36 Burst results for "West Africa"

Fresh update on "west africa" discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

01:15 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "west africa" discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"Of 2020, Luis Shah was thinking a lot about the pandemic. But not our pandemic. The influenza pandemic of 1918. Because Luis a curator of the CDC museum, and an early 2020, she was getting ready for an exhibit on how the 1918 pandemic shaped science and society. But then news started circulating at the CDC. News about a brand new virus. One called COVID-19. And that was when they had to change their plans. By early March 2020, it was really clear that we had to get on top of it. And it has been so different from anything that we have collected and documented in the past. The collection at the CDC museum, it's like a time capsule of every public health crisis that's happened in the last century. Take, for example, the polio exhibit. Wander over there, and you'll see a big hulking iron lung. Which is wonderful mayonnaise Barton Apia lived in for over 40 years. That, I think, is a crowd favorite. Then there's a glass jug filled with this noxious looking yellow water. And that water comes from the Bellevue Stratford hotel in Philadelphia. In 1976, bacteria in that hotel's HVAC system caused an outbreak of a mysterious respiratory illness at a convention of the American legion. The disease was dubbed legionnaires disease. The legionella branch had a big gallon jug of this killer water and we finally talked them out of it and we have it on display at the museum. And I say it's priceless, but it has no value at all. There's also exhibits on the obesity epidemic in the United States. And on the health impacts of secondhand smoking. And I do want to do a shout out for a smallpox eradication collection. We have probably the most stellar smallpox eradication collection anywhere. You can even try on a hazmat suit if that's the kind of thing that strikes your fancy. I mean, come on. But it's one thing to track down an old iron lung or charm your colleagues out of a murky jug of water years after the crisis has abated. It's something else entirely to collect artifacts from a pandemic, you're currently living through. We were doing a rapid response collecting kind of approach that we were trying to collect materials in real time. But rapid response collecting is a little bit like asking curators to peer into a crystal ball. You have to predict what objects people in the future will really connect with. Which ones will help them really understand what it was like to live through this crisis? So when reports about COVID-19 first started coming in, Luis sprang into action and cast a wide net. In early 2020, when a cruise ship called the diamond princess, had an outbreak on board, the museum approached first responders and quarantine passengers, and asked them, hey, do you have anything for us? In response, they got passenger correspondence, even a copy of a diary. And when CDC artists created the first medical illustration of the SARS CoV-2 virus, the museum nabbed one of the 3D models that they worked from. And of course, there was one object in particular that soon became a really big deal. One that reminded Luis a lot of 1918. There was the whole issue in 1918 about masking and there were mass shortages. So the Red Cross were doing like these events where it was women that joined together to make masks. Sounds familiar. Flash forward to the PPE shortages in the spring of 2020, and Americans are once again breaking out their sewing machines. And the museum made sure to collect some of those homemade masks. And as the CDC also rushed to certify the safety of new companies that wanted to manufacture N95 masks, the museum stashed away some of those that passed the CDC's muster. Luis says museum's first realized that they needed a rapid response collecting strategy after September 11th. Like people would put up a fly or have you seen my son or you have seen my mother, those kinds of things. And they were collecting the teddy bears at the sites. And it's a kind of collecting ephemera that if you don't collect it right at the moment, it might disappear. In 2014, the CDC museum put this new rapid response collecting into action with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. And they knew they wanted to tell a story that was bigger than just the CDC's role. They wanted to represent all of the different perspectives in this collection that they were building, including artifacts from the community and religious leaders who stepped up to help fight the Ebola virus. We had aman and administer that actually shared copies of their Quran in the Bible that was mocked up with passages that documented why it was okay to have safe burial practices that were being recommended quarantine procedures. I will say in Ebola exhibit that was probably the most popular section of the entire exhibit. Included was a healer's bottle donated by the Sierra Leone indigenous traditional healers union. And it's wrapped with threads and cowry shells and was used to wash hands. The items showed that it wasn't enough for health officials just to promote safe practices. The messages also had to come from people who were trusted in their own communities. Rumors were an incredible issue in West Africa at the time, particularly early in the epidemic. Some people thought Ebola wasn't real. There was all sorts of things like, you know, this was purposeful, you know, people drinking bleach. That sounds sort of familiar, doesn't it? With the torrents of misinformation around COVID-19. The museum has had no trouble finding these kinds of artifacts to add to its collection. Things like anti vaccine posters. You might even say some of these artifacts come to them. Occasionally we'll have protesters in front of CDC and we have collected their materials. And they're sort of.

CDC Luis Luis Shah Barton Apia Bellevue Stratford Hotel Legionnaires Disease Ebola Influenza Polio Smallpox Philadelphia Obesity Sars United States Red Cross West Africa Sierra Leone Indigenous Tradit Aman
German rescue boat with 800 migrants reaches Sicilian port

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

German rescue boat with 800 migrants reaches Sicilian port

"After days of waiting a German ship carrying over eight hundred migrants has arrived it's a Sicilian polls shouts of joy could be heard from the dock because the vessel tree near the ship full of rescued migrants was finally granted permission to dock at the port of Trapani in western society there were about a hundred and sixty minus on the ship including fifteen of very young children the children will be taken to shelters once most of the adults will have to quarantine on other ships many of the passengers came from countries in West Africa Egypt or Morocco more than half of the passengers have been saved from a sinking wouldn't date to nineteen November I'm Karen Thomas

Trapani West Africa Morocco Egypt Karen Thomas
Sudan Says Military Coup Thwarted; Dozens of Troops Arrested

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:09 min | 2 months ago

Sudan Says Military Coup Thwarted; Dozens of Troops Arrested

"Admiral to lead the lead story breaking news out of israel. This morning hadn't even made it in. The american press yet sudan claims to thwart military coup attempt. Many officers detained. Now i bring this up because sudan long ago and far away Harbored osama bin laden under a radical islamist regime. Have you been to khartoum. You're usually been to everywhere. Have you been to cartoon. I have not. He'd finally finally finally about. I'm not surprised because it was an islamist dictatorship forever right exactly. I think if. I'd said yes. You should have been very suspicious. Well why do we care about places like guinea and sudan. When coups happened admiral because the overall rule of law we wanna foster in the international community at breaks norms when elected governments of whatever stripe are overthrown be geo-strategically. We've seen again and again in these coup ridden contres bad actors bleed into it because they're largely ungoverned spaces in so many cases and we've that from afghanistan to libya to syria today to sudan. I fear for it in western africa. Guinea so i think those are the two principal reasons we oughta be concerned. One is philosophical political the others practical military beginning mogadishu or other failed states. But i do know you can give us a fairly good idea. What is living in a failed state. Like it's pretty much like what you saw in kabul over the last few weeks it masses of people desperation in their eyes extreme poverty armed gangs open trucks with skinny teenagers. Driving around with ak47's i'm describing both parts of east and west africa at this point all of those factors are part of this breakdown in lawlessness that audit concern very deeply in in all of these

Sudan Khartoum Osama Bin Laden Israel Guinea Western Africa Libya Syria Afghanistan Mogadishu Kabul West Africa
Guinea Reports West Africa's First Known Marburg Virus Death

BBC Newsday

01:49 min | 4 months ago

Guinea Reports West Africa's First Known Marburg Virus Death

"Authorities in Guinea have confirmed death from the Marburg virus, the first case ever found in West Africa. It's a fever with very, very high fatality rates, which causes sufferers to bleed to death. The person's contacts have been traced to being monitored, and we can speak to Dr Patrick, a bulk of the World Health Organization who joins us down the line from Brazzaville. Something a surprise in the sense it's the first time this has been found in West Africa. What do we know about this specific? Case and somewhere near Gueckedou in Guinea, I believe Okay. Thank you. Thank you so much. And thank you for having me. As you clearly say, This is the first time Guinea we were seeing a case of mobile in West Africa. The kids in points and index gets well. Was reported on some of the patient who is for the six years old who reported with the high grade fever, bleeding of the gums, cheeks. And Unfortunately, the patient died two days after attending being attended to in the hospital. Samples were taken from this location confirmed for mobile in within the simple security in southern Kettle. Further secondary confirmation of that the country is not sure every name Conakry but also in the car yesterday. So these kids to pastor is that right? That's right, at least in that the kids with one probable case that is the wife so far we are following up the boat, so one for the six contact And, uh, Essentially happening in the same location where we just concluded containing the Ebola, um, right visit two months

West Africa Guinea Dr Patrick Gueckedou Marburg Fever Brazzaville World Health Organization Conakry Ebola
"west africa" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:45 min | 4 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"From his home in Guinea in West Africa when he was 13. I'm struck by how small He is short and slight, and he's quiet. This is single earlier. This is the place where with this back we've walked down to the harbor, but we can't get within 50 M of the water. This is another of his many bail conditions. So this was the point over here. The down? Yeah. Where you were arrested. The way Yeah. This is a place where I was arrested. And this is a pleasure Technique. Director Prison. What's it like? Remembering that day when you were taken off the ship in handcuffs, Remember? I mean, it reminds me there was a day in my life. The truth. I was not so scared because I thought that it was a misunderstanding. And if they understand Then they were free austerity of our freedom. It was not that afraid. At what point did you hear that They were accusing you of being a terrorist. My lawyer, Ho told me that they're accusing us of being terrorists. Mhm. I was surprised. I was surprised I tourists, But why? Why? Why are they calling story about accent? Why have not killed anyone? Have attacked in the one I didn't I didn't fight in the one Nothing. So I was surprised to see what did happen on the ship. And how did the Maltese authorities land on this charge of terrorism? Let's begin The story as women leaves the coast of.

