9 Burst results for "Wendy Pollock"

"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:40 min | Last week

"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

"The startup. Qatar was supposed to reinvent construction. It raised more than two billion dollars. Over the last six years to build factories hire thousands of employees and make a slew of acquisitions. Its aim was to create faster methods for building apartments offices and all kinds of buildings. This is wendy. Pollock the information senior editor here with corey. Weinberg who has closely documented katina's rise and fall. Hey corey hello so it. All really came crashing down this week for tara. You broke the news that the company was shutting down. Let me ask the simple question. I what happened. So what happened is a company that had raised at least two billion dollars doesn't really have any any left. That was the message that the company left to employees many of whom they were laying off this week and qatar has been kind of a saga which i have been trying to report on for honestly like four five years now. It's been pretty clear for a really long time. That things were not good at guitar that they was beset by mismanagement and struggling projects and a a lot of issues particularly on do the executive and investor levels and all of that kind of came crashing down in recent months essentially what. The company told employees that that that they had a rapid deterioration of. It's the company's financial position. In part due to covid you know sort of material and labour becoming a lot more expensive. The company also was not able to secure any new debt for the construction projects that they were taking on and they couldn't raise any more capital so just a real host of issues that essentially to this company's demise and as you reported the the company nearly collapsed last year right. So what happened then. Yeah so last. Year was another big year for patera almost this time last year. Essentially the board of directors was voting out guiterrez co founder and ceo. Michael marks. who was really the face of katara. He was this guy in his late sixties. Who had run several. You know sort of major businesses before and was a well known name in silicon valley and marks gave katara A real some real clout but investors realized that he had totally mismanaged the company. They voted him out A new regime came in the company tried to raise even more money to kind of keep it afloat despite the fact that it was losing a ton of money because it was not building apartments for as cheap as they said it would and essentially the reserve just kind of kept kept draining. The company considered chapter eleven bankruptcy last year. They found it up money to keep itself afloat for the time being and of time just sort of ran for them. I think why are people in silicon valley so interested in this company. What did you represent. I think katara represented a major effort to prove the thesis that technology can finally improve the productivity of construction in the us. I think silicon valley has always been really obsessed particularly recently with old line industries. Can it can at disrupt real estate. Candidates dropped healthcare. These really big societal. Problems and construction is one of them i. It's a the fact that it costs so much to build. Housing is one major reason why we have a housing shortage in this country. And qatar was the boldest to say. Hey tech consort of this. So i think that sort of generated a lot of fascination in the company so qatar failed. Does that mean. That construction can't be disrupted. I don't think it means that i mean. There are several notable companies. That are at least taking on different pieces of the construction industry. Maybe they're not quite as much money. Maybe they're just focused on making the current system a tiny bit more efficient. And and maybe they want attract as many headlines as guitar era. But they're still out there you know. I'm thinking of companies like core which they software and essentially priced software company for general contractors. They recently went public. They've had a decade long track record of success and there are a slew of smaller startups trying to take on pieces of this industry. Maybe they're not trying to do the qatari model. Which was essentially due. offsite construction. Do a lot of construction in factories and that was just incredibly expensive like tara had to build out factories all across the country. It had to figure out how to transport big wall panels from a phoenix factory to a construction site in vegas. There were just a ton of issues with its model. And i think maybe the silver lining of qatar downfall is is other companies coming after it will learn from qataris mistakes. It seems to me that this is as much a story about softbank. The world's biggest tech investor as it is about contessa. What does this say about softbank. Softbank really deserves at least a good portion of the blame for guiterrez demise was the biggest shareholder. And you know this. Qatar was an example of soft bank's strategy to essentially try to up end industries. Just by throwing a ton of capital at it like remember this ca- tara's the investment in qatar by softbank was like peak vision fund. one era. you know before it had been humbled by the decline of we work and some of its other companies were faced severe layoffs. And other kind of issues. You know qatar within that batch of of companies and and now i think it topic has probably learn some of those lessons that you can't just you know sort overcapitalize companies. In the way. They they did with guitar but You know. I think bossier she son who is sopping. Ceo has singled out. Qatar is one of one of the vision funds. Greatest failures so i think. Hopefully they'll learn from it but you know. I don't think this the company's failure tells us anything new about softbank that we didn't already know well. This has been a fascinating saga. And i encourage everyone who hasn't had a chance to be your stories about patera to to do sound. That's our show this week. Thanks so much for listening. Thank you to kevin jessica and wendy for being on the show and thank you to keenan kush four producing the former one. One have great weekend everybody..

corey last year more than two billion dollars Michael marks Softbank this week vegas softbank four five years kevin jessica Qatar contessa a ton of money one chapter eleven keenan kush four thousands of employees at least two billion dollars silicon valley one major reason
"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:50 min | Last month

