35 Burst results for "West Africa"

"west africa" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:59 min | Last week

"west africa" Discussed on WTOP

"Immigrated here from West Africa in between Wes Moore and lieutenant governor aruna Miller says he sees a role model for his own children and hopefully they have the same opportunity as he got. Tourist battle of Glenn Bernie left today inspired two. Feel good to see young people can see there's hope. In little lines of Columbia says the four oft repeated words that resonated with her, no one left behind. After feeling hopeful about the next four years. In Annapolis, John dome in WTO. See video from the ceremony read a lot more about this historic day in Annapolis at WTO dot com. Stay with us here in just a few minutes from now we'll have a conversation with Politico's bracton Booker. He's interviewed westmore. He was also covering today's ceremony in Annapolis. Virginia Republican governor Glen youngkin is calling for legislation to require students and parents to be told about certain academic awards. His announcement tonight comes in response to widening concerns about how some Northern Virginia school districts failed to publicly recognize student achievement on a standardized test. Young kids office says he's asked a couple of lawmakers in Richmond to sponsor legislation on his behalf during the ongoing General Assembly session. His office says the measures would ban any school or school employee from withholding information that relates to recognition or awards earned by the student. It would also be illegal to hold back information that may affect the student's admission to a college or university. This week marked two months since that explosion ripped through a condo building in Gaithersburg, police say the blast was caused by a man taking his own life. WTO's Mike Murillo sat down to talk with several families who continued to struggle to recover among them a family with a baby daughter. On November 16th, march saint juror answers a call from his wife at work. She says, honey, I think the building is on fire. He rushes to his Potomac oaks condo building. And when I get there, there's nothing left of my place. I see it completely on fire. His wife suffered smoke inhalation, but she and their daughter got out in time for the family, the day since have been rough going from hotel to hotel. I went through a lot of stress, a lot of stress. My wife went through a lot of stress. And our infant daughter, you could tell by looking at her and the way she was responding. She knows that she's not home. She knows she's bouncing from one place to another. Saint George has also making things worse as insurer State Farm called them two days before Christmas to say they were not insured because his father who bought the policy didn't have saint George on it Christmas was brutal. After WTO called State Farm, saint George received a call saying that he was covered in State Farm says they're working with the family. He says one thing that got them through is all the people who step forward to donate to the survivors of the blast. If it wasn't for them, this would be a whole different story. We literally would probably be living in the car. Now, saint George hopes they can truly move forward and pick up the pieces. Mike Morello WTO news. Learn more about the blast survivors tonight at WTO dot com. Coming up here after traffic and weather. Hello, Maryland. Maryland's first black governor Wes Moore sworn in this afternoon. We'll hear from Politico's bracton Booker. He was there at the Maryland capital today.

Annapolis WTO Wes Moore aruna Miller Glenn Bernie John dome bracton Booker westmore Glen youngkin Mike Murillo West Africa Politico Potomac oaks condo building Northern Virginia Columbia saint George Gaithersburg General Assembly Richmond Virginia
"west africa" Discussed on Simply Bitcoin

Simply Bitcoin

05:52 min | Last month

"west africa" Discussed on Simply Bitcoin

"It is coordinating tool with measurable properties, good money as good properties, even when everybody doesn't believe in it yet. And big Sean responds with a dart and he goes, money is not money because we all decide on it. There are certain characters, some money that make one better than another. So Sean, as we kind of touched on it in the news segment, what are these characteristics? And as we can see, the world is waking up to this. So for those that aren't deep down the rabbit hole like us, maybe you can do a little synapse of what do you mean by this tweet right here? Yeah, exactly. I think a lot of people, when you tell them that Bitcoin is money or you talk about the history of money, why certain people have decided to pick different monies. People think that the reason that money is money is because there's a belief system around it, and that we all believe that this is money, so that's why it is. And that was like a common misconception that I fell into when I was first studying about money and studying about Bitcoin and all these things because it's just like the same narrative that you hear. Oh, well, we all believe it's money and that's why. And that's not why. The reason why money's exist is because there are certain properties of money or certain characteristics of money that are exhibited in better money than other monies. And some of those money, some of those characteristics would be durability, divisibility, portability, and one of the biggest ones is scarcity. And money that are not scarce like the dollar end up being counterfeited end up being manipulated at the base layer. And when they beat and when they're counterfeited and when they're manipulated like that, people lose trust in the money and the money gets debased and it goes away. And that's what we've seen, you know, if you read the Bitcoin standard, one of the things that they talk about are the glass beads. In West Africa and Portugal comes down and they have a way of creating these glass beads. And so because they could create the glass beads that Africans couldn't back in the day, then they manipulated their currency and made everyone poor. And that's exactly what's going on today. Whether you want to call it quantitative easing or money printing or

Sean West Africa Portugal
"west africa" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

04:19 min | 2 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"And then they would have this agreement, which is basically a credit line that they would the sovereign government would start to draw down that credit line. And I'm if we continue to provide that so long as they saw progress. But what does progress is that specific political goals that they would like to see? Yes, the best way I could put it. And it's been struggling to frame it the right way. But basically around the end of the 50s, early 60s, you had two main things happen in the context of our conversation. You had, again, you had Europe and Japan kind of get back on their feet and become kind of mighty again, right? With their economies that are industries. They recovered from the wreckage of World War II. And then you had decolonization, right? So you had all the empires pulling away from their former colonies. In 1960s, kind of like the known as the end of colonialism, right? Some of the colonial empire's fell away in the 50s, some fellow away after 1960, but basically 1960s sort of supposed to mark the end of colonialism. So what my thesis is is that the World Bank and IMF were created to help stabilize and sort of, let's say, rebuild Europe and Japan. And once that was done, unfortunately, they were repurposed to extract resources and cheap labor from the developing world. Like swapping territorial colonialism with financial colonialism. Yeah, in the same way that when I write about the monetary colonialism in West Africa, the French pulled away politically, like they no longer controlled French West Africa didn't exist anymore. It was like a sovereign nations, but they still controlled the money, right? So we went from political colonialism to economic colonialism. So I guess what I would argue is that post 1960, the bank and the fund

Japan Europe World Bank IMF West Africa
West Africa floods destroy crops, worsening hunger fears

