day an International Holiday?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:09 min | Last week

Caller: Why Don't We Make Arbor Day an International Holiday?

"I was just wondering, why do we not make arbor day a world holiday? Where everybody across the world goes out and plants a tree, we're so worried about carbon emissions, we understand that trees give off life breathing, oxygen, and they absorb carbon. Worldwide holiday. Whether there's a lot of, there's a lot of things Mike that we could do other than some of the reckless spending on some of these energy plans that are built into this deal that Joe Manchin has decided he's suddenly going to support. Senator Manchin talks about the energy aspect of this. Now, what he should recognize is that these same Democrats that he has caved to will come after the coal industry in his home state of West Virginia.

Arbor Senator Manchin Joe Manchin Mike West Virginia
As fewer kids enroll, big cities face a small schools crisis

AP News Radio

00:59 min | Last week

As fewer kids enroll, big cities face a small schools crisis

"The pandemic has exacerbated a big city shrinking school's crisis A small student body sounds nice but in a big urban building it's more expensive per student during the pandemic many families left big cities or switched to private schools that met in person and analysis by chalkbeat and The Associated Press shows more than one in three Chicago elementary schools had fewer than 300 students last school year in New York it's one in 5 in Boston one and two on Chicago's west side principal romy and Crockett runs trauma school of excellence which lost almost a third of its enrollment during the pandemic When you lose kids you lose resources And when you lose resources that impacts your ability to service kids especially kids who have very high needs Nationally schools with more students of color are more likely to be closed and those in effected communities feel unfairly targeted Officials are facing tough choices Cut school budgets keep shrinking schools open despite the financial strain or close them down when the COVID relief money runs out I'm Jennifer King

Chalkbeat Crockett Runs Trauma School Of Chicago The Associated Press Boston New York Jennifer King
Alvarez hits RBI single in 10th to lift Astros over M's 3-2

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Alvarez hits RBI single in 10th to lift Astros over M's 3-2

"Go down Alvarez snuck a ground ball through the left side with a man at third to give the Houston Astros a three to two win over the Seattle Mariners in ten innings The win is Houston's 6th in 7 games against the second place Mariners since the all star break and increases its AL west lead to 12 games Astros manager dusty baker Every time that you beat somebody in your division that's a two game game So that was huge Today is a big difference between ten and 12 And so we just happy that we won that game today Jaco de rizzi struck out a season high 8 batters over 7 shutout innings Adam spelling Houston

Houston Astros Al West Alvarez Seattle Mariners Mariners Dusty Baker Houston Jaco De Rizzi Adam Spelling
Wilson, Plum help Aces deal Fever 13th straight loss, 93-72

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Wilson, Plum help Aces deal Fever 13th straight loss, 93-72

"Asia Wilson and Kelsey plum each scored 22 points as the aces hammered the fever 93 72 Wilson was ten of 15 from the field and had 6 rebounds three assists and three steals Wilson had 18 points by halftime helping the aces carry a 54 37 lead into the locker room Plum hit 8 of her 11 shots including three of four from three point range Jackie young added 15.7 boards and 5 assists as the west leading aces moved to 21 and 8 the fever have lost a team record 13 straight games to fall to 5 and 26 I'm Dave ferry

Asia Wilson Kelsey Plum Wilson Jackie Young Dave Ferry
James Lindsay: ESG Is Like China's Social Credit System

Mark Levin

01:47 min | Last week

James Lindsay: ESG Is Like China's Social Credit System

"Lack of transparency is how ESG scores are determined It's an open door for abuse he said you have this ability for a very small number of people who will the tremendous amount of power over markets To be able to make those decisions It's a return almost to a feudal system The lords get to decide what is right and what is wrong In fact ESG scores are much like China's social credit system but applied at a corporate level He says it's identical to China's social credit system It just got a nice name that fits western not just western but western values which is how they sell it to the public or get people to back it And think they're doing good in the world Even more troubling is Lindsey's argument that ESG fits into a broader global agenda that he said wants to make the west energy poor to the benefit of countries like communist China and a way of social control They want to implement the exact same control system because they see that it works to control people in China The power lead in the west often do want to control the people The goal is to make China into one model and the west into its inversion China is a communist country that runs a fascist market and the goal is to use corporations to create a fascist market that install communism in the west That's your social credit scores Your economic justice scores et cetera and the reason for that is the religion of communism believes that when you take opposites that are arranged like that and you put them into relationship with one another they contradictions become manifest And eventually work out into one synthetic hole

China Lindsey
You Don't Raise Taxes During a Recession, but Joe Manchin Did

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:19 min | Last week

You Don't Raise Taxes During a Recession, but Joe Manchin Did

"Question they went after Joe Manchin and his family big time. Big time. And it was a complete bait and switch. And Mitch McConnell is reportedly furious. After Joe Manchin promised, Mitch McConnell, he was not going to be on board with this debacle with this albatross around Americans next. Again, you don't raise taxes in a recession. That's why they are so stupidly trying to pretend it's not a recession. We are absolutely in a recession. Inflation is strangling the American consumer. People are struggling. North southeastern west. And Joe Manchin wants to raise taxes on west virginians and the coal industry? Are you kidding me? They got to him. And he caved. And the texture on the pure talk text line is correct. I was wrong. In hoping that and believing that Joe Manchin was going to honor his word and be true to his constituents, Democrats are going to Democrat. You know, hey, pay attention Republicans. This is how they roll.

Joe Manchin Mitch Mcconnell
Joe Manchin Describes Negotiations With Chuck Schumer

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | Last week

Joe Manchin Describes Negotiations With Chuck Schumer

"A West Virginia senator coal country is taxing his own constituents after he has already said you don't do a tax increase in the middle of a recession. Well, that's exactly what Joe Manchin has done. But maybe what he admitted to hoppy kercheval helps explain why. When we were working and negotiating, we started our staff started back way back in April. And first of all, nobody in the right mind after I have been ostracized for how long and victimized, if you will, because I killed the DDB because the BBB was just the I think about the offer our economy is a bad deal for our country and to change the trajectory. We are as people. So I was totally opposed to that in America kept saying, build back better, build back better, smaller. There's no such thing as a build back better. This is truly going to be around inflation reduction. So what we did, we started talking start negotiating in this and that everything else. And the bill that we had there were some things in that bill that we were negotiating up until when the 9.1% came out, there were some things in the bill that I was concerned about that could be looked to be on to be inflationary inflammatory. So I told you more on Thursday as a chuck. I want to wait. I'm not satisfied with the way some of the things we have, then we better wait and see what this inflation figures are for the month of July because everyone was saying, it's going to go down, go down, go down. I've been hearing that since it was 6% and one to 8% and went to 9.1, 9.1. So I told my staff after the instruct got mad, and he said, well, you're walking. You're not going to do this and that, not your chuck. I'm not walking away from anything. I'm just being very cautious. The people must Virginia can't at Ford, higher prices. They can't afford higher gasoline prices. So what changed? For energy prices. So I said, I told my staff to start scrubbing it.

Hoppy Kercheval Joe Manchin DDB West Virginia America Chuck Virginia Ford
Politico: Somehow, Someway, Joe Biden Is Back in the Game

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:02 min | Last week

Politico: Somehow, Someway, Joe Biden Is Back in the Game

"I saw a Politico last night somehow some way Joe Biden is back in the game. He's suddenly on the verge of a turnaround. White House thinks it could salvage his summer and alter the trajectory of his presidency. All because Joe Manchin caved, you know, I held out hope for Joe Manchin by pal Mark Davis in Dallas, said, no, don't do it. Don't do it. I'll believe it when I see it. Democrats going to Democrat. And Joe Manchin betrayed Mitch McConnell, betrayed his constituents. You know that Joe Manchin is on board now with a coal tax, you heard that correct. A West Virginia senator wants to tax the coal industry. Tax increases. Because, you know, it makes sense to have a tax increase during a recession.

Joe Manchin Pal Mark Davis Joe Biden White House Mitch Mcconnell Dallas West Virginia
5 dead, 68 Haitians rescued from waters near Puerto Rico

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

5 dead, 68 Haitians rescued from waters near Puerto Rico

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting 5 are dead and 68 Haitians were rescued from waters near Puerto Rico At least 5 Haitian migrants drowned and 68 others were rescued after a human smuggling boat dropped the migrants off in waters near an uninhabited island west of Puerto Rico Federal and local officials searched the area near Mona island after receiving a call from rangers with Puerto Rico's department of natural resources A U.S. coast guard spokesman said 41 men 25 women and two children were rescued Haitian migrants are increasingly fleeing their impoverished country amid a deepening political and economic crisis and a spike in gang related killings and kidnappings Last weekend authorities in The Bahamas recovered the bodies of 17 migrants and rescued another 25 after their boat capsized early Sunday I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Puerto Rico Mona Island Department Of Natural Resource U.S. Coast Guard The Bahamas
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"A pilot project is called the in drip irrigation pilot program that was implemented on our farm. Land's in that was a success Not only exists success of Conserving water for for recruitment. But also for those other entities and for other tribes in a water users in the state of arizona in in nationwide also. I want to ask about that partnership with with the state of arizona. And how do you view your role as the original stewards of the land is the original stewards of the river. how do you view the tribes role in as you have so many loud voices clamoring or the drought and around the shortages. That others may face a what do you think. Your role is at the table there. Well i think our role is very important. It's very important. Like i like. I said before you know we're we're one of the five tribes on the lower basin and hold the The largest and oldest water rights and so And we and like. I said we would be the last to To be cut on our water up on the river so we we are extremely important. And i'm so thankful for our past leaderships that you know That got us to where we got today and that even at the state level and the those leaders may have not thought we were important as a player. But there were those that have the had the insight that said. Yeah you know we need them. We need Chris should be of this Dc pete program. I want to ask about the ways that you're working with. The biden administration the the new leadership at the interior department. You're i know. We mentioned the irrigation project working with with. But just how does that. How does that relationship work. And have you noticed a change yet with with deb holland is the first indigenous interior secretary versus versus. How things were under under the trump administration. Well for one thing. I know we have applied for grants and serving our our our water..

Chris deb holland today five tribes first trump one one thing arizona Dc
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"And democrats saying that. They're worried about the future of nature in addition because this was the eleventh survey that we've conducted we've now been doing this for over a decade We can draw some comparisons between what voters are saying now and what they've said in prior years and on almost all issues relating to the health and condition of nature in the west voters are expressing more concern today than they were ten years on. In fact in most cases the increases in concerns have been by double digits and even doubled in some cases. I thought it was very interesting to see how opinions about climate change especially have changed over time. Loria what have we seen here. Over the last decade we basically seem respondents telling us that this is a bigger concern than we've ever seen before even from last year we saw increased in that concern level so the very first year that we conducted the survey actually asked about global warming. We ask twenty seven twenty seven percent so that that was an extremely or very serious problem. That has double today in the same state so that we can compare apples to apples fair. It's up at fifty four percents So a doubling that intense concern about climate change and it's really gone up across the board gone up the most among republicans and independent voters in the west. Still going up by double digits among democrats. Who started at much higher levels of concern But that's a big shift and those who are most concerned. Today are those voters underage thirty five the youngest group that we look at Sixty one percent tell said an extremely or very serious problem in fact. Eighty four percent of those youngest voters. Tell us it's at least somewhat serious problems in their state. Can you tell from these numbers. How much of it is that demographic shift or how much of it is changing awareness of the threat. Well should. I think that we've seen a range of different issues popping up in terms of concern. I mean voters in the west have long been concerned about things like a low level of Water and rivers and inadequate water supplies. But now we're seeing really big concern as well about wildfires. It wasn't something that we had the foresight to to ask about In our very first year. But we've been tracking it for the last five years and we now have and ten voters telling us that wildfires uncontrollable wildfires threaten homes and property or at least a serious problem in their state with three and five telling us it's extremely or very serious problem. Surely highest in in states like colorado montana. But it's more than three quarters every single state and many of those voters that are telling us it's more of a problem now than they even thought. Then they saw ten years ago are telling us that that's attributable to changes in the climate in fact that was the most likely cause a for those who said it was more of a problem today than ten years ago along with drought but really focusing in on changes in the climate it also struck me that The loss of habitat is something. Voters seem to be much more aware of now than they were even a decade ago. So we've seen we've seen really rising concern about a range of different issues. I mean every conservation related problem that we asked about a decade ago is mel higher today and so loss of habitat again went up like vice. Seventeen points i remembering that correctly That's something that. Interestingly has gone up even in the in the last year. Just given i think some of the concern about the influx of people coming to this region Over the course of the pandemic and Building and development taking place in in a range of different types of communities not just in major cities but but really throughout the region. David was interesting..

