20 Burst results for "Wendell Berry"

"wendell berry" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 7 months ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Joel berry, my question to you is, how did you get into writing comedy for the Babylon B? You're very young. And yet you have a mustache and beard, so you're not that young. Yeah, it's an interesting story. I was in supply chain logistics sales for ten years. That alone and hilarious. Yeah, thank God, I'm not doing that today with all that's going on, but I wrote some things on the side. I had a little blog. I had a kind of a podcast that I did in my part time. And that was it. You know, I don't have any background in comedy or professional writing. I just was a fan. I started writing for the B on the side and my spare time. And they took me on as an employee about two years ago and to this point now I'm the managing editor of the site. So I don't know. Yeah. Like anybody shows up and they just make you managing editor. No, you know what? What I find funny is that I've written a lot of comedy in humor and I've written a lot of children's books and those are two genres really. Where most people think because children's books are for kids and they're simple, like they could write children's books. And most people because they laugh at jokes, think they could write humor. And actually, I think the two hardest things to write are children's books and humor. If you do it right, basically, because there's a lot of bad children's books, but the idea that you were a fan of the Babylon bee and then suddenly were actually able to do what they do and to become a part of this institution. That's pretty amazing, seriously. I mean, it's just, you know, you can't you can teach a lot of things. But you can't teach

Joel berry Wendell berry Wendell Atlantic monthly Ethan Nicole Joel wendel Ethan Seinfeld Yale University Letterman Midwest east coast The New York Times Ohio LA confusion Twitter
"wendell berry" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:37 min | 8 months ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on Bear Grease