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

West Africa floods destroy crops, worsening hunger fears

"West and Central African countries are battling deadly floods that have upended lives and livelihoods raising fears of further disruption of food supplies in many areas battling armed conflict According to a new UN World Food Program situation report below average rainfall and devastating flooding have affected 5 million people this year in 19 countries across west and Central Africa experts say that it's likely to deepen the already worrisome hunger situation for millions in the region in Nigeria floods have killed at least 600 people and displaced 1.3 million so far this year The situation is similar in other parts including Cameroon Niger and Chad where the nation's governments declared a state of emergency after floods displaced a million people I'm Charles De Ledesma

Central Africa West UN Nigeria Cameroon Niger Chad Charles De Ledesma
"west africa" Discussed on Climate Connections

Climate Connections

01:31 min | 3 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on Climate Connections

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. A recent study of children in West Africa shows that extreme heat can worsen malnutrition and over time stunt kids growth. The reasons are complex, extreme heat can cause crop failures that reduce the availability of food and increase poverty, and it can increase the prevalence of disease. So we took kind of a step back and looked at how extreme heat is affecting. Child malnutrition, through all kind of possible mechanisms. That's researcher Sylvia Blum, while at Cornell University, she was part of a team that studied more than 32,000 infants and young children in West Africa. The team found that exposure to extreme heat over a child's life decreases their vertical growth. When temperatures rose above 95°F for about 12 days per month, the prevalence of stunting increased by 18%. And in the short term, more hot days were associated with low weight from acute malnutrition. These effects are already occurring at current levels and the temperatures are already rising. So she warns that without climate action, extreme heat could slow or even reverse efforts to improve child malnutrition in the region. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liz West Africa Sylvia Blum Cornell University acute malnutrition Yale center for environmental
"west africa" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

03:42 min | 3 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Angel. 90 6 point one. But that's how I enjoy learning what angels. I leave my bed by I leave my bed by. Don't come buddy. At the breaking news, never. You've tried the rest. The experience is traffic generator. It's much more than just another program. Turn it up. From Africa and do all the world. Live from Ghana, West Africa. All the news. This is breaking news, breaking news, breaking news. 9 o'clock. 9 o'clock. 9 o'clock. But it is 8.

Angel West Africa Ghana Africa
"west africa" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

03:42 min | 3 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Angel. 90 6 point one. But that's how I enjoy learning what angels. I leave my bed by I leave my bed by. Don't come buddy. At the breaking news, never. You've tried the rest. The experience is traffic generator. It's much more than just another program. Turn it up. From Africa and do all the world. Live from Ghana, West Africa. All the news. This is breaking news, breaking news, breaking news. 9 o'clock. 9 o'clock. 9 o'clock. But it is 8.

Angel West Africa Ghana Africa
"west africa" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:56 min | 4 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"So we're going to keep hammering away and after this podcast and going right back up on the hill and saying, hope springs eternal, this has to happen. We have to do this. We have to give this backing. Now, we have almost a $1 billion of investment incredible. On preventing the next pandemic, the Republicans and Democrats actually came together and committed to the funding to say we've got to do this better. And so we have the teams that are actively getting better at driving response to outbreak. And part of my lesson there is, they're overwhelmed by having to build fast and being asked like, why isn't this happening already? We've provided the funding. What the heck's happened? And I'm trying to help people understand the story of how much gain we're providing where we're able to do this. So, for example, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ebola broke out in West Africa where DRC is in 2014, 2015, 10,000 dead, and it was four months of circulating virus. Before it was recognized in the health system and an outbreak was declared. And so that's why it's spread everywhere, spread invisibly. We have made investments over the last 7 years to drive improvements in that system. So that by 2020, instead of four months, it was 15 days in the 2020 outbreak before the case was a case was identified in a hospital diagnosed and an outbreak declared and a response mounted. And the result it was 55 deaths and it was confined to the country. In April, with a systems we'd worked with the government to produce less than 48 hours for it to be detected. Suspected by the clinician, the diagnostic test was right there, they ran the test, it confirmed the person had Ebola. They immediately called an outbreak started tracing contacts and the outbreak was declared over within weeks, only 5 deaths, and it was locally contained.

DRC Ebola West Africa
"west africa" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

02:56 min | 5 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Custody of third party custody. And the billions who are potentially capable of custody on custody, most of them are currently destined to because they own exchanges. So we're talking about the 90 to 95% to either have no option or it's third party stranger custody as the option. And from that point of view, it's a step in the right direction. It's not about getting the people who have the ability, they have the monetary means. They have the technical means. And they just have the confidence to self confidence to self custody. If you have all three of those, then you should definitely do that. So that's the, I should say, that's the Bitcoin standard as the gold or the Bitcoin standard. And there are services like Casa unchained and so on who, if you have the monetary means and it's a larger amount that you're holding that can help you and stay through the path of doing a multi signature manner and make sure that you follow best practice as well. But the idea of but that's 5, ten, maybe 20% of the market. We're talking about 80 to 90% of the market rich is currently destined to not have any option at all or to hold it on an exchange. And this is step in the right direction. Separately, in terms of checklists, that's just good for anyone. I would suggest, even in a first party wallet and you're about to make a payment, it would be good to ask questions because people see it I see a lot, especially it was still providing now, but it was very prominent in a few years ago in parts of West Africa, various scams. It was one coin that was a bit connect that were a few more. I've lost track of the number. And people would fall for these scams.

West Africa
African officials: Monkeypox spread is already an emergency

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

African officials: Monkeypox spread is already an emergency

"Health authorities in Africa say they're treating the expanding monkeypox outbreak there as an emergency and the calling on rich countries to share the world's limited supply of vaccines Monkey box has been sickening people in parts of central and West Africa for decades But the lack of diagnosis and weeks surveillance means many cases are going undetected across the continent Now in an effort to avoid the glaring equity problems seen during the COVID-19 pandemic local experts want to be able to address monkeypox as an emergency so that it does not cause more pain and suffering and get quicker access to vaccine stocks vaccines have not previously been used to try to stamp out monkeypox epidemics in Africa officials have relied mostly on measures like contact tracing and isolation I'm Charles De

Monkeypox Covid Africa West Africa Charles De
"west africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

