37 Burst results for "West Africa"

Fresh update on "west africa" discussed on The World

The World

00:55 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "west africa" discussed on The World

"The next news hour Redefining America Abroad. I talk one on one with Secretary of State Antony Blinken at Wednesday on the PBS news, Alan This afternoon at three o'clock here on KQED. I'm mark a woman. You're with the world. Nigeria's economy is in crisis and kidnapping for ransom has become a booming business. Yesterday, Nigerian officials announced that hundreds of schoolgirls who were abducted last week by armed men have been released. It was the second time this has happened in less than a week, though last year a mass kidnapping of school Children at boarding schools happened at least once every three weeks and ransom payments have been steadily growing. Confidence. McCarry has been following this. He's a security analyst at SBM intelligence in Legos. I ask him what we know about the well being of the hundreds of girls abducted last Friday and released a few days later. Well, they are find they've been taking to the government house in Zamfara sees and so far they've been good. Although some of the girls who escaped during the attack were injured. The feel of them have been taking care of on the book of the girls who have a rescue. Of course, all of them about 3 79 of them. Appears to be in good shape. You recently published a report on the economics of abductions in Nigeria, showing how it's becoming an increasingly lucrative business. Is it ransoms that ultimately get these Children freed? Well, the federal government's would want us to believe that they were released because of luck issue shins on definitely without any Russian people. But the reality is those who, in our report, you stated that the legend kidnapping those who bit stream 20 level and 2020. The value of the industrious showed us between similar nonsense million dollars. But I think events since then, when we're police reportedly spaces frenzy as taking a huge toll. And rulers punish Alicia and will officially all parts of the country. Yeah, that's what it sounds like. So previous abductions have been profit will making more abductions popular? Our listeners will remember in 2014 nearly 300 schoolgirls. Were abducted by Boko Haram hashtag, Bring back our girls trended all over the globe. As I recall, Those girls were in captivity for awhile. It seemed it was a long term Boco Haram strategy to radicalize those young women. Are you saying these recent kidnappings are totally different, and just about cold, hard cash? Yes, For one of the key difference is that when Boca Haram kidnapped the girls, it was basically do, too is exhilarated coin from its name. The Western Education is this scene on that women, especially the girl child has no place. Although business Lennon was an education is really in classrooms, and so they were the targets, and they were easy to kidnap. But for this or that terrorists in Lane, Juris, North, Central and most with Sandra police resumes, I think it's a big difference. They don't go to their strategy and most division is mostly economic, So their own kidnap is still loads towards getting concessions. Financial concessions from both states governments were about your priest. And the federal government. You know, I think of school shootings in the United States and one of the first things A lot of people suggest is to it least have a police officer assigned to be on duty at a school is a government at least doing that. Well, there is that option on the table. But I want it I would see here is that it is not sustainable on for the exact reason that the United Nations recommended wish you for policing is that every state should have one police officer to fund your citizens in India. It is one police officer to see soldiers, citizens. So then you're as a country that This under police. There's been a rise in the number of attacks on police officers. So assistance now this decision is so bad that even police source says helpless on so putting a single police force that you got the bodies could I just So fired you from government control over them. Prisons doesn't really doesn't really tackle the problem. Governance. McCarry is a security analyst at SPM Intelligence and Legos. Thank you very much for your time and for explaining this growing intractable crisis. Thank you very much for having me. Cinema in West Africa is caught the eyes of Hollywood. The Academy Awards air Not till April, but Oscar committee members will make their decision soon about which films will get nominations. There's already a shortlist, though, and a new movie by Philip Locke quote from the Ivory Coast. Has made the cut for best international feature One of two African directors on that short list like Oats film is a story about storytelling in an unexpected place, the World's Africa correspondent Halima Condi reports. Blow along when French Ivorian director Philippe Le Court was a child. He remembers traveling to the famous LaMarca prison in the Ivory Coast Largest city. Abby John LaMarca was familiar place for me he would visit every weekend because his mother was being held there as a political prisoner. The cultural members observing the inmates with fascination. That's the strong image off America, As the director I won't do is my emotion. I work with my memory I want with my feelings. Those early impressions of LaMotta prison form the basis of his latest feature film Night of the King's, It tells the story of a new arrival to the prison. He's a young pickpocket er, who was selected as the new Roman A storyteller. You must entertain the inmates at night. It's based on a real tradition at the prison. Michael was toe observed this society. Off prisoners as a complete society with your society with the government with the law with his beliefs. Roman is played by a first time actor in a bakery. In one early scene. He's been dressed up in nice clothes. Inmates crowd around him in a circle, pressuring him to tell them a story. He lost a lot.

Philip Locke Philippe Le Court United States Wednesday Halima Condi India Alicia Ivory Coast 2014 West Africa Spm Intelligence Michael Last Friday Zamfara Alan Last Year PBS Last Week Mccarry Boco Haram
Fresh update on "west africa" discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

00:36 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "west africa" discussed on PRI's The World

"Also and the judge ruled that the activists algebra tap on and joanna our brave leaders not criminals. She said they hung up the rainbow posters. To protect people from homophobia in the catholic church. Karleena says the specific church. They were protesting had recently labeled lgbtq identities as sinful an easter art installment according to court this installment was homophobic and this is also something that i really didn't expect to hear the prosecution didn't expect to hear that either kayak founded the conservative group that brought the case the life and family foundation after the verdict she wrote on facebook that quote the justification sounds more like a homo activist publication than a sentence passed on behalf of the republic. She continued the blame of the accused. Is unquestionable catholics. Are the most discriminated against group in society and the courts of the republic of poland should protect them from violence including by lgbt activists. Lawyer carleen aguirre doll says. Poland doesn't have a precedent law so this week's verdict doesn't necessarily mean other judges will rule the same way but the justification was extremely powerful. And i believe this will be assigned to other judges in similar cases because there are other cases as for this case karleena knows the fight for. Lgbtq rights isn't over the life and family foundation have already announced their appeal and karleena believes. The court of appeals will take the case to poland's supreme court that process she says could take years for the world. i'm being. Kelly are an oscar spotlight on an african director month. Just ahead. you're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world nigeria's economy is in crisis and kidnapping for ransom has become a booming business yesterday. Nigerian officials announced that hundreds of school girls who were abducted last week by armed men have been released. It was the second time this has happened in less than a week though last year. A mass kidnapping schoolchildren at boarding schools happened at least once every three weeks and ransom. Payments have been steadily growing confidence. Macari has been following this. He's a security analyst at s. b. m. intelligence in lagos. I asked him what we know about the well. Being of the hundreds of girls abducted last friday and released a few days later. Well the fine. They've intaking to the goldman house in zamfara states and so far they've been good. Although some of the girls who escaped during soccer injured the fee of them have been taking off on the bulk of the goals so of risk it of course all of them both of them gets to be in good shape recently published a report on the economics of abductions in nigeria showing how it's becoming an increasingly lucrative business Is it ransoms that ultimately get the children read well the government would want us to believe that they were released because of log institutions and differently without any arose from feed but the reality is also In our report. We sit at the ninja kidnappings stream of the industry Between underlies. Both i think events since then when will release reporting A sticky new huge on rule exponentially All of the country. Yeah that's what it sounds like. Previous abductions have been profitable making more abductions popular. Our listeners will remember in two thousand fourteen. Nearly three hundred schoolgirls were abducted by boko haram. Hashtag bring back. Our girls trinite all over the globe. As i recall the girls who are in captivity for awhile and it seemed it was a long-term boko haram strategy to radicalize as young women. Are you saying these. Recent kidnappings are totally different in just about cold hard cash. For one key differences that bullhorn kidnaps it goes It was basically due to his ideology coin from its name. The western education is in. And that's a woman was really go. Chad hustle plays all new business. Lennon with an education is really in classrooms and so they were the targets on the easy to kidnap but for this or the terrorists in lingerie as central and northwestern geopolitical resumes. I think it's a bit difference. Van gogh to suggest. Strategy and motivation is mostly economic. So they're on. Kidnap is still owed sues guessing concessions financial concessions from boots just governments wherever audio pres and federal governments. I think of school shootings in the united states and one of the first things. A lot of people suggest is to at least have police officer assigned to be on duty at school. Is the government at least doing that. Well there is that option on the table. But i want an old see here is that it is not sustainable. And for the for the executive is in that the united nations recommended. We should police in. Is that every state should have one police of two hundred citizens in andrea. It is police officer to assist on your citizens contracts on the police. There has been a rise in number of attacks on police successful as it stands now decision so bad. That's police officers helpless. And so put single use of gotti bodies that s-o-f-i from controllable Really those really tackled Covenants mccarey is a security analyst. Spm intelligence and legos. Thank you very much for your time and for explaining this growing intractable crisis. Thank you very much for having me. Cinema in west africa is caught. The eyes of hollywood. The academy awards are not till april but oscar committee members will make their decision soon. About which films will get nominations. There's already a shortlist. Though and a new movie by philippe lacquered from the ivory coast has made the cut for best international feature one of two african directors on that shortlist like coats. Film is a story about storytelling in an unexpected place. The world's correspondent alina condie reports when.

Karleena Last Year Carleen Aguirre Doll Last Week Andrea Marco Werman April Yesterday Second Time Lgbtq Lennon Hundreds Of Girls Zamfara Macari Two Hundred Citizens Facebook Van Gogh West Africa United States
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | Last week

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:51 min | 2 weeks ago

How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

"In twenty thirteen fronts sent soldiers to marley to stop jihadist advance seven years later and more than five thousand troops are still there in the region and despite their intervention twenty twenty was the deadliest year since the crisis began in the region known as a suhel avast sweep of land south of the sahara. So what is going wrong with the strategy of the so-called g five the group of five suhel countries became a facile. Mali mauritania initia- and chad. And of course a fronts will tell us more. I'm joined by the journalist and researcher in west africa and the sahel region. Pull me good morning pool. Good to have you with us. Good morning just explained to us how we've got to this state of did crisis what i think. We have to distinguish two things back in two thousand thirteen The jihad is already taken over the north of mali and they were launching a fresh push southwards and they had got down as far as the capital. Bamako that would have threatened security instability right across africa so the initial french intervention which was actually sent by Emmanuel macron predecessor. Phosphor alone which remember him that that may give you a sense of how far back in time. This was that was an almost conventional military intervention and it ended the jihadist the towns across the mouth of molly and remove that immediate threat but as so often in these situations a conventional conflict benefit of fragmented into more widespread terrorism localized attacks and some general instability. And that is much much harder to tackle. And you can't do it just with military means and so there's been a huge effort over really substantial seven years now as you mentioned to try and bring stability to the region but it's it's particularly difficult because you don't just have a ideology ideological jihadism if you're like fighting a terrorist war against a perceived international influence against the secular nature nature of these west african states. But you also have That mixed up with all sorts of local tensions and grievances For example between groups who depend on animal hooding and people who have commas and this is in this region the suhel which is just south of the sahara so it subjected to climate change water land grazing or in short supply. Population is rising rapidly. But the jobs aren't there to keep pace so you've got all her social and economic factors as well and that that's what's made it such a difficult challenge to bring this crisis under control but probably the most intense. The most dangerous situation was in the second. Half of twenty and nineteen when an armed group in eastern mali cooled islamic group in the greatest sahara pledging affiliation to die ish in the middle east staged a series of really very very bloody attack saw malia ninja army garrisons and the french also suffered heavy losses. And after that in january of last year there was a sort of strategic rethinking if you like and the decision to focus the military effort on them and to try and get up a stronger development have heard an peacemaking effort in other parts of the region sent. We have seen some progress since then