"That that actually came from its own. I mean the green revolution norman. Borlaug won a nobel peace prize because some of genetically modified wheat so that it could feed more people at the idea behind. Some of these things was to actually feed hungry a growing population on planet earth in in places that didn't have optimal weather conditions and it has had byproducts but i mean originally the motive for some of these things some of the things inside that system. Yeah we're we're actually humanity thing so how do you. How do you do that. Like that was really a question that i kinda had even after this research for this is like what do you do when system is not really sustainable. But it fuels everything right now in the present because what we're saying we're looking back at civilizations in the soil is that the current way we're doing things is pretty much guaranteed at some point in the future the system's gonna break. I mean your interpretation. Yeah and i think you're talking about ten years no right. If we're talking about civilizations babylonia and mesopotamia these guys did stuff for thousand years in this. This baseline kept moving of what was normal in here. We are this extremely young nation. I mean we've been having agriculture for one hundred and fifty years or so and country in. Its depends where you're at. Yeah i mean. Big mid west agriculture. For sure you're talking about these. Yeah but i mean in dirt that book that we were talking about the dirt the erosion of civilizations by david. Montgomery i think is his name. He said he he correlates the rise and fall of civilizations not so succinctly with just erosion but he said it's you know we look major. Civilization lasts a thousand years and they erode their dirt about a thousand years right and then he brings it up to president. Says we're on track to do it in about two hundred and fifty Which starts making you. I mean this. I was thinking about this on the way down here. The idea that we have removed ourselves as a culture from the way we produce food and this is something. I've talked about a lot with hunting where it's like. I think you should participate. If you're gonna eat meat you should participate and know what it feels like to kill something because that has a weight and gravity that will make you cherish this product. It will make you understand everything that went into it and in the same way agriculture. It's like we're rolling eroding soil when the soils gone. We don't have food when we don't have food we're gone like it's a very big problem. Yeah i think what you're looking at It's it's not just agriculture to human problem that we're like blips on i mean just. Our allies are like flashes in our capacity to radically alter the system that moves on just a completely different timescale. Yeah you know like and whether it's agriculture whether it's education whether it's politics whether it's like the national debt in america. I mean all these things we know like. This isn't sustainable. This isn't sustainable. But we're kinda of what the sunk cost fallacy. Th there's an economic term where we kind of just put so much into it. We can't turn around now. We can't turn around now. You know and i it so i don't think it's just. It was interesting to look at it at the lens of agriculture. But i think you're just looking at human problem in You have a book up there on. The shelf called the unsettling america by wendell berry and he talks about renewable energy. And he's he was. This book was by the way published in nineteen seventy seven and it feels as relevant today as i'm sure did back then but he talks about renewable energy and his friend were having a conversation like is nuclear. The ways solar the way and wendell's takeaway was like we'll find a way to kill ourselves with whatever. Consumption is the issue. It seems to be a consistent problem. You know what you said about a human life span is the issue at hand because we are. i think that's what fascinates me about looking back at history in about seeing all these these old guys and studying them studying about the earth is that we are. We are sounds cliche but it's true we will. We are here for such a short short time. It's kinda like a grass fire if think about think about a grass fire grass fire. There's this one small little edge that all the attention is on and it's moving across the landscape and everything behind it's burned and everything in front of it is not burned in. If you were to turn loose people to deal with it all you can think about would be that edge of the grass fire. You wouldn't be looking ahead. But how do they put out grass fires a lot of times. They go way in front of the grass fire in and fix a break up there but now this idea of reformation is a word that that we use sometimes just about how the system is broke and man. That's a hard thing to say. Because i'm thinking of people's faces and names that i know that our farmers that they're making a good living they're happy inside of the system that but it but it's not it's certainly not the best system but even think of like we. It's kind of like not known you're sick especially with dr woods. You talked about you settlers when they walked across or when they could ride their horse through the woods and not lose their hat because the trees are so because his ears blocked the limbs chestnuts. And the when you hear like what forced look like or the woods two hundred years ago. It's radically different. Than what i would consider a look at this good stander hickory and oaks out in this holler Yeah you know. And it's like we're we're trying to preserve things that we don't even know what they were we. We have land on one of the rivers around here and there's a huge erosion problem. I've got farmland with cut bank and it's cost me thousands of dollars a year. We knew when we got it It's just you know we're trying to figure out how to deal with that in. My whole viewpoint was radically shifted by this eighty four year old cattle woman who still builds her own barbed wire fence. We're on the other side of the river and we're talking about the river and the gravel mining that had set all this off and she's like. Oh well you know. The river didn't even used to be here. I she's like i learned to swim. And she points across the valley were to the other side of the where the ground goes up the ridge. She says i learned to swim there in the forties. And that's where that's where there used to be. And then they're digging all this gravel and the river jumped and it's been like that for decades But there were no like aerial maps back then or you know or the river meandered well a lot. They dug gravel. They were digging gravel next to the river so it cut in oxana eight. Yeah and it just hopped over to where man had been land. Yeah so the river wasn't even there. It wasn't in like it's mind boggling to to sit there because there's like beavers and there's it's real pretty and we want to restore it but the thing is it's like you're not really restoring it yet you know it's just all these are not black and white questions they're like even thought and it's good to to think about these.

Borlaug norman Montgomery wendell berry america dr woods wendell david oxana
"wendell berry" Discussed on NICE WORK! A Super Nice Club Podcast

NICE WORK! A Super Nice Club Podcast

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on NICE WORK! A Super Nice Club Podcast

"Thinking systems change and The importance of zooming out and seeing what are the you know upstream causes downstream effects. Hauer things mutually causal just really reprogramming our minds to be a non linear and I think zooming out in showing kind of that. The larger context is a great way to remember no whether it's geographically or temporarily or across sectors. You know how can we all zoom out a little bit more. Eisenhower said If you can't solve the problem in large in it. And i think it's so important that we do that and you know because if we don't it's like it's like all of the complex crises of today are somewhat of a gordian not you know not that like if you blow on one thread at actually just makes the whole thing tighter But if you are solving for pattern. What wendell berry call solving for pattern. Which is like the pattern below that emerges into problems. If you're looking at those root causes looking at systems than you're more likely to have success and create real good real nice enrollment pushing harm around the system. I'm calling it good so two names there. You probably know eisenhower famous guy. If you haven't heard the name wendell berry folks just write it down pullover driving. Just remember it remember. Is it wendell berry somebody to take a little bit of a look at that. I'm gonna you're not gonna get distracted right here but this is a great american hero. So buckminster fuller institute we just tell us about what the institute does We'll get to what you do there in a little bit because we're talk a lot about you but let's let's give them some background. What the institute do and then. We'll talk about who. Obviously buckminster fuller was as well but backwards but this is try yoga so start with the a five great so buckminster fuller institute is dedicated to preserving the legacy.

