19 Burst results for "Wendy Sherman"

Biden fills out State Department team with Obama veterans

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Biden fills out State Department team with Obama veterans

"President elect Joe Biden is filling out his state department team with a group of former career diplomats and veterans of the Obama administration Wendy Sherman is the pick for deputy secretary of state while the toria Nuland is slotted to be undersecretary of state for political affairs those are the second and third highest ranking posts at the state department Sherman led the Obama administration's negotiations leading to the Iran nuclear deal and was also involved in talks with North Korea during president bill Clinton's second term Newman served as an Assistant Secretary of state for European affairs during the Ukraine crisis Biden says the team with Anthony Blinken as secretary of state embodies his core belief that America is strongest when it works with allies and will use the diplomatic experience and skill to restore America's global and moral leadership Ben Thomas Washington

Obama Administration President Elect Joe Biden Wendy Sherman Toria Nuland Sherman Anthony Blinken North Korea Bill Clinton Iran Newman Biden Ukraine America Ben Thomas Washington
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:14 min | 10 months ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Amanpour

"Enter all of those alliances Yes, we will all want to work. Together will have to do their part, but I think the world always works better when America is at the table when we're bringing our values, our leadership, our expertise and our capabilities to table. So let me ask you about that. Leadership and expertise part of it because you know, there are many particularly in the research scientific and some political allies of here abroad, so to speak sort of. Been Moaning the not just lack of American. Global leadership and coordination in trying to find a coordinated way to combat corona virus, not just the lack of it, but the actual undermining of it. I, mean you just mentioned pulling out to the WHO, but but there are a lot of other ways that it seems the United States has has just undermined global solidarity and we see. We see pictures of Secretary of State Pompeo just in the last few days. Wondering around in Europe and trying to shake hands with his with his counterparts and telling him no, you know, take the elbow bump I. Mean it's almost like you know not quite getting it. Just tell me from your perspective, not just from the Obama administration, but historically what it means to have global solidarity in a crisis like this. We would not have achieved what we did in World War. One and World War Two without global solidarity to fight against. Forces that were adversaries to democracy to freedom to the world, helping each other out of without global solidarity. We wouldn't have been able to deal with other pandemics that have come along whether that was murders. HIV AIDS All of these things were settled and solved because we all work together. You know George Bush Republican President I'm a Democrat a Republican president really created pep far which was meant to deal with HIV AIDS particularly in Africa, it was extrordinary program that he undertook it made an incredible difference to the continent. It really moved forward the research and science on HIV aid so today. We know that people can get HIV AIDS. AIDS almost free of it and certainly can live a full and complete life, even if it is within their system, so we when we worked together, we get extraordinary things done and Christiane. We all know that China is reaching out as a competitor challenger as a confronted to the international system that was built after world. War, two and the best way to deal with that is to invest in our own technology, our own innovation to.

HIV America WHO Obama administration Christiane Europe China George Bush United States President president Africa
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"I actually think it's not about trust. I think it's about respect the people across the table from you have interests you may not think they're legitimate interest but they have interests and they have politics that they have to deal with and I need to understand that and I want them to understand my interests and my politics and see if we can find a place where some of their interests can be addressed but I never lose sight of the objective which in the case of Iran was to make sure they never have a nuclear weapon the hello and welcome to the Harvard Kennedy School policy cost. I'm your host talk. Moyo today joined by Ambassador Wendy Sherman who is professor of the practice of public leadership and the Director of the Kennedy School Center for Public Leadership Ambassador Sherman served as Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs at the United States Department of State between two thousand eleven and two thousand fifteen during her remarkable career. She has been at the table for some of the most. It's challenging negotiations in recent history. She's held talks with the late. North Korean detail Kim Jong Il she sat across the table with Iranian officials to hammer route the twenty fifty nuclear weapons deal and she's bought what she's learned about authentic leadership diplomacy and succeeding as a woman in a male dominated field to a new you book which is titled. Not for the faint of heart lessons encourage power amp assistance. Welcome to policy cost embassador chairman. It's great to be with Talker so my first question given your diplomat has to be about protocal. May I call you Andy Ambassador so let's let's start with the reflections so you've worked as a diplomat. You've been at the table and some of the most challenging negotiations what's the common thread. What a some of the things things that you think about nausea look back on those times in the work that you've done particularly in the context of you coming to the Kennedy School teaching courses on negotiation and leadership well. It's very interesting that you ask that because about to teach my first course here at the Kennedy School in the second half of the fall semester and it's called leadership. I've been negotiations away from the table. Everything you need to know to get the job done and the reason for the courses that a lot of students think that the way you really get a deal done is to be in the room at the table. The table when in fact it is all the things that happen away from the table that really get the job done in any negotiation and what are some of those things some of those things include the history the norms the culture of the parties sitting at the table. people negotiate differently depending on their culture. The history among and between parties may have a lot to do whether there's any respect at the table let alone alone trust it has to do with politics and power Do you understand the power relationships. Do you understand all the stakeholders. Do you understand the politics that are playing out not only in in our country been in any other country or with any other party in the context of their organization Tation. It has to do with policy development. what's going to be your objective at the negotiation. What are the right and left guard rails. How will you know if you succeed and it also has to do with setting the table all the tools that archer disposal to set the table including your arena which is communications and public affairs affairs can very much shape what happens in the room so this a little bit about some of those elements in detail so culture. I know when I was reading your book talk a little bit about the cultures of interplay that came into the negotiations for the Iran nuclear deal and you talked about one specific example about how women and men don't shake hands and you did the you put your hand to your chest in a little bow. That's an example what other examples of of culture and sort of interplay and impact that that you've seen happen. I'd start in the Iran situation with history. Most Americans think that history begins in nineteen seventy nine when the Iranians took Americans hostage for four hundred forty four days at the start of the Iranian revolution in fact for the Iranians history starts back in the nineteen fifties when the United States working with British intelligence knocked off democratically elected prime minister are because we were afraid that Iran was going to nationalize all the oil and make it difficult for us and for Great Britain so the Iranians hostility towards the United States historically started long before hours because we put in place the Shah of Iran who was whereas very good to the United States but truly a horrible dictator to his people and brought about the Iranian Revolution in the case of with North Korea. The United States obviously fought a war on the side of South Korea against the north the north at at the time of the Korean War was the growing economy in the southwest the poor economy now the south is the behemoth in Northeast East Asia along with of course Japan and the north is the poor cousin so where you start what the history is how how people negotiate differently. Some countries are very transactional. I'd say the North Koreans are more transactional than the Iranians are the Iranians artist transactional. I mean means. They're ready to do a deal if they can get what they need and you can get what you need. They're quick to quicker to do a deal. I think than some uh-huh the Iranians are much more sophisticated negotiators very legalistic very complex. It's not to say either of these. Negotiations are easy. They're quite quite difficult but people have different negotiating styles some countries negotiate top down others negotiate bottom up and the same would be true for businesses and any organization so the history matters so when you walked into for example Iranian negotiating table. It was fairly hostile EILLY. You looked at with distrust I mean how do you get from that given the history to a point where you're actually talking and bill developing some trust that are you working towards common ground which we'll talk about later on. I actually think it's not about trust. I think it's about respect. I don't think that given the history between the United States in Iran that one can really have a basis for trust and I think it is however about having some respect act that the people across the table from you have interests and you may not think they're legitimate interest but they have interests and they have politics that they have to deal with and I respect that they have interests and that they have politics and I need to understand that and I want them to understand my interests and my politics and see if we can't find a place where some of their interests can be addressed but I never lose sight of the objective checked which in the case of Iran was to make sure they never have a nuclear weapon and a which point. Did you feel that you've got to a place where there was respect. And how did you know you would there. We got to know each other quite well. Because we spent hours and hours and hours with each other and remember this was a multilateral negotiation so I not only had to get get to know the Iranians but I had to get to know the English. I had to get to know the French I had to get to know the Germans the Russians the Chinese and all of their delegations what all of their interests were the European Union. I had to understand. US politics I I joke all the time that I negotiated inside the US administration. I negotiated with Capitol Hill. I negotiated with interest groups in the United States. I negotiated with each one of the partners in the negotiation and bilaterally and with them as a group I negotiated with Israel which had a huge interest in what we were doing it and negotiate with all the Gulf countries I negotiated in any country that had had an interest in this and yes occasionally even negotiated with Iran. It is a very complex time intensive process and all the while I was doing the negotiation I was the under secretary of state responsible for all the rest of the world so one of the things that you would do one of the things that I was doing but not the the only thing I went to fifty four countries while I was the under secretary over four years from twenty eleven to two thousand fifteen some of them more within once so it was a privilege to have the job but in exhausting job it was and you were saying that you got to know the other party at the table fairly well and that the relationships that you built over the time started to develop into respect yes I think respect for each other's positions and interests even if there was not agreement agreement respect that we couldn't get to a solution unless we all sort of came to agree on what with the objective was during this negotiation a Russia for instance invaded Ukraine and took over Crimea and and that was a situation where the United States was going to have to take some significant action to sanction Russia for this but at the same time I I was negotiating table with the Russians trying to solve another problem and I had gotten to know Sergei Rehab cough my counterpart quite well because we had actually work together with Secretary Kerry and Secretary and Foreign Minister Lavrov to negotiate the Syria Chemical Weapons Agreement so I know new Sergei rather well by now as a negotiator and he I was had great respect for his skill and you went up to him at a cocktail. I think I think in your book you mentioned that it was actually morning coffee. A coffee said it was a very busy room and I went over to him and I said Sergei. How could you possibly do what you have done and it took him a moment to realize is when I was talking about and then he realized it was Ukraine. He looked at me for a moment. He said nothing is Amiss and he walked away and the reason he walked away was to say to me. If I stay here we you're going to have a fight and that will not serve our purpose in this room. We will have to deal with this issue for sure but not right now not right this moment while we're trying to ensure that Iran doesn't obtain a nuclear weapon so it makes sense yes makes perfect sense and you have to be able to walk and Chew Gum and run and skip all at the same time right and and that's what we did as a essentially. He compartmentalized yes he was able to say there's something else that we're working on. Its focus on that and we'll come come back to two that. Did that. Increase your respect for him or was that just it you know Did you feel very very skillful diplomat so it increased is my respect for his skill right okay so let me just come back to sort of getting to know the parties at the table and building up to a point of respect. It didn't always go through very smoothly. MD's apart in your book that you describe where you said something in a Senate hearing I think it was and you said that deception is in the DNA to the Iranians and that made it all the way to Tehran and how that affected and how we when you look back on that what's the lesson there you stop there..