Suhel Mali Initia Emmanuel Macron Sahara Mauritania Marley Bamako West Africa Chad Jihad Africa Malia Ninja Army Middle East
Guinea declares Ebola epidemic, neighboring countries act

The World

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

Guinea declares Ebola epidemic, neighboring countries act

"A free for nearly five years, the government of Guinea in West Africa has announced a nebula epidemic you'll recall the Guinea was one of the country's worst affected by the Ebola's epidemic that lasted from 2014 to 2016. That epidemic killed more than 11,000 people. Now

Government Of Guinea West Africa Guinea Ebola
New Ebola outbreak declared in Guinea

Voices In The Streets, Unfiltered

00:10 sec | 2 weeks ago

New Ebola outbreak declared in Guinea

"There's a new Ebola's virus outbreak in West Africa. The World Health Organization says At least three people have died in Guinea. Matt Matt Johnson, NBC news

Ebola's Virus Outbreak West Africa World Health Organization Matt Matt Johnson Guinea Nbc News
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

"Now. We are talking about africa. I wanna know john paul. Why why do we need to keep africa on our radar very interesting question. So one one thing that keeps me. Loyal to entrepreneurs on fire is the quality of stories and experiences of ultra preneurs. Who've made it that's one big reason. Why listen and. I'm also sure that's why many people listen to the show but interesting is what being on entrepreneur means that you're able to live in the now and also prepare for future so it's almost impossible to think about the future and nothing about and here's why when you look at the population of the world. Africa correctly has the youngest population of people. Right now sixty percents of people on the continent of the age of twenty five. So this is more or less looking at china. Before china became china up to date china more or less the second biggest economy in the world the factory of the world and all of that so you can imagine that people who saw china. The china became china. Actually the ones who got in on the meat of the game. So that's exactly what africa represents but more importantly there have been events in the past couple of years that have put africa in the centerpiece. The very most the most recent one which is very interesting is covid now all the time most companies have built their supply chains around china and south east asia but then when it hits it was obvious that supply chains with very vulnerable. And if you're going to diversify your supply chain. It's impossible not to look at africa if you're looking at affordable label if you look at them. The truck symmetry of the continental either north america or europe. And what are the means. Most countries on the continent either speak english or french and these are more or less global line. Which is you're going to penetrate any of the big markets and. It's really now happening. Because what the chinese are doing is the chinese. Market is starting to specialize in advanced high-tech stuff. I most of those low cost production that brought business the whole of storing from america. When are beginning to see going to places like vietnam. Bangladesh and other countries in southeast asia. But then you cannot forgo a population of one point three billion people which is what africa presents and what we're seeing is some companies setup accretions within the african continent places like rwanda at the opium ghana senegal. And what they're doing is they are preparing. These guys are digging for the future and one interesting. That's happened in the last four years in america. Is the people in africa. So in america when you think about africa the image that comes to mind is charity and philanthropy. Africa needs. Needs help and help and help. So the approach of the americans this time and even europe has been to help africa give africa aid. Give them all of that. What the chinese are doing is they're coming with more or less trade and business and things. What africa needs really because you have this population of very young people enterprising people. I mentioned that sixty percent of the world's uncle beats at arable. Land is in africa so in most parts of the world with maxed out the land space. Yes we're doing. We're using technology and other means to increase the yield on the land. But when we're talking about virgin space. Federal land arable land. Most of it is still in africa. Still cultivated and we're looking at a global population that is set to double back at least by the time we reach two hundred fifty or more according to the un and if we do not keep pace with globe with population growth would amount of food were producing then the world is going to be faced with serious threat of hunger so these are just a few examples of why africa needs to be on your rita. Yes so thinking about now. It's great but you're thinking about the future you need to remember that even before could hit five of the top. The top ten fastest growing economies in the world when africa. These are not really things. We've seen the mainstream media. Why i'm happy that chain. Is that the approach of the chinese in africa. Doo controversial is a big difference. This guy's coming here boots on the ground and they're dealing with the market. The previous relationship with africa has been to deal with africa's governments give african governments money for age and they develop africa unfulfilled years. It's never happened instead. It's helped enhance corruption. A sense of entitlement and dependency so most of the problems never get so because that's free money free money fluent in from europe money flowing in from north america so what people like us exist to do is to show that the people we should be voting. For with our money is the entrepreneur's they're the ones who have the incentive and the motivation to really solve africa's problems and guess what's global money starting to call me and i'm sure many ago minova listeners. On on on entrepreneur no stripe the big global player in in payments strike just acquired an african company. Niger company for two hundred million dollars. That's a major exit and it's stories like this that are starting to prove that africa is not a charity case. Africa is opportunity. The programs are trying to solve through eight. Actually need to be solved through entrepreneurship and the process. We create more jobs more wealth and greeted big happier world john. Let's talk about what you see as the most interesting opportunities that exist right now. I mean you talked about a lot of opportunities. I love how you really are hammering home. The fact that entrepreneurship is what is going to turn africa around and really bring that continents into the as we move forward into twenty twenty one and beyond but specifically what are the one or two most interesting and fascinating opportunities in the business world that you're seeing right now. The first interesting one is more or less. I talked about it earlier. In terms of africa's potential to produce food because right now we're looking for the next food basket of the world and one interesting that africa offers is the or what's we've we now know as superfoods so for example there's a grain that's grown in west africa. It's a green code for new now. This green is so rich in cultural significance for example when the tombs of ancient in jim ships are more or less opel excavated amongst other materials. Like honey. and things like that four new for new f- who is one of the greens that it that the ancient egyptians actually put in the the pyramids in the borough chambers of dead feroz. That's tell you how important it was back. Then this is like one of the longest growth one of the greens has been grown the longest in history almost five thousand years now. The reason why new is important is when you look at the american market and european market more or less developed world and you see how important health and wellness is this all about eighteen. Organic food. Gluten free food and things like that you announced that to see if like for new is actually superfood but in africa is grown by people in africa eating by people that i start to see what america has done with them a green assira like we know what which is more or less breakfast zero before quinoa became like a blockbuster serial in america it had the same profile as phone. You in south america. So what we're beginning to see. Is they celebrate to ship in. New york is named spear pm. He's now taken for neo his packaged. It's not just in its physical formats but in the narrative that used salads and last year. I think it's early this year. It got the national distribution across the united states in whole foods. You know to distribute this kind of food and new just one. I know listeners may be familiar with moringa which is another superfood. it grows in the wild in africa. We really take you for granted over yet. But then we've sent entrepreneurs coming here and repackage it into something that selling like a lot because it resonates resonates with the health and wellness movements the big trend going on in the

Africa China United States Europe John Paul North America South East Asia Senegal Rwanda Bangladesh Ghana Vietnam Asia Rita UN Niger
Choosing To Foster To Adopt To Build a Family

If These Ovaries Could Talk

03:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Choosing To Foster To Adopt To Build a Family

"You got talked into having kids matt. How were you in the process of like. Did you ever consider surrogacy. Or were you always gonna do fostering to adopt or tell us about that both griffin i had spent a considerable amount of time in africa. I lived in west africa for two years in the peace corps and during that time which now is like twenty years back i was really struck by the fact that in in west africa specifically the idea of family is much more fluid than i think what we traditionally see his family hearing west africa. You know if you don't have a kid 'cause you can't have a kid for some reason but neighbor has six your neighbor will give you wanna. There's it's just kind of like the way the community works like f. You need kids for survival of kids are how you cook kids or how you clean. Kids are how you ensure your your old age and so it really struck me at all. We can't give way to my brother. It struck me that astray that like we had a really generally a very limited view of what family could be in this country and so when it come time to have kids i think for both griffin i. We were just both like well. We're we don't need to go through the hundreds of thousands of dollars process of surrogacy or the thirty thousand dollars process of even a private adoption foster. That's like spell like the right thing for us to do. Yes so you chose foster with the hope to adjust that past. I'm sure you did your research. And you knew that that was gonna come with possibly heartache. Along the way. And that's that's you have to have a really thick skin to take that path. No i mean. I think we knew that there was always a possibility of baby going back going home. I think that that is an easier kind of idea in theory and i think we both went into it. You know again. Having a peace corps volunteer griffin ran a nonprofit in africa. We are both like well. That's what we do you know. We're we're good we're doing. It's the right thing to do. And we'll learn to love the biological family and we want to do what's right for the kid when they hand you five dale baby in the hospital and you start hearing the story of how that baby got their got there. I don't know something kicked it. It became a lot harder to envision. The idea of giving a baby back now. But i think that most people certainly gay men don't think about is you don't think you have any paternal instincts and that was actually the shock for us all of a sudden when somebody hands you a baby and says don't kill it. Yeah your instincts animal. Don't kill it your animalistic instincts. Kick in the baby. Could make funny breath from across the room. You're like you know so do. You can't rule out the nature portion of the program and so i think that also made it a very different challenge in theory thought. Oh yeah we'll we'll give a baby back and then once you get the baby you're not trying to get the baby

West Africa Griffin Peace Corps Africa Matt Dale
Pirates attack Turkish ship off West Africa; kill 1, kidnap 15

At Home

00:29 sec | Last month

Pirates attack Turkish ship off West Africa; kill 1, kidnap 15

"The union, saying the district safety plan falls short. This is ABC news officials in Turkey or trying to rescue more than a dozen sailors after their ship was attacked by pirates as itself from Nigeria to South Africa. Pirates have attacked two Turkish Chicago ship off the West African coast, kidnapping 15 sailors and killing one other. The Attackers spend six hours forcing their way into a secure area of the Liberian flag. Mozart where they took the sailors hostage. They disabled most of the

West African Coast ABC Turkey Nigeria South Africa Chicago Mozart
World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge  UNs FAO

UN News

07:50 min | Last month

World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge UNs FAO

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting.