wendell berry Hauer Eisenhower buckminster fuller institute eisenhower buckminster fuller
"wendell berry" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:14 min | 8 months ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"I have a new plant addiction house. Plant indoor plant addiction. I mean. I wish you could see my office right now. Literally have propagation stations experiments between dirt propagation versus water propagation and. It's everywhere it is taken over my life and i think it is because especially in the last couple years. We were home so much. But also i need to feel like i'm raising things and my kids are at this age. Now where they don't really need the constant and actually it would be hurtful if i was constantly nit-picking at them so this has become my thing to raise. And it's been really inspiring for me. And i and calming and reminds me breathe and i have dirt under my fingernails pretty much constantly in. It's it feels really good and it is inspiring and i'm wondering like what inspires you as an activist. And how does that manifest itself in your art in my art or is it a is it. All the same is your is what you're doing right now. Also your art. I think absolutely. I'm for the first time. Get into work with the greatest artists while time which is mother nature and together we are making here trading like such an aesthetic beauty that it trumps everything else. I've ever done forever could do in acting or music or whatever but for me art has always been an expression of what i see like normal other kinds of very special people who combined vocations and calling. And i'm gonna use wendell berry an example of a poet farmer where what he gets from agriculture and culture are a seamless can shake in his life in many ways. Car will work from the same kind of inspiration and the visions that i have of. What's possible so. I closed my eyes. And i imagine a world and then i tell those stories and either. I'm telling them on a fictional level or now telling them here on the earth and in the land telling the story of what what this what does land will look like when it's revived. When we start to remove all the non native species and start to mitigate some of the monocropping that did go on here and start to create more diversity. What is it gonna look like. What kind of animals will kind of new life will come will be introduced in come seemingly from nowhere but will manifest on painfully. Because we've created that fertile soil. We've created that space for them to to come in and so through investing at contra my vestment company for me i see that as yet another creative expression but this time creating plot points within investment and within industry i guess i just have a big heart for as charles. Eisenstein says a more beautiful world. Our heart snow is possible. And trying to do what. I can to make that actually manifest create it build it. You mentioned your company. Contra ventures which focuses on aligning money with values. Why do we need to do that. What do you mean by that. And how for my listeners. Can they get involved and do that in their daily lives why i do believe that we all on different levels would benefit from healing our relationships money get into right relationship with money itself. Think we take it for granted and in many ways and we don't recognize how money can often create systems that are not necessarily benefit our deepest values our ethics. And it's just. It's a journey that i've been on when i realized because i was climbing ladder and i was just making more and more and i had all the riches in the spoils of success but i wasn't happier and the world outside didn't seem to be getting better. The more our economy grows. So i started to tug out that string and explore. What is this money thing. Why are we continuously looking to accumulate. I recognize that money is a tool. It's what we used to share value exchange value and build and create our society in our world. It's an incentive for us to put an effort but somehow along the way we started to focus on money itself as the goal. How can i get more of it to store more of it to hoard more of it as opposed to how do we use money as a tool to create the world. We wanna see and and so i had to clean up my act and getting into that right relationship with money because and it starts with stops if i'm not if i'm operating from a sense of scarcity and fear and maybe tomorrow i i'm gonna need all this money so i better hold onto it. If i'm operated on that level it doesn't serve me or the the world. So i had to really let go and start to become myself at a person that is not looking to accumulate and accumulate but actually looking to let it go let it flow and put it in the right places. We have a saying that money is merely a tool and the spirit of the tool is determined by the hand of the user. So i if. I make sure that i'm thinking of. I'm getting my relationship to money in the right way and then i can actually now deploy that capital to the best possible systems that will create the world that we hope to see a hand of the user. It's a really important thing. And i think about social media right how it can be used for such wonderful things and organizing in ways that have. We've never organized before as organizers and activists and advocates but also can be used for such horrible things. So i do believe the hand of the user is probably the most important thing. I'm so interested in if you have any thoughts on how someone is earning a middle class wage say and maybe has a 401k. Investment portfolio with their employer. How do we get their investments aligned with their values. Yeah i think is something that everybody has to ask themselves. Are they buying into sort of the capitalist imperatives that you work harder and then maybe one day you'll be rewarded in the future or are you really looking about looking around and and deciding. What do i really need. What brings me deep satisfaction. Filament and how do i align my actions and my effort in the work that i do to achieve that did you know that they are investment portfolios available that aim to align your investments with your values this type of investing is called sustainable or socially responsible investing and it serves the dual purpose of pursuing competitive returns while making a positive impact on society and the environment so it aims to align your investments with your value millennial and women are leaner in this space. And i know it's easier said than done and there's not one answer for everybody there's no panacea we all have to go through that work in recognizing how money has in many ways hijacked are thinking an has certain incentives imperatives that we are compelled to do and sometimes at the detriment or compromising are deeper values. I look around and a lot of people are doing a lot of really unfortunate things just to make money and.