05:28 min | 7 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Was acquired. The crowd evolved through the interaction of the 18th century ashanti kingdom with other parts of the world to trade. Its woven on a loom basically a rudimentary loan that has not evolved much for close to a century. In yet, the weavers are able to produce some of the most intricate, beautiful designs. Tend to is the textile that speaks to the evolution of African society, especially in West Africa specifically the ashanti kingdom. Where the types of canteen that a person could wear was determined by their rank in society, you could, for example, be banned subject to very tough punitive measures just for wearing a kinder cloth that did not belong. See your class. And so it is something that has really, really evolved. Today, they can take cloth is worn and used mostly by the Indians in a lot of Africans and Diaspora as a form of celebrating.

ashanti kingdom West Africa
Dr. Ryan Cole on Monkeypox and What It Means for All of Us

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Ryan Cole on Monkeypox and What It Means for All of Us

"Doctor Cole tell us, what is monkeypox? What is the threat that it poses to most Americans? Monkeypox is a orthopoxvirus. It's in it's an epox family camelpox cowpox, monkey pox, smallpox is the one people think of. So again, this is a fear campaign trying to make everybody afraid. They modeled this at the nuclear threat initiative, which has founded and co owned by the cofounder of Facebook. Just like they projected COVID with event two O one, monkeypox is we've known about it since 1958. There's two strains West Africa strain and a Central African strain. The West Africa strain is what circulating right now. If you don't engage in homosexual sex, your risk of monkeypox is about zero. So it spread at a rave in the Canary Islands off Portugal and some big raves in Europe. It's really the gay bisexual population that it's sticking to. It is not very transmissible. It is very treatable. There was actually a patient in Dallas that had it last year. We get outbreaks of monkeypox around the world every year. They're just scare mongering with it. And it's really staying in that gay homosexual bisexual population. And it's not aerosolized virus. Is this strange slightly different from earlier strains, the 2018 strain that went around, Singapore, Israel, UK. It has about 50 mutations, which was highly unusual. We know Wuhan was actually synthesizing monkeypox so they could come up with a test for monkeypox, the lab in Wuhan, ironically. But monkeypox is low risk. And this is the West Africa strain. This is the less deadly strain. The irony too is that it looks a lot like chickenpox and shingles, which obviously there are a lot of people getting chickenpox and shingles because of their immune suppression from their COVID

Monkeypox Doctor Cole West Africa Smallpox Canary Islands Portugal Facebook Wuhan Europe Dallas Singapore Israel UK Chickenpox
Stormy repeat: NOAA predicts busy Atlantic hurricane season

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Stormy repeat: NOAA predicts busy Atlantic hurricane season

"Federal meteorologists say it looks like an extra busy Atlantic hurricane season again this year I'm Ben Thomas with a look at the forecast The national oceanic and atmospheric administration's Atlantic hurricane season forecast calls for 14 to 21 named storms with 6 to ten becoming hurricanes and as many as 6 major hurricanes with winds topping 110 mph Each of the last 6 Atlantic hurricane seasons have been above normal which is a record Among the factors this year forecasters point to warmer ocean temperatures overall la Nina which sees equatorial waters in the Pacific cool climate change and active monsoon season in West Africa and long-term patterns There have been more category four and 5 U.S. landfalls in the last 5 years than the previous 50 I'm Ben Thomas

Atlantic Hurricane Ben Thomas National Oceanic And Atmospher La Nina Pacific West Africa U.S.
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:00 min | 11 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the majority of the people we spoke to say the underlying problem here is who gets to make decisions 50 years after it was founded in France 5 of the organization's 6 main operational centers are still based in Europe They decided its priorities and assigned staff to missions Those attitudes are very much colonial attitudes and colonial ways of doing things Doctors Without Borders says it's confronting the hard truths about how racism and colonialism are embedded in the organization To begin addressing the problem they say they opened an operational center in West Africa But Doctors Without Borders has acknowledged these issues for almost 15 years In 2006 the organization pledged to give all staff fair opportunities Over the next decade it held meeting after meeting issuing one mea culpa after another and pledging to do better But more than a thousand former and current staffers have come out publicly to say nothing has changed Looking back from 2006 and now we in 2021 that's quite a long time Of course we need to work to us delivering change faster Is the vice president of doctors that borders international board It guides the organization but doesn't supervise day to today operations Boom eacho is a physician from Kenya Of course there's still white and western overrepresentation in our top management And this is something that we need to actively and more robustly address Sam was once a national staff member and was elected to the position several weeks before we spoke He says the issues we're raising aren't isolated incidents I worked as a national staff and ten years So I'm familiar with this frustration I'm very familiar with it I've lived it I've experienced it Sam says Doctors Without Borders staff have rightly highlighted the problems of structural racism within the organization for years And he says people must keep raising their voice to make change I pushed him on this point People have been saying these things for a really long time and have been coming out for decades So you're still putting on the burden on staff to say what they've already said I'm not putting the burden on this stuff but we need information Where do we get this information We go out to the field We need to speak to the people But Sam you have that information I mean that information has come out four decades from thousands of people at this point We need to engage We need to have this conversation without staff and colleagues feeling that it's a bad end to them We need to have a constant conversation We need to continue engaging.

eacho West Africa Sam France Europe Kenya
"west africa" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on KOMO

"Northwest news radio 1000 FM 97 7 covering the northwest and the world You coming up on northwest news radio There are growing signs that 105 year old interstate bridge may finally be on its way to getting replaced I'm John lover tini I'm Ryan Harris with why the plans to limit the governor's emergency powers might be well intended but might cost us billions It's 8 o'clock From ABC News I'm Daria albinger There's no reason to believe president Putin will stop here That from the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas Greenfield at an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council tomorrow the United States will take further measures to hold Russia accountable for this clear violation of international law and Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity The meeting was called after Putin recognized the independence of separatist controlled areas of the eastern Ukraine Donbass region and then sent in troops to in his words maintain the peace The U.S. embassy staff which remained in lviv has been moved to Poland for security reasons and the U.S. is urging Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky to leave Kyiv too Zelensky has now faces one of the strongest armies in the world and we've heard from Vladimir Putin that he intends to at least support the independence of this breakaway region in the east of the country and the feeling is that if all Vladimir Putin wanted to do was declare independence in the Donetsk and Luhansk people's republic areas in the far east of the country where you don't need a 150,000 troops to do that Maybe susanne panel in Ukraine a deadly blast at a gold mining site in West Africa The explosion happened at a gold mining site in southwestern Burkina Faso the country's national broadcaster reporting at least 59 were killed and more than 100 injured with witnesses describing seeing bodies everywhere The explosion is believed to have been caused by chemicals used to treat gold that were stocked at the site the first blast happened around 2 p.m. local time with other explosions following in as the liquid ABC News at the foreign desk A stretch of Southern California beach is closed to swimming and surfing after up to 50,000 gallons of raw sewage spilled into nearby waters Jury deliberations will resume tomorrow and the federal hate crimes trial of three Georgia men convicted in the murder of ahmaud Arbery Your listening to ABC News What's done more to improve overall health and wellness modern medicine or personal hygiene actually it's both but considering that bathing went mainstream in the 1800s and brushing your teeth in the 1900s is in a time for something new like cleaning your nose after all your nose is the body's air filter for trapping dirt and germs the first line of defense against allergens bacteria and viruses from getting into your lungs But how do you clean your nose with no bodge Isn't medicine it's more like plumbing Navajo uses powered suction to pull saline in one nostril to the very back of the nose where germs can get trapped in multiply and then out the other nostril flushing out mucus and microbes so you can breathe better sleep deeper snore less and stay healthier Join over 2 million.