Iran United States Harvard Kennedy School United States Department of St Sergei Rehab Under Secretary of State for P Ukraine Wendy Sherman Kennedy School Kennedy School Center for Publ Ambassador Sherman Andy Ambassador Moyo Kim Jong nausea MD under secretary chairman
"wendy sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:53 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"All this with investor Wendy Sherman is on the line. She was the leader of the US negotiating team for the Iran nuclear deal during the Obama administration. Welcome back to the program. It could make you thinking what remains of this agreement if Iran goes ahead with its actions. Well, we will see the inspector still are inside of Iran, meaning that there are is on what they're doing with their nuclear program. They still have many parts of their program that won't be functioning yet, for a number of reasons. But the fact is that they will essentially have my elated the deal they will innocence be withdrawing from the deal when they do that slowly or all at once remains to be seen, but I think your introductory points, the important one of the US by withdrawing and by increasing the pressure on around by reimposing sanctions taking other actions has started escalatory cycle so that the people that I call the hard hardliners, Iran are also joining that escalatory cycle, and it's a very dangerous moment for all of us suppose that some of the Iranians with whom you wants to go. She had called you up and ask you for advice. What would you tell them I would tell them for the safety and security of their country. And for the world. Please stay in compliance with the nuclear deal, but that's easy for me to say because the sanctions the US have spoken on have had an enormous impact on Ron have really decimated. A lot of their economy and around the politics, people don't think of that, but they do and hard, hard liners, the Islamic revolutionary guard corps and the could force, the folks who do a lot of the maligned behavior in the Middle East are on the ascendancy suppose you got a call from someone of the Trump administration and granted you disagreed with the decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal. But that's done suppose you gotta call somebody asked. How should we handle the Iranians? Now, I'd say Mr. Trump, if you really want to negotiate with Iran, you've got to put something on the table. You know, when he wanted to have a meeting with Kim Jong UN of North Korea. He said, well, we won't do exercises anymore with South Korea, he called the more games, which is what North Korea calls them and he put something on the table and perhaps get the Iranians there. But they are. Are a culture led by the Crecy of resistance. They went through Iran Iraq war for twelve years, they're not going to capitulate easily to President Trump. Let me ask about another set of players here because we should recall that this was not just a nuclear deal with the United States. There were European powers involved. There was Russia involve China was involve. Iran is still been keeping the deal with them. Even though the US withdrew what position are those other powers in now that Iran is saying it's going to exceed at least one one part of the deal. We've put our European allies really are closest partners in an impossible position. They've been trying to keep the deal together by creating a mechanism to innocence, get around some of our, thanks, particularly for humanitarian aid medicine and food. That's not working so well for a number of reasons and Europe, wants this deal is violated is going to have to reimpose all the sanctions, they're going to be in a very difficult position. And it is weakening the US European alliance and they are very important partners for us economically. And in terms of security, you talked about an escalatory cycle ambassador. I'm wondering if Iran's announcement is particularly meaningful there. I know that there's been a lot of news coverage of tankers that were apparently attacked in the Gulf of the United States is blamed Iran, we can have an argument about who exactly is responsible and how strong the intelligence is. But in the case of this announcement on the nuclear deal, there's no doubt about what Iran, it self has said indeed. There is no doubt. It is a really moment of great concern. I know that acting secretary of defense in hand said these troops are really for defensive purposes, only, but there is a lot of buzz going around that in fact of the US, we'll take some kind of retaliatory action against those tanker attacks believing that it was a Ron that did it. And we could find. Ourselves at war what if things the United States could do to respond to these actions that falls short of war. Well, they've sent troops to send a signal that we are going to make sure that the strata for move stays open thirty percent of the world's commerce goes through the strait. They could. In fact, take a cruise missile strike against a particular targets of concern in the region that are controlled by Iran. Wanna go into those civics of, of what other administrations have thought about when they might face Imler circumstances, because we know the Pentagon fortunately plans for everything and any eventuality, but any kind of a strike could further exacerbate, this escalatory cycle, it would be a further reaction. And as I said, we might find ourselves at war investor. Thanks for your insights for shit. Hanky Steve Wendy Sherman, led the US negotiating team that completed the Iran nuclear deal. Today, NPR has exclusive reporting that reveals new information in a major civil rights era, murder case, several white men, attacked Reverend James Reed, and two other ministers in Selma. Alabama in March of nineteen sixty five rebe died from his injuries and three local men were put on trial in December of that year. They were later. Acquitted NPR has unearthed the truth about the attack and learn the identity of a fourth unindicted assailant. He was an enforcer for violent group, led by a man named Elmer cook. I tried to forget it. I don't even want to talk about it. You said, scared you just thinking about thinking about being a part of scary. Part of it that was the voice of the fourth man, and we should give spoiler alert here for listeners of NPR's investigative podcast, white lies. This story will reveal some of what's in that new episode which comes out this morning. Graeme Smith of NPR's investigations team has the rest of the story. The attack on James Reeves shocked nation already struggling to process, the violence, they'd seen on the TV news from Selma, today's earlier state troopers beat and teargassed black voting rights marchers, at the Edmund Pettus, bridge, and event, the came to be known as Bloody Sunday, Reeve, a white unitarian. Universalist minister, and father of four living in Boston had flown Alabama in response to that brutality, one of hundreds answering a call for solidarity from Dr Martin Luther King junior as twilight settled on Selma rebe and his companions. Reverence, Orlov Miller and Clark left of black owned cafe to head back to a meeting at Brown chapel, AME. Me, here's Olson interviewed days after the attack. He recalls seeing a group of white men moving in their direction. Jim was behind as we were walking, and he did not look around. I did look around in time to see one man with some kind of a stick or pine or a club, swing this stick by out to rape. Jim on the side of it and Jim immediately. Oh to the pavement on his back after the initial blow the other men piled on kicking, and striking the fallen minister and his friends, a crowd gathered and watched rebe suffered a severe head injury. He died two days later, president Johnson cited his death in introducing a voting rights Bill, but in Selma, there was only a half-hearted murder prosecution by the local DA a strident segregationist. No local witnesses testified for the state and all white jury delivered acquittals for the three accused Elmer cook, Stanley Hogle, and naming O'neil, Hogle, also known as duck all now, deceased NPR's investigation of the case, led by reporters chip Brantley and Andrew bet grace identified a key witness to the assault Francis bowdoin admitted she lied to the FBI. And in court in nineteen sixty five claiming she had seen the attack, but couldn't identify the attackers. She told us the men who'd been put on trial. And acquitted were in fact. Guilty Boden also confirmed the identity of an unindicted fourth assailant William Portwood at the time still living in Selma. She told NPR she knew the men will Stanley field Nikam by the Mon, eight turned the corner. They come out to round corner behind him. So you saw Stanley Hogle Kogyo Elmer coat and Bill would come out and silver moon in follow them around the corner and attack. Sure the FBI records, say they investigated Portwood at the time, but he had Nella by and was never arrested. We found Portwood still living in Selma. He admitted NPR that he had participated in the attack along with cook. And the huddles Portwood who said his memory was failing after a series of small strokes claimed only to have kicked, one of the ministers. He also admitted to being the muscle for cooks group which had a reputation for violence. I was real real bad. But I didn't kill. It would Moseley just Fennell. I didn't do that. They didn't like our bad bad boy, but I never have been able to get, you know call. I never have been able to get caught. He said, according to Alabama law in nineteen sixty five anyone who participated in the assault on rebe could be charged with murder. However, less than two weeks after reporters Brantley and grace confirmed Portwood involvement. He died Reeves case is one of three murders connected to the voting rights movement, and Selma and the only one without a conviction. Three Klansmen were convicted in nineteen sixty five for shooting Detroit housewife via lose to death and a state trooper pleaded guilty in two thousand ten for the killing of civil rights organizer Jimmy Lee Jackson in nearby Marian. Graham Smith, NPR news. James Reeves murder is the subject of the NPR podcast, white lies and later today on all things considered in nineteen sixty nine the cuyahoga river in Ohio burned, but it's cleanup has been such a success that environmental officials come from all around the world to take notes, you can listen by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or just ask for your member station by name. This is NPR news. Let's find out what's up with traffic,.