David last year ten voters Today ten years ago Eighty four percent ten years five colorado montana three Seventeen points Loria eleventh survey Sixty one percent fifty four percents thirty five republicans today twenty seven twenty seven perc more than three quarters
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"You right behind toasting marshmallows. In the summer leaf peeping the aspens in the fall. It is time for the annual conservation in the west pole from colorado college in all seriousness. High-quality public opinion polling is very hard to come by even more so when it comes to outdoors and conservation issues so this poll which is now in its eleventh year gives us incredible insight into what westerners are thinking. And how those thoughts have changed over the last decade. We're going to talk to pollsters behind it in just a minute but first let's do the news. It took mere moments for the oil and gas industry to start running around like chicken. Little as soon as president biden announced a pause on oil and gas leasing across the west kathleen sagana. the head of the western energy alliance. Trade group went on fox news to warn that. Even pausing new leases. We'll do this. And so this order yesterday would kill fifty eight thousand seven hundred jobs in eight states in the west where over ninety seven percent of the federal production is found. yeah it was a similarly dire story from the ceo of the american petroleum institute. Mike summers he went on the call with reporters to say that there are hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in government revenue at risk. Api is even spending more than a million bucks on tv. Ads that suggests school buses will vanish into thin air. Just because of a pause on oil leasing really does sound terrible. Doesn't it and there is just one problem with those dire predictions and that's if you ask oil and gas executives. They will happily admit they are doing just fine. The ceo of conaco phillips was on an earnings call. Now keep in mind this earnings call. It's regulated by the sec. You don't get to lie to investors and he said on this call quote. Conaco phillips has the flexibility that i've versity and the depth of low cost of supply and low greenhouse gas resource to manage through this issue without materially impacting. Our plans there is no equivocation there. No material impact. That is as definitive as it gets. It's a similar story. At two of the other biggest producers on public lands in the west both yoji resources and different energy have confirmed. They have at least four years worth of drilling permits on national public land. The chief operating officer of yogi told investor conference quote when it comes to access to federal lands. That's one of the things. Were really not worried about in our business. So if oil companies aren't actually threatened by this temporary pause and leasing. Why do they want the american people to think. The.

Mike eight states eleventh year yesterday kathleen sagana Conaco phillips over ninety seven percent more than a million bucks billions of dollars two fifty eight thousand seven hun conaco phillips first one problem hundreds of thousands of jobs both four years american president one of
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Minerals? In that perspective of when I meet with members of Congress in their staff I I. Do support the grand. Canyon the bill that whole introduced and we do support bears ears. We don't support the executive order obviously, but we just keep letting them know that we can't support uranium. Mining, by any means and just provide the solutions I think going back to report the report. Is. Provides a solution that me. Earn, it's it's probably important to note. That the definition of a critical mineral as defined by the administration if that's applied to broadly than any mineral the. Able could be deemed critical and so that's again why in the report we dive down a little deeper and And try to make sense at that all and and. Not that we shouldn't apply that definition to broadly well, I build off that a little bit too if you don't mind it's. Just as an example. There are critical minerals minerals that are on the critical in our list that can be found in in the refining process for oil, for example, and and so. If you're not careful in in how you define this and actually in coal as well. So if you're not careful in how you define this. And what you consider critical mineral or nonfuel mineral. You could be opening it up to just about anything and So there's there there's some risk there and so uranium's. Sort of nose under the tent right for for potentially other non-fuel sources that could be it actually could contain critical minerals there. I don't think we WANNA to go down that road either. David I I want to go back and just give us a sense of why is all of this so important to sportsmen and women I why should Elk Hunters. Why should trout fisherman care about this? I mean wh why? Why do these wildlife groups are why are you getting involved in critical minerals argument anyway. Yes sure. So It's I. Don't WanNa say it's pretty basic I don't WanNa say it's simple but I think about it this way. About a third of the land of the United States does managed by the federal government for the benefit of all people. And one thing we've learned since March since his pandemic really took over this country is that we want we learned a lot of things obviously one of them is that people value their public land and all the recreational opportunities they provide. We've noticed in two thousand twenty that that visitation at public land shattering records all across the country. So people are backpacking hiking and birdwatching and fishing and hunting right, and and all sorts of other things like they never have before and one thing. I've always liked to tell people when I talk about public lands and visiting the West is people don't come to visit public lands to tour minds. I live in Wyoming, I live in the state that is known as an energy extraction state. If like why we're a country, it'd be the third largest energy exporter in the world. People don't come here to tour a coal mine or see an oilfield they come here for the wide open spaces and the wildlife opportunities. One of the things that are public lands provides are. We have these. Like I said the wide open spaces, but we also have these as because of that, we have these large ungulate migrations. So if you're an elk hunter, for example, deer hunter, one of the things these public lands providers, they provide the habitat for for some of the largest large ungulate migrations in North America right certainly in the lower forty eight states that will migrate hundreds of miles from the summer to winter range. And we have like I mentioned before these these thousand Mile Long Salmon runs from the coast into Central Idaho we have sage grouse whose. If you haven't seen at the annual mating ritual on these lex sides the mating sites it's become this iconic symbol of the western. sagebrush. Ecosystem. and. All of these things are important to to hunters and anglers, and if you don't have the habitat, you don't have the wildlife you don't have the wildlife. Habitats worth wildlife you can't participate in the things we love to do the hunting and angling. So ensuring that this mining is done if it is done in an appropriate way that that protects these the wildlife resources in the habitats upon which they depend. Is So, critically important. I intentionally used the word critical, right? It's so critically important for hunters and anglers to see that critical mineral mineral extraction is done responsibly. There's too much state to not do it right. At the very beginning time mentioned. Twin medals the proposed mine up in in the boundary waters in Minnesota. Julia. Do you want to jump in there on? The status of twin medals what could happen on the legislative front and how that fits into this broader critical picture yes. So for those that aren't familiar with. The Boundary Waters, Canoe Area Wilderness, it is a northeastern Minnesota kind of straddle the border between. Minnesota in Canada, and this is such. One of the sites that it's too valuable to risk right is the most is not only the most visited wilderness in America? But it also contains twenty percent of the National Force Systems Freshwater. So that welcomes You know that's a huge deal, and because of the environment, the boundary waters, it's a wet environment and all the the wire razor interconnected mine the the support or mine that is proposed up there if that mind develops on who produce Cohen Platinum whatever the critical minerals. That we see, but that would be detrimental and a lot of people with the false narratives around the boundary waters where people opposition think the water flow for the matter waters flows south actually flows north. So if this proposed, mine would be developed the upstream of the boundary waters flow into the superior national forest into the Great Lakes. So imagine that whole. Watershed in waterways being polluted it would not only be terrible for fishing wildlife habitats up for our anti fishing opportunities where a lot of us not only hunt and fish in those areas. But we also go there for soloists especially during these these times with the pandemic and trying to social distance but. On. Top of that, like that driving outdoor rec economy up there would. Not Be so thriving anymore right. So it's one of those places that is very dear to a lot of. A lot of people and when it comes to legislation, there is a village out there Introduced by Bennie mccollum. She's been a champion of the still and same with your staff and Mexcio president from backcountry hunters. England did testify earlier this year on on that bill, which protects the boundary waters. So. It's something that is a great example to use for this critical mineral were as just one of those. Places that are are simply just.

Minnesota Congress Elk Hunters executive North America Wyoming United States Bennie mccollum Idaho federal government Great Lakes David Mexcio Canoe Area Wilderness England National Force Systems Freshwa Cohen Platinum Julia America president
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"The only thing lad is You know just really quickly the there isn't necessarily a deadline on the record of decision they just can't make the decision within the thirty days. From the time the finally I s was released. So just wanted to make that quick clarification link Thank you. I was equally shocked to see Don Juniors tweet but. At, the same time very appreciative because this just proves that Bristol Bay is really valuable to the entire nation Similar mark said, this is only sides of the political divide agreeing on something which. Barack Obama pause delay a national treasure when he visited it. Excuse me during his second term in the presidency, and now don Jr. agreeing that this place deserves. To Be protected, you know something that our people have known all along. But if you look at the history of this issue, this has been a bipartisan issue for quite some time. Every single time this goes to Alaskan boulders the. Vote in favor of protecting. Bristol Bay. Her own numbers show that sixty two percent of Alaskans don't support this project which in terms of Development Alaska to have those kind of numbers almost unheard of especially sustain over this period of time. senator. Murkowski. Passed a congressional directive on with a budget amendment last year you know that stated that the Army Corps needed to do a better job which, of course, the ignored when we saw the final is but this this just proves that no matter what side of the political divider on. There's one thing we can agree on and that that is at Bristol Bay deserves to be protected from threats like the pebble mine and it shouldn't be stopped. I would be remiss if I didn't mention the cavalcade of celebrities who show up in mark's film mark. Harmon Tom Coleco. Tom. Douglas. Who is a household name in Seattle food circles at the very least Adrian. GRONYEA. Those are wonderful voices and obviously all very effective advocates. But Alana, I, want to I want your take on how do we make sure that those voices that get folks attention are also balanced with indigenous voices that are most threatened by this how do we make sure that indigenous voices also get elevated in this conversation? That's an excellent question and I think mark did an amazing job in this film making sure that indigenous voices are being amplified and being empowered in these circles you know I think movements like this you look at the base of it, and this is really about human rights. Ross are right to clean water. All right chart alters right to continue to be native people. And when we have such amazing allies were willing to stand with us That's Really I think the goal is to be standing with indigenous people in fights like this with the people of that land and I think you know mark has done an amazing job because he has he's been here. He has met us and he really values our voice in this fight and make sure that we are included even things like today to make sure that the indigenous people are being heard. So mark you just had a virtual screening of the wild earlier this week obviously in person screenings or not happening this summer..

mark Bristol Bay Harmon Tom Coleco Barack Obama Don Juniors Alaska don Jr. Army Corps Seattle senator Murkowski Alana Douglas Ross Adrian
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"But thirty by thirty, we'll also take state by state action and we could see that I in California I'm joined by Lexi griddle filled from the California outdoor recreation partnership to talk about a bill that is moving its way through the California legislature to do just that it's called assembly bill thirty thirty it's good name Lexi give us some background on this bill and WHO's behind it. Christ currently, we are partnering with the Outdoor Industry Association support Ab. Thirty. Thirty. Is. California's version of US Senator Tom udall federal thirty by thirty as you mentioned but it takes a little bit of a different form in California. While it does protect at least thirty percent of our states, public lands and waters are the year twenty thirty bill is authored by remember ask cholera and he has worked with a Grassroots advocacy group basically in the Latin X. community and they're called Zule and basically what number Colorado did was include specific language and Ab thirty thirty that acknowledges improving access to nature for all people in the state with a specific emphasis on increasing access for communities of color and economically disadvantaged communities. I. Corp One of our top three initiatives it's equitable access. Values particularly aligned with California's version of thirty, five thirty. It actually was heard in the state assembly on June ninth and it's been now in the California State Senate Committee on Natural Resources and water since late. June, it was up to be heard on August at the Senate is under time constraint now due to covid nineteen management, and now the bill has been. Scheduled to be heard, next Wednesday August twelfth other things that we have more time to gain support for the bill. But the bill also has one last week the passed through the legislature. If it passes natural resources and water, it will need to pass the appropriations committee and then at four by the end of the legislative session and that is August thirty first. So clock's ticking to make it through this session. Do you think that that's a possibility or just with covert and everything being what it is it is it more likely that this ends up getting getting bumped to a later session? I think that's definitely a possibility that it does get to the next legislative session given what's going on with Kobe and our legislature is focusing on covid nineteen. But legislation right now. And there isn't really much Pacific with code right now involved with this particular bill. Yeah and given what we've seen in the past or other bills typically when something's this late in the game, it's pretty hard to get it through the legislature but we are staying hopeful and we are still supporting through this session. So before you go give us a quick rundown of the California outdoor recreation partnership does is your first time on the podcast so so welcome and gives a sense of of your organization. Yeah, of course, we're five. If One C. Six nonprofit organization, we were established our voice for the outdoor recreation industry to shape policy support investments and engaged and inclusive community about participants in California around the benefits of outdoor recreation, we're backed by over seventy five recreation companies and nonprofit organizations. in case, you don't know the California outdoor recreation economy is built upon and contributes ninety two billion dollars in consumer spending..

California California State Senate Commit Outdoor Industry Association Lexi griddle Senator Tom udall Senate cholera US I. Corp Kobe Colorado
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Let's go ahead and start with with Theresa on that one because we haven't had anyone from the continental divide trail coalition on the show before you're the first. A yeah, you know the kind of chocolate humor that lead partner with the cotton Forster's Park Service to manage in Stewart in protect the connell divide shell, which for those of you know as a trail that is three thousand one hundred miles long runs her Mexico. Canada lines of the Rocky Mountain West and it. It actually is a congressionally designated resource it protects. kind of a big deal. North American watershed, so it's where the Atlantic and Pacific watersheds begins so when we talk about on the trail, we're not just a physical thing that you can hiker biker. Ride a horse on. We're talking about this landscape. A one point nine eight million acres, that is the watt are shed of the North American continent and when we talk about that. We're talking about water climate change clean, air. Access to Public Orlando are federally managed and ensuring that people understand that they live. Talking about the history of those landscapes that have a longer history than when Congress designated them as a national sneak travel, talking about indigenous cultures and communities, their stories, and their experiences needed to be need to be added to the history, and the land is we talk about them and understand them respect and honor them. A lot of our work is obviously in the traditional angsty bank. Volunteers out doing trail work, but it's awesome engaging with local communities on both physical communities like Saliva Colorado, but also communities of color that have a long attachment and connection to these landscapes often are recognized in our current. They were in so how we can leverage this landscape as a way to broaden the understanding of how we relate to these landscapes in their long history, and they're. They're hopefully long future is critical for our work it really is about creating connections to call her community and landscapes themselves, and then we can also talk about how many of these things whether it's climate, change or impact of fire or the impact of oil and gas. Leasing, general access to are are these these these natural places is critical to our health and I think when they all mentioned his in these days of Kobe is what I'm calling it. One thing. We've recognized more than ever before. HOW IMPORTANT HAVING!.