"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

"When app developers build apps like uber or instagram which took advantage of the cameras or gps building. Iphones but just like many near teenagers. Apple's app store is starting to get into trouble. Sure developers have made billions of dollars off of it over the years. But apple's innocence is gone. This is the information for one one. I'm cory weinberg on. This week's episode apple is on trial. It was sued last fall by epic games. Which has that. Apple's app store is a monopoly. The iphone maker faces an upcoming three week trial in. Us district court which begins may third and oakland. The information justice go. We'll be covering the trial and he'll give us the rundown on the case. The backstory and why apple is likely to win then. Venture capitalists have for years been pouring money into food delivery startups. So why does a startup from philadelphia with a funny name like go. Puff think it's reinventing delivery and urban logistics. I'll speak with the information senior editor. Wendy pollock about reporting that. I did about go bus. It's been a very secret. His company over the years kind of under the radar. But i got under the hood and got to look at his numbers. Go off just might be for real if it can overcome technology branding and labor challenges but first. Let's get to josh and the apple trial apples. Trial against epic. The maker of fortnight is the first key. Us courtroom test of the backlash against big tech. It will showcase the wildly profitable but souring relationship between apple and some key mobile software developers. Josh cisco has been covering the trial for the information and he joins me now. Hey josh hickory we. We don't always get breakdown fun courtroom battles at the information but today we do a this is a fun wide. Let's start with with sort of the bias happening. Why is the app. Store under legal scrutiny. Next week well essentially because of its size. Apple's app store along with google's app store. Google play are the two primary means of getting software apps on your mobile phone and apple's stores wildly popular. It's sort of the two companies are duopoly and they wheeled tremendous control over developers and there's been an increasing pushback from the developer market against both apple and google. This particular trial just involves apple. But there's been a tremendous pushback against both because of what developers perceive as onerous terms that they have to abide by in order to get their software onto phones. All right so. Let's talk about some of the terms and the plaintiff in this case. He's epic games. Who is epic and are they kind of alone out there. Making a case against apple did they. Did they have in their corner. What's what's that side. all about. What do they say so epic is known mostly for fortnight a video game a multi player video game. That's been wildly popular over the last several years They have been pushing back against apple for for some time. It came a crescendo. Last august with this lawsuit They're definitely not alone. Numerous other companies big ones such as spotify match. There's a company called tile. Many other companies have also started pushing back against apple The control over the app stores and essentially amounts to who main issues one is apple forces developers for to use their payment system for any purchase. That has made with an app and they take thirty apple takes a thirty percent cut and developers say that they have no other choice if they want. Apples payment system. And you know if there's if there were other payment systems pay pal square or anything else that would lower the commissions to a more competitive Market rate rather than apple unilaterally setting the price so good are these developers gang. What are they hoping in epic in particular. What are they hoping. Use the outcome of this trial epic and other developers are hoping that essentially the app store gets cracked open that other payment providers are able to to process in-app that would bring the thirty percent commission down and they want to be able to sell software onto the onto. Iphones outside of the app store. They want a third party app store. Which has has steadfastly refused to budge on either additional app stores or alternative payment systems and would argument. Do you expect apple to make about. Why are third party. Apps store could be bad it could be bad for consumers could be you know what what is what is their argument of why they should have a a kind of mode like this of the. Is the app store. Good in their mind. Apple first off says that the product they've created as created tremendous value for everybody involved in and that's wrong and people you know the apple itself end developers have made billions and billions of dollars. Apple says that it needs to have control over over software over what third party software is downloaded onto phones. They say it's a security reason that they are able to curate this experience. The only offers high-quality apps and it's free of malware god actors and wrapped up in that is its payment system. They say that this is. This is their product and they've created value and they should be able to be compensated for that value. So you've written a little bit about apple's history around sort of issues of competition. Has apple faced antitrust issues from the beginning of the app store. Like like take us back. A little the yeah. There's been complaints to some degree since it started. They've been meshed in class action litigation. It's making some of the same arguments that epic and other developers are making. Those cases have been brought by actual actually been brought by consumers by people who purchased the apps who say that those commissions apple charges of any competitively unnecessarily inflated the cost of apps that if apple didn't charge thirty percent developers would be able to lower their prices so they were overcharged dot. Litigation is ongoing. I think there's been a steady stream of complaints from developers. Probably some of them Baseless but others maybe with more validity re whenever developer gets kicked out of the app store. They're always you know they're not pleased. And i think there's over time there's been a push to sort of call that any competitive regardless of whether apple has a valid justification or not. They've been in under scrutiny for a number of other issues as well. There wasn't a trial against e book price-fixing that involve them and a number of book.

google Josh cisco thirty percent Google play apple billions three week Last august josh hickory thirty iphone two companies philadelphia google's app store uber This week today Apple Next week Apples
"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:30 min | 2 months ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