Kenya Africa Keith Pressman Ethiopia West Africa Southwest Asia Mali India Yemen Somalia Pakistan Iran FAA NFL Lucas Mediterranean
Nestle, Cargill at high court in child labor case

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Nestle, Cargill at high court in child labor case

"Child labor laws are before the Supreme Court today. It's a case brought by six Africans against US chocolate companies. The plaintiffs from Molly say they were trafficked as Children and forced to work long hours on the Ivory Coast cocoa farms and kept at night in locked shacks. The suit against Nestle USA seeks damages and argues that the company should better monitor child labor on the farms. The Washington Post reports. Child labor is why Spread on the cocoa farms of West Africa, or about two thirds of the world's cocoa is grown

Supreme Court Molly Ivory Coast United States Nestle Washington Post West Africa
Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

"I just on your lawson. The founding director of the paloma in togo and andrew santo. Who's just written a book with twenty eight interviews with museum leaders across the world. I also speak to. Dan hicks about his book. The british museum's about the bronzes and for our work the week christopher repeal of the national gallery in london talks about san mateo painting of copernicus. That's coming to the national for an exhibition next year before that a reminder that you can sign up for the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories goes to the art newspaper dot com and the link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there you can also sign up for a range of other newsletters including the book club and the art market. I now a new book by the writer and cultural strategy advisor andhra santo features twenty eight conversations with directors of museums and other institutions oldham during the covid nineteen pandemic the future of the museum. Twenty eight dialogues. Include voices from across the world attempting to define museums and the challenges and opportunities ahead of them now and in the coming days among them. Direct is of african museums including sonia lawson the director of the paladin loma in togo in west africa. Andress and sonia join me to discuss the role of museums today and look at how sonya's togalese institution reflects a new coq drew dynamism on the african continent andress. I wanted to begin by asking you. This book was written on zoom. Just as we are now essentially so you talked to twenty eight museum or cultural institution directors about what they were doing. It happened to be done in the covy deer as it were but was it. Germinating is an idea for a much longer period this spring. I wrote an article in art. Net news actually wrote it over easter weekend. So i remember did very well I guess that was early april. I can't remember the exact dates and it was an article about reopening museums. And it just hit a nerve. It really got a lot of people talking at the time. And i heard from dozens and dozens of museum directors and just became part of illogic conversation. And that's when we really realized that this is the moment because it gave us an editorial frame because it it really was a moment that made us ask what is the future about. Still trying to figure it out. I think there's no doubt in all of our minds that this is one of those years in the calendar that will be a turning point. A historical marker where new phase is beginning persona. I think this phase is the one that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just ended. Now we have a new face. So what does that mean for museums. Once i figured out that this would be a book not just of conversations with museum. Directors conversations about the future not necessarily revisiting. Why museums have been great in the past of which many reasons to talk about that too but to really have a forward-looking and that is what led to choices like this extraordinary new institution in togo. Which i think is such a taste of where museums or cultural institutions or cultural centers are headed All around the world so so in a way this moment. This covert moment crystallized. How such a book could come about and how we would choose directors to be in it before we speak specifically about sons institution. I wanted to ask you about a phrase that you use in the to the book where you talk about how. The paradigm smashing experimentation in museums and cultural institutions is happening in effectively in the global south so in africa in asia in latin america. Can you expand on that a bit now. Because what do you think lies behind that. Well first of all i. That's not to say it's not happening elsewhere. And i think the book provides lots of examples of how people are thinking you in original ways about museums all around the world. But i think that there are perhaps two main reasons. Why so many of these truly interesting. And i would say inspiring. Examples of new practices are often happening in the global. South one is that many of these institutions are brand new. So it's you can speak to this. They have an opportunity to really design for the now and for the future. They're not dealing with a legacy infrastructure. They're not trying to retrofit something. That was already there and tried to adapt it to the future.

Togo Andrew Santo Sonia Lawson Dan Hicks National Gallery San Mateo Andress Oldham Sonya West Africa Sonia London Latin America Asia Africa
African Girls Access Avenue to achieve aspirations and rights: UN deputy chief

UN News

04:12 min | 3 months ago

African Girls Access Avenue to achieve aspirations and rights: UN deputy chief

"Empowering goals in africa can put them on the fast track to achieve their aspirations and basic rights to which they're entitled but too often denied that's according to the un secretary general muhammad. Who's on a two week. Solidirity visit to west africa and the suhel to underscore the united nations support for the region during the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic in a wide ranging interview with the un mission. Maneuvres radio network mikado fm. The deputy u n chief discussed the importance of education. As a foundation to advancing gender equality. Josefina began by asking what the best way forward was for empowering women and girls first of all we have to understand that what we actually doing is providing an avenue for them to achieve their aspirations and basic rights so sometimes when one talks about empowerment is trying to give something no. You're trying to ensure that you open up that space that they acquired rights and education is one of them It's a building block There'll be many of the things that will come to empower a woman But a girl needs to be in school. She needs the foundations She needs the basic elements of education whether their civic the language the math the science everything that helps such stop. churning her brain her aspirations her dreams and connecting them with this this possible that can communicate it so it's really important that that education happens because it opens up the mind to the possibilities. Is it a matter of coffee. Increases confidence it. it You you understand. Better your place in society you'll rights Even if someone else's translating them differently if they're harmful practices in your coaching you begin to understand if that's harmful and that it's not okay And so. I think it's a it's a place that you learn about society about your individual responsibility so for every right. There's an obligation. It's not just about taking it's also not giving And so there's a lot that goes into education about learning your history It's it's a. It's a life long experience education but those building blocks in the beginning of very important for nurturing the mind into region. How do you see d education. Where are the needs. You know for me. Every time someone asks me that question. I remember that. I was educated in the suhel On primary school was as it should be that we had all the basic amenities including a school feeding With nutritious food but it was a place of learning on. It is the skills that i took on and i built a secondary education. Is those skills that allow me to do the things that i do today which is to get a job but better than that. If i don't get a job. I couldn't look around me and i can create the opportunities and i can look for the skill set but i need to move further with it. What does that mean case like. Go to school. I come out to the degree. And i'm looking for a job and i can't find one but because i have the wherewithal i can decide that i will take a job at not train for I can decide that. Perhaps i'm going to set up a soap making factory but because i have an education i can look for the business plan because i can read. I can light. And i've been taught math and science. I can put all of that together and make my business. Education is not just the job. it's the tools it gives you to create To create the work around you More recently i was in a camp With the internally displaced people from from boko haram and we had a group of women Will and girls And i said to them. So what would you prefer an educational skill set and this. Both because with the education comes. Knowledge with the skill set comes in ability to create An and that was very interesting for me and the young girl said they wanted to western education. The older women said we wanted an islamic education but both wanted skills because that's to them was the connection with the light hood. It was a connection with an income. It was in connection with that economic empowerment. That for them so important. For their family

Suhel UN U N Josefina West Africa Muhammad Africa
Donald Trump Is Still not Conceding To The Election Results

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:52 min | 3 months ago

Donald Trump Is Still not Conceding To The Election Results

"Donald trump is still refusing to concede after losing the us election and is insisting that he won citing baseless claims of voter fraud. He's backed up by most of his republican party and together. They're ignoring the will of the people the very foundation of democracy brian classes and associate professor in global politics at ucla and a columnist for the washington post and has written extensively on these subjects. Brian is this aku. no it's not. And the reason for that is because a coup has a very specific definition. Which is a seizure of executive power by military force. And that's not likely to happen in the united states but it is potentially going to be something where the republican party and trump are attempting to seize power after. They've lost an election which is extraordinarily dangerous for democracy. And even though it's not easy to succeed in it is. I mean there joe biden. We'll get inaugurated on january twentieth. The amount of damage is doing in faith in the democratic institutions and the democratic process of the united states enormous. And so we shouldn't take lightly i mean. Can you imagine the international reaction. If this was happening elsewhere in the world. Latin america africa. There would be a huge global outcry. Why are so many colluding with the emperor's vision of his new clothes. It has happened elsewhere in the world we had an election. a couple of years ago in the gambia in west africa in which gem lost the election and then claimed that he wanted and tried to stay in power and there was a threatened military intervention To remove him and eventually forced him out. So you're you're absolutely right. It would be treated differently and very seriously the reason why people are going along with it is twofold one is on the international stage. You have hesitancy because of geopolitics. So you know. Boris johnson would condemn this. If it was happening in west africa he won't condemn it in the us because he's worried about the blowback from the trump administration the last seventy days and on the domestic stage. The republican party is going along with it because they've made a calculation unfortunately that they think that it's best to keep the base fired up and also they don't want to alienate the base by breaking with trump before. They think he's had his time to sort of run his course so they've made a very cynical strategy Part of their game plan. And it's as i say it's doing immense damage because a majority of republicans now something between seventy-five and eighty five percent of republicans. Believe this election was stolen. Despite every piece of evidence pointing to this being one of the most well managed and well executed elections in modern american history. So at what point does it. Democratically elected leader become a dictator. It's a very good question. It's a gray area. It's it's basically win. They have taken power and failed to relinquish it in accordance with the democratic process. And so this is an instance where if trump were to stay in power illegally then yes of course We would have to stop talking about the. Us has democracy. What we have now is an attempt right. I believe that the democratic institutions of the us even though they have been battered under the last four years in our very damaged are strong enough that in this instance it won't prove successful and i think if we do actually game out the idea of him somehow trying to stay in the white house after january twentieth wouldn't the. Us shut down. There would be there would be riots. There would be violence. There would be general strikes. I mean it's it's unfathomable because even though that chunk of the republican party the hards believed that trump's somehow one or that the election was manipulated. And they're wrong about that. Eighty percent of the country knows joe biden one which is depressing. It's only eighty percent because it's quite clear that he won but it still overwhelming and therefore it's impossible to imagine Trump stained power without enormous backlash to that. And i don't think the republicans would actually go along with it once you get to that stage. I think they're indulging him because they think it's a ploy but i don't think that they would let him stay in power beyond inauguration day and i'm guessing that also republicans don't want to alienate the voter base. That may well get them to senate seats in georgia on the fifth of january. Yeah it's an interesting strategy this because of just in terms of pure it's obviously extraordinarily cynical but if we're evaluating interest from the merits of strategy as effectiveness there's a potential for blowback here right if you tell people that the elections are stolen from you in places like georgia. There's a risk that people in georgia who are republicans. Don't vote right. I mean they have. They have to get their base out and so even though they might be fired up about the the narrative that the republicans are selling them the narrative selling them as saying don't matter because they get rigged anyway which is again not true but some people believe that to be true and you wonder if on january fifth which is not a normal time for people to be voting. Usually special elections have low turnout whether the democratic base which is going to be very fired up for this could have a boost from the fact that some georgia republicans will say. Forget about it. I i don't wanna vote. Because i've heard all these conspiracy theories that my vote won't be counted anyway so you mentioned the danger for democracy an and as he also said one presumes that eventually he will have to go but how much damage can inflict before he does. I mean one area would seem to be how we view democracy in the future and would perhaps appoint to a changing of the constitution. Which really only has a couple of paragraphs on the office of the president. And i guess it relies. It's soft guidelines isn't it relies on on the good nature. The good faith of the president to to behave in a presidential way. Maybe that needs to change. Yeah i mean. I think the story Of the post trump era could be one. That's very optimistic. For democracy depending on how the senate seat elections go Because as you rightly point out what he's done is exposed. How much of american politics relies on norms and the sort of good faith that people in elected office will obey those norms. And what could happen as happened. After watergate with richard nixon is an attempt to codify right into law the norms so that they can't be up for discussion and i think this would be a very positive development that being said he can do enormous damage. He's got seventy four days in office and you know he is poisoning Republicans in particular in terms of their minds thinking about democracy. And that matters. I mean you have to have both parties believe in the legitimacy of the other party when they went elections if you want to have a democracy survive and right now that is not the case. And i you know. It's the first time in at least modern american history. That's been true so we do need to pay very close attention to what he's doing in terms those soft aspects of democracy. Now he's mark espa the defense secretary since then. There's been a run of firings and resignations at the top of the pentagon. John now has his people in place. And he's ousted those whose who would defy will. What might he try and achieve here. I mean could. He bring troops home from afghanistan in time for christmas. As long said he would thereby further destabilizing the region could he provoke conflict with iran leaving biden with a huge issue to deal with. Yeah this is one of the mysteries. I mean trump. You usually can understand trump pretty well by looking at ego narcissism personal interest financial interests. The question here is whether that explains these moves. As well so one narrative of course would be espa stood up to him on various things like deploying the military to quash protests and said. I'm not going to do that. And this is payback for him to fire him but there is some other stuff going on. That makes me wonder if there's more to this story like for example. A series of arms deals that have seemed to be arms transfers. It seemed to be concluded with various middle east Dictatorships and the question is is trump trying to do something to us foreign policy or is he trying to provide favors to countries that he may have future business interest in because his financial empire is going to be under enormous when his debt gets called in after he leaves the white house and there could be some Interest for him in trying to curry favor with some foreign governments in which towers may sprout up in the coming years. I don't know but Tinkering with national security drain a already volatile. Lame duck period is extremely dangerous. And it's not just the firings it's also the fact because he refuses to accept biden's transition biden hasn't started getting the presidential daily brief so he's not up to speed on all the threats facing and all of that means that it's less likely that biden will be as ready as possible on day one and that is something that should not be a partisan issue it should be for all americans to care about and of course he's not getting the funds that are meant to be released for the transition team either and there's a deadline for the legal challenges and as you say it's unlikely any of them will stick to to the degree that they changed results. So how and. When is this going to end well. Presumably what will happen is the certification deadline which is coming up in a couple of weeks for the various states. will come and go with certifications so that you know the new times called or email. All of the secretaries of state who are in charge of elections in in all fifty states and one hundred percent of them said that there was no fraud in their states and in fact trump's lawyers are saying the same thing in court when they're pressed right. The judges are are you. Are you alleging fraud. And they're having to say no because the lawyers actually have to inhabit reality so at some point the results will be certified and once that happens. It's a legally binding certification. That trump has lost the election so i think that the delusion will increasingly become a fringe view. It will still exist. Trump may never accept that he lost but as long as he's out of the white house on january twentieth limits the amount of damage he can do because it will be the end of his time in real power. Brian thank you very much indeed.