Vladimir Putin Daria albinger Linda Thomas Greenfield Ukraine ABC News Ukraine Donbass U.S. embassy volodymyr zelensky U.S. Ryan Harris tini Luhansk Faso UN Security Council lviv Putin Kyiv Southern California beach United Nations Donetsk
"west africa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Completely changes what they have an idea of it. So I'm interested to talk about soul food and it sounds like there's just a lot more to it than just the food. There's like a spirituality to it almost. There's an attitude to it. Can you explain to me a little bit, just how it differentiates from just kind of mainstream American food with regard to the to the thought behind it, the attitude, the spirituality, maybe. I tell people all the time that the best way I could describe soul food is the fact that I can stand next to my grandmother and have her walk through a recipe with me exactly and for some reason mind still doesn't taste like hers. As a person, puts a piece of themselves in whatever they make. I'm a firm believer in that. But then too, you know, kind of on a more spiritual side is a lot of cooking is rooted around tradition and rooted around stored. I'm looking for a habit almost, right? Like ritual like ritual. So for me, washing rice is something that habitual for me. I've done it my entire life. Rice is one of the first things I learned how to cook, but I find a certain sort of solace in knowing that the way that I have to wash and prepare this rice is the same way that someone in West Africa right now is washing rice or somewhere else in this world someone else's washing rice exactly like this and it's been done and passed down for generations. So I think that there's a way that soul food was able to connect you to now the people that are around you now, and so your past as well. Connecting us now into the past, really profound amethyst. Folks, I am learning so much about this whole topic, indigenous foods, African American foods, and I hope you are too. We're gonna have to take a short break, but we will be right back. You're listening.

West Africa Rice
German rescue boat with 800 migrants reaches Sicilian port

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

German rescue boat with 800 migrants reaches Sicilian port

"After days of waiting a German ship carrying over eight hundred migrants has arrived it's a Sicilian polls shouts of joy could be heard from the dock because the vessel tree near the ship full of rescued migrants was finally granted permission to dock at the port of Trapani in western society there were about a hundred and sixty minus on the ship including fifteen of very young children the children will be taken to shelters once most of the adults will have to quarantine on other ships many of the passengers came from countries in West Africa Egypt or Morocco more than half of the passengers have been saved from a sinking wouldn't date to nineteen November I'm Karen Thomas

Trapani West Africa Morocco Egypt Karen Thomas
Sudan Says Military Coup Thwarted; Dozens of Troops Arrested

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Sudan Says Military Coup Thwarted; Dozens of Troops Arrested

"Admiral to lead the lead story breaking news out of israel. This morning hadn't even made it in. The american press yet sudan claims to thwart military coup attempt. Many officers detained. Now i bring this up because sudan long ago and far away Harbored osama bin laden under a radical islamist regime. Have you been to khartoum. You're usually been to everywhere. Have you been to cartoon. I have not. He'd finally finally finally about. I'm not surprised because it was an islamist dictatorship forever right exactly. I think if. I'd said yes. You should have been very suspicious. Well why do we care about places like guinea and sudan. When coups happened admiral because the overall rule of law we wanna foster in the international community at breaks norms when elected governments of whatever stripe are overthrown be geo-strategically. We've seen again and again in these coup ridden contres bad actors bleed into it because they're largely ungoverned spaces in so many cases and we've that from afghanistan to libya to syria today to sudan. I fear for it in western africa. Guinea so i think those are the two principal reasons we oughta be concerned. One is philosophical political the others practical military beginning mogadishu or other failed states. But i do know you can give us a fairly good idea. What is living in a failed state. Like it's pretty much like what you saw in kabul over the last few weeks it masses of people desperation in their eyes extreme poverty armed gangs open trucks with skinny teenagers. Driving around with ak47's i'm describing both parts of east and west africa at this point all of those factors are part of this breakdown in lawlessness that audit concern very deeply in in all of these

Sudan Khartoum Osama Bin Laden Israel Guinea Western Africa Libya Syria Afghanistan Mogadishu Kabul West Africa
Guinea Reports West Africa's First Known Marburg Virus Death

BBC Newsday

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Guinea Reports West Africa's First Known Marburg Virus Death

"Authorities in Guinea have confirmed death from the Marburg virus, the first case ever found in West Africa. It's a fever with very, very high fatality rates, which causes sufferers to bleed to death. The person's contacts have been traced to being monitored, and we can speak to Dr Patrick, a bulk of the World Health Organization who joins us down the line from Brazzaville. Something a surprise in the sense it's the first time this has been found in West Africa. What do we know about this specific? Case and somewhere near Gueckedou in Guinea, I believe Okay. Thank you. Thank you so much. And thank you for having me. As you clearly say, This is the first time Guinea we were seeing a case of mobile in West Africa. The kids in points and index gets well. Was reported on some of the patient who is for the six years old who reported with the high grade fever, bleeding of the gums, cheeks. And Unfortunately, the patient died two days after attending being attended to in the hospital. Samples were taken from this location confirmed for mobile in within the simple security in southern Kettle. Further secondary confirmation of that the country is not sure every name Conakry but also in the car yesterday. So these kids to pastor is that right? That's right, at least in that the kids with one probable case that is the wife so far we are following up the boat, so one for the six contact And, uh, Essentially happening in the same location where we just concluded containing the Ebola, um, right visit two months