Contra ventures wendell berry Eisenstein charles
"wendell berry" Discussed on Collective Insights

Collective Insights

03:57 min | 10 months ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on Collective Insights

"I lived through you and you threw me and etc so anyway as much to say about that but i definitely think that that language that were all pointing to a very similar thing here that dying. Why wait till death to die like. It's not just a practice in the abstract. If i read any of those text correctly the debt these deaths are happening. Not as an exercise. But part of what you got t- key into his dying all the time. You're you're sloughing cells your waist make the waste. You make his death a little. Mrs deaf like i was saying earlier. Our sense of self we yesterday is dead to us. It's in the past this way. Where you sort of a future-oriented as we turn into our future the past become something of a of a death. I mean and i don't mean this. Just metaphorically i mean this let yourself actually bake in that process. That is happening whether you see it or not. It's happening all the time. And i think the joy is making that conscious of playing with that rolling with that delighting in that feeling all the feelings that go with that that to me is the practice So yes. i don't think we should practice deaths and abstract. I think we should look at howard dying each moment and yet and yet and yet living each moment and those two things are entwined so even. If you're just pursuing life you will have to come to death. You have to realize death as part of your pursuit of life i think and i think that's what wendell berry and others are trying to help us realize. Yeah yeah i mean and into your point about your own potential death and you say you know you might freak out right. I think it's it's it's poetic to say practice resurrection and his poetry to say. Hey let go of our pain. Our pleasure our preferences oceans like yeah right on right on a man got it right right but but the reality is like every single debt. We absolutely white that shit. We absolutely don't want to have to happen. There is there is there. Is the reflexive dying raging against the dying of the light. We're like no. I want this thing do work. I want to be seen or to win or to succeed or to be validated. And to have that stuff ripped out of our hands is always deeply uncomfortable. And i don't think we ever get over that like i constantly catch myself in that. I'm like oh no. I've signed up for this. I'm totally down and then it's like you know but this time not this way you know so feels it's feels a perpetual It's it feels like a perpetual tearing. Yes yes and this way life on the mortar. Koei is i mean the the first fucking thing we do when we come into this life is we wail. you know. There's it's a vice. There's a violence to birth violence to death. These words i mean they have different meanings but in. Yeah that the thing you know. That's why my sense i did so i would keep pontius back to this. Sort of meta level where pieces not being calm. Peace is not hating yourself for not being calm or something like that. There's something that a more durable peace allows for anything in a way. It just doesn't grasp at it. It doesn't grasp at grasping. So you know. I meant that. Yeah i feel that. All the time i have. I've i've started to equate those one of the ways. I know a i'm alive often enough. Is that tension you're describing is actual. Pain is one of the things that tells me actually still here..