Guinea West Africa 13 Maltese Ho single 50 M
Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

BrainStuff

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

"You've probably seen stories about exemplary bravery and battles soldiers and volunteers who risk everything to pull injured. Compatriots out of harm's way so they can receive much needed medical attention but some of these heroes will never receive. Any medals parades accommodations for their work. And not because of injustice but because their ants species called capone-era analysis are termite hunting. Aunts that scientists say not only rescue injured comrades but also treat their wounds. The survival rate among those injured in this combat is remarkable up to ninety percent. These ants live in colonies in sub saharan africa that average nearly one thousand members the ends wage war on termites rating their nests and dragging the dead back behind the lines as a source of food. These rates however often come at a heavy price. The termites biting crushed the ants ripping off limbs and snapping off heads. Eric frank a scientist at the university of low son in switzerland has studied these ants and seeing them do battle with termites at a research station in the komo national park one of the largest protected areas in west africa in northern cote d'ivoire. He would watch the and drag the injured back to their nest. But because the ants make their homes underground it was difficult to define exactly what happened next. So franken has team set out to discover what was happening inside the nest i they captured entire ant colonies and set them up in artificial nests. They then hooked up infrared cameras to keep tabs on the insects. The scientists also captured termites and then allowed the answer to stage a raid. Many aunts were gravely injured during the melee. Many lost limbs they're able bodied comrades responded by staging a battlefield triage separating gravely wounded from the only slightly wounded. The seriously injured those who lost at least five limbs often died on the battlefield because as the researchers noted they didn't seem to want to be helped that bendon distort their bodies making it difficult for their sisters in arms to carry them to safety. Those whose wounds were less serious however allowed themselves to be cared for

Eric Frank University Of Low Son Komo National Park Saharan West Africa Africa Switzerland Franken Bendon
The Energist | Micah Renfro on Oil and Gas Startups

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

01:36 min | 5 months ago

The Energist | Micah Renfro on Oil and Gas Startups

"Welcome back to yesterday's podcasts. We've got about a mica. Mike renfro the right. Okay just make sure with is an energetic. The energised the z. Energised mike what do you guys do with you. Just so we do executive recruiting and consulting visory Been around since nineteen seventy nine I haven't been there since. Nineteen seventy nine but the firm was. The firm was founded by a couple engineers and a couple of geologists that drew their rotation to think it was like west africa and they were in their twenties. And i don't want to go to west africa on rotation. Now i can't imagine back in the seventies wanting to go g and So they decided to start The energised is technical. People recruiting technical people. then. We've stayed in energy throughout to my knowledge where the one of the longest standing if not the longest standing energy focused recruiting firms out there head hunting firms out there and so i started working there about eleven years ago. Maybe ten years ago something like that started in investment banking kind of got my teeth kicked in that for a few years rather wells fargo fargo tweet san francisco and new york so go energy investment banking. Yes so i was in the capital markets group. So i say we did. Like i did pretty much spreadsheets. And kind of converting senior bankers notes So i didn't didn't really have a whole lot inputting any other stuff

Mike Renfro West Africa Mike Fargo Fargo San Francisco New York
Travel to Benin - Rachel Décoste

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:04 min | 6 months ago

Travel to Benin - Rachel Décoste

"Or wikipedia. Wants me to say benin. But i will defer to the guest here. I'd like to welcome to the show. Rachel day cost from year of return. Book dot com. And who has come to talk to us about the country of been in rachel. Welcome to the show. Happy to be here first of all. We're probably gonna need to put this on a map because some people are wildly googling right now in wikipedia where is the country have been in innocent a west africa the biggest countries nearby our nigeria and ghana. And why did you find yourself in banana in the first place. Let's start with that. I did a dna test years ago. I am african canadian. Meaning my ancestors. Came here as enslaved africans. We don't know where from and i thought. Dna tests would be a good way to find out where my origins were from. After i did the dna tests been in was one of the top countries along with togo. Nigeria the whole region. Really and then. I took a trip there for six months and been in was one of the five countries. I visited excellent. And why should someone go to in. What i loved about. Being in was that it was authentic in terms of it hasn't yet been too americanized to westernize is still wear the traditional clothes. Drink their traditional tease ethan traditional food and it really felt like you were transported back to a time. They've kept their culture almost intact. And that's why you would want to go to benin versus another country that might be more westernized. There's something authentic inorganic about banana. That is so heartwarming. Banana is a small country. As i recall. It's actually a smaller country in africa. But it's the same size approximately the same size of ohio. Which always surprises

Benin Nigeria West Africa Rachel Ghana Togo Africa Ohio
"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:31 min | 6 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"For the possibility that inflation Along with the Federal Reserve's promised to let it happen. That it could lead to a more volatile world time may be running out to find out the true origins of the cove in 19 virus. Drew Hinshaw from the Wall Street Journal says the W. H O is calling for a second round of investigation. But time is the resource. They may not have enough of a lot of the things they're looking for, for example, antibodies in the blood of people and animals. They fade over time. If you Tess doing antibody tests on a farmer, a mink farmer in China somewhere and they are negative for the virus. It's difficult to know of a negative because they never Were infected or they negative because you know, it's a this point been more than a year and antibodies fade and become harder to detect with time. Another crucial piece of the puzzle for the W H O team will be blood banks. WH o lead team really wants to test Blood banks that store samples of blood and In Wuhan. They've agreed to keep those samples. In other parts of China. After two years they get tossed out so the clock is ticking in terms of zoonotic issues versus lab made virus issues. There are new calls to investigate. That, too, After pushing it aside is politics for most of the year, prominent scientists are now saying there are enough small pieces of evidence. Bringing up questions that need to be answered. One of the critical moments was when the head of the W H O himself called for the lab to be in, you know, thoroughly probe he said he was willing to send experts That's pretty mainstream. When the head of the World Health Organization is saying we shouldn't investigate a lab, it's it's hard to characterize it as ah French theory and then we had that sound from Tony Fauci last week saying, Yeah, I think we should probably do another investigation. Well, that wasn't about face after 14 months, right, right. So the fact that China won't allow investigators in on even have a fraction of the access that the who had during the Ebola outbreak has been frustrating for US lawmakers. To draw a point of comparison in 2014 the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Guinea threw open its doors You know, folks and blue vests were going to village to village, interviewing people. Saying, Hey, how did this person get sick? How did this person get sick? Nothing like that has been allowed in China. The team that was investigating this virus. It took them more than a year after the pandemic began to get on the ground and asked, Okay, what have you guys been doing? So the question is, What are they hiding? And will we be able to find out who has so much time passed? That evidence is is now gone. Well, I mean, based on the Clipper, he said that the quality of the blood is already degraded. It would seem that had half right, right, so we may or may not find out anything. If we send a team into China now and the longer they delay better for them. 7 20 is the time onto the roads. We go check in with Ryan to see how it's rolling. Take it away, Sir, This report is brought to vicap trust. Formerly G B be getting a little busier all the way around 80 from Roseville. Those still just nine minutes to the cap city split across the top of town north Gate on ramp to westbound. I 80 got word of an accident there. Couple of vehicles involved. Reportedly. The ramp is block westbound Cap City Freeway splits downtown. Just nine minutes. It's 13 in Carmel Grove on I 5 14 on 99 got some slowing now. 12th Avenue, the highway 50 50 west down from Folsom is an 18 minute drive in from Woodland on I five. You do it in 2016 to get in from Davis. He's found 80 across the causeway Got a issues going the other way. However, right now very slow from West El Camino on I 80 all the way to a little past Was capital also got a report of an accident. A child's road speed sensors aren't showing any slowing there. Also, another one reported in the center divider all further up the road at Mace Feed tenses are showing any slowly. They're either after 30. Last year's Genevieve's. Burford and Brothers is now cap trust Sacramento. The name is changed with values remain the same independent employee owned and a commitment to act in their client's best interests. Always you can find him. Cat trust dot com Forward slash Sacramento traffic on the tens, every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons from the Cap Trust Traffic Center News 93.1 kfbk. The excessive heat warning remains in effect for the evening hours, mostly and today with a high of 98 to 1 of two Night into Rick. Clear sky with a little of 55 to 59 tomorrow.

Drew Hinshaw Tony Fauci West Africa World Health Organization 2016 Roseville 18 minute Ryan last week China today Carmel Grove Davis 12th Avenue Folsom 2014 Woodland Last year West El Camino nine minutes
The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

BBC World Service

01:50 min | 8 months ago

The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

"Hidden. Many are elderly in their seventies there in these camps because they're accused of being witches, But their voices can now be heard on a new album called I Forgot. Now, who I used to Be sad about that. I love Dublin Bay when my whole but one of the women have never played music or written songs before they were recorded by award winning record producer Ian Brennan and his wife, Maria Elena, Omaha's a deli. But Elena herself has a personal connection to witch hunting, which will get into in a moment. But first Marlena joins us from her home in Italy. Welcome. Oh, thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Marlena. How did these women and they are primarily women Get to these camps? Well, these women are a poor there as early they have been kicked out off their land by younger relatives who are very attracted to buy their land. And that land is all. They own a S. O. This women are very vulnerable. You know, they suffer from physical mental in the Caesar, such as Alzheimer's agility. Misshapen limbs, blindness and they are completely exploited that they're stripped off their dignity, their turned into a monster there literally stripped off their own land. So these women are accused of being which is what is being a witch mean in West Africa. Being a witch is a being a person that can cause harm to your cropper that can cause a stability, which is our accused off doing harm to families. And you know, Westerners often

Ian Brennan Marlena Joins Dublin Bay Maria Elena Elena Marlena Alzheimer's Agility Omaha Italy West Africa
Being gay in Ghana: LGBT community is 'under attack'

The World

01:58 min | 8 months ago

Being gay in Ghana: LGBT community is 'under attack'