Republican Party United States West Africa Trump Administration Joe Biden Georgia Donald Trump Boris Johnson Gambia Ucla Washington Post Latin America Senate Biden
Under Your Feet

The Past and the Curious

06:09 min | 4 months ago

Under Your Feet

"You may remember Charles Wilson Peel as the man featured in episode thirty four all about museums in Philadelphia's independence hall above the very room where the declaration of Independence was signed. He opened a museum to display a whole bunch of unusual things. There were mammoth skeletons, ancient artifacts, a wily and well traveled little prairie dog and a wall full of portraits of very important people. He painted those VIP portraits himself appeal among everything else was a remarkable artist and the paintings that he made of the many people who lived in the late seventeen hundreds are some of the best of the time period. We should remember that in the seventeen hundreds there was no television or computers there weren't even photographs. So the average person would probably never actually catch a glimpse of someone famous like George Washington or Ben Franklin and person. which meant that they might not know what they really looked like. Isn't that funny thing to consider if you were alive at the time and wondered what a person look like looking at a portrait was just about the only way to see a famous face. So, curious people were happy to pay Peale's museum admission to see paintings of these very important people and finally put faces with the names they had heard about all the time, the old animal parts and the little prairie dog that peel had on display. Just a nice bonus. Now Peel was just one man and he couldn't paint everyone. Appeal portrait was typically an honor reserved for only the most notable people, presidents, founding fathers, famous personalities. You had to do something pretty special to get appeal portrait. And here's another thing to keep in mind. This was the seventeen hundreds in America and the early eighteen hundreds. So all of the faces that tended to fit those descriptions at that time were white faces. All except for one. On the wall that peel filled from floor to ceiling portrait's in his museum, one painting certainly stuck out to any visitor. It was the face of a black man and he was very old. And the dark skin on his narrow face was accented by white tufts of beard hair in the painting. He's wearing a knit cap on his head. Mike one you'll probably be getting out soon with the rest of your winter clothes. If you haven't already the old man's eyes looked bright and strong and his expression was one of satisfaction. It's an incredible face to look at and many people have wondered who was this man in a way the portrait happened by accident. In eighteen nineteen peel had traveled from his home in Baltimore to Washington DC to paint James Monroe the fifth president of the United States. while. They're peels. Curiosity was piqued when he heard about a free black man who is a practicing Muslim and who not only owned a home in nearby. Georgetown but was a successful business man who had helped finance the bank. This was remarkable and because this was forty six years before the civil war and the end of slavery, it was very unusual. This man was called Yaro Mahmoud. And people said he was one hundred and forty years old. That part was fake. He was probably around eighty at the time but everything else was true. Peel had to make a special trip across the Potomac River to meet Yaro talk with him about his life and have him sit for a very unusual portrait. Painting portraits takes a lot of time as you might imagine, which means there's plenty of time to talk, and that's what Yaro did. The little that we know about him today is mostly because Peel wrote much of it down. It's a pretty amazing story and one that challenges our ideas of the people who were living and thriving in. America at the time. In the year. Seventeen. Fifteen euro was only fourteen when he was captured and taken from his home in West Africa he like millions of other men, women and children was victim of the slave trade. People were kidnapped from their lands, take into another and forced into Labor. Euros people were known as the Fulani and it is believed that his family were wealthy Muslim leaders in this community. Historians think this because Yaro knew how to read and write both in the Fulani language as well as Arabic. Later in his life he learned to read and write a bit of English as well. Making him literate in three languages. That's a feet for anyone at the time but especially unusual for someone who would live much of his life and slavery. Most. Enslaved people would be kept from learning to read and write at all. But for euro, it helped him stand out. After the terrible journey on a slave ship across the Atlantic Ocean Yaro landed in Maryland where a man named Bell bought him directly off the boat. Everything and everyone Yaro new was gone never to be seen again, the man who legally purchased him was a wealthy farmer who owned several properties that depended on the work of enslaved people, farms, watermills, things like that pretty quickly though bell figured out that Yaro was more well suited for work other than hard plantation labor luckily, for Yaro, his education lead to another old, he became what is known as a body servant. In this role young Yaro traveled with bell everywhere he went. When he met with other farmers, Yaro was there. He met the people he would sell his grain too Yarra was there. When he met with powerful politicians, Yaro was also there. And nearly every one of those people would remember meeting Euro. Mahmoud. How could you not? He was obviously incredibly talented and smart, but also by being in the room when business was happening. Yaro was able to learn how to make it happen himself.

Yaro Yaro Mahmoud Charles Wilson Peel America George Washington Philadelphia Ben Franklin Peale Potomac River Maryland Bell Mike James Monroe Georgetown Euros West Africa President Trump Washington
Macron wants France to have a seat at the top table

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:17 min | 4 months ago

Macron wants France to have a seat at the top table

"President Emmanuel Macron is not unique among French leaders in entertaining grandiose notions about his country's singular place in the world charles-de-gaulle believed that France cannot be France without greatness and wrote of its exalted and exceptional destiny for Napoleon. The word impossible is not French. Emmanuel macron is a banker by background rather than a warrior, but he seems to share with his swashbuckling predescessors. The conviction that France is a great power and should behave like one in recent months alone macron has met with the Democratic opposition leaders of Belarus dispatched warships and fighter jets to Greece as it butts heads with Turkey and perhaps most startlingly invited himself to Lebanon within forty eight hours of the warehouse explosion which devastated. Beirut. In August, all of which is to say nothing Francis outreach economic and military to its former colonies in West Africa. Last month macron. told the UN General Assembly that the world as it is today cannot come down to a rivalry between China and the United States macron appears to have a firm idea of at least one of the nation deserving of a seat at the top table.

President Emmanuel Macron France Un General Assembly Beirut West Africa Napoleon Greece Belarus Turkey Lebanon United States China Macron.
The Beginning of Black History

Black History in Two Minutes

01:34 min | 5 months ago

The Beginning of Black History

"Most of us think that the first Africans to arrive in what is now the United States, we're slaves, but it turns out that that's not true. The first African to set foot on what would become United States soil was a free black man named Juan Garrido. A conquistador, the Spanish name for a conqueror. Rita was born around fourteen eighty in west Africa. As a young man he traveled to Lisbon. Portugal then to Sa- V. Spain when he converted to the Roman Catholic. Church he took a new name Juan Garrido meaning handsome John. He winds up sailing with the Spanish is a free person as A. Door and spends three decades in service to the Spanish crown. In fifteen thirteen garrido participated in Pants Dale Fain expedition in Florida in search of the Fountain of Youth. This is the first record of a black person setting foot in what is now the United States. What does that mean? It means that there was this space people of African descent could occupy. That wasn't exclusively being a person of bondage. RETO. Settled in Mexico where he spent his final years working at a gold mining operation and while he was a freeman, he profited from local slave labor. Garrido died in fifteen fifty almost seventy years before the first enslaved Africans arrived in Jamestown?