Theresa partner Rocky Mountain West Mexico Park Service Stewart Canada Orlando Congress Atlantic Kobe Colorado
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Dc with the trump administration or whatever administration. It might be nuts in the White House and we're forgetting about all of this incredible Advocacy and growth. That is now happening on the state level and in cities where the president decided to remove himself or move our country from the Paris climate accord. There were all kinds of governors and mayors In both you know red and blue places. Who said wait a minute? This doesn't make sense. We've got to do something you see. Foundation Juicy Business and Industry folks you see young people And frontline communities all coming together to make change happen and all that comes from this set of advocacy this stat of education and learning. You know from fifty years ago with Earth Day and the Environmental Justice Movement and a number of other movement. So I'm even though we're in so very challenging times. I am a hopeful and optimistic that we are right at the precipice of change And I think we're gonNA see some amazing things out a silver lining if you will of creating a new generation of awareness and activism when it comes to to to environmental justice and obviously climate change in particular being the most urgent issue. It seems right now from your eyes what does progress on climate change. Look like both this year as you look at the end of the trump administration's first term and then looking into the future to the end of the decade or even two hundred fifty. How how do you get there on addressing climate change in these this political uncertainty and with the state? Sure well I think. In relationship to year it is a matter of educating folks on the power of their vote. You know we. Are you know just not that? Far Away from when everybody the opportunity to engage in our civic process So we need to make sure that people understand you know that their vote can actually translate into change it can translate into getting people Who you don't have to convince about you. Know the immediacy of the climate emergency It also helps folks understand that we can create a whole new set of economic opportunities in that space. I think that we also in this moment Continue to support young leaders And all the incredible energy and innovation that they have going on And letting them know how valued they are along with our frontline communities providing this or in that space and keeping the You know communication open with brothers and sisters across the planet which is so import Because unfortunately you know. Our current administration is kind of a closed. The doors zoo significant conversations with others all of that moving into November Getting the right sort of results there and then very very rapidly Getting in place a number of steps that are going to be critical as the IDC report. National Assessment report is share with us. You know we'll be in that nine year timeframe there so we'll have have to do a whole bunch of things very quickly To be able to address some very very Significant challenges that we're going to be faced. I'd imagine that if we're not in this era of social distancing right now we would be seeing rallies and protests around the world for the Fiftieth Birthday. Obviously that's not going to happen next week from your perspective as someone with very deep connections in organizing and communities and promoting change How has all of that changed in this new virtual world that we're in right now and I do think some of these changes are are gonNA stick in the way people organize even not being able to see each other face to face? I think it is you know again. It's an exciting time challenges. Bring out the best. Hopefully an in most votes and there were huge huge you know million plus people rallies that were planned and now folks have taken that online There are literally you all across our country and across the planet. A number of virtual events that are plant is exciting. I can't wait until Earth Day because there are so many artists and entertainers Who are going to be apart of helping to bring people together to motivate folks to get people you know connected You know in a number of different ways Young leaders and others. You know we've got the Earth Day network and others who just got all of these different opportunities to learn and engage. People are getting registered to vote online. Where we're where you can It's amazing saying how quickly people were able to sort a schist or pivot And get these pieces in place and I that you will see that. This is also building bridges between Jew bureaucracies organizations who may be had traditionally been as connected And you're going see you know these new online flat arms As ways you know just bring the country and bring others a more closely together in a time. We can't physically touch each other. We are touching each August Platforms in real. Change is not come out of that. That brings me to my last question. Which is your your work with the hip hop caucus. What is it about? Music and hip hop in particular makes it such a a critical or useful platform for speaking truth to power while you know many of these artists and entertainers you know they come. From what folks are talking about. You know it's not a theoretical sort of set of conversations or creations And music you know. Music has always been a big part of my life. But you know it is a connector. It is a bridge builder And you know hip hop is the number one musical genre. The world So you know all the various forms that are out there whether it's country music or Bluegrass or hip hop or raft Or classical Or you know some of the other forms that folks down you know. It's an opportunity To actually connect you know we have way too many walls that people bill between each other between communities between racists And it's an opportunity to break those down And instead of having walls you know to have so you know. I was so blessed to be at the Office for two years and very thankful for that experience because I got a chance to see and hear artist. You know who really got it. You know we work with the taboo from the black. Iv's and he and the magnificent seven to stand up for standing rock which won an MTV music awards for which really put a spotlight on what was going on there and standing rock but also you know y water quality is so important and how there's a cultural aspect to it and a number of others. You know Andy Smith. You know redoing the Beatles Song and just Gene everyone with under comes really pointing folks forward and looking at the positive audibility is really just a reach away so You know music. The Arts is a big part of this new paradigm of how we make change happen. There are times right now when all of us feel despair bleak somewhat alone because of all of this Who Do you put on? Who Do you listen to when you need to feel inspired? Wow there's so many folks on this direct a chance to rapper. I love chance the rapper because he uses his activism in in a very you know powerful way of you know getting resources to folks getting people engaged comment. I love comment He he just made everything he's the best he's the Best Cardi B. I love parts in the political process. And you know reaching a whole different set of folks in many others would be able to There's a laundry list of folks that I listened to and of course I would be remiss if I didn't give a shoutout to Chuck D People. Tease me all the time. 'cause public enemy was one of the first groups ivory started the follow back in the day. And to the you know so this particular moment you know chuck and arrest them are still killing it. Still Educating people and still letting people know that you know you have to fight out except for Flavor. Flav but will leave what they're all right. Mustafa Santiago Mustafa Santiago Ali. It has been a pleasure. Thank you so much for taking the time today. Thank you thank you. Y'All say less than and remember the we can help folks move from surviving to thriving and that's it for another episode of Go West Young podcast. I've got to say as bleak as these times. Are I really needed? A shot of optimism like that. Thanks so much again stuff. Santiago Ali as well as Patrick Dueling from the Western Slope Conservation Center. I do appreciate all of.

Mustafa Santiago Mustafa Santi Paris chuck president White House Environmental Justice Movement MTV Santiago Ali IDC Andy Smith Western Slope Conservation Cen Flav Patrick Dueling
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

16:20 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Again. Thank you and we're going to give the last word to Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico. Who is clearly thinking about his legacy and his family's legacy as he prepares to leave. The Senate wants. His term is up next January. The senators closing keynote at the conservation in the West. Symposium was both a warning and an invitation to the crowd and above all else. It was deeply personal. Take a listen. I am so glad to be out west because for me the West is home. As she mentioned my family homesteaded in the West almost one hundred eighty years ago we have roots in Utah Arizona. My Home State of New Mexico in here in Colorado Westerners have a special connection to the land are thousands of acres of gorgeous untamed beauty. Sixty mile vistas snow covered rugged mountains Alpine lakes and mountain streams and abundant wildlife. The Great Western writer Wallace stagner called the the west the geography of hope. And it sure is for me. The Wild beauty of the West will always inspire me and it inspires my public service and it probably is one of the biggest reasons I am in public service. As some of you know the Udall family has been working for a long time to protect the beauty and grander of the West. The she ran through quickly. So I'll just do it again but I was GonNa make all the connections but Uncle Mall. We call him uncle Mo he was the chair of the House Interior Committee. My cousin. Mark Your senator here and your House member for eighteen years Cousin Brad you may have not heard as much about him but a great water expert and climbing expert that is out of Colorado State University and lives up in Boulder and my father Stewart Udall. Worked in the cabinet a two presidents as Interior Secretary. So just last month we marked. What would have been my father's one hundredth birthday? That was on January thirty first twenty twenty and I've been reflecting on my dad's legacy it's become clear to me just how much we can and must learn from his vision. During my father's first year as secretary of Interior the head of the Bureau of Reclamation flew him over southern Utah to show him a site of the next big dam in. My Dad looked out of that airplane window and at the red rocks buyers below and he didn't see a damn. He saw the next national park and he went back to Washington and helped Create Canyon Lands National Park in one thousand nine hundred sixty three fifty seven years later. My Dad warned the nation about what he dubbed the quiet crisis in a book he wrote and President Kennedy wrote a forward in that book. He saw the creeping destruction of nature and wrote that. And these really writing this to all of us. You the younger folks that are here. You're the next generation. This is his quote. It's a pretty special quote. About what how you relate to the land and I'm quoting here. Each generation has its own rendezvous with the lamb for despite all our fee titles and claims of ownership. We are all briefed tenants on this planet by choice or by default we will carve out a land legacy for our heirs in quote along with scientist like his friend Rachel Carson. My Dad called on the nation to act with urgency. And and then the strangest thing happened. The Nation actually acted and in one thousand nine hundred sixty policymakers enacted many of our nation's bedrock conservation laws and preserved millions of acres of wild places. It's hard to imagine in this day. A bitter partisanship over environmental issues. But in the one thousand nine hundred sixties in the nineteen seventies congress passed these ground breaking laws on a strong bipartisan basis. And they did it. During the era of big dams and economic development at any cost. That was kind of the attitude them when conservation and economic when conservation and environmental protection were afterthoughts best. Now I didn't come here to talk to you about how great my dad was. He wouldn't have wanted that. He's a very modest guy. He would've wanted me and he wanted all of us to get to work on the problems at hand and we now have got our work cut out for us. The first challenge is what I call the nature crisis. Wildlife has never been in greater danger here and across the nation and the world we are losing species and habitat at unprecedented rates in human history since one thousand nine hundred seventy in North America. We've lost three billion birds in the US. A recent study found that we lose a football fields worth of habitat every thirty seconds a comprehensive. Un Biodiversity Study found that one million species risk extinction a sixth mass extinction upon us and less we act to preserve space for nature and the West why life is at risk the iconic plains Bison survived the ice age but it may not survive the age of humans plains. Bison what's number? Just think of this thirty to sixty million bison in the planes across North America now. The number is twenty thousand so thirty to sixty minute twenty thousand in its native. American tribes that are nurturing. The Bison Back. The once ubiquitous ubiquitous monarch butterfly found in eight Western. The poll states that we talked about earlier is in jeopardy populations of other pollinators like bees are crashing. Human existence depends on bio at least forty percent of the world's economy is based on biological resources. Biodiversity gives us food shelter Madison Economic Development Life itself as my father said in. This is a quote here from one of his books back. Many many years plans to protect air and water wilderness and wildlife are not in fact. Plans are in fact plans to protect man and today he was very conscious of women and he would have said he would have changed. Man The human beings protecting human beings and the nature crisis is inextricably linked to the climate crisis. Climate Change destroys habitat and can conditions necessary for healthy ecosystems and the fragmentation of habitat makes it harder for wildlife to adapt to a changing climate the destruction of forests and natural lands both creates greenhouse gases and reduces the potential for absorption of carbon dioxide. I don't have to explain what climate change is doing to the West water scarcity out of control wildfire pollution from fossil fuel production yet. The president who is down the road from US tonight isn't listening. He rolled back almost every effort. We have to fight climate change and save nature. He's withdrawn from the Paris Agreement. He's eliminated the clean power plan. He's trying to subsidize on economic coal fired plants. His administration has significantly weakened the endangered species act by rule. They've been viscerally. Clean Water Act protections. They're taking a hatchet to some of the most precious public lands with an unprecedented rollback of grand staircase and bears ears national monuments. The list is seemingly never ending. It's no exaggeration just fact that the trump administration has the worst environmental record in history. But I'm not here to make you depressed. I kind of felt there was an era of depression. Setting over all of you with all that. So we've gotten to the depress point. We're moving up. Okay just listen to this part. We're moving up so I I'm here to get you fired up okay. One of the most valuable lessons my father taught me was to learn from because everything we do every step we take is building on those who came before us in my father's time Lake Erie and the Cuyahoga River was on fire. The Bald Eagle was going extinct cities were clogged with smog. Factories dumped toxins into rivers without any limits and economic growth and the so-called progress. Where almost all people cared about. The leaders of the Environmental Movement fifty years ago met the challenges of their time and we must meet the challenges of our times because the quiet crisis my father wrote about in the sixties is not quiet no more the crisis of nature and the crisis of climate change have risen to a crescendo and the public is ready for action. We must ride a new playbook to save our planet and our way of life. Here's the good news. I'm here to tell you we can do it. The West is changed a mentally. Since my dad's era our economies have grown and diversified. Our cities have skylines. We have become much more diverse. The West has evolved and we've moved forward and so has public opinion especially on environmental issues. The people are demanding action. And that's why I'm confident. We can meet the challenges before us just like my father's generation. Two thirds of Westerners think climate change is a serious problem. That's up eleven percent in ten. Three-quarters want their members of Congress and governors to have a plan to reduce carbon pollution including a majority of Republicans seventy seven percent consider habitat loss for fish and wildlife to be a serious problem and seventy six percent support protecting wildlife quarters on public lands. So you've got Democrats and Republicans and independents sharing these views by big majorities. Despite what you see coming of Washington. There is an opportunity for fashioning consensus based solutions. It's beyond clear that the administration's rollback of all things environmental is wildly unpopular in the west. And here's the irony. The president's attacks or energizing the environmental movement in this country like we have not seen in a very long time. You Ask somebody like Colin who was on this panel here with the National Wildlife Federation. How's your membership drive doing? It's off the chart. You ask all the other groups that are concerned with all these issues. We're talking about membership. Is growing. People are energized. We need to harness that energy to ride a bold new conservation vision for the future vision. That doesn't just undo the trump administration's attacks but goes even bigger because if we only reverse the trump record it would be like putting a band aid on a life threatening wound senator. Tom Udall with a look back at his family's legacy and look forward to his own A. Let's wrap up with a look back at this week in Western history and I love this one because it all happened on our public lands are story starts in September of Nineteen eighty-seven when paleontologists at the Cleveland. Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry in Utah Under a nearly complete dinosaur egg. He was just over four inches long and two inches wide. It was broken. Open half with what appeared to be a dinosaur embryo still inside the following February. Which is to say this week in nineteen eighty eight? The scientists revealed their discovery to the world noting that it was the oldest dinosaur embryo ever found at the time because the egg was found around a lot of allosaurus bones. They said it likely came from an allosaurus. That's a big theropod. Predator looked a lot like a t rex but as the paleontologists continued to study the egg with cat. Scans and x-rays a different story emerged. The structure of that egg didn't match any of the known dinosaurs in the Cleveland. Lloyd quarry and the embryo wasn't developed enough to give any substantial clues so in other words it was almost certainly not an allosaurus but they were certain that the egg wasn't moved there. It appeared that the mother may have died before she could lay it and the egg remained inside the dead dinosaur. That could possibly explain why it was so well preserved. It's believed by the way that entire Corey there was a Predator trap. Think along the lines of the La Brea Tar pits in Los Angeles. This by the way is all from an article in Science magazine. That came out a year later. I looked for any follow up since then. I couldn't find any so it appears we still don't know what species of egg it was but that was not the end of the story for the Cleveland. Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry Back in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and eighty eight. It was a national natural landmark. It housed the first ever visitor center run by the Bureau of Land Management. That had opened back in sixty eight and over the decades more than fifteen thousand bones have been excavated from the quarry and last year thanks to the John Dingell Conservation Management and Recreation Act the Quarry. Got A new name. It became Jurassic.