West Africa Guinea Dr Patrick Gueckedou Marburg Fever Brazzaville World Health Organization Conakry Ebola
"west africa" Discussed on Hermit_Radio

Hermit_Radio

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on Hermit_Radio

"Look into that or i think that is it. Something hopeful about the can chaos At the moment. Yes i mean the one thing that i struggle with especially as of lately as like i see the suffering of the world and you know it's concerning in for me it it breaks my heart you know. I hate to see people in pain or suffering and You know the one thing is that we are you know whether people realize it or not we are all connected you know and we all are a reflection of each other and the hatred. That's going on right now. It's only hurting us. And i don't personally think there is going to be anything to fix it other than Stuff going massively crazy and people let you know things like have to get so out of hand that people realize what's going on and that's because on if you think about the universe and i've talked about this before is the macrocosm microcosm right big universe little universe little universes what's going on in your personal life. Big universities like global. What's happening with everybody. And they're the same doesn't matter whether it's you know what i mean like. Yes your little universe maybe experiencing something vastly different than somebody in west africa But when things get so chaotic on a global level then everybody does feel it. And i think that is what we're experiencing that itself. The global universe is experiencing something crazy and that is eventually what is going to wake up everybody on the little universe level Take something that drastic for to for it to happen. It has to be so wildly. Outlandish that people like okay. We can all agree on this. We need to start looking at things differently. I mean like let's just look at some examples of like what's going on in the last couple of years right like almost weekly. Ufo's are in the news right like we're talking about it now like they're taught the government's talking about it. They just released.

west africa
"west africa" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"From his home in Guinea in West Africa when he was 13. I'm struck by how small He is short and slight, and he's quiet. This is single earlier. This is the place where with this back we've walked down to the harbor, but we can't get within 50 M of the water. This is another of his many bail conditions. So this was the point over here. The down? Yeah. Where you were arrested. The way Yeah. This is a place where I was arrested. And this is a pleasure Technique. Director Prison. What's it like? Remembering that day when you were taken off the ship in handcuffs, Remember? I mean, it reminds me there was a day in my life. The truth. I was not so scared because I thought that it was a misunderstanding. And if they understand Then they were free austerity of our freedom. It was not that afraid. At what point did you hear that They were accusing you of being a terrorist. My lawyer, Ho told me that they're accusing us of being terrorists. Mhm. I was surprised. I was surprised I tourists, But why? Why? Why are they calling story about accent? Why have not killed anyone? Have attacked in the one I didn't I didn't fight in the one Nothing. So I was surprised to see what did happen on the ship. And how did the Maltese authorities land on this charge of terrorism? Let's begin The story as women leaves the coast of.

Guinea West Africa 13 Maltese Ho single 50 M
Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

BrainStuff

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

"You've probably seen stories about exemplary bravery and battles soldiers and volunteers who risk everything to pull injured. Compatriots out of harm's way so they can receive much needed medical attention but some of these heroes will never receive. Any medals parades accommodations for their work. And not because of injustice but because their ants species called capone-era analysis are termite hunting. Aunts that scientists say not only rescue injured comrades but also treat their wounds. The survival rate among those injured in this combat is remarkable up to ninety percent. These ants live in colonies in sub saharan africa that average nearly one thousand members the ends wage war on termites rating their nests and dragging the dead back behind the lines as a source of food. These rates however often come at a heavy price. The termites biting crushed the ants ripping off limbs and snapping off heads. Eric frank a scientist at the university of low son in switzerland has studied these ants and seeing them do battle with termites at a research station in the komo national park one of the largest protected areas in west africa in northern cote d'ivoire. He would watch the and drag the injured back to their nest. But because the ants make their homes underground it was difficult to define exactly what happened next. So franken has team set out to discover what was happening inside the nest i they captured entire ant colonies and set them up in artificial nests. They then hooked up infrared cameras to keep tabs on the insects. The scientists also captured termites and then allowed the answer to stage a raid. Many aunts were gravely injured during the melee. Many lost limbs they're able bodied comrades responded by staging a battlefield triage separating gravely wounded from the only slightly wounded. The seriously injured those who lost at least five limbs often died on the battlefield because as the researchers noted they didn't seem to want to be helped that bendon distort their bodies making it difficult for their sisters in arms to carry them to safety. Those whose wounds were less serious however allowed themselves to be cared for

Eric Frank University Of Low Son Komo National Park Saharan West Africa Africa Switzerland Franken Bendon
The Energist | Micah Renfro on Oil and Gas Startups

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

The Energist | Micah Renfro on Oil and Gas Startups

"Welcome back to yesterday's podcasts. We've got about a mica. Mike renfro the right. Okay just make sure with is an energetic. The energised the z. Energised mike what do you guys do with you. Just so we do executive recruiting and consulting visory Been around since nineteen seventy nine I haven't been there since. Nineteen seventy nine but the firm was. The firm was founded by a couple engineers and a couple of geologists that drew their rotation to think it was like west africa and they were in their twenties. And i don't want to go to west africa on rotation. Now i can't imagine back in the seventies wanting to go g and So they decided to start The energised is technical. People recruiting technical people. then. We've stayed in energy throughout to my knowledge where the one of the longest standing if not the longest standing energy focused recruiting firms out there head hunting firms out there and so i started working there about eleven years ago. Maybe ten years ago something like that started in investment banking kind of got my teeth kicked in that for a few years rather wells fargo fargo tweet san francisco and new york so go energy investment banking. Yes so i was in the capital markets group. So i say we did. Like i did pretty much spreadsheets. And kind of converting senior bankers notes So i didn't didn't really have a whole lot inputting any other stuff

Mike Renfro West Africa Mike Fargo Fargo San Francisco New York
Travel to Benin - Rachel Décoste

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Benin - Rachel Décoste

"Or wikipedia. Wants me to say benin. But i will defer to the guest here. I'd like to welcome to the show. Rachel day cost from year of return. Book dot com. And who has come to talk to us about the country of been in rachel. Welcome to the show. Happy to be here first of all. We're probably gonna need to put this on a map because some people are wildly googling right now in wikipedia where is the country have been in innocent a west africa the biggest countries nearby our nigeria and ghana. And why did you find yourself in banana in the first place. Let's start with that. I did a dna test years ago. I am african canadian. Meaning my ancestors. Came here as enslaved africans. We don't know where from and i thought. Dna tests would be a good way to find out where my origins were from. After i did the dna tests been in was one of the top countries along with togo. Nigeria the whole region. Really and then. I took a trip there for six months and been in was one of the five countries. I visited excellent. And why should someone go to in. What i loved about. Being in was that it was authentic in terms of it hasn't yet been too americanized to westernize is still wear the traditional clothes. Drink their traditional tease ethan traditional food and it really felt like you were transported back to a time. They've kept their culture almost intact. And that's why you would want to go to benin versus another country that might be more westernized. There's something authentic inorganic about banana. That is so heartwarming. Banana is a small country. As i recall. It's actually a smaller country in africa. But it's the same size approximately the same size of ohio. Which always surprises