Iran NPR United States Selma William Portwood Alabama murder President Trump Wendy Sherman Elmer cook James Reeves Jim rebe FBI Ron
Donald Trump, Iran And Tehran discussed on Dr. Drew

Dr. Drew

03:35 min | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, Iran And Tehran discussed on Dr. Drew

"Yeah. We're talking about Iran. Are we going to go to war in Iran? It sounds really really if look I'm gonna get your phone calls in just a minute. I just want to mention a couple of things. So Donald Trump takes office. He pulls us out of the joint comprehensive plan of action. This this was the nuclear deal that the Iran nuclear deal and part of that was because he really wanted to have these sanctions just this ongoing economic embargo that he could impose on Tehran to bring it to it's knees because they figured the Trump administration figured that would force some sort of fundamental change in the Iranian regime or maybe even regime change itself. And then recently, they double down they call this maximum pressure. They recently announced that they will no longer grant sanction waivers to any country importing, rainy and oil that essentially clamps a an oil embargo on. Dan. This week the White House tightened that squeeze they imposed additional sanctions on Iranian steel, aluminum and copper Tehran. Then responded by announcing this week that it would no longer fully comply with limits on uranium production imposed in the P O A that Iranian nuclear deal. Even though the United States pulled out of it. The Iranians were still adhering to the deal because there were other countries who are still participants in it. But this week Tehran announced that they're not no longer going to comply with limits on uranium production. And it was because of these additional sanctions this additional economic pressure. That's been put on them by the United States of America. And in April, the Trump administration as I said before designated the Islamic revolutionary guard as foreign terrorist as a foreign terrorist organization, then Tehran countered and labeled US military forces as part of a terrorist organization and all of this has. Simply been escalating escalating escalating, the Iranian economy right now has gone into a deep recession. According to the IMF, the International Monetary Fund rans gross domestic product has fallen by six percent over the past year. The inflation rate is nearly forty percent and the Iranian currency has lost nearly two thirds of its value. So, you know, this I guess maybe Trump thinks are Bolton thanks that. They're weakened now. Maybe it's the time to strike. I don't know Wendy sherman's, the director of the center for public leadership at Harvard. Kennedy School and the former lead negotiator of the JCP away for the Obama administration. And she points out that the Trump administration's maximum pressure campaign has not succeeded to date. She says although Iran has continued to comply with the terms of the nuclear agreement that is until this week. It has actually stepped up its maligned behavior in the region Americans remain in. In prison and the Iranian people have no more freedoms. So Trump's campaign so far has greatly increased the possibility that Iran shifts gears and moves once again to try to acquire nuclear weapons bringing us right back to the crisis that the JCP away was designed to avoid only a much worse crisis. This time around we're in an escalation cycle that is incredibly dangerous. I echo those thoughts and ask you is war. What's coming? And would you support it? I mean, would you put on the uniform to go fight in Iran? Do you think we're fighting for America's interests? Would you want your sons or daughters to go to war