West Senator Tom Udall senator Utah US Cleveland New Mexico Environmental Movement president scientist North America Lloyd quarry President Kennedy Senate Stewart Udall Udall Bureau of Land Management congress
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

12:58 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Montana Governor Steve Bullock laying out. What's at stake later on? In the day there was a great panel discussion with four conservation leaders on the future of conservation efforts in the West and even more so than in years past the threat that climate change poses kept coming up again and again. Here's Amara the. Ceo of National Wildlife Federation talking about how climate change has become an urgent and shared political issue in the West. I mean I think I think the roadmap for climate is very similar to the roadmap for public lands right. Make it hyper local. You make it things exactly as was said you know the abstract kind polar bears and Buffon's obviously did not get the job done as the messaging. But you're talking about fires in your backyard. Talking about Trout Stream. That's warming screwing up the spawning rates talking with the droughts Things that affect the backyard dinner table all of a sudden becomes real and I think you know all of a sudden it becomes a shared value. I think we're GONNA see the same evolution on climate that we did the public lands. Where you frankly can't win if you're on the wrong side of this issue over time and we're seeing it already in Colorado. We're seeing already in New Mexico little little bit in a few of the other states. But you know I don't WanNa get too far on the politics but the only way to really lose as a Republican right now. Some of these deep red states is on the wrong side of public lands. We can do the same thing with climate right vic. Values basement by local investment local solutions. Again not overly federal top down kind of working with community solutions and making sure. Natural solutions are big part of the conversation. Making sure that we're really trying to lift up industries and you'll build the outdoor economy but that's the pathway and really. The last few years have shown this right. I mean Montana. Governor Bullock should not have won his race right president trump card this date by almost twenty points. He ends up winning by four same thing in the same thing in the Senate race John last time. Right weed beets Rosendahl. Obviously that race should not have been won by a Democrat trump. Was there four times but again on public lands and all this kind of public lands and kind of being the frame but public lands in particular being on the wrong side of the issue is just say death-knell and we're GONNA see that. Play out again this time in a couple of Senate seats and we're also seeing that folks are trying to quickly become more on the right side of public lands to try to salvage. Senate seats right now. So how that plays out. I think it's GonNa be really important. We're GONNA see the same thing on climate. I mean it's just spend a Lotta time in DC. It's so great to be. You're not in the swamp for a day but the the denier kind of rhetoric is fading very quickly all of a sudden now it's about innovation research or hey we need to know more but it's not the denial and we saw years ago. That's because the impacts display of folks have been fed kind of through the meat through very specific media and kind of talk radio and the like And even on Fox. What they're seeing is fundamentally different and all of a sudden if we can connect our values to what they're seeing with reasonable solutions of some that becomes a value and that's how the politics shift overnight. We also heard from. Len neces- for who you may recall from our live episode in Tucson last summer. Len is an assistant professor at the University of Arizona's American Indian studies program as well as the Udall Center for public policy. There as if that's not enough. He is the CEO of outdoor Apparel Company natives outdoors. He is also literally a rocket scientist. Having worked at an ESA research center on supersonic vehicles. So with all the things Sleng could talk about. He focused on tribal sovereignty and respect and the progress that has been made and then rolled back over the last few years In the Obama Administration there was some strides made towards meaningful consultation of federal agencies and actions. That happen On Public Lands Unfortunately it was incomplete You know one of the things that I like to say. That could improve. This is is uniformity across agencies Making sure that these processes of how tribes talk and consulted in the in the process of this federal decision making this consistent also accountability. That's accountability for federal agencies. That's been one of the pitfalls of the processes that in many cases in this administration if tribes sent an email about a particular decision that's considered consultation and the last is also ensuring that tribes voices have a meaningful influence on the decisions that are made right now in my backyard in Tucson. The border wall is a great example of that The act that basically allowed for this. The construction of the New Wall. waved a lot of Environmental and cultural Laws and considerations in in its development in order to speed it's process one of them is the native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and Just a few days ago there was a the basically a controlled explosion of an area that was a native American grave right along. The border and the tribe wasn't consulted on this You know this is one of the many ways in which this plays out. And at least for the Autumn Tribe. It's very real in terms of impacting their heritage in connection to the landscape our executive director here at the Center for Western priorities. General Kla was also on that panel. She highlighted the way public. Land's can help rural economies but also the importance of not focusing that impact on just a handful of ultra popular places and then putting those lands at risk from overuse governor bullock. Touched on this when he talked about The offices of outdoor recreation and I think a of States Colorado Utah Montana Oregon. I don't have the list in front of me. But a number of states have created these outdoor offices of recreation to help bring the out directly Konami to communities throughout the West but also make sure that the impact is Not Hurting our public lands but enhancing our public lands so growing the economy in these communities and spreading it out so that businesses are relocating to communities That might be you know losing You know the traditional energy economy and creating a an out directly Konomi that is a clean economy so I think the outdoor offices outdoor REC offices have been had a had a great impact. And we're seeing more states Add those to their governor's offices and finally my tape. Rc CEO of Hispanic Access Foundation. She highlighted the impact that the land and Water Conservation Fund in particular has had on diverse communities across the country. I think the biggest success in the last ten years one that I really care about In all mention a couple is that Communities a more diverse communities are really engaging in the conservation movement and really starting to lead their campaigns and and work that's important to them in communities in the way that We need Those communities to lead I think one of the quiet But very important policies and programs out there is the land in Water Conservation Fund. And there's been such a such a challenge to have reauthorized every time that it comes around and then also funded and the permanent reauthorization of the land and Water Conservation Fund was really critical because it provides it has provided resources to our parks and waterways for in all fifty states and and in so many communities including mind growing up in southern California Really helps provide resources for trails and for for Campaigned A camping areas and and other recreational areas but is also provides more safe and and areas for kids and families to recreate. That has been a hard policy and program to really A make sure that all of US support because it's not been branded very well. It's not a well known a program but yet it touches all of our lives and it's been in the last year when it was reauthorized permanently And we don't have to have that challenge in the future. It's really exciting now. We just have to really focus on getting it funded. Let's bring in the pollsters who did the heavy lifting here. Laurie Weigel with newbridge strategy and Dave mets with FM three. Laurie Republican pollster. Dave is democratic pollster and that is one of the reasons why the Colorado College conservation in the West Pole is the gold standard when it comes to public opinion on outdoor issues. Laurien Dave. Welcome back to the PODCAST. So let's get the basics out of the way here. This is a big poll. You've got thirty. Two hundred people polled across Arizona. Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah and Wyoming which is to say four hundred voters in each state the polls conducted in English and Spanish. And all of the regionwide numbers that we're going to be talking about here. You've waited them to reflect the population of each state. Did I get the basics down here? I want to start by asking both of you to pick out what you think the biggest takeaway was from the sears poll and Loria let you go first. I thank you So I think one of the one of the real benefits of the survey has been that we've been able to ask people about various issues over the last ten years. So the the tent survey that we've conducted and while we haven't tracked every single question the same you know. We made a concerted effort this year to kind of go back in the archives. Look at some of the things we asked the very first year in two thousand eleven and assess how people are responding and so one of the biggest areas of change which obviously penn state is just where climate changes and attitude on climate change. It went really not being top of mind. It all when we asked people in two thousand eleven but just tell us the most important environmental problems or issues today to being tied is number one so from five percent in two thousand eleven volunteering that issue basically a third of voters throughout the West just immediately thinking of climate change as as a big environmental issue and every single question that we asked about climate change that we attract from two thousand eleven we thought Increasingly people are concerned and say the serious issue And that they want action to be taken on it. So that was that was a real big change From from essentially a decade ago. That's a a remarkable shift in a short amount of time. Dave and the other changes that you've noticed over the years here that stuck this year. Well one of the big ones that stood out to me was the importance of the environment as an issue that people are focusing on when they're making decisions about how to vote Obviously this is an election year and so Issues relating to land and Water and wildlife or not just important in their own right but in terms of who we're going to elect to handle these issues over the course of the next few years And in this year's poll we saw a dramatic increase in the importance of these issues to voters relative to what we've seen in past election cycles Eighty percent of voters told us that Issues relating to clean air. Clean Air while I'm sorry. Modern Clean Air. Wildlife in public lands are important issues for them and deciding whether to vote for an elected official including forty four percent who said it was either a primary factor or very important issue to them. That's almost half of the western electric and those numbers are up dramatically from where they were in two thousand sixteen just four years ago heading into the last presidential election equivalent. Figure was only thirty one percent. So that's a thirteen point jump in the intensity of attention that people are paying to conservation issues in just for years And I think that speaks to a degree of Sort of interested people have had as as at least federal level. We've taken a radically different direction. in terms of protections for Land Water Wildlife With the new administration. That's been in place since twenty six and that was a fairly remarkable number that stuck out to me asking voters about overall priorities. How WE SHOULD USE PUBLIC LANDS PROTECTING CLEAN? Water and air versus maximizing the use of public lands for responsible oil and gas drilling..

Montana West Colorado Governor Bullock Dave mets Ceo Water Conservation Fund Len neces Tucson Senate National Wildlife Federation Buffon Trout Stream US New Mexico Obama Administration Arizona outdoor Apparel Company
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

