3 Burst results for "Wesleyan Methodist Church"

"wesleyan methodist church" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"wesleyan methodist church" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"State. On July 2nd, 1776, the very same day the Continental Congress votes in favor of independence, New Jersey becomes the fourth state to establish its own independent from Britain constitution. Its fourth article describes voters as follows that all inhabitants of this colony of full age who are worth 50 pounds proclamation money clear a state in the same shall be entitled to vote for representatives in council and assembly. Inhabitants is a gender neutral word, and while the masculine pronoun he is all over this document. It's excluded from this article on voting, which uses they. Now, the article does have a property requirement, which likely excludes married women's subject to curvature, but the wording still opens the door for the single woman. The found soul. Is this intentional? Future historians will argue over it. Some will point out that several state constitutions use gender neutral language. They bring Delaware likewise says inhabitants. Yet these states don't grant women the vote. While other historians disagree, they'll argue that under the logic of no taxation without representation, it only follows that as the head of her household, they found souls should vote in some in revolutionary America surely see that. Whatever New Jersey's intentions in 1776, the state 1790 law settles the question. It only applies to 7 of New Jersey's 13 counties, all of which are heavily Quaker and federalist, but while describing where a voter may ballot, the 1790 law says and I quote, he or she. Take that in for a second. In 1790, the New Jersey legislature unequivocally describes a potential voter not only as he. But with the word she. 7 years later, in 1797, New Jersey extends it's clearly intentional women's suffrage to all 13 counties. It also ditches the words clear estate on the property requirement. So does that mean all New Jersey women, regardless of marital status, have the vote? It sure sounds more justifiable in any case. The percentage of women voting dramatically increases, and despite whatever doubts, historians harbor about Abigail Adams and tensions when writing to John all those years ago, she welcomes the news. Cheering her country women in the garden state. But why New Jersey? It's likely for the same reason free blacks are voting here. Unlike other states that tend to be solidly democratic Republican or federalist, the garden state is split, and parties are happy to pick up any votes they can. It could be that federalists ensured only women in their counties got the clear legal knot in 1790, while Republicans caught up with the method by 1797. But neither free black snore women will have the vote for long hair. Both become scapegoats for any irregularities in elections. This is especially true of Essex county's 1807 vote to decide whether Elizabeth or Newark will become the new county seat. The voter fraud is so obvious the New Jersey state legislature rejects it altogether. Then, in October of that same year, the state legislature does, as many other states are presently doing. It limits the vote to, quote, free, white, male citizens. Thus, as the door closes on black voters in various northern states, New Jersey, the lone American state that had enfranchised women amid the revolution. Closes the door on both groups. Little movement or visible agitation for women's suffrage is seen for the next few decades. Not until the 1830s. As you might recall from episode 40, this is a time when several social reform movements, like the abolition of slavery, the alcohol limiting, if not ending Temperance movement and public education start to take off. With women at the forefront of much of this, these movements begin indirectly encouraging women's suffrage. For instance, when Kentucky establishes a school system in 1838, that same law also grants the state's rural taxpaying, found souls the right to vote on issues related to taxation and education. But sometimes it's the negative experiences within these social movements that propel women's rights and suffrage. Specifically, I'm referring to the 1840 London based world antislavery convention. Even after Elizabeth cady Stanton and lucretia Mott travel all the way across the Atlantic to be there, the men running the show vote to exclude women. Lucretia and Lizzie are understandably furious, and that fury leads them to hold the United States first ever women's rights convention in 1848 at Seneca falls, New York. I gave you the details on the Seneca falls convention in episode 40. But here's a quick refresher. Held at the wesleyan Methodist Church in Seneca falls, New York. The convention attracts roughly 300 attendees. Day two includes a few men, notably, the powerful orator and self emancipated abolitionist, Frederick Douglass. The convention votes to sign a document called a declaration of sentiments. It has a very Declaration of Independence vibe as it asserts that quote all men and women are created equal. Then continues with the list of injuries and usurpations, not inflicted by a king upon callings but by men upon women. The convention also votes on 11 accompanying resolutions. They fly through unanimously with the exception of the 9th, which makes the daring claim that women should have the right to vote. So, while many women are prepared to speak up for more rights than the doctrine of coverture currently affords them, calling for the vote, that feels too radical, even for them. It's only with the hard lobbying of Elizabeth and Frederick that the 9th resolution passes. The Seneca convention is a great success. It also starts a blossoming friendship between Elizabeth cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Frederick Douglass. There's a natural alignment between their causes after all. Both groups are seeking their civil rights. But no one better illustrates this alignment than those who fall in both groups. Black American women. And one black American woman is about to make a big splash in the public sphere. It's the morning of May 29th, 1851. For an Akron, Ohio, attending the second day of a women's convention. A thin 50 something black woman rises and addresses the audience. She says, in part, may I say a few words. I want to say a few words about this matter. I am a woman's rights. I have as much muscle as any man and can do as much work as any man. I have plowed and reaped and husked and chopped and mowed. And can any man do more than that? The poor men seem to be all in confusion and don't know what to do. Why children? If you have women's rights, give it to her and you will feel better. You will have your own rights and they won't be so much trouble. I can't read, but I can hear. I have heard the Bible and have learned that eve caused man to sin. While if woman upset the world, do give her a chance to set it right side up again. And how can Jesus into the world through God who created him and woman who bore him? Man? Where is your part? But the women are coming up blessed be God, and a few of the men are coming up with them. But man is in a tight place. The poor slave is on him, woman is coming on him, and he is surely between a hawk and a buzzard.