Juan Garrido United States Lisbon Portugal Rita Mexico Sa- V. Spain A. Door Fountain Of Youth Dale Fain West Africa Jamestown Florida
Interview with Winstina Hughes, Planner for the Maryland Dept of Transportation

Hallway Chats

08:03 min | 5 months ago

Interview with Winstina Hughes, Planner for the Maryland Dept of Transportation

"Welcome to Hallway Chat I'm Liam Dempsey. And I'm Tara Claes today we're joined by Weinstein Hughes when Stena is an assistant regional planner for the Maryland Department of transportation she created her first wordpress blog for a geographic information systems assignment and followed it soon after with one on community development and suburban planning. She has presented at Work Camp New York City work camp. US and Work Camp Austin. A wordpress meet up co organizer Weinstein a lead were camp new. York two, thousand eighteen. Welcome when Stena? We're so glad here. Thanks for having me. Tara. Thanks for having me. Lamb. I'm excited to join you wearing. So excited to defensive time with you. Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself? Okay. I can tell you. I'm a bit more about myself i. Grew up in northern Jersey in south orange. Maplewood. My family immigrated. From Sierra Leone West Africa And somehow they brought me back to Maryland. Settled initially I'm so I am living and working in, Baltimore? Fantastic there's there's a lot there about that. We could delve into but let me let me just talk a little bit about growing up there since he started with whole were you when you when you move from Sarah alone do you remember your your country of or you're young enough to not have any memory? I have. I have memories of playing in our backyard. Like the lush greenery of it. The red. The red dirt. Just. just kind of outside where we lived I remember just how bad it was. And I remember listening on to my dad calling. To see how I was just a memory of knowing that my parents weren't with me. And just really happy to hear his voice. And? When we moved here. This is. Really. where I grew out. Those are those those memories are of. I'm like a child and when we moved here, that's when things really start forming. That's when I'm you know I started thinking about just you know school like a as a kid. I. Think. We. You know when you're as young as four or five things are just kind of like impressions I'm but then we hit an age where we start understanding what's around us Andy Start. Having. A sense of the places where we're going and the people that were spending time with and when we immigrated here on that was the time where things really started in. No. Forming for me as a child and and. Being aware of the spaces I was in and you know. I grew up here in every part of who I am is really. The experience of being raised here in the states and Being raised in south. Orange Maplewood. have. You been back to Sierra Leone. I haven't been back. I'm one of those children but. That hasn't traveled back. Since I? I can't name. Do you have family there still though I do I do have aunts and uncles and I have cousins. That are from back home. And I have some cousins that have traveled here and they've gone back I'm. But I've I've lived here since since we came in, it's been continuous experience. Yeah. Thank you for sharing that your your story of coming to this country and growing up here. Tell us a little bit. Your experience Sir I think you talked about before we started recording about. Going to school to Grad, school and Can you tell us a little bit about your education background and your wordpress wordpress fits into that picture? Yes So you know you mentioned that I'm an assistant. Planner and I went to college for city planning. And I went to Grad school as well for for city planning sitting regional planning. And you know it's it's really a way of looking at the world. A WAY OF LOOKING And Identifying Spaces right areas that you can contribute to improve, and that's what I really love about. About what I studied and I really enjoy the work that I do currently. I, work for DOD and. Works specifically. With state highway and we see the tangible results of the projects that we work on. You know like when we go to meetings I'm and you know the individuals that we speak with. It's There's a real mess to it as opposed to. If I were in an office. kind of like. We spend a fair amount of time in the office, but it's not like a policy document I'm writing. You know it's like I can go and see where I work is I can listen. To understand what the needs are of of those who live in the communities. that. We that we go to and that's really what's always been exciting for me as a planner I did some community organizing work as well and? Not only that. I worked at a nonprofit in DC as an intern, and I had a chance to look at a Housing Trust Fund I had the chance to look at how they went about organizing around housing issues and an even organizing around immigration issues and and it's it's so exciting to work in a field that that hutchison all those different areas and it's died it's that fluid ness of of of the field working an infrastructure or working with community issues or working on. Economic Development. That led me to. Writing about. you know what I learned in school and then writing about it is really you know what really got me more involved within the word s community I that jess log but I'm that I wrote in college, and then when I graduated I started writing a blog on development. For Me Boyd and just in the process of all the positive experiences move me from just you know blogging on wordpress dot com to building my own sites. And then there's there's so much evolved from that as well. From writing to becoming a a meet up organizer in a work, Camp Speaker, and. You know just just all those those opportunities came from. From just you know blogging sharing my thoughts about. An area that I'm so passionate about that I'm so fortunate to work in.

Work Camp New York City Stena Weinstein Hughes Work Camp Austin Maryland Department Of Transpo United States Tara Claes Liam Dempsey York Maplewood Me Boyd Sierra Leone Grad School Baltimore Andy Start Maryland Northern Jersey Sarah
Migrants trying to reach Europe pushed to deadly Atlantic

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Migrants trying to reach Europe pushed to deadly Atlantic

"Migrants are increasingly crossing a treacherous part of the Atlantic to reach the Canary Islands a Spanish archipelago near West Africa in what has become one of the most dangerous routes to Europe the international organization for migration says about four thousand people have survived the perilous journey this year alone with around two hundred fifty dying all going missing that's already more than the number of people who perished trying to cross the western Mediterranean in all of last year the increase in traffic to the canaries comes off to the E. U. funded Morocco in twenty nineteen to stop migrants from reaching sudden Spain father Mediterranean in August alone there were more than eight hundred fifty arrivals by sea to the canaries according to an AP tally of numbers released by official sources I'm Charles the late this month

Atlantic Canary Islands West Africa Europe Mediterranean E. U. Morocco Charles Spain Official
"west africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"No West Africa has just two cases of covert nineteen at the time of writing this one in Nigeria and one in Senegal what's the situation now and what's happened to local health systems after the dreadful Ebola virus outbreak of twenty fourteen we can find out more by speaking to professor Stanley a call he's the director general of the west African Health Organization which basically means he's responsible for coordinating the response of fifteen countries in the region and he joins us from Burkina fossa a very warm welcome to you said just remind us of of the cases is we've said to is that the number of cases you've heard of no I I thought this morning I think we have three because said there is a second case the last Senegal Baghdad thank you very much for having me the systems are saddened you'll want to talk about is Sam systems that we set top immediately after I bought a lot from the lessons off the board thank you very much for having me this morning you're very welcome now you know these western west African countries they were presented with Ebola challenges does this then give countries like this the confidence to deal with something like code nineteen yes you can say that M. you can say that the course all the lessons off you the devastating Ebola epidemic am countries did not just simply give him the confidence by I simply that stayed on the ice and cons but rather they'll win a series all systems that we have set in place particularly coordination systems that manage that countries themselves how to do then Deborah law within a regional framework national public has informed that national public health institute so I institutions what we sometimes call in West Africa national all you need to leave right now and if you do not fifteen countries said that must take a lot of coordination what level of preparation do you have that in place and what what structure is all then place yes so you don't think a little fat coordination not in fact the auto thing also is that people may not know that we have three language blocks within the fifteen countries I'm gonna phone francophone and lusophone the structures in place R. as I said before the national public catch institutions which are networked through to a regional center for disease control which is set on the waffle one based in Abuja but in addition we also have a network of reference laboratories that quartet for subject specific so some of them for example experts in Lassa fever some of them are experts in corona virus however since the corona virus epidemic we have a short since a couple of days ago that all our country's contest for coronavirus in addition to these there is a systemic risk communication there is also a system of coordination and communication between at the highest levels of authorities with in house so the ministers of health needs and discourse regularly and at from the time that the cold feet nineteen was declared a public health emergency of international concern by Kobe at you at we have had a series of these meetings in order to communicate on call up there enough it sloughs finally I profess that yep got it sounds like it's well coordinated but they work concerns from the World Health Organization is about how countries on the African continent we're going to cope with code nineteen given the fact that you had you know stretched health systems and and and the concern was that it wasn't as robust as a developed countries yes you could say that in terms of infrastructure you can certainly not say that in terms of the preparedness but when you think about if this was going to be a very large epidemic we cannot be hospitals in ten days in West Africa like they did in China now of course you know that what may happen is that we will have to and these are some of the clients that we have in place M. two schools you know that's what I'm two people but we also have of course the challenges of transport from the rural areas and that's why we have developed a caustic regional strategic plan for which we are seeking funding to ensure that if we are in for the long run we have a contingency stock we have the P. P.'s we have some of the areas where we'll have to double up on teen infrastructure in order to cope with it okay luckily at the moment the two countries that have had confirmed cases Senegal and Nigeria have those infrastructure okay thank you very much that's professor Stanley of Colo dead the director general of the west African Health Organization the only way we got the sport with Matthew and also gold refineries in Africa that rise up but first we're going to talk about the mustard Moussa mosque in Kenya's second city of Mombasa it was very well known at one time for radicalization one of its keryx at Sheikh Abu durable who is linked to both al Shabab al Qaeda was killed in twenty twelve by unknown gunmen you may remember the violent protests that followed that then a couple of years later Sheikh maka Buri who used to host rallies draped with al Shabaab flags was also killed but the mosque carries on and it's now sort of digging out I suppose a a place for itself rather than hostility and extremism as a center for reconciliation and peace building how is this happened the BBC's Ferdinand Omondi reports in twenty fourteen it does feel V. as police raided the masjid Musa mosque in central Basra twice police said the most had been turned into a.

West Africa Nigeria Senegal
"west africa" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"In West Africa author Edgar Rice Burroughs mentioned the term Tarzan as meaning white skin in a language Alexander Hamilton high school in Elmsford was planning to put on a production of the Disney version of Tarzan your superintendent mark by aka we were very clear on the Disney version of it was more about the portrayal of our students and the characters that they would be playing in the cast typing and things of that sort he says the decision to scrap Tarzan for something else was part of a larger plan in the Elmsford school district to be more inclusive it is changing our process by which we go about this spring musical selection as well of as other selections even in our academic programs we just want to be more mindful of the community that we represent by arco says if one person feels uncomfortable with something he wants to hear about it mac Rosenberg WCBS newsradio eight eighty now to parade floats and a small Delaware town looking into whether they have their traditional Hummers parade this time around the new year's day parade in Middletown Delaware about an hour south west of Philadelphia drew criticism there were several immigration related floats including one portraying children in cages at the U. S. border the town has been dealing with the issue of how to monitor the parade without infringing on anyone's freedom of speech town officials met Monday night local news outlets report no decision was made about the twenty twenty parade on new year's day as the town figures out how to institute regulations that are not unconstitutional but Michigan CBS news Manhattan prosecutors have dropped their case against rapper Remy ma Grammy nominated rapper's she was arrested back in may on charges that she punster love and hip hop New York cast mate Britney Taylor in the face at a New York City concert back in April love hip hop reality show on cable the rapper's lawyer denied that all answer because I was at home at the time with a daughter in the case was dismissed Monday after prosecutors said conflicting evidence and witness accounts made the case to our to prove and then said well you had with this is no longer cooperating with investigators the rapper's real name by the way is reminisce Smith as he left the courthouse wearing full for coke and a smile on her face Stan twenty two now to Avengers fans getting a preview of a new chapter in the superhero series a lot of lives down from my past Marvel has just released the first trailer to the public for a standalone movie featuring Scarlett Johannson.

Britney Taylor Avengers Manhattan CBS Middletown superintendent Disney West Africa Scarlett Johannson Stan Smith Edgar Rice Burroughs New York Grammy Remy ma Michigan Philadelphia Delaware arco
"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"west africa" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"To West Africa where he's from the authorities in West Africa probably not the fifteen year magazine registry the common well said the victim did not want to come to court new details about a shooting on Penn Avenue in Wilkinsburg last evening years KDKA radio strode to steal police are charred seventeen year old Robert trade cook with attempted homicide the nineteen year old victim is in critical condition shot multiple times KDKA TV reports cooking the victim had been feuding according to the criminal complaint cook would been dating the victim's sister claim self defense the nineteen year old allegedly threatened cook with an A. K. forty seven earlier this year and the day before the shooting city could a pop cook in the head cook says he found the victim on Penn Avenue fired about six times when the victim wouldn't run away Jody studio newsradio ten twenty Katie K. A. New York City police commissioner James o'neill has fired officer Daniel Pantaleo the officer involved in the chokehold death of Eric garner in twenty fourteen New York mayor bill de Blasio says the NYPD learn from this tragedy it is a beginning but we have a lot more to do when the change has to get deeper and deeper and that is not a top down enterprise that is for all of us to do a daughter of Eric garner thing to police commissioner for quote doing the right thing but said her family's fight for justice is not over emerald snipes garner wants action taken against the other officers who were at the attempted arrest of her father and once and Eric garner law passed that would make police chokeholds illegal in sports the pirates hosting the Washington nationals at PNC park tonight it is seven oh three eight will check Tripoli traffic and accu weather together in two minutes my grandmother it's one forty for fast.