"The world now to West Africa and Gamma. That nation has long been look to as a beacon of stability on the African continent. Ghana was the first sub Saharan country to gain independence. Gonna instill pride themselves on their freedoms. But that liberty isn't afforded to everyone Consider the LGBT Q community there. Recently, Public acts of homophobia in Ghana have pushed LGBT Q gun and into the national spotlight. World's Bianca Hillier reports January 31st was supposed to be the start of something new and Ghana How crazy it was opening ceremony for the country's first ever LGBTQ center. Alex Dong core is the director of LGBT Plus Rights, Ghana, the organization running the space. Way wish to create a peaceful ourselves as a movement to be able to sit down and strategize and mobilize and quartered needs be sources. Honors. LGBTQ community has a history of fighting for freedom. But most of this organizing has been done online for security reasons. So this physical space in across signaled new opportunities, but it didn't last long. Moses fall moaning, heads up Ghana's National Coalition for proper sexual rights and family values and quickly put up a fight the presidency and the minister of foreign affairs and the RGB have every right to investigate the setting up of that office to close it down immediately and arrest and prosecute those people involved in it. In the weeks following the LGBT Q Center's opening Fella moaning led a campaign to shut down the space. Archbishop Philip Nama, president of the Ghana Catholic Bishopsconference quickly echoed the stands on local television. This practice is completely foreign to our Ghanaian culture. And the law should be friend and such a way that It is punishable in a very

Ghana Bianca Hillier Alex Dong Lgbt Plus Rights Saharan West Africa National Coalition For Proper Lgbt Q Center Moses Archbishop Philip Nama Ghana Catholic Bishopsconferen
Bloomberg News Energy Reporter Robert Tuttle Explains the Suez Canal

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:44 min | 8 months ago

Bloomberg News Energy Reporter Robert Tuttle Explains the Suez Canal

"Reporter Robert Tuttle joining us on the phone in Calgary. Hey, Robert. Love your story. You can ask my tea when I'm like. Oh, we've got him yet because I feel like Let's explain the Suez Canal. I think these are things we either learned about in great school history and then just kind of threw it away. Just take it for granted when it comes to moving trade around, but it it's really important. Yeah, I mean, it's it's hugely important as you said it was built more than a century ago went into operation in 18 69. It's played a central role in the last. In that sense, it's been open. It's played a central through two World wars. Revolutions. It's been a really important conduit for the world to you. One could say it almost helped told together the British empire and from some extent for a while there Uh, yeah. I mean, it holds today it carries about 12% of the world's trade goes through it. It's Zoe, the biggest prize. The most important aspect of that trade is, of course, oil. You know, the Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest exporter, sends oil through the canal to Europe in the North America oil comes the other way as this, uh, To reach Asian markets from wherever West Africa from the U. S. But it Zab slightly essential plays a central role to the world trade until it blockages costing quite a bit of money. Holding up about $10 billion a good today. They're just waiting there. No,

Robert Tuttle Suez Canal Calgary Robert ZOE Saudi Arabia North America West Africa Europe
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 9 months ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 9 months ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Polar Vortex causes extreme freezing globally in February

UN News

01:29 min | 9 months ago

Polar Vortex causes extreme freezing globally in February

"Polar vortex was responsible for the freezing conditions in the state of texas at last month. Your weather experts of said before warning of a worrying increase in global carbon dioxide levels spokesperson cleanliest from the world meteorological organization. Wmo told journalists during a regular briefing in geneva that the united states shiver through its coldest february since one thousand nine hundred nine thanks to the natural phenomenon to do with vortex. This is an area of low pressure cold air surrounding the polls. It normally keeps that the optic woman air and lower latitudes weakened this winter that meant that he called egg Sitting out the object woman by contrast went into pods of the optic minnelli's added that no less than sixty two all time. Daily called minimum temperature records were broken in the united states from february. The eleventh to this extinct. According to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration february temperatures were also well below the one thousand ninety one to twenty twenty average over much of the russian federation and north america. But they were well. Above average over parts of the arctic and from north west africa to southern europe and china the un agency also cautioned that although february was a relatively cold month. This does not negate the long-term warming trend from climate change. Cold records are becoming rarer in contrast to heat temperature records and heat waves. We expect this trend to continue. Wmo said in a statement

WMO United States Geneva Minnelli Texas North West Africa National Oceanic And Atmospher Russian Federation North America Arctic UN Europe China
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:51 min | 10 months ago

How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

"In twenty thirteen fronts sent soldiers to marley to stop jihadist advance seven years later and more than five thousand troops are still there in the region and despite their intervention twenty twenty was the deadliest year since the crisis began in the region known as a suhel avast sweep of land south of the sahara. So what is going wrong with the strategy of the so-called g five the group of five suhel countries became a facile. Mali mauritania initia- and chad. And of course a fronts will tell us more. I'm joined by the journalist and researcher in west africa and the sahel region. Pull me good morning pool. Good to have you with us. Good morning just explained to us how we've got to this state of did crisis what i think. We have to distinguish two things back in two thousand thirteen The jihad is already taken over the north of mali and they were launching a fresh push southwards and they had got down as far as the capital. Bamako that would have threatened security instability right across africa so the initial french intervention which was actually sent by Emmanuel macron predecessor. Phosphor alone which remember him that that may give you a sense of how far back in time. This was that was an almost conventional military intervention and it ended the jihadist the towns across the mouth of molly and remove that immediate threat but as so often in these situations a conventional conflict benefit of fragmented into more widespread terrorism localized attacks and some general instability. And that is much much harder to tackle. And you can't do it just with military means and so there's been a huge effort over really substantial seven years now as you mentioned to try and bring stability to the region but it's it's particularly difficult because you don't just have a ideology ideological jihadism if you're like fighting a terrorist war against a perceived international influence against the secular nature nature of these west african states. But you also have That mixed up with all sorts of local tensions and grievances For example between groups who depend on animal hooding and people who have commas and this is in this region the suhel which is just south of the sahara so it subjected to climate change water land grazing or in short supply. Population is rising rapidly. But the jobs aren't there to keep pace so you've got all her social and economic factors as well and that that's what's made it such a difficult challenge to bring this crisis under control but probably the most intense. The most dangerous situation was in the second. Half of twenty and nineteen when an armed group in eastern mali cooled islamic group in the greatest sahara pledging affiliation to die ish in the middle east staged a series of really very very bloody attack saw malia ninja army garrisons and the french also suffered heavy losses. And after that in january of last year there was a sort of strategic rethinking if you like and the decision to focus the military effort on them and to try and get up a stronger development have heard an peacemaking effort in other parts of the region sent. We have seen some progress since then

Suhel Mali Initia Emmanuel Macron Sahara Mauritania Marley Bamako West Africa Chad Jihad Africa Malia Ninja Army Middle East
Guinea declares Ebola epidemic, neighboring countries act

The World

00:16 sec | 10 months ago

Guinea declares Ebola epidemic, neighboring countries act

"A free for nearly five years, the government of Guinea in West Africa has announced a nebula epidemic you'll recall the Guinea was one of the country's worst affected by the Ebola's epidemic that lasted from 2014 to 2016. That epidemic killed more than 11,000 people. Now

Government Of Guinea West Africa Guinea Ebola
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 10 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:10 min | 10 months ago

Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

"Now. We are talking about africa. I wanna know john paul. Why why do we need to keep africa on our radar very interesting question. So one one thing that keeps me. Loyal to entrepreneurs on fire is the quality of stories and experiences of ultra preneurs. Who've made it that's one big reason. Why listen and. I'm also sure that's why many people listen to the show but interesting is what being on entrepreneur means that you're able to live in the now and also prepare for future so it's almost impossible to think about the future and nothing about and here's why when you look at the population of the world. Africa correctly has the youngest population of people. Right now sixty percents of people on the continent of the age of twenty five. So this is more or less looking at china. Before china became china up to date china more or less the second biggest economy in the world the factory of the world and all of that so you can imagine that people who saw china. The china became china. Actually the ones who got in on the meat of the game. So that's exactly what africa represents but more importantly there have been events in the past couple of years that have put africa in the centerpiece. The very most the most recent one which is very interesting is covid now all the time most companies have built their supply chains around china and south east asia but then when it hits it was obvious that supply chains with very vulnerable. And if you're going to diversify your supply chain. It's impossible not to look at africa if you're looking at affordable label if you look at them. The truck symmetry of the continental either north america or europe. And what are the means. Most countries on the continent either speak english or french and these are more or less global line. Which is you're going to penetrate any of the big markets and. It's really now happening. Because what the chinese are doing is the chinese. Market is starting to specialize in advanced high-tech stuff. I most of those low cost production that brought business the whole of storing from america. When are beginning to see going to places like vietnam. Bangladesh and other countries in southeast asia. But then you cannot forgo a population of one point three billion people which is what africa presents and what we're seeing is some companies setup accretions within the african continent places like rwanda at the opium ghana senegal. And what they're doing is they are preparing. These guys are digging for the future and one interesting. That's happened in the last four years in america. Is the people in africa. So in america when you think about africa the image that comes to mind is charity and philanthropy. Africa needs. Needs help and help and help. So the approach of the americans this time and even europe has been to help africa give africa aid. Give them all of that. What the chinese are doing is they're coming with more or less trade and business and things. What africa needs really because you have this population of very young people enterprising people. I mentioned that sixty percent of the world's uncle beats at arable. Land is in africa so in most parts of the world with maxed out the land space. Yes we're doing. We're using technology and other means to increase the yield on the land. But when we're talking about virgin space. Federal land arable land. Most of it is still in africa. Still cultivated and we're looking at a global population that is set to double back at least by the time we reach two hundred fifty or more according to the un and if we do not keep pace with globe with population growth would amount of food were producing then the world is going to be faced with serious threat of hunger so these are just a few examples of why africa needs to be on your rita. Yes so thinking about now. It's great but you're thinking about the future you need to remember that even before could hit five of the top. The top ten fastest growing economies in the world when africa. These are not really things. We've seen the mainstream media. Why i'm happy that chain. Is that the approach of the chinese in africa. Doo controversial is a big difference. This guy's coming here boots on the ground and they're dealing with the market. The previous relationship with africa has been to deal with africa's governments give african governments money for age and they develop africa unfulfilled years. It's never happened instead. It's helped enhance corruption. A sense of entitlement and dependency so most of the problems never get so because that's free money free money fluent in from europe money flowing in from north america so what people like us exist to do is to show that the people we should be voting. For with our money is the entrepreneur's they're the ones who have the incentive and the motivation to really solve africa's problems and guess what's global money starting to call me and i'm sure many ago minova listeners. On on on entrepreneur no stripe the big global player in in payments strike just acquired an african company. Niger company for two hundred million dollars. That's a major exit and it's stories like this that are starting to prove that africa is not a charity case. Africa is opportunity. The programs are trying to solve through eight. Actually need to be solved through entrepreneurship and the process. We create more jobs more wealth and greeted big happier world john. Let's talk about what you see as the most interesting opportunities that exist right now. I mean you talked about a lot of opportunities. I love how you really are hammering home. The fact that entrepreneurship is what is going to turn africa around and really bring that continents into the as we move forward into twenty twenty one and beyond but specifically what are the one or two most interesting and fascinating opportunities in the business world that you're seeing right now. The first interesting one is more or less. I talked about it earlier. In terms of africa's potential to produce food because right now we're looking for the next food basket of the world and one interesting that africa offers is the or what's we've we now know as superfoods so for example there's a grain that's grown in west africa. It's a green code for new now. This green is so rich in cultural significance for example when the tombs of ancient in jim ships are more or less opel excavated amongst other materials. Like honey. and things like that four new for new f- who is one of the greens that it that the ancient egyptians actually put in the the pyramids in the borough chambers of dead feroz. That's tell you how important it was back. Then this is like one of the longest growth one of the greens has been grown the longest in history almost five thousand years now. The reason why new is important is when you look at the american market and european market more or less developed world and you see how important health and wellness is this all about eighteen. Organic food. Gluten free food and things like that you announced that to see if like for new is actually superfood but in africa is grown by people in africa eating by people that i start to see what america has done with them a green assira like we know what which is more or less breakfast zero before quinoa became like a blockbuster serial in america it had the same profile as phone. You in south america. So what we're beginning to see. Is they celebrate to ship in. New york is named spear pm. He's now taken for neo his packaged. It's not just in its physical formats but in the narrative that used salads and last year. I think it's early this year. It got the national distribution across the united states in whole foods. You know to distribute this kind of food and new just one. I know listeners may be familiar with moringa which is another superfood. it grows in the wild in africa. We really take you for granted over yet. But then we've sent entrepreneurs coming here and repackage it into something that selling like a lot because it resonates resonates with the health and wellness movements the big trend going on in the