wendell berry howard pontius
Why Makers Struggle to Get Things Done

The Next Right Thing

02:58 min | 11 months ago

Why Makers Struggle to Get Things Done

"I read a line the other day. That i keep thinking about its from wendell berries novel hannah coulter that. I have been quoting a lot from lately. Here's the line. People are living as if they think they're in a movie. They're all looking in one direction toward a better place and what they see is no thicker than a screen. What they see is no thicker than a screen. I'd love to know what wendell berry had mind when he wrote that or rather what the character. Hannah had in mind when she thought it. But i deeply resonated with it. Even though i can't fully explain why. And maybe that's part of what i'm noticing myself over the last several months i'm resonating with a lot of things and holding pieces and parts fragments and flotsam. I'm collecting but i'm not arranging. And i like the collecting collecting as good and necessary collecting as part of what i do. I collect stories. I collect ideas images. Conversations beauty poetry and quotes but collecting is not. Creating collecting is not making to speak plainly. Y'all it's been a minute since i've made stuff and that is true. With two small exceptions one exception is actually this podcast for four years. These ten to fifteen minute podcast episodes have kept me sane crafting something with a bit of a slant something to help create space for your soul and mind to take a breath before we make our next move. I've loved doing this. I will love continuing to do this. But it's not very much content every week. Second as maybe silly as it sounds posts on instagram. Or something that i have continued to create. I don't post every day. But i do post every week and those small squares photos images and captions are form of making for me these days. Sometimes it's the only form. I get do right privately. And of course that counts too but it's inconsistent at best and i hope you don't hear this as a complaint but just a statement of the fax in two thousand nine paul. Graham wrote an excellent essay called schedule managers schedule every now and then i pull it up to read to remind myself no. I'm not crazy. And i haven't lost my creative edge. I've just become accustomed to working in a manner that is directly opposite from how i'm wired now if you've never read the essay. Here's the gist. Paul graham writes that there are basically two types of schedules amaker schedule and a manager schedule. Here's a quote directly from essay. The manager schedule is for bosses. It's embodied in the traditional appointment book with each day cut into one hour intervals. You block off several hours for a single task if you need to but by default you change what. You're doing every hour when you use time that way. It's merely a practical problem to meet with. Someone finds an open slot in your schedule. Book them and you're done

Wendell Berries Hannah Coulter Wendell Berry Hannah Instagram Amaker Graham Paul Graham Paul
"wendell berry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yes. Ah, pastor who is completely different than I am theologically and probably politically, we both We both were really affected by window Berry and started getting together to have coffee. Once a month. He used to joke will will swap back and forth and will be at the organic coffee a place one time at a chick fil a the next so that we're each on our home turf. God, but we would be able to have have good conversations That really did get at, uh, the hearts of our our disagreements, and we would talk through our disagreements. But neither of us had an audience of our own tribe to which we were playing. I genuinely wanted to know. Why do you think the things that you do? And here's why I believe the things that I believe, and he did the same. We didn't. We didn't convince one another of very many things. If anything, What we came to understand each other as as human beings on and to build a friendship that way and one that I greatly valued. How did you discover that shared love of Wendell Berry's poetry? I think he's the one who initiated this because he had. He had seen some things that I had written on Wendell Berry and then talk to and we both had had known Mr Berry and had some connections with him personally, And so that's that's kind of how it came together. Yeah, it's a great model. After a short break more with Dr Russell Moore and Bishop Michael Curry. You can always listen.