West Africa Wilkinsburg cook James o'neill Daniel Pantaleo officer Eric garner bill de Blasio NYPD Robert Katie K. A. New York City Washington PNC park nineteen year seventeen year fifteen year two minutes
"west africa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And we're here, you know, we're here in this city. And this is this is a futile place. Right. Wouldn't you say towers? I would say I mean, it's really gorgeous, it's on lake Huron. And it's it's such a laid back summer kind of place that I mean, even the birds are laid back. I just saw female Mallard in a crop top really now. So it's kind of place. Just realized surprise. You didn't ask if it needed a ride? Well, speaking of which it's joke corner. No joke. You were telling me Joe corner, ladies and gentleman by would not tell you this yorker earlier because he wanted he wanted me to react spontaneously with the joy that he knew I was going to feel just today. Crap tac. Yeah. That was that was a good that might have been. In fact, maybe if Mallard was in a field was in a. Okay field, and it was a crop top with that have been funnier because odors, the crap oh, it is a crop. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. That's funny. Yeah. Or on a silo silo? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Oh that could be funny. I want to have you take your mind back in time. Okay. So far she to last year when I told a very good job. God. I tell us joke all the time. It wasn't really is supposed to be a joke. It was a mind bender in the mind bender. Chris I'm actually joked today, but the mind bender was that Napoleon met his Waterloo at Waterloo. Yeah. Yeah. And then there was another one about the late great Irish vocalist, Richard Harris, and this is kind of a fun fact too. And this was that Richard Harris he had himself. He got himself into a real Donnybrook Donnybrook. But this is this is marva story. Okay. That isn't it though. Because you told me that when earlier right? Yeah. I go play remember it. But again, I'm just reminding you of jokes pass got lots of postcards from our listener, I use this next joke. The same kind of. That like that. But this is for everyone is anxious to hear this is a little longer. This is about Joe and Terry and Joe and Terry are two guys who live in Mali in west Africa. You with me so far. I'm just chilling. Okay. So join Terry live in Mali, west Africa. Joe saying to Terry cheese. I gotta spend the weekend at my granny's house, which one said this Joe Joe and Terry said, what's wrong? Don't you? Love your granny. And Joe says, of course, I love my granny. But she lives out in the country. You know, it's rural here in Mali in west Africa. And the problem I love my granny. But she doesn't have WI fi shows at any internet service, and she doesn't have cable TV. Said that's crazy where could she live not to have that and Joseph out in Timbuktu somewhere? Wow. So. So that brings us to. Oh, maybe we should listeners have a mall downtown. Chilling until at cable, John just hurting today. You can see why wasn't laughing last night as I was thinking bad. And let's head a little motel coroner because we had photography coroner yesterday. And you know, we open it up to listeners should it be photographers coroner or photography corner. And I did get an Email from new listener Christina. And she said Deere, Bob, please stop mentioning my name on your show. Okay. Okay. Well, that's easy. Okay. That solves it so motel corner. And you wanted to mention something about the amenities that were provided. Well, I was surprised at the level of syrup of amenity that we receive the for example, the little bar of the bar of hand, soap, you know, you get those at a hotel, and they're generally kind of small in there. Motel motel corners. What is called? Yeah. Hotel coroner this is a regular feature. Okay. So in the motel not the hotel. I opened up the little pack of soap in this pack of soap was actually the size of a quarter. Looks like I guess the old fashioned straight razor blades. That's a good comparison Pearson. If any of our folks listening to the show are thinking of slashing their wrists right now. It was about the size, right? Regular racy. Yeah. Yeah. Some people are that are objecting. I don't know. I just thought I heard some wildlife bursting through the bushes to try and stop us. I'm thinking I'm sorry to hear laughter all over the place. I think the job role already it has it has a mosquito bit me. And it's transmitting a joke all over the par-. Yeah. And also I noticed as far as those amenities. Did you notice that little sign on the sink that it said if you forgot to pack some let's say like a toothbrush or some item? It says come to the front desk for a complimentary item. So I came to the front desk, and I forgot my toothbrush. And the woman said boy, you're looking good today. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's another joke that I did not know is coming to that was a good one too. Yeah. What's happening is there's something to Orioles over there. You just had that far away bird. Look all of a sudden your face for everything else. Everything else delight. And then it's just down to business. Speaking of with down the business now next Saturday, we're going to be at the graph nature center. And we're giving a talk on feather brain, my new book, feather brained, feather brain. And that's my new memoir about how I learned to become a bird or Mike bumbling quest to become a burger and find a rare bird on my own check at Amazon dot com and your local please, please patronize your local bookstore. I got my kindle there you go. You went to the kindle store. But I had to say I did order online as well. I paid for one I paid for two. I was going to give you one. Well, that was a long time ago that it came out, and I figured well looks like I'm not going to get when I did get a complimentary is from the publisher. Why saying you the first ten pages? Didn't I? If they were very fast reader, I just sent him a few at a time, but we're at the graph nature center in Holland Michigan on Saturday too late for any of you, folks. It was a great talk. Yeah. Thanks a lot. But we are supposed to also possibly take some burgers out or some would be burgers out to show them how to bird, and I'm kind of nervous about that. Because I have no idea what to tell them. I look up and then listen. Look listen identify. And I think he said walk, but the welcome is I go ahead. The problem is when you and I are all birding what we do seems like magic, it just seems like ordinary person in just you know, I throw an arm out to the left, and I say a Baltimore Oriole. I throw an arm out to the right? And I say Baltimore Oriole. And it's just seems like magic that is magic right there. Yeah. And I don't know the definition of magic that was an Oriole right there. Yeah. I don't know how you can danley live. Magic live magic. And just talking about showing an arm out. There was the Baltimore. And yesterday when we saw the full disclosure, you did throw your arm out. I did. And now, I have it in a sling. So what's next? I had. I don't know. I have something. That's a species list Cup. That doesn't make any sense. Flattens. I must of. This list cups. Yeah. Oh list. Oh, I know what it is clip. You see this here is a clip. I have this little notebook. And right now this little notebook is holding v very important notes to this show. Right. Because you can't do a podcast like this without very specific notes. People think this isn't scripted. But every word. Yeah. Script everywhere to scripted. So anyway, this is my species list notebook. And when I go birding, I'm pulling it out of my pocket all the time. And I'm writing down Baltimore Oriole tool. Uh-huh. And something like that. And so, but Rama's I keep pulling it out of my pocket and putting it in again pages. Start getting all wrinkled. It's a little spiral notebook in the pages. Get all wrinkled, and it's just a wrinkly mess. And so what I've done here. Bill. I I wish this was video. Wow. I have put a little clip on the bottom of the spiral notebook any holds all the pages flat. This is gonna. Revolutionize bird. It will. I should have go asked me site. And I should you know collect money to develop this product on the go f- me site. I wanted I want you to demonstrate this on the book character Bill home Facebook page. Oh, that's good. You want to do a video that wait. What's this fine here? Holy cow. Oh, robin. Rabbit foreign your round again. Well, let me I hope I didn't because everytime. I fling. My arm out. I turn the burden into a Baltimore Orioles. So I think that nearly brings us to the unbelieving her half. We're at towers point, I was gonna do another photography coroner. But you know, I was gonna go into all the technical aspects of taking photos of birds. But I guess we just don't have time for anything informational what go into all the technical aspects of taking photographs of birds saddened, the F, stop setting, the shutter speed setting that there eyeso-, but we know we don't have time for information. This shows too fast, moving content, frankly, it's all about entertainment as well. It is. And once again, I would like to thank the folks at filler Inc for providing so much content for this show. So we don't have to think it up ourselves. Just go to their website, click on filler. And automatically it appears. Yes. And while you're there, please check out the link from our friends and briskets to go darn briskets. In is. There's another Orioles underground. Wow. What's the what's the special today? This this special is how could it? How could it special? All right. So what did you say Bill? Let's so we're going to go Boyden. And then we're going to let you know what we see other than a Baltimore Oriole here at beautiful tower state park on lake Huron in northern Michigan's and tree swallows are flying over in saluting us. Thanks for the right in my car. Right. And so we'll be back with some live birding or post burying excitement. After this word from our sponsor..

Baltimore Orioles Joe Joe Terry cheese lake Huron Baltimore Orioles Baltimore Oriole Mali Joe corner Mallard Bill Richard Harris west Africa Donnybrook Donnybrook Waterloo Holland Michigan marva filler Inc kindle
"west africa" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Yes. People do like I want people to jump in the English people gave them a gift, and they were servants in west Gandhi, they were slaves and West Indies. They get a bag of maybe the math over food. And why? Charles Dickens has written a lot about it. And so that's there was a wonderful New Orleans audible parade, and they have. On everything that's African up in the West Indies, you know of African and I actually share that would be. Yeah. And you know, I don't get into look. I wanna thank in maturity, right? As a young person. Like, I said I would seek out. I will go seek and destroy mission. Right. When I learn something new. And I've been gone for a long time. So, you know, I don't have to get on these ways to begin to just start spitting stuff that make y'all got ain't trying to impress. Nobody. I'm satisfied with who. I am. I am and all of that. And so yeah, but you know, a lot of this these customs traditions because as I was saying, well, we I came in. We all have always left are signs and symbols in wonders as evidence of who we are all over the world. So there's no place you can go and not see the evidence who the black man and woman is so at the end of the day men of these things have themselves rooted in all kinds of African history. But one great book. Thank you, Gloria. I appreciate. You have been very kind to all of us to offer these wonderful trip because I have no there were people all over this country that wanted to go and didn't have the gumption to go or didn't. And they have traveled live learned so much and their heads on straight. Now, they're looking better in the eye. Whether they get hit all down for thank you very much for that. Derek? Thank you. Thank you, Gloria for your kind words, and sometimes, you know, this universe is so wonderful and rich the universe will give you back that what you put in the 'cause the cosmic force in the universe. I just remember sitting here one day and saying because I wanted to go back if any if you've never been Africa, you try to make a spiritual voyage spiritual voice. Now, you physically and see some things that'll be wonderful and beautiful. You wanna make a spiritual pilgrimage? And now you want to go into Senegal, I love west Africa. And so even when we went and had tell ya, how talk about Micheals it'd be so much going on when we went there. We went to the city of Saint Louis. And it is the coastal city that black people said we don't care what happened this ocean will feed us, and we're not following the ways of the colonizer. We're going to stay close to the water because the water will give up his bounty, and you can go into Saint Louise is fishing town. And. Of course, it was a poor too. But they ain't nobody Harvard the fish, they they'll give up so much fishing. You think? Is something that the ocean will never run out of resources to feed you. And poverty is a relative state of mind. Then people are not poor. Now, we look at my God these people just poor. They're happy the children are clean. They run around in the village. And so, you know to the point is being that I was making is they? You all look at them in a certain way. But when you see it, and you can tap into the spirit of the people. You're not the same right? Then we went from there fishing village, where we stayed in like the little small hurt they will add conditioned and all that but yet net and all that may hurt somebody of negro grumbling and moan and groan, and then they won't go. And thank the media. We all the way over in. Every what are you going to say you don't have to go use the toilet in a hole? Cover some would cover. And so will you give so accustom the accoutrements of this world that you can? Humbling, and we went from there do a five star luxury hotel owned by black people name and many of us in the house there amid the owner. In this same country from a hook to a five star with 0 pool that fell off over into the medication. So big.