"We're going to turn our attention now to travel. I'm wendy pollock senior editor the information so corey a little over a year ago travel pretty much ground to a halt around the world as covert hit and for travel. Businesses suddenly wasn't clear. How or even whether they were going to survive and now a year later it looks like plenty of them are not only surviving but thriving in the sense that they're attracting investment. Let's going on. Yeah it's it's kind of crazy. Phenomenon is particularly if you think about just the past year so the best example of this that we let our story with this week is startup called saunder which essentially leases out apartment buildings in cities and run them as almost hotel properties. They were one of the first start ups to really lay people off in earnest last march they laid off like a quarter of their staff hundreds of people and they you know their revenue fell their losses. Grew in the past year but they arrived and now they are going public spac at evaluation. That would be nearly double. Its last round. And so then. Sandra if handful of other examples like really show that if you survived as a travel startup over the past year here maybe sitting in an okay position. What does this fact. You really indicate is it. That travel is coming roaring back or is does this have more to do with the investment frenzy right now valley so i think you could ask that question about almost every deal because when a company. Ipo's historically you're like okay. Yeah this company has made it. You know they they have gone through the gauntlet. The banks have have said like this. Is a good company blah blah blah with the spec weird indicator because the companies don't have to necessarily have everything buttoned up or tied up in the same way as you do an ipo so dishonor spac mean like it is now poised to take off not necessarily but it at least means that some pretty smart investors are are interested in taking this company pop public and it at least good enough at raising money and cutting costs to survive and in a crisis. That's better than a lot of its competitors And at least give it a chance to keep fighting and like you to have a lot more capital and when you're talking to people in the sector. What are they saying about travel. It really depends on what type of travel you're talking about and what geography i think still this year within the. Us people are really expecting a pretty significant travel. Rebound people travelling mostly within the country. Internationally it's obviously tougher. There's still a lot of international travel restrictions and lockdowns. And if you're a business that relies on a lot of overseas travel. You're not going to see great numbers yet. So it really depends. Companies in the. Us are definitely feeling better than companies in europe. For example where. Vaccinations have been a lot slower. People have predicted the demise of business travel for a long time now. But is it possible that the pandemic is going to have a permanent dampening effect that now that we've seen that a lot of office workers can can have meetings very effectively using zoom that companies. Just frankly aren't going to want to pay for business travel anymore. Totally i think that real likelihood as a permanent outcome from this pandemic it was sort of one of the classic lines that i i remember people having even when the pandemic i broke out last spring i remember sam altman the y combinator former white combinator leader writing a blog post talking about permanent shifts from the pandemic last april and he also sits on the board of expedia and invested in airbnb and he said busy travel not coming back and so this has been like a threat and brian chessy. Ceo very says. It's all the time. So let's talk a little bit more about airbnb. Because a year ago it was borrowing money at exorbitant rates to keep cash coming in by december. It had this blockbuster. Ipo so how did it manage that. A few ways it. It is quite surprising though. They raised this capital in. May that essentially apply to seventeen billion dollar valuation or eighteen billion dollar valuation. It's there now trading at a as a at a above a one hundred billion dollar market cap they got there because a they cut costs bulat. They have this story to tell investors that they rely more on direct traffic than they rely on google advertising which is like a huge thing and in online travel every other company relies. Heavily on. google and airbnb doesn't quite as much so they've had this nice story to tell investors whether they're valuation is justified by the fundamentals of their business. Like probably not i but you know for now. They have like a little bit of runway. So what should we be looking for from airbnb over the next year i would definitely be looking for. How do they grow supply. So what does that mean. so that means they. Are they getting more homes onto their platform onto their site or more people deciding. Hey i want. I want to rent out my home. Airbnb are more property management firm saying like. Yeah we're going to gobble up more homes and post them on airbnb. Are they able to attract enough places to stay that. The potential travelers that go on their site are going to find a lot of good stuff. They're going to want to be like okay. If i'm going to travel this year it's gonna be on airbnb. It's not going to be on a hotel or another travel site. The question is going gonna be when people go terribly and be are. They're going to be like enough places for them to want to book. That's really interesting. To what extent does is regulation a factor in the supply of places to say. If you wanna give me the benefit of the doubt you would say say travel is now going to. Maybe look a little bit less focused on big cities if people truly use the pandemic to rediscover worl- environments and and hidden gems a place to go and not everyone's just flooding into paris in new york every year. That's great fair beam because they are you. Know regulation in those types of cities are really tough for them and are only gonna get tougher. I think but if travel is more spread out into places that maybe would welcome more tourism rather than over tourism. That would be good fair being be. I don't know if you know if that'll happen. You know maybe he's got a taste for life without airbnb and they like it I think that's definitely something to watch..

europe Airbnb brian chessy Sandra december new york sam altman last april last march a year later eighteen billion dollar this year paris Ceo google seventeen billion dollar next year past year last spring this week
"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