Africa China United States Europe John Paul North America South East Asia Senegal Rwanda Bangladesh Ghana Vietnam Asia Rita UN Niger
Choosing To Foster To Adopt To Build a Family

If These Ovaries Could Talk

03:11 min | 10 months ago

Choosing To Foster To Adopt To Build a Family

"You got talked into having kids matt. How were you in the process of like. Did you ever consider surrogacy. Or were you always gonna do fostering to adopt or tell us about that both griffin i had spent a considerable amount of time in africa. I lived in west africa for two years in the peace corps and during that time which now is like twenty years back i was really struck by the fact that in in west africa specifically the idea of family is much more fluid than i think what we traditionally see his family hearing west africa. You know if you don't have a kid 'cause you can't have a kid for some reason but neighbor has six your neighbor will give you wanna. There's it's just kind of like the way the community works like f. You need kids for survival of kids are how you cook kids or how you clean. Kids are how you ensure your your old age and so it really struck me at all. We can't give way to my brother. It struck me that astray that like we had a really generally a very limited view of what family could be in this country and so when it come time to have kids i think for both griffin i. We were just both like well. We're we don't need to go through the hundreds of thousands of dollars process of surrogacy or the thirty thousand dollars process of even a private adoption foster. That's like spell like the right thing for us to do. Yes so you chose foster with the hope to adjust that past. I'm sure you did your research. And you knew that that was gonna come with possibly heartache. Along the way. And that's that's you have to have a really thick skin to take that path. No i mean. I think we knew that there was always a possibility of baby going back going home. I think that that is an easier kind of idea in theory and i think we both went into it. You know again. Having a peace corps volunteer griffin ran a nonprofit in africa. We are both like well. That's what we do you know. We're we're good we're doing. It's the right thing to do. And we'll learn to love the biological family and we want to do what's right for the kid when they hand you five dale baby in the hospital and you start hearing the story of how that baby got their got there. I don't know something kicked it. It became a lot harder to envision. The idea of giving a baby back now. But i think that most people certainly gay men don't think about is you don't think you have any paternal instincts and that was actually the shock for us all of a sudden when somebody hands you a baby and says don't kill it. Yeah your instincts animal. Don't kill it your animalistic instincts. Kick in the baby. Could make funny breath from across the room. You're like you know so do. You can't rule out the nature portion of the program and so i think that also made it a very different challenge in theory thought. Oh yeah we'll we'll give a baby back and then once you get the baby you're not trying to get the baby

West Africa Griffin Peace Corps Africa Matt Dale
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:56 min | 10 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New. Sounds number 43 23, so you'll Wanna open up any old Web browser and just type in new sounds. 43 23. You'll get this show full of Marambra and xylophone like instruments from around the world. Now we heard the Ballabon from West Africa. There is another instrument in these Isla phone family in that part of the world, and it's called the JEEL G. Why I l and the London group called Voula VL uses that instrument as the basis for what they do. It's not the only thing they're they're clearly inspired by jazz and electronic music and minimalism. But it's all starting with the sound of the deal. This wooden xylophone from West Africa and we'll hear a piece called gunned Ania. Yeah. There's a lot going on in that piece by the London based band called Voula VL. They are quartet of musicians who incorporate the sounds of electronic music and jazz minimalism, but it all starts. From a musical bed provided by the West Africans I telephone known as the Geel, played by a musician named Becks Birch, who notably is a woman. This instrument traditionally is played by men and so she formed the band so that she could play the deal in this very untraditional setting there in London. We're listening on new sounds this time around to all these different members of the xylophone family made of wood. In Indonesia..

West Africa London Becks Birch Isla Indonesia Ania
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:42 min | 11 months ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stories that encourage lifelong learning and the National Endowment for the Arts, the federal agency that supports the arts and creativity in communities across the nation. More information is available at art stunk of It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. Bloomberg has been publishing a map of the world, which shows the level of vaccine distribution and different countries and virtually the entire continent of Africa. More than 50 different nations. It's just blank. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is our next guest and Nobel PRI peace Prize recipient former president of Liberia and she says Africa may be left out until next year. Certainly for calls the Ebola's outbreak which hit her country, among others, in West Africa in 2015 last year, she was asked to co chair a review of the global response to this pandemic, and she says Africa is in danger of being left behind. In Africa we don't have the resources is a simple as that, unless vaccine is seen as a free could On the basis that until everyone is safe, no one is safe when it seemed in that context. Then perhaps the wealthier nations of the world will come up with a formula that says, how can we share the fascination with those countries that are under resourced? Vaccination at this speed on this scale is unprecedented, and even the United States has discovered logistical problems. It's very hard to get millions of doses to millions of people in a very short time. Are there even greater logistical challenges in parts of Africa? We will face logistical challenges, no doubt. But I like to point our case of Ebola when Africa put up a platform to ensure that the medications and the responses to Ebola's were being available. To support of African countries that this back for was used to ensure equitable distribution among those African countries in need. Of course, there were limited countries at that time. Because Ebola affected the three neighboring countries in West Africa s O. Maybe distribution was easier sell population in those countries of like smaller than others. It would be more complicated if you have all of African countries. We should recall that rebel A was an extreme stress on the societies of a number of countries. What were some of the ways that you learned to address public anxiety and to get genuine medical care to people? Well, the first thing you need to get proper information whose library information On the state of the disease so that proper communications given to citizens. So that they don't have to guess they don't have to speculate. As to the extent of the effect of the disease, and one has to have coordination We can't have different entities in fourth of the health sector are involved in the financial sector. That's the only way you can win the confidence of citizens doing show that even if you have the means to address it, that they take the medication, or they adhere to the protocol. What, Iet's Mask er, whether it's social distancing. And, of course, in the case of the bull again strong partnerships because they're too The three affected countries did not have the resources to get the medication and to get the kind of support I was necessary. But they had good partners in the United States. As you probably know, Madam president. There are a lot of people who have expressed skepticism about masking and social distancing. They've declined to participate, and there's also a very widespread skepticism. Vaccines. Does that all sound familiar to you? Yes, it does. I mean, Liberia face the same thing in the early days of Ebola. But we were able to overcome it, too strong government action and leaders have to be able to convey this. This very tee off this disease tow their lives into their livelihoods in very clear terms. With very care, action and strong commitment not only to formulate those measures but to find a means to ensure that citizens understanding and are willing to comply for their own safety. I'm realizing that part of the reason I was a little surprised by the pandemic when it came Was that I remembered the experience of Ebola's that there was a terrible virus, but that it was contained in one part of the world that did not go worldwide. Granting that a pandemic is always possible. Were you surprised that this virus got out of control in a way that Ebola did not? Yes, because of the failure. Care of the measures to address The virus. I must say In the case of Ebola, I said, initially we face the same problem. The problem of confidence that people who thought maybe this was, you know somebody trying to limit their ability to move about their rights. You know, Toto freedom. Those other kinds of concerns our citizens happen. It's up to leaders to address those fears and those concerns and to make sure that the overcome them former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia. Thank you so much. Thank you. Organizer's promise that the Tokyo Olympics delayed because of the pandemic will happen this summer. But much of Japan is in a state of emergency and no one there has even been vaccinated. Yet Here's NPR's Anthony Kuhn. On Friday, government spokesman Mon Abou Sakai denied in anonymously sourced report by the British newspaper The Times that the Japanese government itself is privately given up on the games. We'll try to save face by bidding for the next available slot in 2032 Prime Minister Yoshihide Ace Ooga reiterated before parliament Friday that he's determined to make the Games happen, and International Olympic chief Thomas Bach said Thursday that there is no plan B. One of the Olympics. Most vocal critics author you, Honma says Japanese officials feel they've invested too much money and prestige in the games to pull out Now each document it Oh, Serena much you guys at once. They've made the decision. They can never reverse it, he says. Even if they realize it's wrong. Nobody wants to take responsibility for canceling it, he adds. In a private speech this month. Tokyo Organizing Committee chief Yoshiro Money admitted he doesn't know if the games will go ahead or not, but added that he can't voices doubts in public. Japan's biggest cities, Tokyo and Osaka and several other prefectures. They're currently under a state of emergency until at least February, 7th. The government will probably have to make its decision before the Olympic torch relay begins. March. 25th, a Kildow news agency pull this month found about 80% of Japanese think the game should either be canceled or postponed. The U. S Olympic and Paralympic Committee said in a tweet they hadn't heard anything suggesting that the games aren't happening, and so they continue to train and prepare. Anthony Kuhn. NPR NEWS Seoul This'll is NPR news. For more than 95 years, New Yorkers have been listening to W N Y C for.