Donald Trump Iran Tehran United States America JCP International Monetary Fund White House Wendy Sherman DAN Harvard Obama Administration Kennedy School Director Bolton Forty Percent
"wendy sherman" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Warnings is out now in paperback, and he's also the host of the new podcasts future state, a ten episode series examining the issue shaping American history and politics leading into the mid term elections and beyond Richard good morning. Good to see you tell us about the podcast. It's ready rolled out a bunch of the episodes. What are you focusing on and what impact you think some of these stories will have on the midterm. So it bothered me that there's no place or very few places where you can go and get long form our long discussion in depth on not the shiny bouncing ball of the day, but the issues that we used to talk about elections. So we're talking about American foreign policy. We're talking about security issues, cybersecurity, terrorism, on having conversations with the experts. I would go to experts I worked with or worked for. So. Bill Clinton, Madeleine, Albright. It's Wendy Sherman, Susan Rice. Nick Rasmussen. The late might Sheehan on terrorism, sitting around having the kind of in depth conversation that we do around my dinner table. Do you think the reference, the midterms here that foreign policy is going to play into the way people vote so much domestic. No, not at all. It's not being discussed and we're throwing away fifty years of American leadership, all the institutions of America build for fifty years. We're throwing away and for no good reason on the roads of Susan rises called America being credible, shrinking superpower. We are losing influence and power every day and you don't get it back in a year or two. If we had the new president at some point, you don't get this leadership back because would be trade our allies and they're not going to forget that. How do you explain these consequences which are to come? Maybe they're not vivid now and before our eyes. But this is what my father talked about. All strategic partnerships that have been worked on for so many years, build help build along with many, many others. And there seems to be a void on many levels without talking about it, which getting about the shining bouncing ball. Of the day, be no one's connecting it to the every person in Ohio. What differences to the person in Ohio? Well, it does. It makes a difference in their in their wallet makes a difference in their national security even in places like go, hi, oh, and Michigan and Pennsylvania. I think you could agree though that trade clearly is some kind of an electoral issue, and we have this. These sort of come relatively cosmetic moves on on NAFTA with Mexico and Canada, and the real possibility of a significant trade war with China. And it would appear that Trump's electoral base likes and supports a lot of this, even though they're serious pocketbook with some places that has been them right. There are some, there's there's farming issues and there's there's steel in lumber issues that are pretty significant. That is a foreign policy issue. It is a foreign policy issue. We're taking running up the national debt and going into debt using Chinese money to pay off the. Debt so that we can pay American farmers for not selling things to China. I mean, it's insane and no one is going into that kind of this. And then the election that I say, well, it's interesting Richard that when you talk about trade which seems to be something that that Trump brings up and you mentioned how we're borrowing money from China to pay farmers, not to sell to China, but how from from our standpoint, where we're looking here and we see Trump last night talking about everything on related to that and how do you square up sort of what the average citizen can do, who is interested in these things? How can it become more relevant in today's political environment? We have to have politicians who are willing to talk about it, and I think a lot of politicians today think they have to talk about whatever Chinese ball Trump throws mean. It's like Trump throwing the paper towels. Puerto Rico every day he throws a political hand-grenade, do our national dialogue and we talk about that and we don't talk about the things that we should talk about. The things that are important and over the long term are making America less safe and less powerful. Well, there will be a new episode future.

Trump China America Susan Rice Richard Ohio Wendy Sherman Bill Clinton Nick Rasmussen Puerto Rico NAFTA Sheehan president Albright Michigan Madeleine Canada Mexico
"wendy sherman" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Of state Mike Pompeo, again, criticizing former secretary John Kerry for his continued conversations with the leaders of Iran secretary Pompeo, telling FOX's the ingrahamangle secretary Kerry can't seem to get off the stage, and you have to it's one thing to meet with your counterpart. It's another thing to do what secretary Kerry Wendy Sherman Ernest. Money's frankly, the whole gang has done which is to actively seek to undermine what President Trump is trying to achieve. It's okay to talk with them, but you have to be working for America working for American foreign policy, and they're not they're they're working for the foreign policy. That is there's not the one that belongs to the United States. Former secretary Kerry has denied he's counseled Iran's leaders to wait out the Trump administration, a violent day Wednesday as a worker opened fire on co workers who Wisconsin software company, injuring several of them before police shot and killed him and south western Pennsylvania, man, opened fire outside of. Courtroom injuring four people including a police officer. That gunman was also shot to death by police to sheriff's deputies wounded in a shootout in east L A, both of them are recovering and to Prince George's county, Maryland police officers were shot and wounded wants tonight, they are both in stable condition. A letter from a founding father whose lately become trendy is going up for auction. Alexander Hamilton with rails of Sacramento is auctioning off a letter from the man behind America's financial system that they hope will turn a profit the handwritten seventeen ninety four letter is from Hamilton to William Ellery in reference to a US treasury transaction, the brief correspondence pins in a similar fashion..

secretary John Kerry Kerry Wendy Sherman Ernest Mike Pompeo Iran America Alexander Hamilton Trump FOX William Ellery United States Hamilton Prince George Money Sacramento officer President Maryland Wisconsin
"wendy sherman" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"They can trust. It's our job is to cut through the talking points. Martha McCallum we're going to ask the tough questions because there's a lot of conventional wisdom out there that needs to be challenged, Shannon. Bream what I'm doing is making sure that whatever is develops through the day. People are fully informed from coast to coast. We're twenty four seven news. But really down to the minute. We're going to be fearless. We're going to be fair. Whether it's midnight were their news channel, real news. Real honest opinion secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, again, criticizing former secretary John Kerry for his continued conversations with the leaders of Iran secretary Pompeo, telling FOX's the angle secretary Kerry can't seem to get off the stage, and you have to it's one thing to meet with your counterpart. It's another thing to do. What secretary Kerry Wendy, Sherman Ernest Monet's, frankly, the whole gang has done which is to actively seek to undermine what President Trump is trying to achieve. It's okay to talk with them. But you have to be working for America working for American foreign policy, and they're not they're they're working for the foreign policy. That is there's not the one that belongs to the United States. Former secretary Kerry has denied he's counseled Iran's leaders to wait out the Trump administration a violent day Wednesday as a worker opened fire on co workers at a Wisconsin software company, injuring several of them before police shot and killed him in south western Pennsylvania, man, opened fire outside a courtroom, injuring four people, including a police officer. That gunman was also shot to death by police to sheriff's deputies wounded in a shootout in east L A, both of them are recovering and to Prince George's county, Maryland police officers were shot wounded wants tonight. They are both in stable condition. A letter from the founding father whose lately to come trendy is going up for auction. Alexander Hamilton of Sacramento is auctioning off a letter from the man behind America's financial system that they hope will turn a profit the handwritten seventeen ninety four letter is from Hamilton to William Ellery in reference to a US treasury transaction, the brief correspondents pins in a similar fashion delirious from the smash Broadway musical Hamilton..