West Indies Gloria Charles Dickens New Orleans Africa Saint Louis Micheals Harvard Senegal Saint Louise Derek west Africa one day
"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Know, the problem for people who want to build in that part of the world often starts with land title because. Unlike here where you have this, you know you buy a house, you'd get a mortgage. There's a little line in there somewhere about your title insurance and it all just kind of gets absorbed in title title insurance. Just a money. Printing machine. Yeah, right. Does everybody pays it and don't know what it's rarely ever quacks because because you can verify title so easily here in that part of the world, we as a builder, an all builders essentially have to self insurer by doing the legwork doing the homework. It all depends on the local, administer an administrative infrastructure in Guinea. It follows the sort of French system of privy to your supervisor and then minister level verification. So we go at the super feature which is like the county level verify that nobody else has claimed any land before we buy it, do it at the perfect or which is like the state level do it up at the at the national ministry. And then we go around to the community members there to make sure that there's no traditional land claim from from tribal history that would that would cause a problem with building on this land. Now. There are some governments that are that that are taking steps to to protect title claims legitimate, titled claims in a way that makes it easier for foreign investors to come in and do the kind of thing that we're doing. There are other countries that kind of look the other way when when someone has a legitimate titled claim and a squatter comes in and starts building on it. And so that's, that's what we look at. When we look at expanding is where can we? Where can we find government who's really committed to. Supporting legitimate title plane really committed to supporting initiatives for for financing buyers and where there's also some sort of international player who's going to who's going to who's going to help fill in some pieces of the puzzle and people are doing this. I mean, we've talked to. There's a fund that was set up by the Dutch development Bank that set up to be a local currency bond fund. That would that would make financing available in different parts of west Africa using local currency. And when you when you have those sort of multilateral development institutions that that they're stepping up to to put some financing muscle behind initiatives like that, then your options start to open up, but but you really have to have all of these pieces of the puzzle fit together from from protecting legitimate land title to to to protecting foreign investors from shakedowns and that kind of stuff. Bob Hornsby, joining me in studio, chief financial officer for American Home builders of west Africa, Dylan, joining us on the phone, managing director of US, Africa, housing, finance, your comments. Welcome at eight, four, four Warton eight, four, four, nine, four, two, seven, eight, six, six. Or if you can't get your phone sentence a common via Twitter at biz radio..

west Africa Bob Hornsby Twitter US supervisor national ministry Guinea Dutch development Bank American Home builders chief financial officer managing director Dylan
"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"I mean, there are, you know, by some measures as much as twenty five billion dollars in remittances that go back into west Africa every year from west Africans. Living outside of west Africa, who are. Have left home to kind of earn their fortune abroad and and much of that money is targeted at real estate projects. People for many people in the dia. The one core dream is to be able to go back to your home country have an ice home to retire to and to let your community. No, I did. It was worth it. I made the sacrifices, but now I've come back. I've invested in my country. I've, I've created something beautiful. I've created wealth created employment opportunities for all the people involved in building this home. And we hear stories time and time again of people who have sent money over to a trusted relative or trusted friend could be an uncle could be a brother in law and and it almost always ends in heartbreak either because the person has simply lied to them has been over the years. We'll send them pictures and say, the balls are going onto roof is going up. They don't wanna. Travel over there too often because every trip you take to try to supervise construction, is that much less money, you can invest in the house you're trying to build or so they may wait five years or more ten years to go look at a finished product and get there and find nothing. That's that's sort of the worst case scenario. And there are other bad case scenarios in the interim, because if you can find somebody you can trust with your money, the chances of that person also being expert at clearing title to a piece of land at at managing construction project, managing and supervising subcontractors on a site. Those are those are ball professional skills that require. I mean, they require complicated set of knowledge and skills that that not everybody has. And so even the people who get something built are often disappointed with the quality and with how long it takes. So what we're doing essentially taking production homebuilding process and implementing it there and giving buyers in the Diana's bro. A an entity here in the US that they can interface with. They contact us anytime they want. They can see daily pictures from the from the construction side through our project management tool that the that, our guys in the field us to to keep the clients up to date on what's going on. So it gives them a way to know that their money is going towards what they intended and not to just sort of exist in this in this zone of of not knowing and crossing their fingers and hoping that something's going to. So the building that is being done and I'll get into how much you've done in just a second, but the building is being done most often for who that, you know, in terms of the economic scale or of the people that live in that part of the world for us right now, almost all of our clients are west Africans living outside of west Africa, who who have been saving up money to build a home back in their home country. We sell homes.

west Africa US twenty five billion dollars five years ten years
"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"So we needed to do it. A meat was an investor in American Home builder's west Africa was keen to to work with us to help find a solution to this. And that's what Africa housing finance grew out of was realizing that particularly for members of the west African diaspora, who may be living in Europe or Canada or the US or Austrailia. There's no banks here that are going to lend to them to build a home in west Africa and industry over there. Just just can't support it, which me let laying out what what Bob just mentioned that tells me that the housing market in this part of the world is significantly meeting at this point not only just in in the buildings themselves, but in the processes that we consider to be traditional in our housing market here in the United States. Absolutely. I think there's an old saying Dan necessities another invention, and that's really the case here where in order for American Home builders to succeed, there had a viable to provide some sort of financing for these houses and that just didn't exist. It doesn't exist in Africa self, you know, in in your really any other country out there. And the US Bank was going to lend for houses built in west Africa. So we had to build it ourselves, which is why we created US Africa, housing finance with, you know, I, of course run now. Well, what is the state of the housing market housing sector in that part of the world right now. So let Bob comment on the on the housing sector. I had a really the finance part of it, and you know, from that perspective, I think it's fair to say there is no mortgage or home lending market to speak of in certainly in in Guinea where we operate. And so as a result, you know, they had to work, they being nursing home, but we've had to work very hard to create the housing infrastructure in the marketing and all that sort of stuff, but became abundantly clear that they could build the best houses in the world. But if beating Hossam mechanism to finance, because people obviously don't have one hundred percent, you know cash to pay for the houses that you weren't gonna be able to. And, and so that's really where you know, we had to develop US, Africa, housing, finance, and you know, it's essentially at it's actually not complicated scheme in the sense that you know it's really taking private equity private investment money in, you know, largely in the United States and then using that to five. Finance houses. Obviously, there's an underwriting process that we have to go through to make sure we're lending appropriately. And then just taking the proceeds from from those finance contracts that we, we originate and then you those out to to investors which gets to the one of the words used earlier in the show is trust, and that ends up being a very important component here because you laid out there are stories that you've written about that. I had a chance to look at it recently that if you said money may be sent to this part of the world to build these homes yet they're not being completed, they're not being finished off and that money is going somewhere for some other venture which erodes that trust. That's right. That's right..

Africa west Africa United States Bob American Home builder American Home builders Europe Austrailia Canada Dan Guinea one hundred percent
"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Podcast is brought to you by knowledge award. We know how important the home building industry is right now in America. The industry obviously was vital part in the rebuild from the recession. But what about bringing that mindset to other countries pair of Warton school graduates are doing? Just that in west Africa, Bob Hornsby and meet Dylan are graduates in the class of two thousand and they are working in partnership to bring housing more housing. I should say to the African continent, Bob is chief financial officer of American Home builders of west Africa. He joins me here in the studio right now and joining us on the phone is immed- who is managing director of US Africa housing, finance, which works with Bob's company on this project. Nice, speeding. You. Thank you for coming in. Nice to meet you. Thanks for having me. Great. Having you with us on the phone. Absolutely, Dan, my my pleasure. Thank you. So I give us the backstory on how you got started with this part of it does tie back to your time here at work, but what I what areas of staff. Are we really looking at? So our businesses now in Guinea Conakry and we're looking to expand this year into a couple of other countries. But the this project actually goes back years before my time at business school, my my business partner, Jonathan and I where peace corps volunteers in I Recode cookie for ninety three to ninety five and it was there that. That we, we, we, I noticed a problem in the housing market there, and it was mostly Jonathan. That's sort of zeroed in on this that wherever you go in that part of the world, you often see houses in varying stages of completion and they never seem to get done. You watch it for a year, watch it for two years, three years and and they rarely get finished or if they do get finished, it's taken so much time that you can just sorta count the material wastage. As they go through Sarah several rainy season before they even get a roof on them. So Jonathan, I stayed in touch over the years. He went to business school at NCI and did a business plan related to housing in west Africa. And then we got our heads together and had a had a meeting of the minds late twenty thirteen early twenty fourteen about. How we would. We would design a way to improve this. The way houses are built in that part of the world and and so that we could deliver something higher quality faster and do it in a production method so that you get the efficiencies of building neighborhoods several houses at a time instead of just one offs here and there, which is the way it's typically done part of the world. And so reaching out to meet organization was part of that process to to take those next. Well, as as with a lot of. Business in that part of the world. In some ways when you when you decide to to work in sub Saharan Africa you, you are in some way signing up to build your own infrastructure because a lot of well typically needs to happen for business to work. Doesn't exist there or doesn't exist in the format that that makes it possible to do it. The way we do here, you opened the show talking about how important the housing sector has been in the United States after World War Two US government created a way to support banks who would Lind to homeowners, and that's, that's really the beginning of the housing market explosion here go to a place like sub Saharan Africa, most places don't even have a functioning mortgage industry. So from from the very beginning, we realize that while we had a good product solution from the housing standpoint and a service solution from in terms of being able to give west Africans, a reliable partner to actually get this work done in a professional manner, what was missing was a financing piece and. When when when this this, this is where you get into that build your own infrastructure. We, we decided that we nobody else was going to do it..