Ebola Africa Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirlea NPR News West Africa NPR United States president Japan Anthony Kuhn Noel King Steve Inskeep Olympics Bloomberg National Endowment U. S Olympic and Paralympic Co Japanese government
"west africa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Thanks for calling the Frommer travel show. Oh, hey, Alice, Can you hear us? Yes, I can hear you. Okay. What? What? Where do you want to go when this all ends? Well, um, I'm originally from West Africa so I would fly it backto West Africa and hang there for a while because I believe the response there when it comes to the virus was very effective and it's true that it's a country. From Ivory Coast because you know, it's Senegal on in Western Africa does have one of the best records for how they've handled Koven 19. It's true. It surprises some people to know West Africa has done extremely well. And I love that idea, Alice not just because you're there because it's another place that I've really been warning to go myself, and I think there's not enough tourists from America Go there. I've heard wonderful things about Benin and Ivory Coast. And I'd also when things begin again, I'd like to start going to places that don't get a lot of tourists or need tourism more. A year. You especially gonna guys? Yes. Yeah, It's a wonderful especially for a ninja speaking person. The food is great. The weather is nice to people. I Two foreign years. So, yeah, that's one of the best destinations to try and also believe that people if they try toe, open their minds and travel more. They will see how Lots of places we had because it seems like eventually in this country for like 10 years, and I believe that the American people are a little bit insulated from the rest of the world. When the pandemic started. I was able to talk to compare reactions, reactions to the virus. No one comes to governments. And honestly, I was really disappointed at you know the government here because Stay, for example, the nation of booking official which is north of my country. Hey, it's one of the poorest countries in the world and put that in perspective. The GDP is like $14 billion and like, you know, like last month, just business made like made like 13 on his hold. And what they did when the pandemic started. I think they tested them of full five people positive. And the president came out and you made it out of an announcement. And he said, Well, we don't have anything even in normal circumstances. We don't have enough enough. You know equipment, but and he said, Well, the only good news is that the average or would give us more than enough that we need but You know, even even rich countries who usually help us. You don't even know how to react, so they really they shut down. They tested they did the right thing to contain it. Unlike us, we had no federal response. There might be a lesson in that. For people who want to travel on Biff. You know when you want to get traveling again, West Africa has dealt very well. It's a very terms of Kobe. It is an extremely safe destination to choose. When things do come back. The one problem will be flights. Fights have never been strong to that part of the world. That's a big reason Americans have never gone and I don't imagine they're going to start running huge numbers of flights there As soon as the pandemic ends. That's the one trick and it's a very expensive destination to get two for most Americans. Which is another reason. I think, Ellis that Americans have been more insulated and haven't been is aware of things that are going on that part of the world because it's so hard for us to get to Andi really do hope that people that things change in at least the next couple decades and people start adding staff got to them. Yeah, and I love I love that You gave one of the main lessons of travel, which is their welcoming Wonderful people to visit every where and when you visit different parts of the world, you can see how they solved the same problems that you're facing. Sometimes they solved them differently. Sometimes they solved the better, sometimes worse. But when you travel, you get to compare and contrast and learn and grow as a person and as a citizen, because it's our important that we as citizens put the right leaders into power. And we're going to be better citizens if we travel, all right, let's let's turn. Thank you so much for me. Let's turn to Patricia in Rocky Point. And Patricia, I hear you two are hoping to go to Africa when this ends Yes, very much. So my husband I have been on a couple of safaris in Africa. But there's one in particular that I really, really want to do. I want to go on the a safari that goes into Rwanda and up to see the mountain gorillas. It sounds so exciting and so wonder from a big advocate for animals and I'd like to see them while they're still there. Still there? Yes, while they're still there. And the and, on the other hand, this is something that's completely diverse. Ah, completely the opposite of this safari I'd like two years ago, My husband and I went on the Queen Mary on a crossing and we stayed in the Britannic. And as you know, there are three levels on the Queen Mary to stay in the pretend we're 95% of the people are and it's absolutely wonderful. But this time I want to go up to one of the grills and Princess Grill or the Queen's Grill those of the upper class and get your own dining rooms and your own section of the ship. Thank you very much. You may go down to Britannica if you're in those classes, But why would you exactly exact I would love to try it just once, and I'm aiming for the Queen's Grill. Wonderful. Thank you for calling. Patricia. We have to take our first break Anybody else who'd like to call 808 for 89222? We have Adam on the line will take a morning We get back from these messages. Where will you go? When this is all over? We want to know what we.

West Africa Patricia Alice Queen Mary Ivory Coast Frommer Western Africa Africa Benin Senegal Rwanda Princess Grill president Adam Rocky Point official
"west africa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"It go shut off the coast of West Africa I'm Dave Anthony and this is fox news engines I trust dot com what you're about to hear is the fusion of entertainment and like many this program former CBS sixty minutes correspondent Lara Logan was on with me last hour if you missed it make sure you check the podcast out but she stated something that I think is absolutely true we are at war now we're at war with the deep state and what war with those who claim to be arbiters of the truth that have now we now have documented evidence that all of this trump stuff is a lie but it goes beyond just the trump stuff and the deep state it also goes into China with the corona virus who is actually defending the truth are are these are these media outlets that have ties to China are they able to even tell the truth now who's willing to say it well we are for one but I want to introduce you to somebody who also will begin to lay out a case that we have been following for a while and that is China's the infiltration of our colleges and universities it is truly hair raising when you look at the entire map of what is going on we are at another war it's a Cold War but it's with China and it's time we recognize it we begin in sixty seconds this is the Glenn Beck program all right I.

West Africa Dave Anthony Lara Logan China CBS Glenn Beck
"west africa" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on KPCC

"Right that is that is interesting so I'm a very interesting observation thank you one of the responses outbreak in West Africa ones and a lot of eight banner in Ontario and that that those who died from the disease or or died during the outbreak of some other cars were cremated and that Liberian society especially you don't do cremations hello my name in order to protect themselves daily changed basically thousands of years of societal behavior in order to protect those who were over a life before they could go back to practicing Belcher dishes that they have we've seen the same thing in a lot of other countries that have been impacted by the coronavirus that they're open cremations in Wuhan carried out there have been banned on those bodies down the Ganges river in Indiana so people are clicking did the blessing I take away from this is people are intelligent and give them the proper information about how to protect themselves they will go so far as to change the practices that their culture has used for a thousand years in order to protect themselves in the short run from a virus that what what that tells me is we we have to put a premium on distributing intelligent trying and incorrect information giving people the tools to protect themselves because that'll save a lot of lives but before we let you go I'm reading another one here it's an email from ray he says if the Obama administration was so concerned about you boleh how come his administration didn't have the necessary equipment and medical supplies stocked but when he left office it's easy to be a Monday morning quarterback your thoughts read won't soon be over ministration did put together an actual stockpile the national stockpile probably wasn't big enough for something like the coronavirus let's be very clear here you pull in the corona virus are very different diseases one has a mortality rate of close to seventy or eighty percent but it's very hard to get messy bola a US base we have to cut somebody's blood or guts to get it yourself the other one has a lower mortality rate we still don't know the exact number but somewhere around two percent maybe one percent of that still really really high in terms of a global pandemic and it's really easy to get we still don't know a lot about how how far it can travel or how well it is not services but the bottom line is coronavirus is very easy to get compared with the Apollo virus a wider percentage of the population is going to cut it yeah and the and therefore a higher number of people who are in need of a higher number of people will have consequences so the stock pile yeah I was bigger and it was growing under the Obama administration one couple in record we saw last week suggests that the trump administration actually ended a contract for maintaining the cycle it is that we now need and there have been some reports of ventilator showing up to states that just don't work and we'll have to posit there read so much to talk about thank you so much for joining us read Wilson as a correspondent with the hill and author of epidemic Ebola and the global strict scramble to prevent the next killer outbreak thanks again read thanks a ton UP next we do have an audio treat as we present our next installment in the series called the sounds of America every year the national recording registry from the library of Congress six twenty five recordings to preserve this time we're going to showcase the country classic we'd be remiss though if we didn't acknowledge the passing of one of America's greatest songwriters John Prine was a Grammy Award winning singer who combined literary genius with a common touch family announced that he died in Nashville from complications brought on by corona virus he was seventy three and Sasha and Simon's you're listening to one day she thanks all the jokes are corny convict movies maker and **** she lacks ketchup on scrambled eight swears like a sailor when she saves are laying eggs she takes that keeps on ticking I'm never gonna let you go more it west monkey whacked out the last crazy as a loon payday they don't mean may never.

West Africa
"west africa" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"To Mali one of the strategies I ended up using it by bringing in a fellow at the kids I talked to the manager of the program who takes kids to Mali West Africa to help build schools this program is called well done and they operate in the bay area high schools so the program manager sat down for lunch with my parents and I met with her head at times and and let her know what to expect and and what would be most productive in convincing my parents so they said their fears with with her the Astor how would happen to build a school which you can't see it he answered very honestly she told them I don't know they still find a way to figure it out I've seen doing volunteer projects around the bay area and she just does fine a lot of times we don't know the exact solution but if we try to find a way to figure it out I didn't know exactly how I would build schools in West Africa then I went there and I need breaks some of St in all the different activities we found a way to make it work someone in the audience wants to know what you would say to a child with a disability who doesn't want to advocate for himself because he doesn't want people to know about his disability if someone feels like they don't want other people to know about their disability it's probably because they sensed that the community is not as welcoming as a convenient so.