secretary John Kerry Mike Pompeo Iran Martha McCallum Alexander Hamilton America United States Kerry Wendy Hamilton Shannon William Ellery Trump Prince George FOX Sacramento Maryland
"wendy sherman" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Joining us tonight. And to turn back to our panel here, Wendy Sherman you worked in the Democratic Senate on as a Senate staffer has did run clean, and I what if the Democrats were in control of the Senate tomorrow, what would you expect this up Ed piece to provoke by way of possible senatorial investigation, I think the Senate would do what the house would do under Eric swallows leadership once it changes to Democrats, but they would go even further. I think I think they would haul people in from the administration. I think they would look to see whether in fact it was time to invoke the twenty fifth amendment. We count on the Senate because they have six year terms and don't have to worry every two years about whether gonna re elected to have a longer view, and we have to have a longer view that takes us to the twenty twenty election and really changes the leadership of this country. You asked about people around the world. They don't know what to do with us. They look at this corruption. It gives autocrats and dictators license to continue to do what they're doing in their countries because they look at the leadership of the United States, and they see a corrupt government. We cannot lead effectively under these circumstances. Europe-Asia we have to believe there are hundreds if not thousands of government service workers in the departments in the permanent staff in places like the State Department, places like the CIA, the NSA Justice. Department all over the administration who have read this op Ed piece today and felt I am not alone. They might not know who joins them in that feeling in the next office or the next cubicle. But I have to believe that there are are hundreds and hundreds of people working in the administration at the at the level that really gets the job done and really keeps the government moving who read that op Ed piece today and saw in it a reason for them to continue your right Lawrence. This op Ed is no minority report. I think it's the consensus view. I think it's the vast majority of people who work in and around the White House in around the senior policy levels of the administration have arrived at the same view of this. They're the people. I talked to the people that Ron, Wendy, Eric, swallow Utah to Lawrence. I mean, I literally have not talked to a single person working at senior level of government who said, oh, actually, everything's. Fine. The president's perfect he's making great decisions were all standing in line that just doesn't happen. This is burst into the open weapon whispered about in Washington for two years, run clan. There's a Senator corker saying day one. It was his assumption on day one and not just an assumption. Apparently he had information on day one as a result of the transition that this is the way it was going to work other. We're going to be people in there who were going to try to keep this unfit person who was occupying the presidency under their kind of control. Yeah, and look, I mean pre day one, right? I mean, we saw it on the campaign trail last year. We saw the warnings that secretary Clinton tried to issue about Trump's on fitness. We saw his behavior as a candidate and all the things he said, the transition followed that. And this situation we're in now is the inevitable product of that Lawrence, the product of the fact that there are career staff and responsible political. Tease who feel like they have to serve in the government. They are serving the government. They tried to do the right thing. They've sworn oath to hold the constitution in Bob Woodward's book. There's a story that secretary Mattis rejected a direct order for the president because he thought it was unlawful, that's his constitutional responsibility as well. It's not a good situation and it's not a healthy situation at it needs to be rectified. I agree with Wendy. It needs to be rectified by the person who wrote this and others coming forward, telling the full story and not really continuing to operate in the shadows, Ron, Jeremy bash, Wendy Sherman. Thank you all for getting us started in our special coverage this evening. I'm gonna take a break here and when we come back the question, everyone including Donald Trump is asking tonight, who is it? Who did it? Who wrote that op Ed piece? I've been thinking about it kind of studying it, my educated guess is next..

Democratic Senate Wendy Sherman Lawrence State Department secretary Eric Ron president Senate Donald Trump United States White House Bob Woodward Mattis Washington CIA Trump Senator permanent staff
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"So we really are without a strategy. And if in fact we went ahead and bombed their facilities, which some of our partners and allies with like us to do. I. Leave, they would rebuild them because you can't bomb away knowledge. They know how to do what they know how to do so they would rebuild them and they could do that in two or three years. And then we'd have to bomb them again and they would have done so probably in secret and underground. So would take time to find those facilities. So I'm actually not at all sure where we're headed. If the administration believes that the sanctions will create an uprising in Iran, Iran is very good painfully at oppressing its people, and we have lost a channel of communication that might help us solve and put pressure on Iran for its very nefarious and maligned behavior in the Middle East, which is terrible, and we need to stop before we go real quickly. You have a couple of times, I think met with your former negotiating partners from the p five plus one and Iran at various speaking events and policy conferences. What is the mood like among them considering. That many of them are still in government and may have some impact on this. Do they have a strategy? Well, I do think that the Europeans Russia China have met with Iran countlessly. There is a joint commission that the US was part of, but is no longer obviously because we've withdrawn our president has withdrawn us from it. And so they are trying to put a strategy together. Iran is looking to see how much oil they'll be able to export. They're looking to see whether there will be investment by small and medium companies. The large companies have all left the total ambience Puccio semen save all left because they are. They need the US market more than they need the Iranian market. But small and medium enterprises might have shot. But I think once all the sanctions are back in place at the beginning of November, it will be very tough. My guess is at the UN general assembly in late September. There will be a lot of discussion about this a lot about how we go forward. And of course, one of the objections that the president had was Iran's behavior in the region that hasn't gotten any better. And that's not about a dollars because it was Ronnie in money that was frozen. We didn't give you as taxpayer money to Iran as part of this deal and. It doesn't take a lot of money to provide some support to the who thieves in Yemen or to have forces in Syria. And so it's not clear to me what the strategy in the Middle East is either. The book is just excellent. There are a lot of great lessons and stories in it. Once again, embassador windy sherman's book is called not for the faint of heart lessons encourage power and persistence. Ambassador Sherman. Thanks so much for talking with me. Ben, really appreciate it. Thanks again to embassador, Wendy Sherman for coming on the podcast..