"That amid the flurry of tech deals tiger has been the flurry. Est it's alpes. Sequoia capital recent horowitz and excel in the number of startup deals. It's done this year. But who is this quiet press-shy firm who is tiger. That's the subject of our first segment on today's episode of the four one one. I'm cory weinberg. And i'll be speaking to my colleague. Kim clark who just came out with a fascinating feature inside tagger goebbels deal machine. Kate spent time talking to founders. Nbc's about what makes the firm unique and what they're investing streak tells us about venture capital in twenty twenty one. Then we talked travel startups investing in trouble. Startups has been understandably week over the past year. But it's starting to turn the corner. Wendy pollock the information senior editor. And i will have a conversation about story. I wrote this week about what's going on with startups like saunder trip actions and hopper and we'll even talk a little bit about airbnb but first let's talk tiger global with venture capital reporter kit. Clark all right kate. You've just spent a bunch of time trying to understand. What has the impact been of this one. New york hedge fund tiger global management but their impact has been on startups in silicon valley. Why did you pursue the story. What what got you intrigued by by tiger. The reason i chose tiger was because they were leading rounds pretty much every day. I was getting an e mail in my inbox from you. Know someone that works. Npr saying are you interested in in writing company. They're announcing around. Tiger global is leading and i've heard of them for years of course they're not new as very clear in the story. They've been around for two decades But this year kind of you know the tail end of kobe. I guess you could say and amid covid. They were striking more deals than they had an in their history and this year in particular about four deals on average per week so so nearly every day so that to answer your question it was the sheer pace of deal making that got me so interested and the fact that these people that work at these firms have not really been written about they managed to deploy several billion dollars a year. Many many tens of billions of dollars a year and yet fly very much under the radar. So i thought there was a good opportunity to sort of discover who these people are and what they're interested in and how they manage to move so quickly despite being a really really really small team totally. Let's start with the people will go into like the pace but tigers not affirm that like some other attention grabbing. Vc firms They they aren't about big personalities. They're not about people you know they're not masayoshi said mark andriessen who of you know historically put themselves front and center who are these guys so the first led by this guy chase call men and his private equity unit. Co-founder scotch lifer. Who really calls the shots. When it comes venture capital deals he has the autonomy to make decisions and does and like i said. They've invested in over sixty companies in just a three or four month period. Twenty twenty one and then kind of reporting to him is this guy named john. Curtis who has only been tiger for about four years. And has you know led rounds and i think fifty or sixty companies in that timeframe many of which you would you would certainly have heard of data bricks and others that have generated a lot of headlines in the last few months and that is really the some of the team of people who have a lot of power firm who are calling the shots on deals there are others including other partners and analysts and data scientists who work in the private equity side. I think one of the biggest takeaways from me and something that really surprised me about this reporting was how small of a team it was and how somehow they're able to move like three or four times faster than a lot of the capital firms that we cover i think one of the most eye-opening examples in your story discovered a little bit of play when people tweeted about the piece It's not like tiger has an army of internal. They don't have an internal team that is like coaching startups on sort of what to do. They're like hiring bain consultants to do that. What is tigers edge is. It just is it. Money is a moving quickly. What has gotten in them into so many deals in. What makes them unique. yeah. I do think it's moving quickly. I do think that these partners that i mentioned of course have expertise that they that they do share. I would say generally and you just kind of hit on. This is that they don't spend a ton of time with their portfolio companies. I mean if you're a team of three or four or five people and you have a portfolio of say five hundred companies. You don't really have the ability to take board seats or to spend your evenings and weekends and afternoons on the phone with various ios in instead they spend a lot of their time pursuing new deals. I think edge is. They can write really big checks. They're very comfortable tie valuations. It's not something that trips them up like might a different more classical. Vc firm and they have a lot of expertise on navigating the public markets. If you're if you're pre ipo business looking for pre ipo round of capital you probably want to raise money from tiger Versus a traditional venture capital firm that focuses more on growing a business in say product market fit and go to market strategy. Those aren't really things that you're worried about your worried about. Who were my investors going to be a public company. And can i find investors. Now that might stick with me through my entire. Ipo process and actually several years beyond that po. They want those long-term holders k. That's what they always say exactly long-term and that's what they want. It's a that's the truth. And that is something that gives them an edge coupled with all these other things that we just talked talked about the last time that there was a venture capital firm or sort of generally like a private tech investing firm That was showing the spotlight or so in the news every day. And you mentioned the centerpiece. It was softbank the pace of deals that they had coming out of their one. Hundred billion dollar vision fund was insane and vc's kind of traditional vc's kind of derided softbank. You know kind of considered it dumb money. Sometimes they're returns been obviously quite good. Thanks to coupon an uber. And and some other bets but people. How do people feel about tiger. Are these guys super savvy of the super smart people skeptical of how faster investing when i started reporting on this. I did expect that. The investors that i spoke to who of course weren't affiliated tiger. I expected that they would not like tiger. I expected that they would. You know sort of insult them in the process and say they're stealing all of our deals. They don't care about valuation their irresponsible. They're just like softbank. And that's not what i found. I think a lot of investors do like working tiger and don't necessarily want to insult them because they mark up the value of their companies and not just not just not just more value but like they provide capital to companies that are very capital intensive. And who need to raise more money and who's investors may not want to be the ones writing them a five hundred million dollar check another five hundred billion dollar check like can do so. What i learned is that they have a lot of valuable relationships within venture capital. They really admire a lot of venture capitalists. I think there are you know. Of course i came across people who think they are way way way too. i guess. Insensitive toward valuations and our way too willing to pay up in such a way that is actually affecting the entire markets. And i think in a year or two or three will be able to see more clearly as we are now able to a- sopping sort of what. The impact of tigers increased pace. This year has been but for now. You can't really call them out and say oh you know you're you're being really responsible because it looks like on paper that they're doing an.