15:46 min | 2 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"But if if David Bernhardt said I'm not GonNa do this myself. But since his deputy Pity Katherine Macgregor. WHO's currently awaiting Senate confirmation? She can go. Have these meetings promise whatever she wants. Report back to Bernhardt Bernhardt can wipe his hands and say well. I had had nothing to do with that. And that's all technically within the bounds of the law. Basically oh absolutely there are many ways to skirt it and they appear good at that. So what's the solution. I mean this is part of I. Guess a much bigger picture on money in corporate influence in politics Is this is a need for stronger. Ethics laws better quicker disclosure. Just banning. Lobbying what you do here well I you know I think a big part of this is attention in with public input and at the same time that these folks are taking meetings with lobbyists in making decisions on behalf of corporations. They're also taking actions to shut out the public. And I I think if you look at some of the research on the the tangible things So let let's talk about a couple of examples real quick because this will show it So trilogy. Metals also a foreign owned mining company. That wants to build a mine in Alaska needs a two hundred eleven mile access road crossing gates of the Arctic National National Park and preserve to get there The you know they hired a long road. Let's a long road. It's Alaska. There aren't many roads around But they hired Bernhardt sold firm And then a month later got a draft environmental study out of the B. L. M. moving forward with it what happened in that draft environmental study hunters anglers conservationist opposed it because this road is going to be closed to the public. It's going to damage seasonal hunting and fishing their significant impacts on recreation nation in the National Park. So this is the thing where the public has been opposed to raise serious concerns and yet you've got a foreign mining company paying Lobbyists yes with access. And they're probably going to get what they want over the all. The local objections Any other good examples. We should be watching out for here. Uh well let's do another mining one. Yeah we can go through a couple of Rocky Mountain Yeah so rocky. Mountain resources a mining company owned by the son of the founder of Burn hearts former lobbying oh connections do connections yes. wants to expand a limestone mine outside of Glenwood Springs Colorado a thriving tourist town got iconic hot springs. There the town is staunchly opposed to it. I've never heard of this before. But the town has ponied up one point two million billion to fight it is a small town. That's could change a child's okay. I and they've gotten all the surrounding cities to oppose it But at the same time I did mine. Owner has hired the lobbying firm to lobby form. Do all their legal work so the Sun has hired the dad to lobby the former employees. Yes this was Bernhardt sole boss So this is an area where I'd be very curious to see how it plays out but at least now. The Bureau of land-management has accepted their application for a big mine expansion. And they're going to move forward with studying that in two thousand twenty. Wow any other common threads here at obviously the multinational corporations I WANNA ask about critical minerals and uranium. Because that's one of these under reported stories that seems like has been kind of fish cruising under the radar for a little bit. Is this one of these things we could see. Come do ahead in twenty twenty. Yeah I mean I think this is all very on brand for the trump administration which is being captured by industry Whether there are lobbyists. CBS involved or not and captured by foreign interests. Out whether there are lobbyists involved or not and So what Aaron Delude to is recently to uranium companies that are operating in the US but they are both headquartered abroad. asked this administration for a quota on US produced uranium so in response once trump put together a nuclear fuels working group which is made up of a bunch of high level administration officials and ask them for recommendations. How do we scale up and expand Andrea Mining in the United States? This is a clear win for those foreign owned companies and what we do know right now is that that report has already ended up on the president's desk we don't know when the recommendations will be made public But the problem is that uranium is governed by the General Mining Act of eighteen seventy two and so this law that allows foreign companies to trounce all over public lands to leave a mess to not pay a dime to US tax payers. This is going to be the law that governs any ramping up of of uranium mining in the West. When we're talking about uranium mining we're talking about southern Utah and around the Grand Canyon so in and that's exactly what's likely going to happen is that this is not the only only hand out to the uranium mining industry they recently the the trump administration recently published a critical mineral strategy that aims to cut environmental review and would open more acres rush to permit new mines on public lands hands and would likely lead to rolling back bands around really special places in the West like the Grand Canyon and would likely lead to more mining and places that and we're protected and then had those protections rolled back like bears ears National Monument? And let's talk about the lobbyists side of this real quick. This is a really juicy part. I'm so one of the companies that asked for all of these. Favors is energy fuels resources. A Canadian owned Firm these folks have been at eyeball deep and trying to reduce lose protections. They operate a mind next to the Grand Canyon. WanNa see more mining around there and they also hired Andrew Wheeler The head of the Environment Agency to lobby before them and he lobbied to reduce the size of bears ears national monument got what they wanted. I mean these folks. This company was literally going around when the Interior Secretary Toward Award bears US handing out maps of what they wanted. Cut Out of that monument and they got it and so I I will say this is a Hail Mary for them you know. I'm looking at their stock price right. Now it's a dollar Eighty six they are in trump is not a company in good financial shape. No and so. This is kind of like a hail. Mary of please help us. Were about to go under. And I suppose that gets. It's back to to bonding requirements and can accompany like energy fuels where clearly the they're in the cash crunch already. Could they afford to clean up the mess they make. especially if that involves contaminating water around the Grand Canyon exactly or will they just go bankrupt and leave local communities holding the bag. Which is what we've seen time after time throughout the course of history nation? Exactly all right. Let's take step back because this is our last episode of Two Thousand Nineteen our last episode of the decade. I won't ask you to a decade in review. But let's let's let's do a little a little year in review highlights highlights low lights and set the stage for what folks should be looking for in two thousand twenty when it comes to public lands the Interior Department what the trump trump administration may or may not do what Congress may or may not do as we get into into next year man. That is a tough question. I think when it when it comes to highlights there are a few things with Congress where there have been You just getting news out today that we're going to get America's newest National Park Doc whitesands in New Mexico some increased funding for the land and Water Conservation Fund. Even though it's not permanent and full funding that is all good stuff and the year started with a giant public lands. Bill passing exactly. Gosh it's hard to think back. That was January but yeah it was just this just this year and I you know on the LOWLIGHTS I. It's the continued March of Industry giveaways on our our public lands. I think is just It's remarkable emmy. We've seen rules safety rules. Road roll back on offshore drilling. They were done after the deepwater horizon. Or you've seen Lee sales in the Arctic national wildlife advanced at just increased leasing in wildlife corridors sage grouse habitat near national parks. I mean to beat goes on So it's certainly not a rosy picture I have a highlight highlight Angelo light. which is if you remember? I guess it was it. January second of this year Zinke was no longer secretary of the interior burn. Her even only believe for less than a year secretary exactly. So that's The low light part of it. Which is David Burt? Hunt has been in there being swampy and really steadily getting things done. He's it's proven that he can get things done and he is attacking For All the things that Jesse just laid out he's attacking the varmint left and right I think that yes we did start out the year with President trump signing a sweeping bipartisan public. Land Package but let's remember that he's actually unprotected. Did Thirteen and a half million acres. I think that is a a low light and work at just continue to be able to see those acres Stock Up and if this is if this is the last year are coming up. We're GONNA see that just continuing and we're going to need to be keeping our eyes on how many acres are being unprotected. And then what we need to do to get these places back back in protection and when we hopefully have an administration that eventually cares about the environment cares about public lands. Well I in. On that note come January there will be roughly affliate year left on on this current administration Should they be one term or not and I think there's a recognition as happens with administrations. That time is running out. Um I'm and they've got a lot of stuff on their list that they want to accomplish in that time and so that's something where you know. I think we'll be watching more. Oil and gas safeguards be rolled back Morley Lee sales happening. I did possibly a rollback of the California desert renewable energy conservation plan so this is something that will be monitoring for the next year and I presume more potential rule changes than if they're going to try and get stuff finalized and into the Federal Register. They've they've got a clock. Ticking on them absolutely I you mentioned Ryan Zinke. I suppose it's worth pointing out that among Ryan Zinke. He's new employers. In addition to his bizarre crypto Currency Scheme He is working for Gold Company. So everything comes full circle. Yeah and just just just to go back to the ties between these two pieces of research I if you look at that. Thirty six clients that burn hearts former firm is representing a full quarter of those or foreign owned and of the mining companies that they are going to bat for for the five or foreign on the on the fifth one. The one that's not included in that is owned by the son of the law firms founder. So it's a swampy Asher all right. I think we're going to leave the swamping this there for now. Nicole gentilly with the Center for American progress. Jesse Prentice Intas done here at the Center for Western priorities. Thank you both and happy holidays and happy New Year. Thank.

Grand Canyon secretary David Bernhardt Ryan Zinke US Bernhardt Bernhardt Jesse Prentice Intas National Park founder Alaska president Katherine Macgregor Senate Andrea Mining Bernhardt Rocky Mountain Arctic National National Park CBS Asher
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

12:47 min | 3 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"And caring about the outdoors <hes> and if we talk about more broadly <hes> beyond native nations and other communities <hes> really were were. We're in the midst of a sixth mass extinction and it's gonna take all of us and it's going to take all of us carrying about the environment and going out for a walk in a national park or just going out to your local park. These are ways in which we can connect with nature and if we create more stakeholders who are invested in the protection of our natural world. I think there's a real value in doing that and you know in reality were in forty fifty years minorities will be the majority and one of the things that the outdoor industry can provide his ensuring that all of us have a stake in the outdoors now we may not have forty fifty years depending on climate change and how quickly things happen so congressman. How how do we on the national level affects change when at least at this moment the senate doesn't seem to have any interest chryst in taking serious climate action. The senate is quite an abyss but i i think i really believe that what we're trying to do. Around the issue of climate change is to talk about the fact that it is a reality. It is science based. We don't have to have the denial debate again. That's pointless and and and to and to start to talk about it in every area that we're doing the first aid series that we had as a committee at the beginning were all in climate change in every every sub-committee mitty dealing with indigenous nations dealing with <hes> water dealing with oceans dealing with public lands and to profile that as a a grave concern for the american people and what's going on in the amazon. We're twenty percent of our lungs are being jeopardised right now as as as a planet a- and and then again that is driven by greed you know those those fires documented that they were they were full in order to create the space for other industries clearcutting cattle and other issues that then jeopardized the overall health of the planet. I i think that climate change is a defining issue for this for us right right now. The urgency is immediate and the deniers well in the driver's seat in the sense of of the administration are not what public public opinion is about that has changed dramatically and back to the point i think about you know the the conservation movement and the environmental movement and that <unk> whole ethic dispense depends entirely in his constituency for four at substance and to keep these issues alive and strong and keep the areas that we want protected and i've been preaching since i got into this committee about the fact that this is a issue that that needs to be very inclusive that needs to build a constituency of the future they too will be part of this protection and this ethic thick and and that that works still lies ahead of us but i think progress has been made in good examples the door district great advocates the on the issue bears ears and others. They moved there <hes> much of their national. They're big national gathering from utah salt lake city colorado as a means to make a statement statement that we we're going to participate help an advocate for what we believe yes. It's a part business decision food but also for the outdoor industry. It's it's a lifeline that they need to keep going and so they've been great advocates in great allies throughout this stephanie. You've spent a career in conservation and advocacy from academia to league of conservation voters. How have you seen the conservation world and the conversations around land protection conservation water. How's that changed over the last ten or twenty years. I think that it conservation and the environment used to be much less political and i was in washington d._c. For seventeen years i worked in the reagan administration on commission called the president's president's commission on americans outdoors that was led by lamar alexander who had been president of the national geographic society and was considered to be a strong strong conservationist all in tennessee yes correct but those days of cooperation collaboration on if you look back at some of the most impactful environmental laws that were passed. They were passed in republican administrations conservation. I worked at the nature conservancy servants. That was my first at the national nature conservancy in the eighties. That was my first environmental job and we used to say conservation is conservative value and that really has it's been progressively getting worse but it is actually now you see people who have a very specific reason to want to overturn environmental laws responsible for guarding being a guardian the and of those same environmental laws. It's it's beyond i mean. It's just hard to even for those of us. Who've been doing this for as long as i have. It's just really hard to watch. I mean today. The latest one was rolling back the methane rules and i worked on those. I worked on the clean air act. I worked on the clean water act. I worked on getting out of the great lakes. I mean so i i mean i just find it's really gotten to the point where they say we're so lucky to have congressman gra helluva there and the oversight and our a majority that can at least exercise oversight. We've got the courts thank goodness and they seem to be in a lot of cases doing their jobs and we still do have science i use so i mean the sonority institute actually was very involved in the early days with rosemont because we actually employed a fulltime mining economist and that's extremely unusual for environmental groups but we live in arizona and there are a lot of mines in arizona and so we felt it was compelling to make the economic argument for why certain types of mining were detrimental to the economic wellbeing of arizona arizona's and we did a study on rosemont mine and we were able to prove that rosemont was actually negative for the economy me and not positive and that it would detract far more from recreation and tourism and other businesses that were creating contributing to the environment than it would in terms of long term employment and the kinds of jobs and someone that they were talking about. We did the same thing in southern california at the request of senator your feinstein during the obama administration and we did a mining study on the cal desert and found the same types of economic arguments saying that it it was far better not to continue to destroy the california desert for mining because it would detract from the economic vibrancy that was provided by tourism and recreation and other values and that led to the creation of two national monuments in the previous administration so that she was able to use that study to be able to argue for those national monument so we've got the courts. We've got science. We've got roll and we got all of you. I i mean you got to vote right. You gotta you gotta show up you got to you've got to take ownership of these resources that we value so much and and we've just we've got a we've got everything goes in cycles right so we've got to hope that the cycles about to turn were were starting to run short on time so i want to switch to a speed round here as best we can lend i wanna go back to the film that you produced for you a member of the navajo nation producing a film home about <hes> the wichian in alaska. What did you learn from about about the kitchen and about the alaska in the alaska natives that surprised you over the course of making that film i mean one the story of bears arctic refuge or the same story. The backdrops changed changed. Was i mean i don't wanna say surprised but one of the other things i think with alaska that is particularly important is yes just how connected people are to the landscape in in the fact that many of these communities don't live in full cash economies that people still fully depend on on getting food from the land and that's what makes life valuable rich and enriching their and the threats that the arctic refuge in opening up the coastal plain to oil and gas development is threatening and entire people's way of life and real quickly. You've got a show coming up here in tucson yeah actually this saturday at r._e._i. Six to eight p._m. Brought to you by the wilderness society and patagonia <hes> congressman real quick land and water conservation fund. Do you think we have a chance at getting full funding past the session or we looking into twenty twenty one. I think out of the house we have a we have a very good opportunity thirty. It's but but like you know and i meant it facetiously but it's true where we're progress on that goes would would be dependent on <hes> on the senate but <hes> make a making the land and water conservation fund permanent was step number one <hes> fully funding it and having a level where more communities and more projects can access that fund is the next step in that requires that we have have a line item that begins to provide that kind of budgetary support to the land and water conservation board now that it's permanent and so yeah i feel good about up the house representatives doing this <hes> the question remains. How far will we get in the senate but it'll be i people say. Why are you passing. I've seen these bills when it's not gonna go anywhere in the senate i think you're also setting a template that that people the american people can see that there are obvious obvious choices going forward and hopefully that gives us some impetus and but some pressure on my senate colleagues to look at these things much more seriously than they are right now and stephanie real quick. I want to hear about the bilingual mapping survey as part of your work that you did on the santa cruz because because a lot of this conversation has become the importance of telling stories so we're just kind of in the infancy infancy of rolling out the results also that but we felt that well one of the one of the ways to connect people and communities to the natural resources that nourish and sustain them is to listen to their stories just exactly as when was talking about and so we we wanted to go out and hear the stories and the stories are not of one language so we we're by national organization our largest offices in cali mexico <hes> it's actually early twice as large as our arizona and colorado operations right now so because of our work in the colorado river delta so to be a truly by national organization often we talk about the places that we work as being more than try national because of our connection with the tribes and with with the multicultural aspects and so so this was a way of engaging the community but also doing a learning tour and are listening toward hear these stories and be able to catalogue these stories and <hes>. I'd like to give a shout out to a couple of my team members that are here because they were very instrumental in both coming up with the idea implementing the history and then <hes> i and then getting it out to our members and other stakeholders and so i have.