Iran US Ambassador Sherman Middle East president Ronnie UN Puccio Yemen Ben Syria Europeans Russia China three years
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"In the story you're telling we were negotiating the UN resolution which we'd left to the end because the United States, the western European countries had one view which there had to be strict limits on arms and missiles, and some other things. But China and Russia didn't want any limits. So we left it to the end when people would have to find a compromise. But it was by. Lateral negotiation because on u. n. resolutions on Iran, the United States holds the pen so to speak. So I was in this room with rob Malley my deputy of time, a really phenomenal colleague and we had him on the shows. Wonderful. He's just, I call him the zen dad. He's just a marvelous human being. And we were sitting with a boss rachi and Mogae, Robin Chee, reefs deputies, and my counterparts, and I thought we had gotten to an agreement. They accepted an some ideas I'd put on the table and then a rachi forward and said one more thing, and I did lose it because I was supposed to actually go to Harvard to be a fellow for the fall as a way to sort of, I'd announce my retirement at the end of these negotiations and we were already passed the time. We thought we would end these negotiations. I clearly wasn't going to get to Harvard on time. I was. As you said, exhausted. I was furious and I just said enough and somewhere. I think this is true for a number of women I learned. It's not nice to be angry. And so what happens to me is I start to cry. So here I was angry. The lead negotiator with tears coming down my face, they had no idea what to do with me. I'm not even sure rob knew what to do with me. This wasn't a Wendy they'd ever seen before and it did, I think, send the message to a rachi though we were out of time in out of corners, and it was time to be done. And so he withdrew his objection and we completed that particular negotiation. Critics point out that the agreement was to expire over time. Then Ron could ramp up the program with the few steps up the point to the money that Iran gets from removal of sank. Nations that possibly helps fund terrorism. And I have to be honest, even at the time I expressed some skepticism of it, although I hadn't read the hundred and one page agreement, but wh what is convinced me over time is pretty much every single person in the intelligence community and foreign policy in the military that I've talked to has said we were better off with the agreement than we would have been without it. How much damage does President Trump's exit from the agreement? Do I it's. think it's quite a bit of damage. I think we're seeing some of that. Now a, we have split our alliance with Europe. And you know, we are strongest when we act with Europe, whether that's about China, whether that's about Russia, whether that's about Iran, and so for us to not be in common cause is really a problem, and there are largest trading partners. So we are hurting ourselves economically as well by weakening that alliance. Secondly, we are setting up a situation where Russia and China become the go to people for Iran, how can that possibly be good for United States national security. It's not clear that other than trying to put sanctions back into place which will create problems for the Iranians that there is any plan to deal with Iran, if they start back towards what they would need to do to get enough fissile material for a nuclear weapon. So. Iran has not gone down that road in part because I think they don't want President Trump to win. He would obviously say, I told you, so they're going to go back to building nuclear weapons and in so without a plan without a way forward, it's hard to know where this story ends and heaven only knows we don't want war, which becomes a possibility more and more over time because what are your alternatives sanctions start to fray over time. Even now the Europeans are trying to find a way for small and medium companies to stay invested in Iran and go around US economic sanctions. China will undoubtedly import oil that they shouldn't under the US oil embargo, which will be back in place at the beginning of November..

Iran United States China Europe rob Malley President Trump Russia UN Harvard Robin Chee Wendy u. n. Ron
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"George Shultz when he was secretary of state famously talked about the importance of gardening that you have to go out to have worked the soil to make sure that when there is a crisis, you have partners, you have allies and what we're seeing going back to your North Korea example now is that we are diverging from the very people that we need. China has the most economic leverage over North Korea. So when the president imposes tariffs, it's going to have an impact on whether China's going to cooperate with us on North Korea, it doesn't mean you have to choose one or another, but you have to work at very carefully to be able to move forward. And think about what leverage you have because you can never forget the other side's got leverage to. And that's that's true in in our personal relationships and in life as well. You know the the difference Ben between an autocrat and a diplomat is that when your diplomat, you weigh things you choose your words, you think about what you're doing. You plan for them and know that you're gonna have to change your plans and autocrat. Often acts impulsively without checks and balances, diplomats, understand that everything you're doing his grounded in history and culture in the way the world works and that you're really working for the future, not just for the immediate immediately what's in front of you, which is how an autocrat moves forward. So we've got very difficult times right now, and we cannot forget about our allies, our partners and those who really make our enormous straight. Breath, even greater and a lot of this coalition building in the lead up to the official Iran negotiations took place behind closed doors and you had just to get to that point. I think months of back channel negotiations and secret meetings all over the world. It's a little bit JAMES BOND dish. That's the kind of thing that used to become an intimacy, but the public increasingly demands transparency in that important talks be done in the light of day. And of course, anytime high level meetings take place behind closed doors. The conspiracy theorists go wild. Is there still some value to back channel diplomacy and a certain degree of secrecy? Absolutely. The Oslo accords for Middle East peace. We're done in secret Cuban negotiations both by Bill Clinton and Brock Obama began in secret. The Iran negotiations as you point out had been negotiated between Great Britain, France, Germany, and Iran in the early two, thousands. And then it became a UN resolution that said, all the permanent members of the Security Council. So including China, Russia, Great Britain, France, United States, and then plus Germany since they'd been part of the original negotiations along with European Union coordinating should all work together to move forward. But we understood that the United States needed to get some traction to see if something real could happen here in..

North Korea China Iran George Shultz United States Germany France Britain president Oslo Bill Clinton Security Council UN Middle East JAMES BOND Brock Obama European Union official Russia
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"You have a chapter about power in your book. We tend to think of power, and certainly, Donald Trump seems to think of power in terms of being a blunt instrument. But you say something interesting in here, you say power is used best when an empowers the weaker party to do what's right. You know someone who really understood that was Yitzhak Rabin the mime minister of Israel. Yes, who said famously that he understood that he had to help Arafat have enough power to be a partner. He had to hold them up and in fact, in nineteen ninety-five when Rabin was assassinated by someone in his own country by right wing Israel, who did not want to see peace coming, many people thought it was the end of any ability to move forward. And it's been very tough ever since. But what I think President Obama understood in the Iran negotiation, for instance, was that. That we needed and secretary Kerry secretary Monis me and my team is that you need to leave everyone with enough power so that they can make an agreement doorbell, they can deal with their politics at home. And even though the United States was the preeminent power in the Iran negotiation, the deal could not have been made without us. We are the military force that would have had to take action. If diplomacy did not work, we had the strongest economic sanctions, possible of Europe certainly played an enormous role as did others around the world. Nonetheless, every other party at the table had a veto power had a power to change the direction of the negotiation, and even president were Hani of Iran had to be left with enough power so that he could sell the deal at home in the official negotiations. Drug on for, I think nearly a month in Vienna. They were incredibly complex in you often like in. The experience of working with Iran and our partners in the p five plus one to solving a rubik's cube explained that analogy for us at say, two things. I used a rubik's cube because the Iran negotiation, which was so complicated had so many technical elements to it that like a rubik's cube. If you moved one piece, then it changed all the other pieces. So the press would say to me, what are the odds we're going to get the deal. And I would say why they're going to get it or were not because you could get to ninety nine percent. And if you couldn't get that last piece to pop into place like a rubik's cube, you didn't have a deal. You didn't solve the puzzle. And I also described in the following way to do these very complex negotiations to use the Iran example. I negotiated within the Obama administration. I negotiated with Capitol Hill. I negotiated bilaterally with each member of the p five plus. Us one, our negotiating partners. I negotiated with Israel. I know go shade with the Gulf states. I negotiated with a non-governmental organizations who had something to say about nuclear weapons and missiles. Oh, and yeah, casually. I negotiated with Iran. It is hit is a very, very complex labor intensive process. And most of the people who were in this negotiation cluding myself, we're multitasking all the time because undersecretary of political fares, I'd responsibility for the whole world. So even while I was doing the Iran negotiation, all four years, I was under secretary. I went to fifty four other countries, some of them multiple times so it it takes an understanding of power, the use of power. It takes a persistence finding common ground with people across the table building a great team, and of course working the process to get to success. I don't think that a lot of people under. Stand that these were not bilateral negotiations not only the p five plus one, but you had a whole host of involved parties such as the Saudis and Israel that you had to deal with. It speaks to something that I think is sorely lacking right now which is the power of global cooperation and coalition building. Absolutely..