fifty Kim clark Kate mark andriessen Tiger global five hundred companies Wendy pollock two decades cory weinberg today five hundred million dollar five people kate five hundred billion dollar sixty companies this year two Clark Nbc three
"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Classic soft bay. Fueled goof up corey specialty. But it's a special episode. Also because and i say this with sadness pride than it is my last. I'm moving onto a new gig after today. Which means i'll have to leave the show behind so there's sadness because i've loved making the show of the past five years. We started at one day on a whim. I it to jessica lesson or founder. Then she gave it the green light and what began as a casual idea has now become a thing. That's run for five plus years. It's gotten better. Please do not listen to the first episode unless you happen to have a thing for reverb and has gotten bigger. We've interviewed authors ceo celebrities and. I hope that we've always giving you insights on the tech world and how it's changed so much of our lives so leaving. All that behind is the sad part. But i'm also proud because the show is in good hands and will continue to go on to basically unchanged corey wendy and her producer. Ariella markowitz been doing great job. Keep things running. And we'll do so for as long as you guys. Keep listening and for me seeing something that you made get taken up by others. Made better and exist long beyond a little pasha project is maybe the greatest outcome i ever could have helped so to all you information for one listeners. Thanks for being listeners. Keeping listeners and stay in touch since he was five years old. Brian potter knew. He wanted to be a structural engineer. Maybe you don't make the best decisions About your future prospects. When you're five years old he went to school at georgia tech then worked for a few different construction design. Firms potter handled all kinds of projects apartment. Buildings parking garages schools in hotels. And as he worked he thought about how to improve things. He's a tinkerer. He wanted to build digital tools to automate some of his work for a lot of just well. I'm very young. i'm just starting out. I don't know enough to know why maybe this isn't done. Sort of a certain way. As i got more experience some things i learned why they were in some things. Still you know still didn't make sense to me. They construction industry has been notoriously slow to adopt new technologies the tech error that has given us instant e commerce on demand taxis and even virtual reality hasn't really afforded us faster ways to build. That's a big problem in the us. As fewer people decide to work in construction and the cost to build housing sores in two thousand eighteen potter went to work for a company promising to fix all that could terra tech driven construction startup. The plan to create efficiencies by building big portions of apartment buildings inside factories think prefabricated housing but on steroids. And it really was. You know a dream job and there was actually a really huge step up for me. When potter went to qatar the startup had just raised. Nearly a billion dollars from the world's biggest tech investor softbank it was the largest infusion of venture capital for a startup trying to upend the construction industry. At the time. I kind of thought this is exactly what it needs to be done. And it looks like what the future of construction to look like instead. Qatar became the latest startup disaster company that nearly went bankrupt laid off hundreds of employees and blues through two billion dollars of venture capital. Those struggles. raise the question. Can there still be check revolution and construction. This is wendy. Pollock a senior editor the information here with reporter corey weinberg. Hey corey low so corey. We've been talking a lot about qatar and the construction industry lately as you reported a big investigative story. That's right capterra has been a bit of an obsession for me lately. I publish a story a couple of weeks ago about the company's near bankruptcy intentional financial statements an sec review and general tumult in the board and in the executive suite the startup gone wrong is its own famous genre of story and we do a fair bit of it but it's not just disastrous theater. We do it too. Illuminates how entrepreneurs are actually trying to innovate. so today. we wanted to spend more time trying to get at the idea behind capterra and what it tells us about silicon valley tell that story after the short break. Hey everybody it's tom so earlier. In march we hosted a live video summit in partnership with singapore passion made possible. We spoke with industry leaders and enterprise software about international strategy how they've expanded globally and what tactical steps they took in doing. So here's david lazer an executive at the ride hailing company. Grab speaking at that event about what it takes for a company to succeed in southeast asia. You need to have people who think southeast asia is only number one focus on that all they do really care about southeast asia and those people need to be power organizationally to drive systemic change. Not just through save maybe operations or sales but also the product also the core the core experiences you offer consumers and on march twenty third. Our next event will be discussing the future of food with josh petric. The co founder and ceo of just an valenti and the co founder and ceo of memphis meets. They think you're meat will be made out of cells and your eggs. We made out of plants. You can find details about this at the information dot com slash.