senate congressman arizona alaska colorado rosemont nature conservancy president washington california santa cruz amazon utah salt lake lamar alexander reagan administration colorado river delta
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

15:01 min | 3 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"It shows the real impact on the ground of the trump administration's public land's policies. We're going to dive into three new land. Management plans from three different states and what you see when you put all these plans side by side is going to be a concerted effort to not just ignore conservation efforts but <unk> ignore all public input from elected officials and citizens years years of planning and negotiations and hard work on the ground by the folks who know the land the best all of that is getting thrown out right now by the trump administration so keep listening to this one even if your eyes glaze over at terms like resource management plans because this conversation really opened opened my eyes to what's going on and i follow this stuff for a living all right a little housekeeping and then we will get into the news. Thanks first of all to everyone who came came out to our live show in santa fe last month. That was truly a blast to be. There are next live. Taping is going to be in tucson arizona. At the end of august august. We are locking down all the final details right now <hes> pencil in august twenty ninth on your calendar and we will have more details coming your way very soon and after that montana we are coming your way in late september okay onto the news. There's a new guy at the top of bureau of land management entertainment. His name is william perry bentley and considering that b._l._m. Directors very rarely make headlines. It's worth paying attention to how and why penalties appointment is making waves so penalty used to be the longtime president of group called. The mountain states legal foundation. They have been an incredibly lee outspoken opponent of just about everything. The bureau of land management does end stand for most notably. The foundation argues that public lands it should not belong to the american people they should instead be sold off to private parties or two states and as recently as twenty sixteen pennsly- italy wrote in the national review quote founding fathers intended all lands owned by the federal government to be sold. He's twitter handle is is sagebrush underscore rebel and that is also one of the many book titles he has written advocating for the wholesale disposal of of national public lands and this is the guy who is now running the agency that oversees more public land's than any other agency in the entire federal government and keep in mind. He's running this agency just by appointment. This is supposed to be a senate confirmed position. Listen but david bernhardt president trump wouldn't even nominate him officially to be be director. Because of course there's a really good chance even with the republican controlled rolled senate and extremist pennsly- would not be confirmed so he's officially a deputy director in function now however he he is the acting director and there is no sign of an actual nomination coming anytime soon so here's a good sign of just how far out there piddly as we are now two and a half years into the trump administration rank and file civil servants have by and large kept their heads down and their mouths shut this whole time. That's now starting to change one unnamed b. l. An employee told huffpost quote. This is sagebrush rebellion twenty twenty twenty adding the penalties appointment quote fits with this administration that is trying to destroy everything in the name of prophets as we face serious economic mkx and environmental catastrophe now. That's coming from a career civil servant. It takes a lot for them to say things like that out loud out to put their careers on the line. There was another unnamed b._l._m. Employees who was even more succinct that person told ian news quote he looks end sounds like a nutjob so he should fit in with the rest of the politicals at d._r._i. We spend a lot of time on this podcast. Ask talking about ethics and scandals and outrages at the interior department but it's in the details on the ground where things actually get done and in the midst midst of all the national stories that get so much attention there is a trend that is flying below the radar and it has the potential to affect public lands for years or even decades after the trump administration has gone. We're talking about resource management plans and i know that may sound boring on the face of it but they are arguably the most important documents that exist when it comes to america's public land's our guests. Today are going to help explain why i first off. We've got mike penfold. Mike is the former state director of the bureau of land management in both montana and alaska. Mike welcome thank you. We've got mark pearson listen. He's with the san. Juan citizens alliance out of southwest colorado glad to be here and we have kristen henry. He is with the oregon chapter of back country hunters and anglers tristen. Thank you for being on the line. How would it be here. Thank you mike. Let's start with you. Since making land management plans lanes was literally your job. How is this process supposed to work well aaron. You're really on the right track to this. Some really bad stuff is happening. <hes> below the radar. I mean when you take a look at <hes> both beal and the national forest service they have very competent people located aided out there on the ground in small communities and you've got <hes> range conservationist wild by biologist watersheds specialists and whole array of different burnt <hes> natural resource specialist who really do know their thing they also have important <hes> technical aliquippa like g._i. <hes> some databanks and understanding of those natural resources and how they can be managed sustainably so it's that that kind of <hes> a personnel that is supposed to develop the plans and generally they have been doing a very good job of it <hes> the public catch a lotta chance to have input to see what they would like to have in the plans and there's a lot of technical <hes> public involvement and those be the forest service technical people put <hes> several options of plans that <hes> that will be used for the next twenty years together the public to comment on and the public comments on them. There's not agreement most the time there's different ideas on how the land should be used but fundamentally those plans are finally developed and approved <hes> out in the field <hes> so it's it's a complex process. It works pretty well. It's it's whoa competently competently done so that's kinda. Outs supposed to work and that's not what's happening today so it. It's the sausage making process. Essentially it's never pretty when you see it gets made but everyone is hopefully marginally happy or at least not terribly unhappy when it's all said and done john's that the the ultimate goal generally a lot of that's the case <hes> and thing that's happening more recently as a lot of collaborative activities are going on where you bring the various people together from different points of view and work <hes> intensively <hes> to work out options that make sense to you know whether you're a mineral developer or arrange your livestock operator or forester <hes> timber operator or or v recreationists person <music> a where you bring those people together and they come up with the options <hes> that really kinda makes sense and some of that's being thrown out the window now today so mark mark <hes> in southwest colorado is what mike described how it had worked in your neck of the woods or or what changed means when the trump administration came in yes thanks <hes> <hes> the <hes> we have a great <hes> sort of example case here where we had a draft plan that came out in two thousand sixteen under the previous administration and then if i don't plan that was there's a complete total one hundred eighty degree flip flop <hes> they just came out in the last month or so that <hes> eliminated all of those sort of collaboratively typically <hes> reached conclusions that mike referenced and that's for <hes> a part of the world around the uncle padre plateau which is a big high plateau oh and western colorado south of grand junction and west of montrose and as with many of the landscapes in the west the highest parts of the plateau oh or or managed by the phone service and then the lower slopes <hes> going down into the arid <hes> bottomland surrounding the plateau are managed by the b._l._m. Mm-hmm and you can imagine that it's really important for the life histories of big wildlife her to be able to move back and forth up to the the highest parts of the plateau in the summer and then down to the lower slopes where where they winter and we had a we have a pretty proactive incompetent professional b. m. office and they recognize the value of those wildlife corridors and came up with a <hes> a really <hes> <hes> future is stake in visionary approach to protect those wildlife corridors and they propose something they'd called ecological emphasis areas but they were really protecting seen those really crucial wildlife corridors up and down on compadres plateau and that that covered one hundred seventy five thousand acres in their draft plan and and it was applauded by by many stakeholders and and when the final plan was released a month or so ago all of that had been completely obliterated from the final planned every single mention of these ecological emphasis areas and wildlife corridors was extinguished from the plan and and that was done with the explicit direction from the washington office to override the professional field experience of the of the managers they had made that made that recommendation addition so that's just one really <hes> specific egregious example of how this <hes> proposed <hes> energy dominance agenda of the trump administration is playing out on the ground in real life so what was the time difference there between that first draft that clearly had been worked on on the ground and and what we finally saw out of the trump administration how much time it pass that was three years but even so two thousand sixteen was the draft but even even more interesting is that at the beginning of this year in january the b._l._m. Frequently releases these draft plans to their that that county governments who are there sorta cooperating agencies and partners and the draft plan that was given to the counties in january still had most of this wildlife corridor stuff in it and then somehow somehow the last few months all that got sanitized at the direction of of <hes> you know the washington office and the interior department and you know they are trying to implement this energy first energy dominance oil gas is the highest priority everywhere in the west and in this tangible changeable outcome that we saw in this local plan in our neck of the woods tristen. Let's let's bring you in here. You're in oregon. Did you see something similar similar with the management plans where you are. You know. It sounds an awful lot like we're talking about the same <hes> the same districts <hes> the avail district was charged with creating our m._p. Or rather <hes> amending in our m._p. That was submitted in two thousand twelve god <hes> on the basis that they had on the basis that <hes> some critical inventories had been omitted <hes> and then fast forward to now. We're saying again extensively at the direction of that <hes> the preferred alternative being table is is falls utterly short as it pretends to all conservation issues really top to bottom and they were looking good from your perspective as as a sportsman <hes> it's things changed or was it just looking bad all along from from where you're you're well. I think we may be putting the cart a short horse but <hes> the the <hes> yeah the southeast oregon in <hes> resource management plan <hes> had had failed to identify some lands of wilderness characteristics and and again without <hes> head of ourselves those those places are just so critical to <hes> to wildlife conservation and and maintaining a healthy large tracts of land for migrating wintering populations of animals so <hes> yet they're they're of critical importance in to see them omitted from a preferred alternative is frankly gut wrenching so i just wanna clarify the difference between what tristen is talking about out who you're talking about a draft resource management plan that was released this year and mark in the case of the uncompleted gary very <hes> management plan that was the draft was released under the obama administration and then finalized and stuff was switched up under the trump administration's so that's where we're seeing the the difference in in time line that mark was talking about that. We haven't seen obviously in oregon because it's just at the draft phase right right now so tryst and keep going then if you could <hes> what are you doing. What's back under hunters and anglers doing and are who are you working with the in oregon to try somehow to to turn this thing around so there's a pretty diverse group of local stakeholders as as both mike and mark mentioned those those players are critical to to seeing <hes> this public process played out <hes> the arm p currently being discussed guide resource management in the district for the next twenty years so <hes> it'll it'll direct grazing o._h. Usage investment in conservation initiatives that title directly impact fish and wildlife management and therefore <hes>.

oregon Mike director mark pearson colorado senate president montana mike tucson twitter trump arizona santa fe washington mike penfold federal government huffpost william perry bentley pennsly- italy
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"The biker you know the camper the fishermen but I think one of the things we also have to do is bring the industries that support them as well into New Mexico and is that say the manufacturing or the the outdoor recreation the industry at large not just the recreation part correct manufacturers concessionaires yeah Paul. Let me ask you a someone earlier mentioned that so many of these places in New Mexico put them anywhere else in the country and they're instantly a national park because they are so spectacular from your perspective as an archaeologist if you could wave a magic wand and ensure some places both studied and protected where are the next places in New Mexico that need that national park status because they are as spectacular as a Mesa Verde or or or we're Choco while that's that's a pretty broad question. I usually try to keep the lectures tonight hours. That works for everybody. Well you know we may have to follow up on on that. I think there's some areas you know. The National Monument is a place that I've worked as an archaeologist now for almost fifteen years and that is a phenomenal landscape for any of you who have not been out there or those who have. I think that's ads waiting. We've talked about the idea of Greater Choco in some way but I think the checkerboard status with state lands tribal trust lands tribal allotted lands makes that super complicated around chock. Oh so I probably that's kind of the opposite love. You'd actually asked me you know I I could get your last part of the thing too. Though is you know before. These lands are protected. We Really WanNa talk about them. Publicly so that's kind of a useful dodge <hes> just for me but there there are a number of areas and I agree with the sentiment that in other states these areas probably already would be protected. I've been in New Mexico since nineteen eighty-four and I feel like New Mexico's biggest benefit from my perspective is that there's not a lot of people here but that's sort of the there's two sides of that coin so we don't have a lot of people you can go places within thirty minutes of Santa Fe five minutes from my house and never see a person all day up around towels so that's a benefit. The opposite side of the coin is we don't have a lot of capital in some places in our state and so we it's a mixed blessing is what I would say but I think there's great potential to protect moorlands across our states and and I think as political change perhaps is in the win next year I. I don't know who knows we might see some things change before we move onto the fun stuff. Let me ask all three of you. What am I not asking? What what am I missing in terms of what's important with New Mexico and the Energy and conservation and outdoor future here? Can we talk a little bit about wildlife corridors lease. Let's talk about wildlife corridors some more yeah so just you know the the really important notion that connectivity could potentially mean life and death for individual animals but also extinction for certain species and even as we look to things like construction of a border wall there are the very real human impacts economic impacts but there are also impacts on wildlife and to the extent that we can do our development expansion of our populations in in concert with our wildlife populations. I really think that prioritizing that will benefit fit the ecosystem itself just like you talk about watersheds that that reach over different land status and different landforms. You talk about ecosystems. I I think protection of wildlife populations also has a broader impact on the health of of the land that we're trying to protect so help us define protection is that is that wildlife wildlife bridges over highways is at status changes. Is it land acquisition. What what forms does that take that actually protects those corridors? I think it's all of the things you mentioned but most importantly it's coordination of efforts so department Hartman of transportation is going to be key in developing wildlife corridors in New Mexico but we also have to work with obviously our our neighboring states. We have to work within state agencies within a land status land-management status. Status Agencies to ensure that we have coordination of efforts because wildlife doesn't does not know borders they do not know land status maps and coordination of efforts. I I think is is a key all right. I want to wrap up the interview part of this with my favorite question when I talked to folks who are obviously V. local experts on their own state which is when you get forty eight or seventy two hours off the grid in New Mexico. Where is your secret spot? Where is the favourite place that you go that you don't share with anyone except for.