Benin Nigeria West Africa Rachel Ghana Togo Africa Ohio
"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"For the possibility that inflation Along with the Federal Reserve's promised to let it happen. That it could lead to a more volatile world time may be running out to find out the true origins of the cove in 19 virus. Drew Hinshaw from the Wall Street Journal says the W. H O is calling for a second round of investigation. But time is the resource. They may not have enough of a lot of the things they're looking for, for example, antibodies in the blood of people and animals. They fade over time. If you Tess doing antibody tests on a farmer, a mink farmer in China somewhere and they are negative for the virus. It's difficult to know of a negative because they never Were infected or they negative because you know, it's a this point been more than a year and antibodies fade and become harder to detect with time. Another crucial piece of the puzzle for the W H O team will be blood banks. WH o lead team really wants to test Blood banks that store samples of blood and In Wuhan. They've agreed to keep those samples. In other parts of China. After two years they get tossed out so the clock is ticking in terms of zoonotic issues versus lab made virus issues. There are new calls to investigate. That, too, After pushing it aside is politics for most of the year, prominent scientists are now saying there are enough small pieces of evidence. Bringing up questions that need to be answered. One of the critical moments was when the head of the W H O himself called for the lab to be in, you know, thoroughly probe he said he was willing to send experts That's pretty mainstream. When the head of the World Health Organization is saying we shouldn't investigate a lab, it's it's hard to characterize it as ah French theory and then we had that sound from Tony Fauci last week saying, Yeah, I think we should probably do another investigation. Well, that wasn't about face after 14 months, right, right. So the fact that China won't allow investigators in on even have a fraction of the access that the who had during the Ebola outbreak has been frustrating for US lawmakers. To draw a point of comparison in 2014 the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Guinea threw open its doors You know, folks and blue vests were going to village to village, interviewing people. Saying, Hey, how did this person get sick? How did this person get sick? Nothing like that has been allowed in China. The team that was investigating this virus. It took them more than a year after the pandemic began to get on the ground and asked, Okay, what have you guys been doing? So the question is, What are they hiding? And will we be able to find out who has so much time passed? That evidence is is now gone. Well, I mean, based on the Clipper, he said that the quality of the blood is already degraded. It would seem that had half right, right, so we may or may not find out anything. If we send a team into China now and the longer they delay better for them. 7 20 is the time onto the roads. We go check in with Ryan to see how it's rolling. Take it away, Sir, This report is brought to vicap trust. Formerly G B be getting a little busier all the way around 80 from Roseville. Those still just nine minutes to the cap city split across the top of town north Gate on ramp to westbound. I 80 got word of an accident there. Couple of vehicles involved. Reportedly. The ramp is block westbound Cap City Freeway splits downtown. Just nine minutes. It's 13 in Carmel Grove on I 5 14 on 99 got some slowing now. 12th Avenue, the highway 50 50 west down from Folsom is an 18 minute drive in from Woodland on I five. You do it in 2016 to get in from Davis. He's found 80 across the causeway Got a issues going the other way. However, right now very slow from West El Camino on I 80 all the way to a little past Was capital also got a report of an accident. A child's road speed sensors aren't showing any slowing there. Also, another one reported in the center divider all further up the road at Mace Feed tenses are showing any slowly. They're either after 30. Last year's Genevieve's. Burford and Brothers is now cap trust Sacramento. The name is changed with values remain the same independent employee owned and a commitment to act in their client's best interests. Always you can find him. Cat trust dot com Forward slash Sacramento traffic on the tens, every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons from the Cap Trust Traffic Center News 93.1 kfbk. The excessive heat warning remains in effect for the evening hours, mostly and today with a high of 98 to 1 of two Night into Rick. Clear sky with a little of 55 to 59 tomorrow.

Drew Hinshaw Tony Fauci West Africa World Health Organization 2016 Roseville 18 minute Ryan last week China today Carmel Grove Davis 12th Avenue Folsom 2014 Woodland Last year West El Camino nine minutes
The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

BBC World Service

01:50 min | 1 year ago

The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

"Hidden. Many are elderly in their seventies there in these camps because they're accused of being witches, But their voices can now be heard on a new album called I Forgot. Now, who I used to Be sad about that. I love Dublin Bay when my whole but one of the women have never played music or written songs before they were recorded by award winning record producer Ian Brennan and his wife, Maria Elena, Omaha's a deli. But Elena herself has a personal connection to witch hunting, which will get into in a moment. But first Marlena joins us from her home in Italy. Welcome. Oh, thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Marlena. How did these women and they are primarily women Get to these camps? Well, these women are a poor there as early they have been kicked out off their land by younger relatives who are very attracted to buy their land. And that land is all. They own a S. O. This women are very vulnerable. You know, they suffer from physical mental in the Caesar, such as Alzheimer's agility. Misshapen limbs, blindness and they are completely exploited that they're stripped off their dignity, their turned into a monster there literally stripped off their own land. So these women are accused of being which is what is being a witch mean in West Africa. Being a witch is a being a person that can cause harm to your cropper that can cause a stability, which is our accused off doing harm to families. And you know, Westerners often

Ian Brennan Marlena Joins Dublin Bay Maria Elena Elena Marlena Alzheimer's Agility Omaha Italy West Africa
Being gay in Ghana: LGBT community is 'under attack'

The World

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Being gay in Ghana: LGBT community is 'under attack'