Brian potter corey weinberg Ariella markowitz southeast asia march twenty third five plus years two billion dollars corey wendy qatar two thousand march david lazer first episode josh petric hundreds of employees georgia tech Nearly a billion dollars capterra couple of weeks ago com
"wendy pollock" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Comes with a whole lot more challenges, steep unemployment, the hazards of in person interviews if you can't even get him and questions about what work should even look like right now. But one stumbling block has largely been removed Those questions about how much you made at your last job. From the workplace culture desk marketplaces making McCarty Carino is on that one. Two years after Emily Martin graduated from law school, she began clerking for a federal judge. She started at the same time as another clerk who was just one year out of law school, but because he had worked for a high paying long her While I had worked for a low paying public interest organization, he made significantly more money than me for the exact same job and less experience. She now works for the National Women's Law Center, advocating for laws that prevent employers from asking about previous pay. 19 states and more than 20 local governments have passed. Such bans and new research shows evidence they're working. It kind of blew us away. It's a big difference. James Besson with Boston University School of Law. Compared the wage gains of workers changing jobs in Massachusetts, which bans salary history questions with workers in neighboring states that don't he found. All workers benefited to a degree, But women and black workers benefited. Most women earned 8% more and black workers 13% more than similar workers in neighboring states. What it says. Is that a lot of that persistent wage it's related to something about the bargaining process. I may not be at all discriminatory. You know, my company may not be at all discriminatory, but I'm perpetuating discrimination. As many companies moved to address equity in the workplace with splashy initiatives and grand pronouncements, something as small as eliminating the salary history question could make a big difference, says Katie Donovan and equal pay negotiation consultant who helped draft the salary history Ban in Massachusetts. It's not a sexy program, but it has huge impact. Still less than half of states have salary history bands and to Michigan and Wisconsin have blocked local governments from enacting them at all. Applicants can always declined to answer, but that could have negative consequences, too, says Wendy Pollock, with the Shriver Center on Poverty Law That doesn't eliminate the bias. That's inherent in these negotiations, she says, when women and black men refused to provide their salary history or try to negotiate for higher pay It's often viewed unfavorably and they're offered even lower salaries. I Megan McCarty, carino for Marketplace. Coming up. I can't seem like I need help. I have to look like I have It all figured out. I'm strong. Saving your business in the middle of a band Emmick, but first, let's do the numbers. Industrials up 177 points today about 6/10 percent 26,000 to 67. NASDAQ up 148 points. That is 1.4%. Just 10,000 for 92. That's a new record. You can't see me, but I'm doing that shred anything. The S and P 500 picked up 24 point 7/10 percent 31 69 AM see the world's largest operator of movie theaters, is closing in on a deal to avoid bankruptcy. AMC shares up seven and 1/4 percent on that note, by the way, the number one movie at the box office this past weekend where box office is defined as the booth at the driving, which coming back A horror flick Relic, which took in just under $200,000. That's according to the MGB. That is less than 1% of the box office revenues of top film a year ago, which was come on Spider Man Far from HOME United by the way, after basically announcing all those layoffs flat, you're listening to marketplace marketplaces, supported by Magnolia Pictures and participant presenting John Lewis. Good Trouble, a new documentary portrait of the U. S congressmen whose story and actions have been elemental.