Mali Mali West Africa program manager Astor
"west africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"No West Africa has just two cases of covert nineteen at the time of writing this one in Nigeria and one in Senegal what's the situation now and what's happened to local health systems after the dreadful Ebola virus outbreak of twenty fourteen we can find out more by speaking to professor Stanley a call he's the director general of the west African Health Organization which basically means he's responsible for coordinating the response of fifteen countries in the region and he joins us from Burkina fossa a very warm welcome to you said just remind us of of the cases is we've said to is that the number of cases you've heard of no I I thought this morning I think we have three because said there is a second case the last Senegal Baghdad thank you very much for having me the systems are saddened you'll want to talk about is Sam systems that we set top immediately after I bought a lot from the lessons off the board thank you very much for having me this morning you're very welcome now you know these western west African countries they were presented with Ebola challenges does this then give countries like this the confidence to deal with something like code nineteen yes you can say that M. you can say that the course all the lessons off you the devastating Ebola epidemic am countries did not just simply give him the confidence by I simply that stayed on the ice and cons but rather they'll win a series all systems that we have set in place particularly coordination systems that manage that countries themselves how to do then Deborah law within a regional framework national public has informed that national public health institute so I institutions what we sometimes call in West Africa national all you need to leave right now and if you do not fifteen countries said that must take a lot of coordination what level of preparation do you have that in place and what what structure is all then place yes so you don't think a little fat coordination not in fact the auto thing also is that people may not know that we have three language blocks within the fifteen countries I'm gonna phone francophone and lusophone the structures in place R. as I said before the national public catch institutions which are networked through to a regional center for disease control which is set on the waffle one based in Abuja but in addition we also have a network of reference laboratories that quartet for subject specific so some of them for example experts in Lassa fever some of them are experts in corona virus however since the corona virus epidemic we have a short since a couple of days ago that all our country's contest for coronavirus in addition to these there is a systemic risk communication there is also a system of coordination and communication between at the highest levels of authorities with in house so the ministers of health needs and discourse regularly and at from the time that the cold feet nineteen was declared a public health emergency of international concern by Kobe at you at we have had a series of these meetings in order to communicate on call up there enough it sloughs finally I profess that yep got it sounds like it's well coordinated but they work concerns from the World Health Organization is about how countries on the African continent we're going to cope with code nineteen given the fact that you had you know stretched health systems and and and the concern was that it wasn't as robust as a developed countries yes you could say that in terms of infrastructure you can certainly not say that in terms of the preparedness but when you think about if this was going to be a very large epidemic we cannot be hospitals in ten days in West Africa like they did in China now of course you know that what may happen is that we will have to and these are some of the clients that we have in place M. two schools you know that's what I'm two people but we also have of course the challenges of transport from the rural areas and that's why we have developed a caustic regional strategic plan for which we are seeking funding to ensure that if we are in for the long run we have a contingency stock we have the P. P.'s we have some of the areas where we'll have to double up on teen infrastructure in order to cope with it okay luckily at the moment the two countries that have had confirmed cases Senegal and Nigeria have those infrastructure okay thank you very much that's professor Stanley of Colo dead the director general of the west African Health Organization the only way we got the sport with Matthew and also gold refineries in Africa that rise up but first we're going to talk about the mustard Moussa mosque in Kenya's second city of Mombasa it was very well known at one time for radicalization one of its keryx at Sheikh Abu durable who is linked to both al Shabab al Qaeda was killed in twenty twelve by unknown gunmen you may remember the violent protests that followed that then a couple of years later Sheikh maka Buri who used to host rallies draped with al Shabaab flags was also killed but the mosque carries on and it's now sort of digging out I suppose a a place for itself rather than hostility and extremism as a center for reconciliation and peace building how is this happened the BBC's Ferdinand Omondi reports in twenty fourteen it does feel V. as police raided the masjid Musa mosque in central Basra twice police said the most had been turned into a.

West Africa Nigeria Senegal
"west africa" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on KGO 810

"The Caspian Sea the North Caucasus and we're out continental weather system with a very large sea to the east of us and we're on it so it's is bizarre these last days have been a joy because Chris and I got to combine the sober reporting of democracy with our trips to natural phenomena and manmade phenomena first trip I want to mention Chris is our trip to the perpetually burning mountain the burning mountain what did you think when you first saw a mountain has been on fire for several tens of thousands of years what do you think how is this possible and then you realize that there's so much oil in the ground and bubbles up in that somehow is lit on fire and continues can discontinues on fire and then what you realize is is that what what other people in centuries past think of this and you think of the Roman soldiers the Pretoria ins and what they must've thought when they saw a mountain on fire they must have truly felt that they were at the end of the way did fail and they turned around and went back to rob that this is far as they went there is testimony to the fact Hey it's on fire we're out here the other joy we had in addition to the reporting is that we went to a phenomenon of human endeavor it's called Goba Stodden and that is rock caves limestone rock caves that rise above the flattened shoreline of the retreating Caspian Sea over the last million years and the limestone caves have been occupied the archaeologists and the paleontologists believe up to twenty thousand the last twenty thousand years so there that old but the joy is when you discovered the rock Carvey said terra clips of that some of which some of the animals state to fifteen thousand years ago what did you make of Chris I just think it's so interesting to think of what humans were doing in pre history and that they still had art they still wanted to communicate and it's interesting to see what they thought about they thought about families they thought about eating food things like that it just is amazing that the same concerns people have today they had fifteen thousand years ago right the animals were early to the rock art and they're still they're they're the equivalent of an ox there are goats and what appears to be wild animals perhaps cheetahs this region was rich in of foliage and there was semi jungle environment here at some point over the last several hundreds of thousands of years however then humans appear and they're quite clearly our drawings of men and women and there's one couple leading a domesticated oxcart carefully across the the wall that we start in front hi you know given that those case were occupied for thousands of years you wonder what what they made of the art generation after generation well they seem to want to come back to the same places because you had some art that is fifteen thousand years old next to some that was ten or nine thousand and six thousand but so they came back and lived in these caves for generation after generation after generation here we are in the twenty first century how humbled we are by the fact that that is fifteen thousand or ten thousand years ago and yet in the twenty first century we are ex we have traveled through a prosperous city that's being built where our hotel the bull of our hotel is in a part of Baku this called white city it's a new build city they're raising what looks to be condos in the downtown Paris model there chateau model and all around this building cranes the election took place on Sunday and Chris and I had a chance to travel to different three different constituencies and what did we witness grass you really saw democracy in action you saw people who are eager to vote at people waiting in line to vote but I think in particular you saw people from the Nagorno Karabakh region who are very enthusiastic to express their opinion had ideas about what's going on in that part of the region and you really saw the beauty and majesty of democracy yes democracy I remind everyone I have my quote from Winston Churchill at hand here this is from nineteen forty seven Churchill on the floor of parliament for those of us who puzzle about Iowa wait for the results from New Hampshire and then of course there are the what you have say shattering questions that remain from twenty sixteen and are projected depending on your partisanship into twenty twenty this is Winston Churchill in this world of sin and whoa no one pretends that democracy is perfect all lies indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time Winston Churchill nineteen forty seven and we turn to twenty twenty and we welcome our colleague Thomas Jocelyn who is a senior fellow at the foundation for the defense of democracies Thomas here to report as his page reports on two different events one a success for the US effort to defend itself and its allies the other a tragedy left from the long war in Afghanistan you can find Tom said of remarks on the long war journal page Tom a very good evening to you I begin with the A. Q. A. P. event now confirmed by the White House who is it that was targeted killed and what is the significance to a cue a P. six says good evening to the top good evening John yes the White House confirmed in recent days that a what they call character them operation which is really a drone strike took out custom all rainy who was the head of all cried in the reading pane insula now okay there you've been sore achy P. serve roast international infamy in two thousand nine two thousand ten what was connected to a series of inspired and then directed plots against the U. S. homeland and it has to be for the times intense character the pressure since then and cut them all rainy the latest senior figure in the group to be taken out in this relentless sort of counter terrorism on the C. I. A. and others have been executing and some you know it when you look at a guy like this what's interesting about I mean this is one thing that my colleague though Roshan I often harp on custom Aranese career started in nineteen ninety in Afghanistan in the training camps that okay to build their he's identify even of the young man in his early twenties is somebody with leadership potential in fact they made him a trainer at one of the the bigger camps at all chi was operating at the time even though I was a young man they identified him as somebody who could be a leader and a trainer in water training camps will behold after a long career which he's imprisoned he's keeps the the US led invasion Afghanistan two thousand one makes his way to Yemen where he's imprisoned for a plot against the US ambassador in two thousand four he escapes from prison in two thousand six any part of this elite okay T. a team of all kind of veterans to rebuild okay in remembrance of the first iteration of AQAP basically gets wiped out after they trying to overthrow the Saudi monarchy in two thousand three the remaining sort of cadres fleeting Yemen and some of them are present their prison including custom all rainy they get out and they start rebuilding AQAP and then basically two thousand nine a relaunch the organization it becomes a leading part of Sir about Pat is global network and out of say one more thing about customer reviews careers it's of no importance the way I've described him as a deputy diamond although hearing well why is this important well maybe not just the head of a creepy in Yemen but actually in all kite is sort of management scheme their structure internationally which is survives relentless war the US has waged against that that customer rainy in Yemen was actually part of the senior management team for all kind of globally so I mean he was involved in making decisions that affected the jobs because everywhere from West Africa South Asia Tom it's a Christian annexing talks are great to be on with you tonight this strike seems to continue a trend with the trump administration that it is doing a very effective job at taking out leaders of various different terrorist organizations and when you when you compare that with previous administrations I think that this is really a strong point in the trump administration what do you think I see we've tracked this for years and this is really just a continuation of what was going on under Obama and before him bush I mean you know bomb on two thousand fifteen keep in mind that for senior members of AQAP Fleer fifteen were taken out drone strikes in two thousand fifteen alone including custom Maury needs predecessor another a what he she who is the former aide de camp Osama bin laden was really a big week so this is really sort of a continuation of this you hyper high value targeting campaign see a U. S. military and other intelligence assets in the US government have been have been launching of course you know under president trump's watch she also got Hamzah bin laden with in willow the way very few details of when exactly or where other than it was in the app pack region the Abu Bakr al Baghdadi in you can point to a whole series of others but this is service sort of this machinery that's in place to do this that's very effective at tracking down high value targets do you sense Tom just final question because we're gonna turn to Afghanistan that the trump administration is more eager to do this in the Obama or is this a permanent permanent a skill set that the DOD offers and it's just a political voices that come and go about it which is it Tom yeah I think it's I think it's the latter I mean is CA Indio do you been doing this for years and they have a whole intelligence program to do this and we can certainly track the number five at targets were taken out prior to president trump's administration sort of a continuation of that Tom Johnson he is the foundation for the defense of democracies senior fellow he and his colleagues keep the long war journal there is tragedy as well these last days K. I a in Afghanistan will turn to that I'm with Christopher Nixon **** we are in Baku Azerbaijan where it's snowing in sunny and windy and dry within fifteen minutes thanks to our partners at Scala dot com a global technology from the guidance of the embassy of Azerbaijan in the United States I'm John Batchelor.