Iran Israel partner Yitzhak Rabin President Obama Donald Trump secretary Obama administration Europe Arafat president Gulf under secretary Vienna United States undersecretary Kerry
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"I think that you describe that as your biggest disappointment in your career because you and Secretary Albright were getting pretty close to a deal right down to the wire. I think you were negotiating and then the chaos of the two thousand election happens. How did that change things for you now is very hard. I think you know, one of the things for all of us in life is letting go. We like to imagine we're in control of a number of things, and of course there's a lot we are not in control of. I've had some personal tragedy in my family that really taught me in a very painful impersonal way that lesson I talk about that in the book, but in diplomatic terms. Seeing that. In fact, something that you've worked so hard on, you've come so close to and you simply run out of time in the president at the time was also working to try to get Middle East peace something. He also had to let go because at the last moment Arafat could not say, yes, you, you have to sort of understand that you don't get to complete the cycle. And history is not very kind unfortunately to diplomacy because of its happen. Presidents change, even military wars are not forever. When World War One was fought the war to end all wars. We thought it was the war to end all wars. But about twenty years later, we had World War two's just as catastrophic if not more so because of the holocaust and the genocide perpetrated we had wore yet again. So it's it's very hard. And one has to believe that history may turn. Again, and we'll get to the right place. President Trump is finding out how hard it is to do that and we'll see what comes next. No, when Kim Jong Il died and his son assumed power, the hope was that he was going to be a reformer. He was going to ease up on human rights and perhaps one to rejoin the world community. He had been westward educated. It was a similar argument to what some people were saying about Bashar al-assad. Do you see much daylight between Kim Jong Hoon and Kim Jong Il or is he pretty much cut from the same mold as father? I think he's cut from the same mold as his father and probably even more so his grandfather, a really, who was a quite a military. I leader. He also, however kim-il-sung his grandfather the founder of modern, so to speak and North Korea after the Korean war was on the verge. Himself of trying to have a summit with South Korea, but died before he was able to accomplish that. And then his son, Kim Jong Il took over and sort of began all over again. Kim Jong UN is a brutal dictator very publicly brutal within weeks of becoming the leader of his country. He executed his uncle, we all are welcome Ilya or with the two women in Malaysia in the airport who executed his half brother. So he is very brutal and publicly. So that said, I think we saw a little bit of a glimmer of his western education in the Singapore summit with President Trump. And before that his summit with the president moon moon Jae-in of South Korea because he understands how to sort of work western diplomats. He understood. Bands of the symbolism in the theater of it. All his father of course, was great at theatre. He had every Academy Award film as well as every Michael Jordan basketball game in his living quarters to be able to watch. So theater drama is all part of what he believes. And one of the reasons I actually supported the summit in Singapore is because in North Korea, there really is only one decision maker and that is the leader of the country. There is no real parliament. There is no free press. Of course, there is no, we the people and Donald Trump. Although there are checks and balances in our system believes he is the only decider and I saw these two men a might be able to reach something. But only if there was a plan, very detailed strategy and a team to follow up. And we've seen that none of that has really existed. The documents out of that Singapore summit were quite thin and. We have seen the outcome of that thinness were now only back to almost ground zero, but perhaps even a little behind..

Kim Jong Il President Trump president Kim Jong UN Kim Jong Hoon Singapore South Korea North Korea Secretary Albright Bashar al-assad Middle East Academy Award Arafat Michael Jordan Ilya founder Malaysia
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"There's a whole generation out of a famine in the nineties that has a stunning growth and stunted intellect, and so we couldn't imagine that it would continue. We were wrong. Subsequent administrations have thought the same thing, just put a little pressure on and they would follow over. But North Korea is a culture of what they call juche self reliance, and it is an ideology that says, if we have to starve to protect Irish team to ensure our future starve to build nuclear weapons and long range missiles. That's what we're going to do. You traveled to North Korea a couple of times, I think, and there's a great quote in here about your experience negotiating with North Korea, you say dealing with North Korea always involves one part normal diplomacy and one part absurdity. A give us a couple of examples of the surreal experiences you had and beyond young chilly cereal. The first trip I went with a former secretary of defense, Bill Perry, who is leading for President Obama a process to look at our policy and see if we couldn't get back on track. We were. Concerned about the testing of missiles that were getting longer and longer ranges. We were concerned that if North Korea went back to trying to get a nuclear weapon at the time, they had no nuclear weapons that we were quite concerned. And so I went with Bill to North Korea and one of the things we did, they wanted to show us their rice Patty and they're hard workers. So we went to that rice Patty, and there were revolutionary signs all long, the border of the the rice paddy field. They were using oxen and plow. But the really absurd part of that is at one end of the field was a band in white dress uniform playing military songs. Now, don't think that happens on a normal basis. It was a quite bizarre. It was meant to say to us how proud they were of their agriculture, which was pathetic quite frankly and what they were able to do. And then of course, there. Is the very famous story when Secretary Albright went the highest ranking official until secretary Pompeo matched that. And obviously, then when President Trump met with Kim Jong UN the current leader, the son of a congenial. When we went to Pyongyang it was extraordinarily we had no embassy. They are no people there. We had to bring everything over land including a US, marine guards, and we were in a meeting and we're told we were going to go with the Kim Jong Il to something quite special. We had no idea what it was. We were put in cars. The next thing we were new knew we were entering run Garowe stadium, which is any Norma stadium to ten minutes of cheers for Kim Jong Il while we sort of plastered awkward smiles on our face or very frozen smiles to look diplomatic, but not cheering and clapping. But in. Front of us were literally on the floor of that stadium, hundreds of acrobats and somersaults and across from us literally hundreds of people with flip cards. And with those flip cards, making scenes of the revolution of how great the country was. And one in particular was a set of flip cards that demonstrated a Tapu Dong missile missile. We were concerned about being launched and was on, you'll turn first the secretary. And then to me and said, perhaps that will be the last time that missile does launch. Yeah, I remember Kim Jong Il certainly headed a flair for the cinematic in these big public events with casts thousands. What were your impressions of the dear leader? Well, we all together had about twelve hours with him some in bilateral negotiations, some in events. It's very hard to have a great big feast. When you know people are starving, so it was rather difficult and a bit awkward. But one does what one must enter those circumstances. He was quite knowledgeable when the secretary went down a list of fourteen questions we had about their missile program. He was quite knowledgeable. He knew the detail. He only turned to my counterparts kung suck ju once or twice. The only other person in the room with him was an interpreter. So he was very self confident quite transactional. We thought we were on our way to a DO, but unfortunately the Clinton administration ran out of time and subsidies. Currently, the Bush administration decided not to pursue what we had negotiated..