Emily Martin McCarty Carino Massachusetts James Besson Wendy Pollock Boston University School of La National Women's Law Center Megan McCarty Magnolia Pictures Katie Donovan AMC Michigan Shriver Center consultant John Lewis Wisconsin
"wendy pollock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This morning lockdowns and working from home obviously had not been great for the menswear industry. But Corona virus isn't the only thing Brooks Brothers has been dealing with of late. Let's go to offering. The business suit has been going out of style. For years. Now. Marketplaces Justin Ho has more on the rise and the fall of the men's uniform of the business world. Brooks Brothers opened its first door in lower Manhattan in 18 18 when the U. S was made up of 20 states. Future customer Abraham Lincoln was only nine years old when the suit as we know it today started becoming popular in the late 19th century Brooks brothers cashed in. They were right there at the heart of finance as the heart of politics. Really when America was getting it starts? Susan's graffiti is the founder of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham Law School, she says Brooks Brothers really popularize suits that were ready to wear off the rack that helped that suits fit more people. That's graffiti says It also made the suit and the high status it represented more accessible. Everybody had to have a Brooks Brothers suit if you're going to be and they'll class or upper middle class or even another class business person. Graffiti says. By the middle of the 20th century. The suit also became a symbol of corporate conformity. Think mad men. But in the 19 nineties, casual Fridays had become a thing. Then Silicon Valley. Okay hoodies and sneakers and casual became mainstream. Justin Shack, managing director at Rosenblatt Security's on Wall Street, remembers the suit and tie days. I used to own Brooks Brothers suits back when I'm starting my career, and I can't remember the last time I did. Since 2014 the market for men's suits has shrunk by 11% according to the research from Euromonitor and menswear has changed with the Times can get in Cohen's Rothman's menswear store based in New York, he says his biggest seller these days is dinner. So we sell a lot of genes, and we sell a lot of spore codes with Gidon says the suit isn't dead. But the suits he sells tend to be fashionable suits meant for special events. It's not really classic work where that's not what the young guys looking for a suit, The Koven 19 pandemic has only made things worse for the suit. Industry is people work from home in stars have closed. His Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy. It says it's seeking a buyer for the brand. I'm Justin. How the marketplace Trying to get a new job often comes with challenges trying to get a new job in a pandemic. Comes with a whole lot more challenges. Steve unemployment the hazards of in person interviews. If you can't even get him and questions about what work should even look like right now. One stumbling block has largely been removed Those questions about how much you made at your last job. From the workplace Culture desk marketplaces making McCarty Carino is on that 12 years after Emily Martin graduated from law school, she began clerking for a federal judge. She started at the same time as another clerk who was just one year out of law school, but because he had worked for a high paying off her while I had worked for a low paying public interest organization, he made significantly more money than me for the exact same job and less experience. She now works for the National Women's Law Center, advocating for laws that prevent employers from asking about previous pay 19 states and more than 20 local governments have passed. Such bans and new research shows evidence there working, he kind of blew us away. It's a big difference. James Besson with Boston University School of Law. Compared the wage gains of workers changing jobs in Massachusetts, which band salary history questions with workers in neighboring states that don't he found. All workers benefited to a degree, But women and black workers benefited. Most women earned 8% more and black workers 13% more than similar workers in neighboring states. What it says is that a lot of that persistent wage it's related to something about the bargain process. I may not be at all discriminatory. You know, my company may not be at all discriminated. But I'm perpetuating discrimination as many companies moved to address equity in the workplace with splashy initiatives and grand pronouncements. Something as small as eliminating the salary history question could make a big difference, says Katie Donovan and equal pay negotiation consultant who helped draft the salary history ban in Massachusetts. It's not a sexy program, but it has huge impact. Still, less than half of states have salary history bands and to Michigan and Wisconsin. Have blocked local governments from enacting them at all. Applicants can always declined to answer, but that could have negative consequences, too, says Wendy Pollock, with the Shriver Center on Poverty Law That doesn't eliminate the bias. That's inherent in these negotiations, she says, when women and black men refused to provide their salary history or try to negotiate for higher pay It's often viewed unfavorably and they're offered even lower salaries. I making McCarty carino for marketplace. Coming up. I can't seem like I need help. I have to look like I have It all figured out. I'm strong, saving your business in the middle of a band Emmick, but first Do the numbers down. Dust rolls, up 177 points today about 6/10 percent 26,000 to 67. NASDAQ up 148 points. That is 1.4%. Finished 10,000 for 92. That's a new record. You can't see me, but I'm doing that shred. Anything. S and P 500 picked up 24 point 7/10 percent 31 69 see the world's largest operator of movie theaters, is closing in on a deal to avoid bankruptcy aims. He shares up seven and 1/4 percent on that note, by the way, the number one movie at the box office this past weekend where box office is defined as the booth at the driving, which coming back horror flick Relic, which took in Just under $200,000. That's according to the MGB. That is less than 1% of the box office revenues of top film a year ago, which was come on Spider Man Far from home United, by the way, have basically announcing all those lamps flat. You're listening to market past marketplaces, supported by Magnolia Pictures and participant.