New Mexico National Monument Mesa Verde Santa Fe Hartman seventy two hours thirty minutes fifteen years five minutes
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

13:42 min | 3 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Those those larger goals <hes> and to establishing <hes> understanding between the decision makers and Congress the Federal Agent State Agents and state leaders and we need to continue we will continue to <hes> ensure that that level of consultation and that level of commitment on the part of these agencies <hes> is is realized moving forward on these issues these these types of issues governor Brian Vile of Academic Pueblo here in New Mexico? Thank you so much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us today and for your perspective and congratulations on the Choco protection bill taking a big step forward today thank you we'll we'll let you go and we will start looping in the crowd that we've got here who unfortunately we're not able to hear you so we'll let you go. Thank you again governor for for joining us today. Thank you very much all right so I want to start then with Paul read from archaeology southwest since obviously Choco is also incredibly important from an archaeological perspective. Why is this an area from archaeological sense worthy of protection and what what are the risks of drilling there right well Taco itself of course is a national park with nearly four thousand sites tacos been protected as a park since one thousand nine hundred eighty well we're concerned about is literally one hundred feet outside the boundary of Choco and what we have of course is this explosion to choose words carefully and the oil and gas drilling almost right up to Jacko's macos boundary once companies figured out how to get into the Mac Os shale formation at about a mile down they've been able to do that and we've had something like two thousand wells go in in a relatively few number of years so as we get outside the TACO boundary we've been concerned for six or seven years now and going further back but really active in that time trying to help them through this process primarily of modifying their long range plan and saying you know maybe we don't have to open up all these lands for drilling? Let's set some aside. Let's figure out what lands should perhaps be permanently set aside and protected even though they're not part of Taco in the park. What other special areas can we put in place for protection and the other thing? We've really ramped up and I'm thrilled that we had governor bio for a few minutes is we've develop partnerships now with almost ten tribes including the Navajo nation and a number of Pablo nations in our goal. There is to get those tribal voices to the table. This is something that and Blah all the federal agencies talk about constantly but the follow up on their part can sometimes be short so I think it's fair to say that ACA probably is the most active group at this point. That's one reason why we partnered with Alabama last fall to get academic tribal members out on the landscape and identifying areas of concern at this point. We have a report on that. That's going to be in the governor's hands here on a scale of days and once it's been approved through the governor and they decide what can be released to the public. We'll have some very concrete results to share with the rest of the world and I think we'll see that a lot of the resources that archaeologists can identify have already been protected but a broad range of resources that tribal members see on the landscape including. Clearly natural features that we would never think about or not really being protected so that's a big part of what we're trying to do. At this stage so commissioner Garcia Richard. Let's talk oil and gas drilling. Obviously oil and gas development is booming in in New Mexico and that is a huge part of the state's economy right now you were elected in November two thousand eighteen with the promise of of obviously not undoing that or hampering the business of oil and gas drilling but it also protecting the state so how do you balance the impacts both environmentally and economically. Thank you for that question so I just want to before I begin my remarks remind everyone that as I like to do often that we are on aboriginal land here where we are standing in Santa Fe and so this topic is is very apropos to to talk about right now. The the State Land Office issued an executive order that took seventy two thousand acres in the Choco area off the table for future oil and gas drilling and guess what folks the bottom did not go out of the market we are still able to bring in record revenue from oil and gas development into the state so despite what naysayers may say about essential protections that we must have on our a cultural and sacred sites it can be done in a balanced sustainable way and you know it's funny. I don't know if you all here know this but governor vile not not only had he been the lieutenant governor for Acapella he actually was the cultural resources officer for the Pueblo as well so he really has a great knowledge expertise and background in terms of not only the western archaeological perspective live on protecting the Choco the Greater Choco area but also the native perspective because sometimes what is sort of invisible to the western archaeological I will be Y- contributed from our native brothers and sisters in their communities and their backgrounds and their expertise and so it's essential that we have both schools of thought coming to the table to really inform our decisions around protection of our cultural and and sacred sites. I want to bring in Todd Lady who is the deputy cabinet secretary at the energy mineral and Natural Resources Department. Obviously you're area has your department has a lot of responsibilities possibilities in this area in terms of responsible drilling we analyze data center for Western priorities looked at data from the oil conservation division last year in New Mexico oil and gas operators reported fifteen fifteen hundred spills more than more than four per day what steps does can your department take to make sure that drilling when it happens is happening in a safe way that is not endangering the environment consistently so that's that's an excellent question and I I have to sort of escape the answer by saying it depends so so our our jurisdiction is oiling gas drilling in the state but but not on federal land not on state land right so so we have a unique role here in that we can we can set rules but say in the Chaco area aware that's all federal land except for the state land that is up there. There isn't a whole lot that we can do in in that specific area through throughout the state. We have new initiatives that are coming online now to ensure just what governor via talked about and that is responsible drilling we can't we know we can't shut off oil and gas development. It's two essential to the economy but we can ensure responsible development commissioner. Let's take a step set-back you you had previously served as a state legislator. You've now been in this job for nearly a year or well half a year I guess so what are your priorities for the state land office and and I think it's important to acknowledge that you come in in many ways with a diametrically opposite view of public lands as your predecessor so how has that first six months been in what are your priorities so far I really appreciate that question and I always look forward to the opportunity to talk about our plans at the state land office so essentially they have everything to do with the future of not only the economy in New Mexico but the climate a globally as well. I mean I really think that right now we are at a crucial pivotal moment where policy decisions that we can make you know at at some of our state agencies at the governor's honors level and then at the state land office really will impact and has an opportunity to impact climate challenges moving forward and so one of my number one priorities that state land office is is to ensure that we are getting every single penny that is due new Mexicans from our natural resources and right now oil and gas developers pay less to develop New Mexico oil oil and gas than they do in Texas the Great Progressive State of Texas right next door actually requires oil and gas developers to pay more for those very precious resources that once they leave the ground are gone and so we have an advocacy and a attempt that we're calling raise the rate we tried it in the last legislative session but essentially we would like oil and gas developers to pay the same rate on our minerals as Texas XS pays and that is a quarter so twenty five percent and currently the rate. Is it more in line with federal rate. It's actually it's capped at twenty percent so the federal rate is twelve and a half and New Mexico's capped at twenty in statute so that's a legislative <hes> that has the legislative fix I would appreciate any any and everyone's help with it because as we move forward and really diversify our economy in New Mexico we know that oil the gas will not last forever. Whatever whatever your view of that industry is that is a finite resource so we should be getting every penny that we're due for the resource ball we have it while at the same time looking to diversify in forms of renewable energy revenue in forms of <hes> Eco Tourism and outdoor recreation revenue and really looking at alternate ways to fund state government Paul Read? This is not necessarily an archaeological question but I understand you lived in Farmington is and raised families. They're a family there. What was that like seeing the the boom and bust cycles that especially impact a town like Farmington that he's Pretty Independent on that that single economic sector right yeah I was in Farmington for twenty six years and I'm I've been in towels now for five so I like to change I mean it was very informative for me to live in Farmington and and to kind of see firsthand what that boom and bust cycle was like and I think it was hard on a lot of families when it went to Farmington in eighty eight the population was probably just under forty thousand it grew over the next ten years to more than fifty cap there and I think they've fallen back a bit now and it'll probably boom again because unfortunately our state in that community in particular is still locked into the oil and gas boom and bust cycle so I think as Commissioner Garcia Richard Said we can improve the way we manage our economy Farmington? The one thing I did see in Farmington over those twenty six years was lots of talk. During those bust cycles about what can we do you know Farmington is a natural gateway to Colorado to the Navajo nation to the badlands lots of beautiful natural places to do things and so the community leaders would get together and they'd say you know we should really we should really think about this differently understand now with some support from outside groups there again having a very serious conversation about how to do that in Farmington and I think it's at least twenty years too late but you know there's hope that they can eventually direct the economy up there in a different direction you know the other thing of course is not that we're talking about cold today but there's coal in the power plant situation now that is driven ribbon the four corners economy since nineteen fifty nine or nineteen sixty so there's definitely some transition needs to happen there as well just to piggyback on that a little bit Paul I would. I would agree with you that not only are we too late but this very well may be the last boom we see in extractive industry the last true boom we see just because of where predictions are in terms of these oil reserves in terms of the price of alternate. Alternate forms of energy are plummeting. It just does not make economic sense anymore to develop these resources from the ground when when solar and wind are becoming more and more cost effective all the time <hes> we're really talking about the last throes I believe of extraction todd your your agency covers more than just oil and gas but also hard rock mining coal mining renewable energy and conservation from your perspective perspective. How do you see New Mexico's energy future laying out over over twenty thirty years?.

New Mexico Farmington State Land Office Choco commissioner Paul Commissioner Garcia Richard Brian Vile Congress Santa Fe Texas Jacko Alabama Chaco
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