Wendell Berry Dr Russell Moore Bishop Michael Curry
"wendell berry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Church and Dr Russell Moore from the Southern Baptist Convention. You know something else I feel has not been named enough loudly enough and put out for us to grieve and approaches. The way we looked at the maps of our country on election night, there's you know, some things get colored and red and blue. Are there Red States and blue states. But it's a picture of fracture. And it's also a picture of inter woven nous, right. These these divisions They don't just run state to state or county to county there one community to community they run neighborhood to make neighborhoods sometimes house to house. They run through our families. They run through our lives, and they run through our religious traditions, which are gatherings of human beings and therefore microcosm so Each of you has been a bridge person, as your tradition have grappled with divisions and what feel like irreconcilable differences that are also alive in our culture, and I I love to draw you out a little bit on What that ticks and you know what? You've learned what you can share about what it means to reframe. And set these divides on different ground. With the help of religious values, so Bishop Curry. You have been right in the middle of very vitriolic divisions within the Episcopal Church in the Anglican Communion globally. Over same sex marriage and you have also been in very public conversations and that I would say a remark by friendship and respect with, for example, bishops on the other side Of this subject. You know, Here's something you you said in one of those dialogues, the inclusion that is at the heart of the gospel that welcome scale lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. Is the same inclusive, outstretched arms of Jesus that welcomes those who disagree with us. I wonder if you just take us a little bit insight that what you've learned that that we can all Learned from You know, I mean, well, it goes back for me to the 10 Commandments. I am the Lord. Thy God, Thou shalt have no other gods. But me got on Lee. God is God. None of the rest of us are which may come his news in some respect, but it's a great relief. I'm not God, I don't have to pretend to be And therefore humility is a posture that comes with my humanity and I one of the things I've really and I struggle with it. It's not easy to do this. Is. How do I stand and kneel at the same time in my relationships with others, especially with those who disagree with me or I disagree with them? Because I've got to kneel before them as someone created in the image of God, a child of God, just like me. Loved of God. Equally love is an equal opportunity, employer and the love of God is equal. So I've got to kneel before them. In a sense, I mean, and yet at the same time, I must stand with the integrity. And what I've found is there are times when that is reciprocated when I was at one of the conferences of the Anglican primates, the archbishops and deciding bishops from around the world. This was the very difficult 11 of the primate who differed with me profoundly. The two of us got close, in part because he had been a position in a prior life. Um and I had just recently had brain surgery and each day He checked in with me. Michael, How are you doing? I said I'm doing all right, and I checked back with him, and we committed to pray for each other. Not the way some folks that will pray for you. That's not a blessing. That doesn't mean you're about the best, but to really pray for you people can do that. I know everybody can't do that. Most people can. There's there's There's more good and most of us and we can. Yeah, yeah, we're not all called to be bridge people, but some of us are. Some of us were safe enough are Um, yeah, Doctor more. So I just want to say a little bit about your role because I think everybody understands mostly understands what a bishop is, but you are really the chief ethicist of the Southern Baptist Convention. Um You're part of kind of the think tank. You attend to the difficult questions in the public square and inside the faith. And the Southern Baptist Church is the largest Protestant denomination in the United States. Over 14 million members, almost 50,000 churches. But also very differently from for example, the Episcopal Church those air all independent churches, Yes. So to be chief ethicist of that kind of configuration is challenging and so You know when to say that you've been a bridge person in that context, and you really have been a bridge person, especially in recent years in the Southern Baptist Convention's grappling with race, and it's in its history and its president. Want to read something that you said at the 2017 annual convention, which is the only time in the year when the whole Southern Baptist Church comes together, You said. When we stand together as a convention and speak clearly we're saying that white supremacy and racist ideologies are dangerous because they oppress our brothers and sisters in Christ. Oppress those were made in the vision of God. They oppress our mission field even above and beyond that unrepentant racism is not just wrong, Unrepentant racism sends unrepentant, racist to hell. So the, um, resolution you were you were arguing for was initially rejected, but it went on to overwhelmingly nearly unanimously passed. Um, you have said that in your younger days. You were all too eager to fight like the devil to please. The lord. Um but, yeah, talk to us. Because what you did there is you made an argument. But it was an argument embedded in the faith. Yes, And I think that's I think that's what's important is to have consciences that really are shaped by one's convictions and then to live those out as best as possible. Consistently. On. That means if we really do believe that there is a day of judgment, then we have to speak honestly about that. If we really do believe that all human beings were created in the image of God, then any suggestion that that's not true is an assault on the authority of Scripture. That doesn't mean though, that we we have tol again evaporate arguments. I mean, Bishop Bishop Curry and I Would disagree very fundamentally on some of these questions that you just mentioned about sexuality. We probably couldn't serve together. Well, we couldn't serve together in the same congregation or church. That doesn't mean That we have to see one another as a Zen Emese to be evaporated. Rather, we can have what could be very strong disagreements and arguments but still listen to one another in the public arena, So I think there's a distinction between There are certain things that a church in carrying out its mission that we have to agree on. We have to be on the on the same page on certain things in a way that we don't expect those on the outside to necessarily understand, or to agree with us about Um Bishop Curry told the story about coming together with his Friend Bishop on the other side. I hate the way we write it so binary on the other side of the issue that's also a political form an issue but through This matter of health, and you have a wonderful story about a friendship with someone who's part of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, which is actually a group that split away from the Southern Baptist Convention in part around some of these social issues and That you came together around a shared love of Wendell Berry's poetry..