New Jersey Seneca falls New Jersey state legislature Continental Congress New Jersey legislature Abigail Adams lucretia Mott Elizabeth cady Stanton wesleyan Methodist Church Delaware Britain America assembly Essex county Frederick Douglass Elizabeth Newark Lucretia legislature
"wesleyan methodist church" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:54 min | 2 weeks ago

"wesleyan methodist church" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Suffrage in one state. On July 2nd, 1776, the very same day the Continental Congress votes in favor of independence, New Jersey becomes the fourth state to establish its own independent from Britain constitution. Its fourth article describes voters as follows that all inhabitants of this colony of full age who are worth 50 pounds proclamation money clear a state in the same shall be entitled to vote for representatives in council and assembly. Inhabitants is a gender neutral word, and while the masculine pronoun he is all over this document. It's excluded from this article on voting, which uses they. Now, the article does have a property requirement, which likely excludes married women's subject to curvature, but the wording still opens the door for the single woman. The found soul. Is this intentional? Future historians will argue over it. Some will point out that several state constitutions use gender neutral language. They bring Delaware likewise says inhabitants. Yet these states don't grant women the vote. While other historians disagree, they'll argue that under the logic of no taxation without representation, it only follows that as the head of her household, they found souls should vote in some in revolutionary America surely see that. Whatever New Jersey's intentions in 1776, the state 1790 law settles the question. It only applies to 7 of New Jersey's 13 counties, all of which are heavily Quaker and federalist, but while describing where a voter may ballot, the 1790 law says and I quote, he or she. Take that in for a second. In 1790, the New Jersey legislature unequivocally describes a potential voter not only as he. But with the word she. 7 years later, in 1797, New Jersey extends it's clearly intentional women's suffrage to all 13 counties. It also ditches the words clear estate on the property requirement. So does that mean all New Jersey women, regardless of marital status, have the vote? It sure sounds more justifiable in any case. The percentage of women voting dramatically increases, and despite whatever doubts, historians harbor about Abigail Adams and tensions when writing to John all those years ago, she welcomes the news. Cheering her country women in the garden state. But why New Jersey? It's likely for the same reason free blacks are voting here. Unlike other states that tend to be solidly democratic Republican or federalist, the garden state is split, and parties are happy to pick up any votes they can. It could be that federalists ensured only women in their counties got the clear legal knot in 1790, while Republicans caught up with the method by 1797. But neither free black snore women will have the vote for long hair. Both become scapegoats for any irregularities in elections. This is especially true of Essex county's 1807 vote to decide whether Elizabeth or Newark will become the new county seat. The voter fraud is so obvious the New Jersey state legislature rejects it altogether. Then, in October of that same year, the state legislature does, as many other states are presently doing. It limits the vote to, quote, free, white, male citizens. Thus, as the door closes on black voters in various northern states, New Jersey, the lone American state that had enfranchised women amid the revolution. Closes the door on both groups. Little movement or visible agitation for women's suffrage is seen for the next few decades. Not until the 1830s. As you might recall from episode 40, this is a time when several social reform movements, like the abolition of slavery, the alcohol limiting, if not ending Temperance movement and public education start to take off. With women at the forefront of much of this, these movements begin indirectly encouraging women's suffrage. For instance, when Kentucky establishes a school system in 1838, that same law also grants the state's rural taxpaying, found souls the right to vote on issues related to taxation and education. But sometimes it's the negative experiences within these social movements that propel women's rights and suffrage. Specifically, I'm referring to the 1840 London based world antislavery convention. Even after Elizabeth cady Stanton and lucretia Mott travel all the way across the Atlantic to be there, the men running the show vote to exclude women. Lucretia and Lizzie are understandably furious, and that fury leads them to hold the United States first ever women's rights convention in 1848 at Seneca falls, New York. I gave you the details on the Seneca falls convention in episode 40. But here's a quick refresher. Held at the wesleyan Methodist Church in Seneca falls, New York. The convention attracts roughly 300 attendees. Day two includes a few men, notably, the powerful orator and self emancipated abolitionist, Frederick Douglass. The convention votes to sign a document called a declaration of sentiments. It has a very Declaration of Independence vibe as it asserts that quote all men and women are created equal. Then continues with the list of injuries and usurpations, not inflicted by a king upon callings but by men upon women. The convention also votes on 11 accompanying resolutions. They fly through unanimously with the exception of the 9th, which makes the daring claim that women should have the right to vote. So, while many women are prepared to speak up for more rights than the doctrine of coverture currently affords them, calling for the vote, that feels too radical, even for them. It's only with the hard lobbying of Elizabeth and Frederick that the 9th resolution passes. The Seneca convention is a great success. It also starts a blossoming friendship between Elizabeth cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Frederick Douglass. There's a natural alignment between their causes after all. Both groups are seeking their civil rights. But no one better illustrates this alignment than those who fall in both groups. Black American women. And one black American woman is about to make a big splash in the public sphere. It's the morning of May 29th, 1851. For an Akron, Ohio, attending the second day of a women's convention. A thin 50 something black woman rises and addresses the audience. She says, in part, may I say a few words. I want to say a few words about this matter. I am a woman's rights. I have as much muscle as any man and can do as much work as any man. I have plowed and reaped and husked and chopped and mowed. And can any man do more than that? The poor men seem to be all in confusion and don't know what to do. Why children? If you have women's rights, give it to her and you will feel better. You will have your own rights and they won't be so much trouble. I can't read, but I can hear. I have heard the Bible and have learned that eve caused man to sin. While if woman upset the world, do give her a chance to set it right side up again. And how can Jesus into the world through God who created him and woman who bore him? Man? Where is your part? But the women are coming up blessed be God, and a few of the men are coming up with them. But man is in a tight place. The poor slave is on him, woman is coming on him, and he is surely between a hawk and a buzzard.