13:52 min | 3 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"So we think that is Aaron let me flip that Bill around, and I think right now given the makeup of the legislature in Montana safe to say something like that couldn't pass in Montana. In the, the foreseeable future. But with Montana still producing a quite a bit of oil and gas is there room to find a bipartisan solution to, to keep a check either both on safety and on things like like methane emissions. I think the answer is yes, because I'm an optimist in, you know, I've been part of the political landscape that has seen some pretty pretty bold moves looking toward the future in Montana. I would also say, though, we still have a lot of work to do to make sure that our elected leaders understand the, the risks in the threats that, that come with that industry, so yes, in terms of us being hopeful that it can happen in the near future. No. In that. Although we've had our share victories, this past legislative session for part of this year. Overall, we still have a lot of work to do within the conservation community to really apply that pressure needed to affect the change that, that our world needs. So in terms of victories, that have come there's a nice boost to conservation funding that Montana. Conservation voters helped push through what what happened there. Yeah. This was a pretty exciting Bill. Senate Bill twenty four for folks following home. It's one of those bipartisan victories, that was so simple, basically, it was an easy lift for, for most folks, and it was championed by, by Republican named Terry gothi air, who supported the Bill to fund state parks trails, outdoor recreation maintenance by simply increasing the voluntary motor vehicle registration donation from six dollars to nine dollars that extra three dollars per. A year on the folks who voluntarily want to contribute to that fund will raise another one point eight million dollars. That is all that is all set aside for for parks trails, fishing access things that are not only good for a clean water. Clean air and outdoor recreation are public lands. But also responsible thing to do pass by margin of two to one in this legislature, which was a very difficult thing to do. We're quite proud of that Bill, proud of its champion, you know, in terms of, of more work to do though, that was a very simple one. And we are in conservation community looking at other ways to build conservation. Specific funding into existing or new revenue opportunities. That is our challenge. At hand this way. We did it by tapping into an existing see. But they're a lot of other ways that I think we can do that, that will win the support of Democrats. Of Republicans, independence everyone in between in that. That's most folks in Montana. I think one of the takeaways thereof these lease that when you ask, folks should there, be more funding for conservation. The answer across the board is yes. And obviously here there's a prediction that if you ask, folks, will you donate more to conservation funding, they will just check the box to do it. And I think that also gets back to conservation. Easement s-. And that's something that happened in Colorado that conservation easement program got updated this past session, just why is that program so important why're these revisions changes important? Yeah. Well, you know, he's been thinking about public land's policy, both this podcast and other places in absolutely public lands are critical to ecosystems climate in human health. But we have with some of us spend less time thinking about private lands. The imports protecting them as well in so conservationism over him really focuses on private lands that. Deserve to be protected. And so what this Bill does here in Colorado. Is it reauthorize of important tasks over in order to give a financial incentive to protect private acres of land? It increases program transparency in it. Also titans of some governance issues around the program. So this is one of bipartisan compromise, all, which was important in a great seed is collaboration between landowners ends conservation groups as well. So we're really fight about this Bill. They're also of course several very bad bills, particularly in Montana that either didn't make it out of the legislature or reveal towed by the governor I was fascinated to see on your scorecard. Aaron a Bill would have made it harder to create conservation easement and that, that kind of head scratching my head that was even in the mix. Yeah, that Bill is. It's definitely one that we were watching quite closely, and it was brought forward by Representative Carrie white of bozeman notably. He runs an organization called citizens for balanced use, which is an organization that doesn't see eye to eye with us when it comes to public lands in how they should be used in what kind of access should be granted to them. Nonetheless, what his Bill would have done would have required the state land board and just for folks who may be aware. Our landlord is our top five elected seats in the state so that consists of the governor, the attorney general, the secretary of state superintendent of public instruction, the auditor those five positions make up the board to make big decisions that affect Montana's public lands. Anyway, what, what the Bill would have done would required that board to approve. All conservation easement on private land through a state program called habitat Montana. What that would have done was give. Politicians the power to prevent landowners, from the right to conserve their own property. It was a very irresponsible Bill. Luckily, our governor governor, Steve Bullock sauve that he vetoed it, by the way. Habitat Montana has helped conserve over three hundred fifty thousand acres of wild lands habitats existed. So very successful thing, we are proud of the fact that our governor stood in the way of an effort by what we consider special-interest to make it a lot more difficult as you said, are into. For folks to, to preserve their own land question for, for both of you just take behind the scenes during legislative session. I know they're crazy. You've got tons going on bills on everything from conservation to vaccines to whatever else. How nuts is it in give give us a little peak behind the curtain on how the sausage gets made? Well, I get off, and I say a couple of weeks year, first of all of this in Colorado, we have a democratic infected a pro conservation trifecta of for the first time in several years in. So there was a lot of consideration of different ironies of tremendous amount of issues to, to be thinking about in legislators were hearing about all the time. So certainly happens. Not trust on constitution by malicious. But across the board of incident question, the all of all of the groups, rescued ourselves as had, we ensure that is this use our priority. And you know, here in Colorado, one thing, I would say, is that what is it hospital for us to do work that we did this year? Is that Colorado voters? Billy, prioritize the environment and may have made that clear. So as just one example, there was a survey taken right after the election. Unlash urine. In November twenty eight teen. It was a survey of unaffiliated voters comprise, a third of our electorate here. And when asked a spread of issues. And when asked a wish of these issues was most important, your vote for governor. It was unaffected voters answered that the environment was their number one issue. And so I think that message in a lot of ways we voters put elected officials into office because of the work that they promised to do on, on climate change. Clinician conservation in, in a lot of as it was a mandate, which is why we saw those legislators and governor polls deliver in such powerful way here. Irna must've been getting thrown into the fire for you a little bit background. You were most recently chief of staff to Senator John tester. So you've got a whole lot of experience on the federal level. But all of a sudden getting thrown into the mix on the state level must have been quite an experience for you. Yeah. And luckily, I had the benefit of working for a US Senator who began his career in public service in the Montana legislature. He was a state Senator for eight years, including president of the Montana Senate. And so, I learned a lot from from him and then seeing how the sausage was made just in the past few months was no surprise. But it is quite interesting in, I'm sure this is true in, in other states as well. But, you know, Montana is a state where people really haven't influence a lot of say, in what their elected leaders do in the citizen legislature. So accountability really works in the state, if there are constituents who are upset or riled up about something or need to communicate a, a message to their leaders, their leaders will most likely sit down respectfully listened to them. So that is the the benefit. That we've got an our state, which is huge geographically but very small in terms of population just over a million people statewide. The other thing that we did in terms of making the sausage, which I wanna share because it's a very effective strategy, but we are part of a larger group of advocacy organizations called the conservation working group. So other folks who share a lot of our same goals, and we have strengthened numbers within that group in every week during the legislative session, we would send all legislators hot list of where the hundred Asian community, stands on bills and other decision points during the week. And that was very effective strategy because the lawmakers, clearly, some of them don't care what we think, but a lot of do and a lot of them are at least curious for our take on them as made those decisions that, and I think we did a very good job of pointing out the economic value of, of conservation work, protecting clean air, and clean water in public lands and fighting climate change in a state like Montana like Colorado. That has direct impacts on people's pocketbooks. We are part of an economy that Joyce, seven point one billion dollars economic activity every year through outdoor recreation seventy thousand direct Montana jobs, which is overwhelmingly more than jobs produced in other sectors. So once we start talking about these issue in those economic terms, people start listening and they start voting based on what we're telling them because they know it to be true. So those are a couple of things that we did just in the past few months to bend the ear of the citizen legislature here. I want to touch on both of your respective governors just polls just took office in Colorado and based on what happened here it seems like he's eager to lead on conservation issues. So what are you looking at going into the future or down to the next legislative session? Yes. Absolutely. Governor pull his ran. Of platform one hundred percent renewables by twenty forty and also what he called his keep con-, awhile, platform, and so are of Asian environmental issues were very much the forefront of his campaign in. We were so thrilled to see him. Sinaloa bills into lines deliver. So we'll be watching several things moving forward of the first of those implementation of these bills that we've discussed here. So what exactly does implementation of climate initiate bills passed looks like and that willy gas Bill as well. The governor also has opportunity to point folks, diverse or than commissions who will be implementing some of the policy that works. So we'll be watching that and then we'll be watching moving forward. The what the governor does insurance of his executive power ended his agency, so everything from wildlife, or nor is wildlife conservation. All the way to the car to water planted shrine, that we have enough funding for that. So a tremendous amount of work was done here. But we have tremendous more of Warwick to do in governor pulse. Earliest mission. I think is, is great recipe, the way on that. And then earned the the opposite situation in Montana Steve Bullock nearing the end of his term. He's running for president, a lot of folks, hope he changed his mind and runs for Senate. Instead, let's put that aside, and just ask what Steve Bullock's conservation legacy. It's, it's one to be very proud of Aaron Steve Bullock..

Montana Bill Colorado Aaron Steve Bullock Steve Bullock Senate Montana Senate president Terry gothi Senator John tester bozeman titans US chief of staff Warwick executive Senator Irna
"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

11:46 min | 3 years ago

"west " Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Detour there. We hear a lot about overcrowding in some park, Zion Yellowstone Yosemite. Did you did you run into that? And do you think that is a genuine problem that, that some of our parks are facing right now? Yeah, I mean, sort of one of the, the side benefits of doing ally. Speaking churches was that on my Sundays, I was often fundraising on Saturdays. I was driving there. So I really grew to appreciate visiting the parks on Monday through Friday, when it was a lot less crowded, but even on those days like I was at Yellowstone in July. And I had planned a number of days there halfway through I said, I can't take this anymore. Like it's just so crowded is your spend so much time to sing in your car trying to get places waiting for parking at sort of ruins the experience and I had been Yellowstone many years ago during may, and that was so much better. Just because the traffic is so nuts that it really. Detriment to the experience. So I think one of the things we're struggling with now is, we have a park service in a park foundation that is promoting visiting these sites rightly, so but we aren't keeping pace with infrastructure that it takes to manage this increase number visitors and especially in the popular parks, the ones that are very well known very well marketed, it really shows. So the maintenance backlog that we've, we've heard about we've talked about a bit on, on this podcast from what you've seen it's real and and urgently in, in some places. Well, yeah. I mean one thing I have to say is that the park service, doesn't incredibly good job of working with what they have as general visitor. There were a lot of things that I didn't notice or they did a good job of hiding or or masking as far as maintenance issues go because, in general, the majority of my experiences parks, I never had to say, like, oh, gosh, I wish I could do this, but it's broken. They don't have the money to fix it. So I give them a lot of credit for, for making do with what they have. But yeah, that being said there are places that really need work done to make them capable of handling the amount of visitors that get. I assume over the course of these three years, you spoke to dozens or hundreds of Park, Rangers and park service, employees. Do you think there's a message that you have learned from them that if given the opportunity you would pass along to the top leadership at the park service, or at the interior department in DC? For the department of the interior in the park service. I would just remind them. How fortunate they are to have a staff that is so passionate about the mission that they are serving. I recently got to speaking engagement with employees of the park service, who mentioned that during a recent survey of all the government departments. The park service had the highest score as far as a staff leaving in the mission of their department and that was very evident anecdotally in my personal experiences. These are people who often work service jobs during the off season, just so they can keep having seasonal jobs, because they haven't been able to become full-time. They are people who are highly highly educated, who were jobs that people might say are beneath their education, but they just love their job. They love their sites so much. So I would remind the, the department heads how lucky they are to have a staff at his so committed to the goal. Of their department and to those higher up those in congress, I would ask that they go to our park service sites because when most frustrating things is to go to historic sites in see the United States make a mistake. Four hundred years ago, make it somewhere else three hundred years ago. Another place, two hundred another place. A hundred still today in realize we haven't really learned from our history that were preserving so I sort of wish I could make congress go to a lot of these places in hopefully it would impact the way they legislate. At a great takeaway. You mentioned dinosaur national monument as, as a big surprise any other sites, you visited that you think needed promotions. The end deserve national park status. Well as far as needing promotion. I really can't speak highly enough about the Dakotas people laugh. When I talk about how much I enjoyed them even I talked about how much I like Theodore Roosevelt, national park so much that the superintendent emailed me at one point and said, I just can't believe how much you enjoyed it and how much you keep talking about it. Because North Dakota is so unvisited that their tourism board has been called the save the best for last club. Where if it's your last state visited, they give you a pain in t shirt certificate so many people just put it off. And yet, both badlands national park in theater Roosevelt, national park where some of the most spectacular experiences head in the park service of the most unique places. I saw that it's such a shame that people see that Kotas may think it's only boring prairie. That's definitely one recommendation, give those are Kaplan capital parks, however, some of my other favorite sites. Don't have that. Nation would include white sands, national monument, absolutely incredible place. Wonderful experiences, there Buckeye reef national monument in Saint Croix. Never lens was spectacular spurious, and there's some funny sites, kind of like I went to organ pipe cactus national monument. And thought it was way, better than Suara national park. And I think about all the people that go to Celaya out because it's one of the big sixty one and overlook, Oregon pike cactus because it's a national monument. And think man, are they missing out? So there definitely were number of sites like that, where I think, may be politics was different policies were different sites that have certain status would have national park status to better reflect the experience have there. You mentioned getting E mail from the, the superintendent at at teddy Roosevelt, any other favorite people, you met along the way, I mean, you must run into all sorts of characters hitting four hundred nineteen national park sites. Yeah. Well there too that. I think one of them was a ranger cat. My national park, and he reached out when I was planning my Lasca portion and he's opening gay as well. And he said, he'd, I really appreciate the visibility you're helping bring to us, especially those less than work here. I know cat is really hard and expensive. So if you need a place to stay like you can you can stay at my place in the park, and so that was really cool, just to get to know him really well for few days in this really fascinating ark. And then a few months after I was there. He got reassigned to Hawaii volcanoes and moves at the end of December, just as the shutdown happened. And so now knowing him on a personal level. I got to see the real life impact of the. Shutdown had because he had a new apartment was the deposit, just shipped all stuff. And he's freaking out in Hawaii, Nola Hawaii, so from one of the most expensive parts of our countries to another most expensive, and he went weeks without a paycheck. And so I was heartbroken for him, but also sort of honored to get this window into the reality of Park Rangers because even with these struggles are still so passionate and that brings me to another great experience. I was in Everglades national park and doing a slew slog, which is where you're hiking in, in muddy waters up to your knees could have pythons alligators in them and the Rangers explaining this in our group has all scared, and she said, well, you don't have to you don't gotta worry about nothing as I got the Lord, I got this stick. And this ranger had described herself as a hillbilly, Alabama, who served in the military to protect America while wearing green and she finished. And she wanted to protect America's nature now while wearing green, and I ended up running into her, again, in dinosaur national monument. And then again in Holly, national park because she worked seasonally and it was fun to see the second time to catch up. And then the third time to get to get an update from her on a really magical experience. I had joined this journey where a wild Canadian goose follow my rafting groups before. And so when I saw her again, I got to say what happened to the goose because she was working there with so very fun connections? That sort of spread the entire length of. So your identity covers a whole lot of ground obviously outdoor enthusiasts a gay man. A working preacher, a classically trained counter tenor. How do you balance all of that on a trip this big when everything you do is being shared with the world real time? How do you find the real mica in all of that mix? Yeah, I sort of joke that if a gay Christian male soprano from the flat state in America can devote three years of his life to visiting the national parks. Don't tell me that there is an outdoorsy type, and that you're not part of that because I sort of go against very many of the prototypes of what you'd expect. It's been a fascinating journey, not just as physical wind, but to start this trip sort of thinking I had to hide who I was for it to be successful. And then in the end finding that it's only by embracing all of those unique traits about myself that this journey, eventually survived in came to completion. So I'm positive that there were opportunities sponsors, that would have loved to work with me that did not because one or some of my densities are all were just to offensive or too risky. In fact, one of them told me in writing that they were dropping me suddenly because I was doing too much LGBT. Owlry. So, yeah, it's been hard to realize that's a reality. But also really, heartwarming to wake up every day in say even if it's Justice three year trip, I figured out a way to do something that many people said it was impossible, and for most of the journey beat entirely true to myself, and wake up every day and say, this might be harder than I thought it might be a reference than I thought it might be way more difficult to complete than I thought. But at least every day that I wake up, I know that undoing something that I feel like is making the world better place and helping others. And if sharing those voluble parts of myself is able to help others than it's entirely worth it. So your trip is obviously, it's a once in a lifetime kind of dream that I, I suspect everyone listen to this podcast is thinking, wow. Wish wish I could do that. You're now what thirty three thirty four years old. You have a lifetime ahead of you having done a once in lifetime trip. So, so what's next for you? Yeah. As you said, this is sort of thing, so many people want to do, and having done it, at least in the way that I did it. I don't do what I did if you argon gonna. Visit all the parks figure out how to have your funding ahead of time or get on Netflix show and be super famous that you can get sponsors easily because making this, my job both in fundraising and putting out a product from experience made it a lot less personally fulfilling..

dinosaur national monument Rangers badlands national park Suara national park Everglades national park Theodore Roosevelt America Park Rangers superintendent Zion Yellowstone Yosemite congress Yellowstone Hawaii Kaplan capital parks Netflix government North Dakota United States Celaya