"The world now to West Africa and Gamma. That nation has long been look to as a beacon of stability on the African continent. Ghana was the first sub Saharan country to gain independence. Gonna instill pride themselves on their freedoms. But that liberty isn't afforded to everyone Consider the LGBT Q community there. Recently, Public acts of homophobia in Ghana have pushed LGBT Q gun and into the national spotlight. World's Bianca Hillier reports January 31st was supposed to be the start of something new and Ghana How crazy it was opening ceremony for the country's first ever LGBTQ center. Alex Dong core is the director of LGBT Plus Rights, Ghana, the organization running the space. Way wish to create a peaceful ourselves as a movement to be able to sit down and strategize and mobilize and quartered needs be sources. Honors. LGBTQ community has a history of fighting for freedom. But most of this organizing has been done online for security reasons. So this physical space in across signaled new opportunities, but it didn't last long. Moses fall moaning, heads up Ghana's National Coalition for proper sexual rights and family values and quickly put up a fight the presidency and the minister of foreign affairs and the RGB have every right to investigate the setting up of that office to close it down immediately and arrest and prosecute those people involved in it. In the weeks following the LGBT Q Center's opening Fella moaning led a campaign to shut down the space. Archbishop Philip Nama, president of the Ghana Catholic Bishopsconference quickly echoed the stands on local television. This practice is completely foreign to our Ghanaian culture. And the law should be friend and such a way that It is punishable in a very

Ghana Bianca Hillier Alex Dong Lgbt Plus Rights Saharan West Africa National Coalition For Proper Lgbt Q Center Moses Archbishop Philip Nama Ghana Catholic Bishopsconferen
Bloomberg News Energy Reporter Robert Tuttle Explains the Suez Canal

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:44 min | 2 years ago

Bloomberg News Energy Reporter Robert Tuttle Explains the Suez Canal

"Reporter Robert Tuttle joining us on the phone in Calgary. Hey, Robert. Love your story. You can ask my tea when I'm like. Oh, we've got him yet because I feel like Let's explain the Suez Canal. I think these are things we either learned about in great school history and then just kind of threw it away. Just take it for granted when it comes to moving trade around, but it it's really important. Yeah, I mean, it's it's hugely important as you said it was built more than a century ago went into operation in 18 69. It's played a central role in the last. In that sense, it's been open. It's played a central through two World wars. Revolutions. It's been a really important conduit for the world to you. One could say it almost helped told together the British empire and from some extent for a while there Uh, yeah. I mean, it holds today it carries about 12% of the world's trade goes through it. It's Zoe, the biggest prize. The most important aspect of that trade is, of course, oil. You know, the Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest exporter, sends oil through the canal to Europe in the North America oil comes the other way as this, uh, To reach Asian markets from wherever West Africa from the U. S. But it Zab slightly essential plays a central role to the world trade until it blockages costing quite a bit of money. Holding up about $10 billion a good today. They're just waiting there. No,

Robert Tuttle Suez Canal Calgary Robert ZOE Saudi Arabia North America West Africa Europe
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 2 years ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 2 years ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Polar Vortex causes extreme freezing globally in February

UN News

01:29 min | 2 years ago

Polar Vortex causes extreme freezing globally in February

"Polar vortex was responsible for the freezing conditions in the state of texas at last month. Your weather experts of said before warning of a worrying increase in global carbon dioxide levels spokesperson cleanliest from the world meteorological organization. Wmo told journalists during a regular briefing in geneva that the united states shiver through its coldest february since one thousand nine hundred nine thanks to the natural phenomenon to do with vortex. This is an area of low pressure cold air surrounding the polls. It normally keeps that the optic woman air and lower latitudes weakened this winter that meant that he called egg Sitting out the object woman by contrast went into pods of the optic minnelli's added that no less than sixty two all time. Daily called minimum temperature records were broken in the united states from february. The eleventh to this extinct. According to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration february temperatures were also well below the one thousand ninety one to twenty twenty average over much of the russian federation and north america. But they were well. Above average over parts of the arctic and from north west africa to southern europe and china the un agency also cautioned that although february was a relatively cold month. This does not negate the long-term warming trend from climate change. Cold records are becoming rarer in contrast to heat temperature records and heat waves. We expect this trend to continue. Wmo said in a statement

WMO United States Geneva Minnelli Texas North West Africa National Oceanic And Atmospher Russian Federation North America Arctic UN Europe China
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:51 min | 2 years ago

How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

"In twenty thirteen fronts sent soldiers to marley to stop jihadist advance seven years later and more than five thousand troops are still there in the region and despite their intervention twenty twenty was the deadliest year since the crisis began in the region known as a suhel avast sweep of land south of the sahara. So what is going wrong with the strategy of the so-called g five the group of five suhel countries became a facile. Mali mauritania initia- and chad. And of course a fronts will tell us more. I'm joined by the journalist and researcher in west africa and the sahel region. Pull me good morning pool. Good to have you with us. Good morning just explained to us how we've got to this state of did crisis what i think. We have to distinguish two things back in two thousand thirteen The jihad is already taken over the north of mali and they were launching a fresh push southwards and they had got down as far as the capital. Bamako that would have threatened security instability right across africa so the initial french intervention which was actually sent by Emmanuel macron predecessor. Phosphor alone which remember him that that may give you a sense of how far back in time. This was that was an almost conventional military intervention and it ended the jihadist the towns across the mouth of molly and remove that immediate threat but as so often in these situations a conventional conflict benefit of fragmented into more widespread terrorism localized attacks and some general instability. And that is much much harder to tackle. And you can't do it just with military means and so there's been a huge effort over really substantial seven years now as you mentioned to try and bring stability to the region but it's it's particularly difficult because you don't just have a ideology ideological jihadism if you're like fighting a terrorist war against a perceived international influence against the secular nature nature of these west african states. But you also have That mixed up with all sorts of local tensions and grievances For example between groups who depend on animal hooding and people who have commas and this is in this region the suhel which is just south of the sahara so it subjected to climate change water land grazing or in short supply. Population is rising rapidly. But the jobs aren't there to keep pace so you've got all her social and economic factors as well and that that's what's made it such a difficult challenge to bring this crisis under control but probably the most intense. The most dangerous situation was in the second. Half of twenty and nineteen when an armed group in eastern mali cooled islamic group in the greatest sahara pledging affiliation to die ish in the middle east staged a series of really very very bloody attack saw malia ninja army garrisons and the french also suffered heavy losses. And after that in january of last year there was a sort of strategic rethinking if you like and the decision to focus the military effort on them and to try and get up a stronger development have heard an peacemaking effort in other parts of the region sent. We have seen some progress since then