New Jersey Seneca falls New Jersey state legislature Continental Congress New Jersey legislature Abigail Adams lucretia Mott Elizabeth cady Stanton wesleyan Methodist Church Delaware Britain America assembly Essex county Frederick Douglass Elizabeth Newark Lucretia legislature
"wesleyan methodist church" Discussed on Talking About The Bible with Rev. Bob Wood

Talking About The Bible with Rev. Bob Wood

14:23 min | 2 years ago

"wesleyan methodist church" Discussed on Talking About The Bible with Rev. Bob Wood

"This is Bob would talking about the Bible podcast. It's really good to be back with you. I've been out of the loop for several months because of a heart attack ahead in November put on bedrest and I wasn't allowed to do a lot so I had to kind of focus on the things that really needed to get done. The podcast is an important but it was a came to be something I had to put on the back burner but as I start the podcast again today. I am kind of cheating because I'm going to be using a sermon that I gave several years ago. At the giant Methodist Church analysts say Honduras called methodist beliefs. I hope you enjoy it. If you have a pin and you want to win with our fill in the blanks in the middle of your worship. She is a little separate page which says on the top of it methodist beliefs methodist movies. A lot of people that I run into when you talk to them about their churches. They know what their churches believe. I dare you to find a Jehovah's witness that doesn't know what his church believe they know you can find to Mormon boys walking down the street. Ask Him what the Mormon Church believes. And they'll know I'd hate to give test methodist asking them. What Methodist Belief Fair? I'm afraid there'd be a lot of failure this past week last two weeks. The United Methodist Church. Not We're not united methods methods church. The Caribbean Americans. The United Methodist International had been meeting in Portland Oregon. Anyone following the debates. There is clear that there's not a clear understanding what they agree on what they believe. But in our tradition tradition the Methodist Church of the Carribean in the Americas the tradition of the Methodist Church in the Americas before which was the Wesleyan Methodist Church. So we all still think of our us as being a Wesleyan Methodist Church all the way back to England. We have a clear understanding our beliefs. John and Charles Wesley. Experience in those of the other young methodist men was affected their teachings in their beliefs such things as their experience when it comes down to not knowing for sure if they were saved John and Charles and the others had worked so much they had show hard to make sure they were saved and yet they did not since it in their hearts a lot of people may be like that even today in our world you talk to people and ask them if they know that they're going to heaven and there's a lack of confidence in that they are going to go ahead John. In Charleston teachings spread across the world and their short lifetime missionaries went out with this understanding this teaching not anything new just going back to the scriptures not anything revolutionary per se. Not Anything that they thought of themselves. Not something that. An Angel came down and gave him a new book. They just started to read the old book that had for many people in the organized structure of the Church in England and gone away. You know England and their day when you were born in your community you were taken to the church and you are baptized and you were a member of the Church. England all your life. It was the thing to do. You weren't a member of the Church of England in some places you couldn't vote couldn't hold public office. Everyone had to be a member of the church in England and membership in the Church of England wasn't about anything about your relationship with God had far more to do with just if you'd gone and sign the paper and turn the right ceremonies and said the right things and John Charles found that not to really fill their needs in their heart their experiences both of them not at alter skate but both within a few short days in seventeen thirty eight. Charles on pentecost Sunday and then John Wesley. A few days later at the society meeting and alter skate changed their lives. They read something John as we read John. Read or heard someone reading something that Martin Luther had written about salvation by faith and it was really changed his life he no longer saw salvation as being something that you did something that God did for you. It wasn't something you worked in earned. If you've got enough points you would get a check mark in your name. We get in the life of life. It was something that God did through you are. I fill talks about one of the things that John and Charles recognized and that we as methodist hold true all need to be saved. That's the first full villain all need to be saved. Everybody needs to be saved is now for a special club. If not that something you can get by on John. Charles knew that real well you know. Their father and their grandfathers had been ministers in the church. You would think that. Not only the preacher son but the peaches grandson would obviously get you in heaven all need to be say. Romans three twenty three says