North Korea Kim Jong Il secretary Kim Jong UN Norma stadium Bill Perry rice paddy field Secretary Albright Pyongyang Tapu Dong Garowe stadium President Obama Clinton administration US Patty President Pompeo Trump
"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on Kickass News

"Hi, I'm Ben Mathis. Welcome to kick ass news folks for the handful of you who've listened to this podcast. From the very beginning, you might recall an early episode I did with Senator Lindsey, Graham who voiced his vehement opposition to the two thousand fifteen Iran nuclear agreement. At the time I cited with Senator Graham among other things, echoing the argument that Iran would be able to quickly ramp up its nuclear weapons program. Once the deal sunsets and while Senator Graham in a rare show of support for President Trump endorsed the US withdrawal from the deal in may of this year, I on the other hand, did not why. First of all, I confess that I've never actually read the one hundred and one page agreement. And over the past three years of doing this show, I've talked to many people who have read it, and the one thing that every leader and foreign policy intelligence in the military on both the right in the left hawks and doves alike. All agree on the world was better off with a new. Klier deal than without. I'm not afraid to admit that I was wrong, and that's why I'm welcoming embassador, Wendy Sherman to the podcast among her many accomplishments during her years at the State Department, she was the lead negotiator on the joint comprehensive plan of action, better known as the Iran nuclear agreement. And she's written about that experience and many others in her new book titled not for the faint of heart lessons, encourage power and persistence today she explains why she wanted to write more than just a memoir, but a book of practical lessons in leadership in negotiation. She says she's prepared for comparisons with Donald Trump's art of the deal which by the way she has red and she has some useful advice for the dealmaker and chief on how he could be a much more effective negotiator with both our allies and our adversaries. She recalls working with secretary of State, Madeleine, Albright, to halt North Korea's nuclear ambitions in the nineties and how they came so close to an agreement only to see the. Efforts derailed by the chaos of the two thousand election. She explains why negotiating with North Korea is always one part diplomacy and one part absurdity. She recalls her personal interactions with the dear leader, Kim Jong Il and weighs in on how his successor and son, Kim Jong, UN measures up. Then ambassador Sherman talks about the many months of diplomacy both covert into over that went into the nuclear agreement with Iran, how much was lost when President Trump decertified the deal and what her colleagues across the negotiating table or saying about it. Now she explains why the negotiation was a lot like solving a rubik's cube, just how heated things got behind closed doors and why sometimes tactics are no substitute for pure raw human emotion coming up with ambassador, Wendy Sherman in just a moment..

Senator Graham Wendy Sherman Iran President Trump Kim Jong ambassador Sherman Senator Lindsey Ben Mathis North Korea US UN Albright State Department Madeleine three years
"wendy sherman" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"The withdrawal will have diplomatic and psychological consequences not just in the middle east but all over the world among other things that will certainly complicate trump's hope to get a deal done with north korea wendy sherman could fairly be called the architect of the iran agreement she led the united states in six rounds of talks with iran and other nations and she's also had firsthand experience of diplomacy with the north koreans sherman went with madeleine albright to pyongyang during the clinton years she spoke with susan glasser who recently joined the new yorkers a staff writer based in washington so they ron deal in many ways was the capstone of both what you were doing in the us government in this last go round in the obama administration of course many people saw it as as the signature achievement of president obama's story now i want you to take people a little bit inside the arduous painstaking at times i'm sure makes you wanna scream a agonizingly slow progress years of your life and that of many other people it took to get to this deal so before we talk about the impact of blowing it up let's talk about how or if you made it i t's that i negotiated inside the administration i negotiated with us congress i negotiated with think tankers in washington i negotiated of course with my interest in see colleagues i negotiated with israel with the gulf states with everybody who had a stake in iran ian oil iranian business in the world and occasionally i negotiated with iran it's an complex process if you do it correctly and you indeed have to be ready to walk away from the table and john kerry who of course led this and towards the end with secretary monets from the department of energy who joined us brought extraordinary technical expertise i did this with a courtoom fifteen but with hundreds literally hundreds in the us administration on secretary kerry was ready to walk away from this several times during the negotiation as was i but at the end of the day we got a deal you then.

obama secretary john kerry president ron clinton pyongyang iran north korea israel middle east obama administration washington staff writer susan glasser madeleine albright united states wendy sherman trump
"wendy sherman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to news our live from the bbc in london with me rebecca casbinet near within the next couple of is it widely anticipated that president trump will announce that he will not certify the iran nuclear deal a formal process the president is required to go through every ninety days mr trump has begrudgingly certified it twice already since becoming president but he has famously critical of an equip the agreement struck in partnership with china russia and european countries under president obama donald trump has described the iran nuclear deal as a disaster and the worst deal ever negotiated but is a better deal even possible and what are the consequences for global diplomacy if mr trump does withdraw his backing not specifying the deal does not withdraw the usa from the arrangement immediately what it would do is forced the us congress to decide what happens next well the iran nuclear deal was years in the making and one of those whose intimately acquainted with it and all the difficulties associated with reaching it is wendy sherman former under secretary of state for political affairs and the us lead negotiator at those talks she joins us live at wendy sherman thank you very much for coming on the program pleasure to be with you thank you so to begin than just take us back briefly to why the obama administration wanted this deal so much in the first place and just how hard was it to strike it in the first place well that's a very good question as the reason that president obama was so determined to.

bbc london russia obama donald trump the deal usa wendy sherman obama administration obama rebecca casbinet president iran china congress under secretary ninety days
"wendy sherman" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"wendy sherman" Discussed on 1A

"Ambassador wendy sherman was the chief us negotiator on the 2015 iran nuclear deal she also visited north korea twice during president bill clinton's administration and met for hours with kim jong il the current rulers father ambassador sherman joins us here in aspen to discuss america's approach to authoritarian leaders and other foreign policy challenges facing the trump administration ambassador wendy sherman welcome to one a great to be with you gesture but have you with us bill i i definitely want to talk to you about north korea and iran but we should probably start with syria because it's been in the news this week on monday the white house said that syria's president bashar alassad seemed to be preparing another chemical attack president trump warned that mr assad would in his words pay a heavy price if one took place first of all what do you make of the president's statement and then let's talk about what you think some of the possible courses of action could be if indeed but charlotte side is doing this for first of all what about the president's statement on syria it's actually quite an extraordinary statement in the sense that it was apparent at the time he made at the pentagon had no heads up about it at the state department appeared to not be engaged with it i am not sure where this came from and what the basis is one assumes the white house would not issue a statement unless they had some intelligence that showed that assad was in fact doing this a i always think it's good if you see something to say something because it can act as a deterrent from assad taking such action that said i'm quite concerned that there isn't a strategy here that the president is approaching syria tactically quite frankly syria's nur national failure we have all failed the syrian people in terms of solving their problems ending the civil war getting rid of terrorism getting rid of bouchara saad who is a dictator who has used chemical weapons barrel bombs against his own people syria your right serious is one of those international plug buyers that i think a lot of countries would say that the bureau piece of the blame for.

trump charlotte foreign policy iran chemical weapons bouchara saad civil war pentagon president mr assad us bashar alassad white house syria america aspen ambassador sherman kim jong bill clinton north korea