Bob Hornsby west Africa Jonathan Saharan Africa Dylan United States partner Africa America Guinea Conakry chief financial officer Dan American Home managing director NCI Lind three years two years
"west africa" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on Here & Now

"To various sites is a public water taps dotted across the city to collect water in bucket so picture it if you will the iconic table mountain in the background and people leaning over tax in long queues trying to collect water with water bottles and plastic buckets and we have to remember capetown a huge tourist destination so this is really going to hit the city's economy will keep an eye on this the bbc's plumes of shiny in south africa puzder thank you thank you for having me we'll staying in africa what did those comments from president trump about african countries haiti and el salvador you know the ones i'm talking about due to america's image on the continent trump has denied using the derogatory language he is reported to have used but some worry that the damage from those reported remarks has already been done for more would joined by ishmail in a shayeb british somali journalists he joins us on skype from the gambia in west africa if male welcome thank you so much army and you wrote a peace four npr's parallels page which will link to adhere in now dot org and you say the anger over trump's comments was palpable in west africa would have you heard from people there well wind peasants from made his comments on many was shot and frankie disgusted that deep president of the united states can describe entire countries and cultures with such disparaging comments and many people felt that was wrong but also they felt mr trump clearly miss undestood oslo interested in the complexity and the realities for people in this continent what do you mean by that what i mean is the previous united states president such as a mark of bomb learn tools to be bishek means hugely popular in the continent's if take an interest in terms of the policy positions but also they've taken interest recognizing the long historical connection between the united states and africa and kohl's.

united states kohl africa el salvador haiti south africa oslo mr trump capetown president frankie west africa npr gambia skype america bbc
"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the anti eu casey foundation it's hard to overstate how important jerusalem is to christians jews and muslims over the centuries it's been conquered destroyed and rebuilt president trump's decision to officially recognize jerusalem as israel's capital is already having deadly consequences what is jerusalem means to the world and why does the rest of the world disagree with mr trump's move next time on one day join us for one a weekdays at two on am 820 wnyc this is fresh air anterior gross a few weeks ago our director roberta gave me a new album by a band i'd never heard of and said you have to listen to this so i did and i thought it was pretty great the band has called ranki tank he that's a guerrilla expression that loosely translated means work it or get funky gonna is the culture that developed among the slaves and their descendants living on the south carolina coast and see islands a culture influenced by west africa go a culture comes with its own dialect food traditions and music the members of ranki tank he are from south carolina they perform songs that come out of or became popular in gulluk archer including spiritual dance music and children's rhymes ranki tank he is made up of four musicians who started playing together nearly twenty years ago then went their separate ways and reunited frankie tank he and lead singer kiana parlor she's performed everything from gospel to pop and rb she studied with an opera singer as a child and got pretty close to being a finalist in the second season of american idle she is joining us along with guitarist and singer klay ross who started the band and trumpeter and singer trout and singleton whose family is from one of the south carolina islands they're going to perform some of their music for us but let's start with a track from their debut album ranki tank he this is that's alright bad so that saw b a seoul zone set up oh.

jerusalem israel mr trump roberta south carolina gulluk archer opera singer klay ross eu president director west africa frankie seoul twenty years one day
"west africa" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Qaeda's preventing humanitarian aid from entering the country the blockade which was imposed november six is causing severe shortages of food fuel and other essential goods after an international outcry saudi arabia has partially lifted the blockade but un emergency relief coordinator mark lowcock says that's not good enough needs to be fully rundown of where to avoid an atrocious humanitarian tragedy involving the loss of millions of lives the like of which the world is not seen for many decades meanwhile is fighting continues to rage in yemen the international committee of the red cross is appealing to the warring parties to allow hundreds of wounded civilians to be evacuated to receive medical care for npr news i'm lisa shlein in geneva secretary of defense dramatic has met saturday with egyptian officials to discuss cooperation between the two countries the first stop on a trip that will also take him to jordan pakistan and kuwait matt us later departed for jordan where he was scheduled to attend a meeting on countering violent extremism in west africa on monday mattis will be visiting pakistan before concluding his trip with a visit to kuwait the following day you're listening to npr news in washington soldiers and police evacuated hundreds of residents in southern albania on saturday after days of nonstop rain rivers overflowed flooding several villages and inundating thousands of homes many roads in the region have been blocked by mudslides basketball star who integrated college basketball southeastern conference has died just a day before he was scheduled to be honored by the conference as bike farmer of member station wpro lenin nashville reports perry wallis played at vanderbilt university fifty years ago wallace told his biographer he was mostly welcomed on vanderbilt's campus in 1966 though not always supported it was doing away games that he endured the most intense jeers and racial slurs shouted by fans around the south talking to all things considered in 2014 wallace recalled his final game just after his mother passed away he led the team in scoring and punctuated the end with a forbidden slamdunk it was a symbolic shot at segregation so this is what i think.

albania perry wallis nashville washington kuwait pakistan geneva npr coordinator wallace vanderbilt university Qaeda mattis west africa jordan secretary lisa shlein medical care yemen mark lowcock saudi arabia humanitarian aid fifty years
"west africa" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"That we have the stuff is because it's the foundation of education in our nation but that's not the foundational egged condition of why we uk nation like are other allegations that represented that are being silence that are part of america yeah like these are texted if historically more people of color into believing that our histories are not as important than that but you know the only civilized democracy or whatever like come from this lineage of grecoroman stuff in it it's not true and you know i talked to the faculty now the freshman and they said you know we were going to addict tax from west africa but we decided not to they can't fix it they just don't want to okay how how who fixit whereas they're a text from west africa the the first time that there was little receiver in west africa was uh with uh make when there was an islamic conversion in west africa and they do cover apparently some of the code veronica civil as asian some of islam externalisation in hume one ten but she says there are other democracies and civilizations that of a man emerged from ancient greece ancient rome name the by and basis foundational what what are they one eight hundred nine four five gene seventy six can someone explain where are they which planet or they ought not on planet earth and then they came to the scene involving steve martin and his very funny dance a can't believe steve martin was ever that young but he's very talented gene it's a scene of the fascination with ancient egypt but here was their objection fires like opportunities to critique whiteness niclas like i have not seen that god not true i didn't talk freshman navy sometimes like a couple of weeks two weeks ago they had seen they had a lecture where this um king taught esa al get was put on the screen fees and it was like literally like black face facing everyone like alert his white people do like the gene dances and like often line half yeah yeah and so like i mean what was it use as it was used they were talking about how each time been logged egypt has popped up in modern culture but the.

west africa steve martin egypt uk america greece ancient rome two weeks
"west africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And let's go to another caller annette you cathleen you're on the air i on i'm if our i'm wrong and i on keep carbone sharon german armed um i was lucky enough to go to west africa she's she early a really sad tons a decent toss but on uh and that's where i went west catholic us um was just the warriors in terms of uh uh kgb and housing the opportunity to travel i can number a trip to trump's um shitting on top of the peanut she's going um going upper volta so i'd like to these turn to west africa use them there's been unions in countries um there's uh togo uh and i never been to nigeria um i'm particularly interested share this trips pets trip to go on to do something leave some people that's your meeting um and i wonder if you have any suggestions i think what you're doing is great and i i've been a little bit aram west africa but my daughter's travelled far more extensive here and west africa than i have one of the things more in and i did after we sold lemme planets we used to have a foundation within the company and we took that out and set it up these are our own foundation be called it planet wheeler job my daughter tashio helps to run that and she does a lot of travelling in kgb have gone there and i i know she's been to sierra leone and i check my with her recent she gave me her passport to hand over and over i didn't think she's been told these places she is way ahead of me so i think west africa would be an interesting place than it is it is uh uh the does need a lot of help and a lot of countries and find good things thanks for the callers concern of course about traveling in nigeria now because the bottom her own watches one area nigeria would be a tough travel place anyway we're worst you'd daughter get a thirty tashnag tabet name and it's our way we gonna smile with more in my wife is pregnant while we were.

annette west africa nigeria trump sierra leone
"west africa" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"A regional dynamic there that is is shifting and they have alliance a strong lions with the united states i think the a all in all the are grateful for for the liberation but as a long time ago and and in the meantime they have to live in ah awfully tough neighbourhood we go to west africa senegal in the gambia's i cannot recall reporting on either these last 17 years uh so certainly on the uh on the francophone africa there is a lot of anxiety now in asia where most recently but uh there've been elements of francophone these are the remnants of french colonial empire that have been tattered and paris acting pretty much like they're still in control these years do you see paris in in west where where you were travelling well is very large french embassy is very large french presence people speak french the cultural influence is definitely there you know you mentioned that you never hear about sending lay like it that way because senegal's actually a fairly stable country and interestingly enough because of that a much larger us presence than i ever imagined in very large us embassy where a lot of hotels that i went to said oh yes we get a lot of us troops coming and visiting because their training now i don't think just senegal's senegalese troops but also troops from these other countries mali each year is a secure friendly countries that the united states is using as a base of operations in west africa that would connect with what general dunford said in a briefing that he gave about the new share mysteries that there i think the number i'm remembering those fifty six hundred american military personnel in africa under africom some of them would be.

united states gambia asia paris dunford west africa senegal africa africom 17 years
"west africa" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"We are integrated in conducting operations with the french we are we have partnered with them there so we have complete transparency and sharing information in west africa with the french and if i just follow up really quickly you mentioned national assets that the point from the united states without specifying what those national assets work you see if any of them actually reach new share before the situation honestly i'm not going to address that uh i do want you to know that we have things i think many of you familiar with those things but we have national assets and as soon as we had the missing soldier we brought those assets to bear but i'm not going to talk the details or the type of capability and to back their search of the american public be prepared for the loss of more us troops in africa what what what i would tell you is that the majority of our operations in africa are designed to support the training advising and assisting of local african partners and we mitigate the risks to us forces which specific guidance that we will only accompany those forces when the when the prospects of enemy contact is unlikely to other areas in africa where we have a different construct so what i just described used to construct that exists in west africa clearly in you've seen it in recent days we have a different type of operation against alqaeda el chabab and alqaeda organizations inside of east africa so we taylor the the conduct of us forces based on the threat the bias in africa is to support local forces in dealing with the threat we're there is a threat.

united states west africa africa east africa
"west africa" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"west africa" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Capacity the capability they need to hold this threat at bay or to ultimately to defeat it um one of the things that has made isis of a more challenging a terrorist adversary for us is is its global reach we have to spread our resources more thinly around the globe i would i would argue them perhaps we have had in the past um because isis has presence in more places and that read that that spreading of resources i mean in the broadest possible sense our diplomatic attention our intelligence resources are are not infinite capacity to do advise and assist operations with our military so we're having to make choices about where we can be most effective and of course west africa is a theory of a theater we have prioritised but you can't do everything you want every where where some of the other places where isis is gaining a uh a toehold you mentioned the philippines that and we know west africa at where else i did mention southeast asia because i think that's one where i see the trajectory uh a little bit on an upward um um it up or direction in a concerns me particularly because they're those of you who follow the terrorism problem since the 900 since nine eleven no that of the two thousand four or five six period we were dealing with a very very difficult problem in southeast asia with jamaa islamia an alqaedalinked terror this group that threatened carried out the bali bombing carried out bombings other bombings in indonesia that were quite devastating and so there is certainly a capacity within southeast asia for extremism to manifest itself in terrorism and if isis taps into that successfully uh it could create a regional threat of of the sort we haven't seen in the last several years sought to what one of the reasons i highlighted it um i would point also to north africa um not just west africa but north africa um again a wide range of terrorist and extremist groups already upbeat even predating isis operated in in libya in el julia in morocco um in the suhel region of north africa and so the the arrival of isis on the scene only added another player to what was already a difficult um terrorism sit in a situation there again i would characterize it as largely a local localised problem a significant threat to our interests in.

us west africa philippines southeast asia indonesia asia libya el julia bali north africa morocco