Caspian Sea North Caucasus Chris
"west africa" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"People ask why why are you why in West Africa why are you doing these these different types of products well you've spent any time there is very easy to see an absolutely beautiful country people are very peaceful white sand beaches eight lotions eighty degrees tropical beautiful they do have their issues with West Africa is a third world country but the people are so genuine the people want to work they want to have self his heart touching to go into a village and you know that you're gonna put a hundred two hundred three hundred these people to work that could be on a very small project a little two hundred three hundred acre taker agriculture projects where they're gonna be clearing the land they're gonna planet they're gonna we'd take care of the harvest and they feel that genuine self and that goes along we get a little hi I'm looking and he did men yeah right in demand did the men key how did it happen to get to so what we did is that what well you think I'm if you get enough to turn on the forty important if we look for we we do want a day being not a community not so noble so Friday even there we got the kid in the middle so far what did forget to what people don't begin he was you know their own after you you gonna get food debt then we'll give you more head as for if you didn't at the TI community group denies that he I'm only get locked up we have access to tens of thousands of acres so the I. intent of karmic Africa is to clear these land call the product harvest sell the products increased the food bank in the country it also creates tremendous shareholder value their subsidiaries JPM or send which was actually the name of the investment platform and JP Anderson's one of wired the rights to the two hundred sixty seven acre granite quarry the granite quarry is used for a stopper slabs to throw granite here in your nice kitchen trucker develop sub Saharan Africa is going to be the next fifty to a hundred years of the number one most for large infrastructure build out worldwide and so they have a huge demand for the stone for the pressure off to make her cement to make roads to make bridges to make airports make dams whatever it may be so this asset that we have there will start operating on the fourth quarter it's about a two billion dollar assets so some stance also really on asset management with so much business going on in West Africa it's hard to believe that there is another venture in the health and wellness space that Jim has wrapped under the Leone asset management umbrella and this story involves a product that is recognized by most people on the planet I formed a comical go up the cal with the intent of building.

West Africa
"west africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The great African American jazz singer Nina Simone decided to make her home in Liberia in West Africa this is a song by Nina Simone cool design Berrien collapsing she worked at the nineteen eighty two and it tells the true story seventy I had so much I had she wanted to make live your whole home she leaves the house on the beach and she did her thing she deftly along this is James C. Dennis senior he's a journalist one of the founders of the Liberian press union and in nineteen seventy four he was running no fewer than five newspapers and magazines in the Liberian capital Monrovia he'd met Nina in the US and he will contact to like area he was educated she was fast I think and her daughter was just about the same age of my only daughter that I have and my wife being an American all yes Lee of black Americans she felt very much at ease in having a hot dog a than most of her time in lie beer at my home Alabama's got me so upset Nina Simone was one of the biggest stars in America at the time she was famous not just for her music but also a civil rights campaigning using her public platform to speak out against racism and in favor of a radical full black nationalism the BBC interviewed her in nineteen sixty eight I don't speak for all colored people but I do know what millions of them feel can you imagine the pain and the energy spent trying not to be yourself energy that you use up being faults of trying to cater to somebody a be what you're not I am so tired of that I'm dying hundred years old trying to be like that I was a Negro entertaining so do you feel that you both nipple wrote a whole mine the responsibility is so heavy sometimes I run from the and I'd like to get away from it more often.

Nina Simone Liberia West Africa James C. Dennis Liberian press union Monrovia US Lee Alabama America BBC
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to the forum on the BBC world service I'm religion death so and today we dipping into the melting pot of high life the music that originated in Ghana and is never stop soaking up the cultural influences that have marked this part of West Africa I'm joined from the United States by music journalist and radio producer banning Eyre author Dr nana and lower rates and in the U. K. by two gone a musicians or any about coffee I do and Cary Bynum and if you let him more foreign programs about music and many other subjects to go to a website that way be able to download programs as a free part cost just search online the BBC the forum so we've been discussing how high life became intertwined with politics in the newly independent gonna which is and and pressed into service as a kind of way of uniting all the disparate elements of this Martin St sonata tell me how successful walls in creamer in using high life in this way I mean gonna has around one hundred different ethnic groups and a multitude of different languages although English is the language of some highlights it's by no means the only one isn't he was very successful because the women wear on his side you know in a way that we went on your side you're good to go so what what actually happened was that the the market women they organize all these sort of get togethers and they played a lot of high live music and talked about the politics of the country all the time and how in Cremona was actually ready to support women businesses and there was a certain type of high live music that income really liked and those were the types of songs that these women played during these functions and at any time that a US increments to come talk to the women and crew my would be present and so that really helped promoted some particular types of high live music that in crew might eventually use for all his political functions but it's true isn't it that not every highlight musician supported and cream and what he was doing the work critics and critics from the music world too yes so we have people like cages sees a to my Melissa aimed Afrikan brothers or could do and every two years yes it was amazing to you this one to you.

Ghana United States Dr nana Cary Bynum Cremona BBC producer Eyre
"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The bulldog clue so you can fill over also you know you were there you saw the whole thing I watch so I guess the double dog's name is four beat out nearly two thousand other dogs representing a hundred and ninety four breeds to win the top honors and then there was a Havanese whose name the reserve best in show after winning a toy dog category other finalists were a Siberian husky a golden retriever a pharaoh hound in an Old English sheepdog and you told me this morning that there is a new breed yes a new breed it's called and also walk and it's a brand new breed it is the only breed that is taller than it is long how looks like a greyhound it's from West Africa but they just introduced this new breed so the one thing that struck me as I'm watching this how well they're groomed every single dog like I mean it's just they've been shampoo would like ten times in the end and they've been brushed over like twenty five times those dogs are cared for in the than most people I know and if you've never seen that fake documentary best in show do yourself a favor must see yeah absolute must all right all okay apparently one of the biggest it's in the country is.

West Africa
"west africa" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on WSB-AM

"In West Africa remains the deadliest ever recorded killing more than eleven thousand people so pretty Cupid ninety five point five WSP first first this is W. S. B. twenty four hour continuing see pictures of a Dunwoody police officer as he is dragged by suspects car into heavy traffic on I. two eighty five suspects speeds away from a traffic stop with done with the police officer Nathan daily hanging out of the driver's window his partner's radio called is captured by broadcastify seconds later the suspects worse across three lanes at high speeds sites whiting a van daily is thrown to the pavement as cars and trucks swerved to avoid him the suspect correction is captured miraculously daily survives and so does a sense of humor I accept donations in the form of sweets the kids talk with him because he's he calms ninety five point five WSP president Donald trump's pick for national intelligence director Texas representative John Radcliffe has withdrawn from consideration after just five days of growing questions about his experience and qualifications meanwhile president trump says he was not intending to send a quote to why sky tweet when he chimed in today on the attempted robbery at the house of democratic representative Elijah Cummings president had tweeted quote really bad news the Baltimore house of Elijah Cummings was robbed too bad from tells reporters that he was just repeating what he had heard on the news and we're learning about a data breach involving thousands of Georgia Army National Guard soldiers more from channel two action news reporter Erin diamond the spokesperson emailed us a statement saying although the Georgia Army National Guard determined there was a very low probability of information compromise we sent written communication to current and former soldiers to inform them we diligently safeguard our soldiers information and therefore out of an abundance of caution we initiated the communication WSP is time ten oh three summer driving pattern coming to an end is schools go back in session big yellow buses are back on the road so be sure to use extra caution around those school bus stops play WSP under Alexa device before you leave home and on ninety five point five when you get in your car for exclusive WSP sky copter reports to you can plan your drive ninety five point five W. S. V. Atlanta's news and talk.