for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. We all are centers. And we all have sinned. And we all aren't living up to God's expectation which is perfection we've all sinned somewhere in our is maybe recently maybe just a few moments ago maybe years ago but all of us have universally said. Romans three chapter chapter three verse. Ten to twelve says as it is written there is none righteous. No not one. There's none that understand it. There is none that speak it seeking after God. There are are all gone out on their own way. They are together becoming unprofitable. There is none that do good. No not one. And so on fourteen versus two and three says the Lord looked down from heaven upon the children of men to see if there were any. They did that any for any they. Any that did understand and see God they all are GonNa side. They're all together became filthy. There is none that do as good. No not one. We may see somebody look at them and say my goodness that person is so good. That person is so holy. I'm sure they never did anything wrong. In the event that have race children know that not to be so little. Sarah is only nineteen months old. My littlest daughter. My goodness she can be mean. She thinks we're not looking. She goes in boxes or brother in the head. She scratches him. She's only nineteen months old and he and I say this now. I grew up in this around. Y'All our Jerry. By the time she's fifteen sixteen seventeen years old. I assure you she won't be able to stand in front of you and tell you she said because I already seen it now. That is true for all of us. We have all said. How many are the take to get in hell? Although won only one only way we can get into heaven on our own accord is to have never sinned in the scripture says right there we all have settled number two. The y'all and Y'all who've heard me preach for this past year that I've been here have heard all these points before because I preach methodist theology the second point in Methodist Theology. You need to note is that all may be saved every one of us can be saved. There's no one that is outside the bounds of salvation. There is no one who listened to the point where God's salvation cannot come to them all people may be saved a man in the United States who is on death row in my home state of Florida. If you had to put together diagram that would say or a history that would say this is an evil man. Well this man's history surely would. He was found guilty of killing two girls who are university students at Florida State University later on. He was found guilty of killing several others. And would it came down to the last few days of his life. He admitted to killing forty one women in the course of his lives you would think how could such a man he asked for Dr Dobson? Some of the older folks may have heard Dr Dobson famous minister in the United States to come and see him and Dr Dawson did the last few days of life and prayed with him to get say. Dr Dobson said it was clear that after he prayed that he stood before him a changed me. All of us can be saved. There's no sin that you have committed and you think you know. I know something I've done in my life. That is so horrible that God could never forgive me and I want you to know that. There's not there is not the unforgivable sin that Jesus talks about is a sin of rejecting Jesus before all else. There's nothing that we can do to separate us. From the love of God John Three Sixteen says for God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten son that who so ever believe in him should not perish but have everlasting life. It doesn't say there are some people. It says the Gods of other world that who still ever believe anyone that believe in God can be saved. Nothing you can do. Nothing that you have done can keep you from. God's Love and God's salvation number three all may know themselves save all they know themselves saved. That's what John and Charles didn't know they didn't know themselves to be saved. They were working so hard to make sure because they didn't know that they were saved the experience that Charles had pentecost and that Jon had at Alder Skate. We're an experience of assurance knowing that they were saved brothers and sisters. When you're saved you can sense in your heart. The Holy Spirit and God's law the Scripture says there in Romans eight sixteen that the spirit itself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God. That's the Holy Spirit in our life. Witnesses to us that we are God's children when people come to alter when they pray in their home when they ask Jesus blood to be applied their sin and they become believers and committed to Christ they since it in their heart. Though I stand at the door knock if any man will open the door I will come in and I will stop with him and he with me. Jesus is ready to enter your heart as we think so often all made though themselves. Say if you don't know for sure that's something that needs to be fixed. John and Charles felt it. We read there were..

John John Charles Church Methodist Church United Methodist Church Wesleyan Methodist Church England Mormon Church United Methodist International Methodist Theology United States Church of England John Wesley Dr Dobson Charles Wesley Bob Martin Luther Honduras