Southern Baptist Convention Bishop Bishop Curry Southern Baptist Church Dr Russell Moore Episcopal Church Cooperative Baptist Fellowship assault United States Anglican Communion Wendell Berry Lee Michael president
"wendell berry" Discussed on In the Garden

In the Garden

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on In the Garden

"The summer. It's quick high water it's getting so hot. Still, shading near now. Owned by easy. And, of course, as I drive down the county road to work in the morning. Always, see the very first tree, this turn color and it it happened last week. That was a maple it was. The it would be a soft Naples they call them or. The. Ring. brooches are turning I this year. which is an I didn't call. We can put this out to everybody that's listening. What Causes Shat Bush. To, turn color not completely not all police. In June you'll walk through the woods and you'll she shad. Bush. We hear shed. Their off the plant. Read. You guys doing I don't know. I think it's probably that that two weeks of ninety degree weather that we had right in the middle of lie. Okay Fair enough all mostly as cling to say, hello I heard a lot of good. Talk, about carrots too I will say that. I generally have amazing crop appeared in. This year they came up. Late April and they got to the point were I. Had I had four rows next to each other, and you couldn't even see between the rows between was so lush just about two weeks ago to call of three or four days. Brown get. But the carrot was still fine right here. It's okay but that rust. No it's probably arrest. Yeah. Something like that, and it could be that that they're done. You know they're just said well, that's it. That's all folks. And if it's a Variety planted every year it not in manic about purple carrots this year I decided to go back to orange. Called Bolero. Planted the Bolero this year we had nice nine inch. Inch and a half around beautiful carrots. Absolutely. Terrific. Down onto the ground so I'm not going to give you guys Robert Frost. Even a very brief quote. Maybe, I've given this already and if that's but I've done I apologize from Wendell Berry. Berry Super. All the gardeners out there And all the not gardeners should. The care of the earth is I must ancient and most forty, and after all our most pleasing responsibility. To cherish what remains of it to foster its renewal. Is Our only legitimate. Hope. Yeah. Yeah. So the it's the most worthy, the most ancient and what was the last one? Inch it the most worthy and after all our most pleasing. Yes, we're your show comes in. Reminds. Calling. US. Decrease. And that I am I had a wonderful potato crop this year. Of course, we're drying them out all over the house you know and before we put them in the cold cellar. And it's such a wonderful sight to see the. Biggest surprise this year and I'll get out of your way but we we grow Mexican sunflowers Tonia. Very, beautiful velvet like leaves super bright orange flowers nothing really three feet tall and that's what the catalog says three feet tall. Tall Eight. Like High They just grew and grew in their lower everywhere. What triggered the navy it was the heat. Maybe. Absolutely. No. Thanks so much for the call. Appreciate it. McKay. Thank you. I guess an entomologist or someone. Skill at an anti well, what did I say? Well, we should not be calling them. Tent caterpillars, and this time of year they are all web worms. Okay. Well, thank you and cabbage loopers are not moths. Yeah. But butterflies. Here's there's a technical. Okay. I got to write this down our butterflies, habit loopers, cabbage loopers, or not moss, but butterflies..