Suhel Mali Initia Emmanuel Macron Sahara Mauritania Marley Bamako West Africa Chad Jihad Africa Malia Ninja Army Middle East
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:56 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New. Sounds number 43 23, so you'll Wanna open up any old Web browser and just type in new sounds. 43 23. You'll get this show full of Marambra and xylophone like instruments from around the world. Now we heard the Ballabon from West Africa. There is another instrument in these Isla phone family in that part of the world, and it's called the JEEL G. Why I l and the London group called Voula VL uses that instrument as the basis for what they do. It's not the only thing they're they're clearly inspired by jazz and electronic music and minimalism. But it's all starting with the sound of the deal. This wooden xylophone from West Africa and we'll hear a piece called gunned Ania. Yeah. There's a lot going on in that piece by the London based band called Voula VL. They are quartet of musicians who incorporate the sounds of electronic music and jazz minimalism, but it all starts. From a musical bed provided by the West Africans I telephone known as the Geel, played by a musician named Becks Birch, who notably is a woman. This instrument traditionally is played by men and so she formed the band so that she could play the deal in this very untraditional setting there in London. We're listening on new sounds this time around to all these different members of the xylophone family made of wood. In Indonesia..

West Africa London Becks Birch Isla Indonesia Ania
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stories that encourage lifelong learning and the National Endowment for the Arts, the federal agency that supports the arts and creativity in communities across the nation. More information is available at art stunk of It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. Bloomberg has been publishing a map of the world, which shows the level of vaccine distribution and different countries and virtually the entire continent of Africa. More than 50 different nations. It's just blank. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is our next guest and Nobel PRI peace Prize recipient former president of Liberia and she says Africa may be left out until next year. Certainly for calls the Ebola's outbreak which hit her country, among others, in West Africa in 2015 last year, she was asked to co chair a review of the global response to this pandemic, and she says Africa is in danger of being left behind. In Africa we don't have the resources is a simple as that, unless vaccine is seen as a free could On the basis that until everyone is safe, no one is safe when it seemed in that context. Then perhaps the wealthier nations of the world will come up with a formula that says, how can we share the fascination with those countries that are under resourced? Vaccination at this speed on this scale is unprecedented, and even the United States has discovered logistical problems. It's very hard to get millions of doses to millions of people in a very short time. Are there even greater logistical challenges in parts of Africa? We will face logistical challenges, no doubt. But I like to point our case of Ebola when Africa put up a platform to ensure that the medications and the responses to Ebola's were being available. To support of African countries that this back for was used to ensure equitable distribution among those African countries in need. Of course, there were limited countries at that time. Because Ebola affected the three neighboring countries in West Africa s O. Maybe distribution was easier sell population in those countries of like smaller than others. It would be more complicated if you have all of African countries. We should recall that rebel A was an extreme stress on the societies of a number of countries. What were some of the ways that you learned to address public anxiety and to get genuine medical care to people? Well, the first thing you need to get proper information whose library information On the state of the disease so that proper communications given to citizens. So that they don't have to guess they don't have to speculate. As to the extent of the effect of the disease, and one has to have coordination We can't have different entities in fourth of the health sector are involved in the financial sector. That's the only way you can win the confidence of citizens doing show that even if you have the means to address it, that they take the medication, or they adhere to the protocol. What, Iet's Mask er, whether it's social distancing. And, of course, in the case of the bull again strong partnerships because they're too The three affected countries did not have the resources to get the medication and to get the kind of support I was necessary. But they had good partners in the United States. As you probably know, Madam president. There are a lot of people who have expressed skepticism about masking and social distancing. They've declined to participate, and there's also a very widespread skepticism. Vaccines. Does that all sound familiar to you? Yes, it does. I mean, Liberia face the same thing in the early days of Ebola. But we were able to overcome it, too strong government action and leaders have to be able to convey this. This very tee off this disease tow their lives into their livelihoods in very clear terms. With very care, action and strong commitment not only to formulate those measures but to find a means to ensure that citizens understanding and are willing to comply for their own safety. I'm realizing that part of the reason I was a little surprised by the pandemic when it came Was that I remembered the experience of Ebola's that there was a terrible virus, but that it was contained in one part of the world that did not go worldwide. Granting that a pandemic is always possible. Were you surprised that this virus got out of control in a way that Ebola did not? Yes, because of the failure. Care of the measures to address The virus. I must say In the case of Ebola, I said, initially we face the same problem. The problem of confidence that people who thought maybe this was, you know somebody trying to limit their ability to move about their rights. You know, Toto freedom. Those other kinds of concerns our citizens happen. It's up to leaders to address those fears and those concerns and to make sure that the overcome them former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia. Thank you so much. Thank you. Organizer's promise that the Tokyo Olympics delayed because of the pandemic will happen this summer. But much of Japan is in a state of emergency and no one there has even been vaccinated. Yet Here's NPR's Anthony Kuhn. On Friday, government spokesman Mon Abou Sakai denied in anonymously sourced report by the British newspaper The Times that the Japanese government itself is privately given up on the games. We'll try to save face by bidding for the next available slot in 2032 Prime Minister Yoshihide Ace Ooga reiterated before parliament Friday that he's determined to make the Games happen, and International Olympic chief Thomas Bach said Thursday that there is no plan B. One of the Olympics. Most vocal critics author you, Honma says Japanese officials feel they've invested too much money and prestige in the games to pull out Now each document it Oh, Serena much you guys at once. They've made the decision. They can never reverse it, he says. Even if they realize it's wrong. Nobody wants to take responsibility for canceling it, he adds. In a private speech this month. Tokyo Organizing Committee chief Yoshiro Money admitted he doesn't know if the games will go ahead or not, but added that he can't voices doubts in public. Japan's biggest cities, Tokyo and Osaka and several other prefectures. They're currently under a state of emergency until at least February, 7th. The government will probably have to make its decision before the Olympic torch relay begins. March. 25th, a Kildow news agency pull this month found about 80% of Japanese think the game should either be canceled or postponed. The U. S Olympic and Paralympic Committee said in a tweet they hadn't heard anything suggesting that the games aren't happening, and so they continue to train and prepare. Anthony Kuhn. NPR NEWS Seoul This'll is NPR news. For more than 95 years, New Yorkers have been listening to W N Y C for.

Ebola Africa Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirlea NPR News West Africa NPR United States president Japan Anthony Kuhn Noel King Steve Inskeep Olympics Bloomberg National Endowment U. S Olympic and Paralympic Co Japanese government