Georgia Army National Guard Alexa Erin diamond reporter Baltimore representative Texas Dunwoody W. S. W. S. V. Atlanta WSP West Africa Elijah Cummings president attempted robbery John Radcliffe director Donald trump partner
"west africa" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"When the world is safer when there are not disease outbreaks happening around the world. So it's a very narrow understanding of America. I set the president's seems to a spouse. So I think he has created a lot of confusion because the policies have not changed dramatically. I mean, there are some specific areas serve around family planning where there have been dramatic changes in policy, but. We saw that with previous Republican administrations as well. But there has not been this big pullback that I think a lot of us were worried about that said, you know, the world continues to be a dangerous place when it comes to global health issues. So we do have this outbreak of Ebola in the DRC, and this is a place where America needs to take much greater leadership than it has. And we're not seeing that kind of forward thinking leadership from this administration in many ways what they've done is just continued what was happening before in terms of funding and support I think different administration. I even think Bush administration, George W Bush administration would have taken a more activist role in tackling these things because you know, when America leads it makes him ACA stronger and the world safer. You mentioned the -able outbreak. The second worst record Senator DRC in Africa. My reporting suggests that this administration specific. Inside chess has really been wrestling with how much to lean in versus lean out, and the CDC has not always been on the same page as HHS proper here in DC. The CDC has been more ambitious with what it has wanted to do HHS under the Trump administration less concerned with intervening amenable help break. Yeah. This just shows the tension within the US government because again CDC these are career public health leaders public health officials. They know I think what the right thing to do here is. And it's not just the right thing for the people of the DRC though. Of course, it is that, but it's just the right thing to do for the world, including for people in the United States, which is America should be very forward leaning. We should have people on the ground helping WHO helping other organizations combat and really get our arms around this outbreak. Because one of the things that we learned from the last Ebola outbreak in west Africa is. When the disease spreads it becomes much harder to manage. And while it remains in the DRC both for the sake of the people there but freely for all of us. It's super important that we'd be very forward leaning. Again, I understand that that creates a conflict with the stated policy of our president who thinks that we can put wall sup and keep viruses and diseases out not possible in the you're twenty nineteen. And so in the world that we live in that tension makes a lot of sense, you mentioned the change in family planning policies. Obviously here in the states were seeing that happen with changes to the title ten funding program, for instance. But that has also manifested in how the United States has changed documents shifted its policy internationally, and I've written on this..

Senator DRC America CDC United States DRC HHS president Ebola George W Bush Africa ACA west Africa
"west africa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:41 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And we're here, you know, we're here in this city. And this is this is a futile place. Right. Wouldn't you say towers? I would say I mean, it's really gorgeous, it's on lake Huron. And it's it's such a laid back summer kind of place that I mean, even the birds are laid back. I just saw female Mallard in a crop top really now. So it's kind of place. Just realized surprise. You didn't ask if it needed a ride? Well, speaking of which it's joke corner. No joke. You were telling me Joe corner, ladies and gentleman by would not tell you this yorker earlier because he wanted he wanted me to react spontaneously with the joy that he knew I was going to feel just today. Crap tac. Yeah. That was that was a good that might have been. In fact, maybe if Mallard was in a field was in a. Okay field, and it was a crop top with that have been funnier because odors, the crap oh, it is a crop. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. That's funny. Yeah. Or on a silo silo? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Oh that could be funny. I want to have you take your mind back in time. Okay. So far she to last year when I told a very good job. God. I tell us joke all the time. It wasn't really is supposed to be a joke. It was a mind bender in the mind bender. Chris I'm actually joked today, but the mind bender was that Napoleon met his Waterloo at Waterloo. Yeah. Yeah. And then there was another one about the late great Irish vocalist, Richard Harris, and this is kind of a fun fact too. And this was that Richard Harris he had himself. He got himself into a real Donnybrook Donnybrook. But this is this is marva story. Okay. That isn't it though. Because you told me that when earlier right? Yeah. I go play remember it. But again, I'm just reminding you of jokes pass got lots of postcards from our listener, I use this next joke. The same kind of. That like that. But this is for everyone is anxious to hear this is a little longer. This is about Joe and Terry and Joe and Terry are two guys who live in Mali in west Africa. You with me so far. I'm just chilling. Okay. So join Terry live in Mali, west Africa. Joe saying to Terry cheese. I gotta spend the weekend at my granny's house, which one said this Joe Joe and Terry said, what's wrong? Don't you? Love your granny. And Joe says, of course, I love my granny. But she lives out in the country. You know, it's rural here in Mali in west Africa. And the problem I love my granny. But she doesn't have WI fi shows at any internet service, and she doesn't have cable TV. Said that's crazy where could she live not to have that and Joseph out in Timbuktu somewhere? Wow. So. So that brings us to. Oh, maybe we should listeners have a mall downtown. Chilling until at cable, John just hurting today. You can see why wasn't laughing last night as I was thinking bad. And let's head a little motel coroner because we had photography coroner yesterday. And you know, we open it up to listeners should it be photographers coroner or photography corner. And I did get an Email from new listener Christina. And she said Deere, Bob, please stop mentioning my name on your show. Okay. Okay. Well, that's easy. Okay. That solves it so motel corner. And you wanted to mention something about the amenities that were provided. Well, I was surprised at the level of syrup of amenity that we receive the for example, the little bar of the bar of hand, soap, you know, you get those at a hotel, and they're generally kind of small in there. Motel motel corners. What is called? Yeah. Hotel coroner this is a regular feature. Okay. So in the motel not the hotel. I opened up the little pack of soap in this pack of soap was actually the size of a quarter. Looks like I guess the old fashioned straight razor blades. That's a good comparison Pearson. If any of our folks listening to the show are thinking of slashing their wrists right now. It was about the size, right? Regular racy. Yeah. Yeah. Some people are that are objecting. I don't know. I just thought I heard some wildlife bursting through the bushes to try and stop us. I'm thinking I'm sorry to hear laughter all over the place. I think the job role already it has it has a mosquito bit me. And it's transmitting a joke all over the par-. Yeah. And also I noticed as far as those amenities. Did you notice that little sign on the sink that it said if you forgot to pack some let's say like a toothbrush or some item? It says come to the front desk for a complimentary item. So I came to the front desk, and I forgot my toothbrush. And the woman said boy, you're looking good today. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's another joke that I did not know is coming to that was a good one too. Yeah. What's happening is there's something to Orioles over there. You just had that far away bird. Look all of a sudden your face for everything else. Everything else delight. And then it's just down to business. Speaking of with down the business now next Saturday, we're going to be at the graph nature center. And we're giving a talk on feather brain, my new book, feather brained, feather brain. And that's my new memoir about how I learned to become a bird or Mike bumbling quest to become a burger and find a rare bird on my own check at Amazon dot com and your local please, please patronize your local bookstore. I got my kindle there you go. You went to the kindle store. But I had to say I did order online as well. I paid for one I paid for two. I was going to give you one. Well, that was a long time ago that it came out, and I figured well looks like I'm not going to get when I did get a complimentary is from the publisher. Why saying you the first ten pages? Didn't I? If they were very fast reader, I just sent him a few at a time, but we're at the graph nature center in Holland Michigan on Saturday too late for any of you, folks. It was a great talk. Yeah. Thanks a lot. But we are supposed to also possibly take some burgers out or some would be burgers out to show them how to bird, and I'm kind of nervous about that. Because I have no idea what to tell them. I look up and then listen. Look listen identify. And I think he said walk, but the welcome is I go ahead. The problem is when you and I are all birding what we do seems like magic, it just seems like ordinary person in just you know, I throw an arm out to the left, and I say a Baltimore Oriole. I throw an arm out to the right? And I say Baltimore Oriole. And it's just seems like magic that is magic right there. Yeah. And I don't know the definition of magic that was an Oriole right there. Yeah. I don't know how you can danley live. Magic live magic. And just talking about showing an arm out. There was the Baltimore. And yesterday when we saw the full disclosure, you did throw your arm out. I did. And now, I have it in a sling. So what's next? I had. I don't know. I have something. That's a species list Cup. That doesn't make any sense. Flattens. I must of. This list cups. Yeah. Oh list. Oh, I know what it is clip. You see this here is a clip. I have this little notebook. And right now this little notebook is holding v very important notes to this show. Right. Because you can't do a podcast like this without very specific notes. People think this isn't scripted. But every word. Yeah. Script everywhere to scripted. So anyway, this is my species list notebook. And when I go birding, I'm pulling it out of my pocket all the time. And I'm writing down Baltimore Oriole tool. Uh-huh. And something like that. And so, but Rama's I keep pulling it out of my pocket and putting it in again pages. Start getting all wrinkled. It's a little spiral notebook in the pages. Get all wrinkled, and it's just a wrinkly mess. And so what I've done here. Bill. I I wish this was video. Wow. I have put a little clip on the bottom of the spiral notebook any holds all the pages flat. This is gonna. Revolutionize bird. It will. I should have go asked me site. And I should you know collect money to develop this product on the go f- me site. I wanted I want you to demonstrate this on the book character Bill home Facebook page. Oh, that's good. You want to do a video that wait. What's this fine here? Holy cow. Oh, robin. Rabbit foreign your round again. Well, let me I hope I didn't because everytime. I fling. My arm out. I turn the burden into a Baltimore Orioles. So I think that nearly brings us to the unbelieving her half. We're at towers point, I was gonna do another photography coroner. But you know, I was gonna go into all the technical aspects of taking photos of birds. But I guess we just don't have time for anything informational what go into all the technical aspects of taking photographs of birds saddened, the F, stop setting, the shutter speed setting that there eyeso-, but we know we don't have time for information. This shows too fast, moving content, frankly, it's all about entertainment as well. It is. And once again, I would like to thank the folks at filler Inc for providing so much content for this show. So we don't have to think it up ourselves. Just go to their website, click on filler. And automatically it appears. Yes. And while you're there, please check out the link from our friends and briskets to go darn briskets. In is. There's another Orioles underground. Wow. What's the what's the special today? This this special is how could it? How could it special? All right. So what did you say Bill? Let's so we're going to go Boyden. And then we're going to let you know what we see other than a Baltimore Oriole here at beautiful tower state park on lake Huron in northern Michigan's and tree swallows are flying over in saluting us. Thanks for the right in my car. Right. And so we'll be back with some live birding or post burying excitement. After this word from our sponsor..

Baltimore Orioles Joe Joe Terry cheese lake Huron Baltimore Orioles Baltimore Oriole Mali Joe corner Mallard Bill Richard Harris west Africa Donnybrook Donnybrook Waterloo Holland Michigan marva filler Inc kindle