Brooks Brothers McCarty Carino Massachusetts Justin Ho Brooks Manhattan Gidon Boston University School of La National Women's Law Center Justin Shack Euromonitor Magnolia Pictures Silicon Valley America Fordham Law School Abraham Lincoln New York Steve Susan
"wendy pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The hazards of in person interviews if you can even get him and questions about what work should even look like right now. But one stumbling block has largely been removed Those questions about how much you made at your last job. From the workplace culture desk marketplaces making McCarty Carino is on that one. Two years after Emily Martin graduated from law school, she began clerking for a federal judge. She started at the same time as another clerk who was just one year out of law school. But because he had worked for a high paying look her well. I had worked for a low paying public interest organization. He made significantly more money than me for the exact same job and less experience. She now works for the National Women's Law Center, advocating for laws that prevent employers from asking about previous pay. 19 states and more than 20 local governments have passed. Such bans and new research shows evidence they're working. It kind of blew us away. It's a big difference. James Besson with Boston University School of Law. Compared the wage gains of workers changing jobs in Massachusetts, which bans salary history questions with workers in neighboring states that don't he found. All workers benefited to a degree, But women and black workers benefited. Most women earned 8% more and black workers 13% more than similar workers in neighboring states. What it says. Is that a lot of that persistent wage it's related to something about the bargain process. I may not be at all discriminatory. You know, my company may not be at all discriminator, but I'm perpetuating discrimination. As many companies moved to address equity in the workplace with splashy initiatives and grand pronouncements, something as small as eliminating the salary history question could make a big difference, says Katie Donovan and equal pay negotiation consultant who helped draft the salary history banned in Massachusetts. It's not a sexy program, but it has huge impact. Still less than half of states have salary history bands and to Michigan and Wisconsin have blocked local governments from enacting them at all. Applicants can always declined to answer, but that could have negative consequences, too, says Wendy Pollock, with the Shriver Center on Poverty Law That doesn't eliminate the bias. That's inherent in these negotiations, she says, when women and black men refused to provide their salary history or try to negotiate for higher pay It's often viewed unfavorably and they're offered even lower salaries. I making McCarty carino for marketplace. Coming up. I can't seem like I need help. I have to look like I have It all figured out. I'm strong. Saving your business in the middle of a band Emmick, but first student numbers Down Industrial Zone, 177 points today, about 6/10 percent 26,000 to 67. NASDAQ up 148 points That is 1.4% finished 10,000 for 92. That's a new record. You can't see me, but I'm doing that shred anything. The S and P 500 picked up 24 point 7/10 percent, 31 69. I am see the world's largest operator of movie theaters, is closing in on a deal to avoid bankruptcy. AMC shares up seven and 1/4 percent on that note, by the way, the number one movie at the box office this past weekend where box office is defined as the booth at the driving, which coming back horror flick Relic, which took in Under $200,000. That's according TTO MGB. That is less than 1% of the box office revenues of top film a year ago, which was come on Spider Man Far from home United by the way, after basically announcing all.

McCarty Carino Massachusetts Emily Martin James Besson Wendy Pollock National Women's Law Center Boston University School of La Katie Donovan AMC Shriver Center Michigan consultant Wisconsin
"wendy pollock" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"wendy pollock" Discussed on KCRW

"If you can't even get him and questions about what work should even look like right now. But one stumbling block has largely been removed Those questions about how much you made at your last job. From the workplace Culture desk marketplaces making McCarty Carino is on that 12 years after Emily Martin graduated from law school, she began clerking for a federal judge. She started at the same time as another clerk who was just one year out of law school, but because he had worked for a high paying law firm. Well, I had worked for a low paying public interest organization. He made significantly more money than me for the exact same job and less experience. She now works for the National Women's Law Center, advocating for laws that prevent employers from asking about previous pay 19 states and more than 20 local governments have passed such bands. New research shows evidence they're working. It kind of blew us away. It's a big difference. James Besson with Boston University School of Law compared the wage gains of workers changing jobs in Massachusetts, which bans salary history questions with workers in neighboring states that don't he found. All workers benefited to a degree, But women and black workers benefited most. Women earned 8% more and black workers 13% more than similar workers in neighboring states. What it says is that a lot of that persistent wage it's related to something about the bargain process. I may not be at all discriminatory. You know, my company may not be at all discriminate, but I'm perpetuating discrimination. As many companies moved to address equity in the workplace with splashy initiatives and grand pronouncements, something as small as eliminating the salary history question could make a big difference, says Katie Donovan and equal pay negotiation consultant who helped draft the salary history Ban in Massachusetts. It's not a sexy program, but it has huge impact. Still less than half of states have salary history bands and to Michigan and Wisconsin have blocked local governments from enacting them at all. Applicants can always declined to answer, but that could have negative consequences, too, says Wendy Pollock, with the Shriver Center on Poverty Law That doesn't eliminate the bias. That's inherent in these negotiations, she says, when women and black men refused to provide their salary history or try to negotiate for higher pay It's often viewed unfavorably and they're offered even lower salaries. I making McCarty carino for marketplace. Coming up. I can't seem like I need help. I have to look like I have It all figured out. I'm strong, saving your business in the middle of a band Emmick, but first, let's do the numbers. Industrial's up 177 points today, about 6/10 percent 26,000 to 67. NASDAQ up 148 points That is 1.4% finished 10,000 for 92. That's a new record. You can't see me, but I'm doing that shred anything. The S and P 500 picked up 24 point 7/10 percent, 31 69. I am see the world's largest operator of movie theaters, is closing in on a deal to avoid bankruptcy. AMC shares up seven and 1/4 percent on that note, by the way, the number one movie at the box office this past weekend where box office is defined as the booth at the driving, which coming back horror flick Relic, which took in Just under $200,000. That's according TTO MGB. That is less than 1% of the box office revenues of top film a year ago, which was come on. Come on Spider Man Far from home United by the way, after basically announcing all those laughs flat, you're listening to marketplace marketplaces, supported by Magnolia Pictures and participant presenting John Lewis. Good Trouble, a new documentary portrait of the U. S congressmen whose story and actions have been elemental to the civil rights movement..

McCarty Carino Massachusetts Emily Martin Wendy Pollock James Besson National Women's Law Center Boston University School of La Magnolia Pictures Katie Donovan John Lewis AMC Shriver Center Michigan consultant Wisconsin