US Wendell Berry Naples Robert Frost Bush Brown McKay
"wendell berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Place is precious and baby, Orin says. If we can't see that and feel it may be that says more about us than it does about this place. I think people should get out good for people to be out on the land. I think it's important to Live outside your house just locked up inside. Being with baby born on the coastal plain of the refuge made me think of a poem by Wendell Berry. It's called how to be a poet. They're these three lines in the middle to go like this. They're no unsafe. Rid places there are on ly sacred places and desecrated places. It's It's beautiful in its own way. It's it's not It's not like a beautiful mountain. You could say it's strikingly empty right now. It's it's beautiful in a different way. What happens next could depend on the outcome of the presidential election. Joe Biden is expected to block Arctic drilling if he's elected. But if the lease sales oil companies go through before the election, it doesn't matter who wins or loses. Once the sales go through, it would be difficult to prevent future drilling. Way want to think Amy Martin and Nick, Mont. And the whole team is threshold for their work on this week's show Podcast tackles one pressing environmental issue each season. The third season of threshold is all about the refuge. I highly recommend you check it out a threshold podcast that orc or wherever you get your podcast, really producer for this week's show was Kathy. Ms Kowski. The music in this hour was composed by Travis Yost. Support for reveals provided by the Reeve and David Logan Foundation, the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,.

Joe Biden Wendell Berry Orin Travis Yost Catherine T. MacArthur Foundat David Logan Foundation Ms Kowski Reeve producer Kathy Mont Amy Martin John D. Nick
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

07:34 min | 2 years ago

How I Built Resilience

"Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition so since the pandemic began retail sales have dropped massively across the country is customers are staying home but cliff. Bars actually seen a spike in demand because their bars are really popular among healthcare workers. I spoke to Gary Erickson and kick Crawford from their home in Berkeley California. The company's been distributing cliff bars to doctors and nurses while also trying to boost morale among their employees to me a little bit about cliff bar. What's been the situation for you guys? We're lucky you know. We're an essential food products. We on March twelve was the day we decided to close. Our office is just in one day. All of a sudden. We're like we're not in the awful. How do we run a business when people are are not in the office running into each other and having meetings and and coffee together out trying to throughout so we have been adopting ever since? Yeah it's it's interesting because we have like certain to businesses going on we have our office business and then we have our essential business are two bakeries one in Indiana twin falls. Where making sure that everybody's safe unhealthy. It's really different to have to do this right now. What's crazy so your headquarters. Essentially in Emoryville is closed down right now but you also. Your manufacturing plants are still operating because presumably. There's a demand for cliff bar. People are kind of want to keep things that that are shelf stable and lasts for a while I guess is. Have you seen a big increase demand for cliff bars redid and we did? There was a pretty good spike. And I We were maybe in third place behind the paper and Sanitizer But it's calmed down. You know I think the the object has mellowed out a little bit. But we're still there's demand demand is high and also you know we know that our product is a really essential food for healthcare workers. So far we've given out the first art march three point six million bars to food banks and healthcare workers frontline and then on another where on the second round. Brunell committed another three million through programmer calling Baked with love incentive gratitude Gary when you have been in crises in the past certainly with this business and when you think about it from a leadership perspective. What kind of advice could you give to somebody who is a leader? Even if it's a small business and they're kind of dealing with what's going on right now. I helped would sell duster couple. Things one is Don't be afraid to ask. Question has no answer Kind of off of Wendell Berry mad farmer manifesto of his about four decades ago. I mean we are asking questions every single data we have. We don't have any answer to but you can't be afraid to ask those questions and then if you don't have an answer today maybe tomorrow we've I can't even count. How many of questions. We've had to ask that. Don't have an answer. Maybe one could be like What are we? What is it GonNa look like when we go back to the office like when we first asked the office when is can happen? And what are we going to be walking around with right vase mouths on? And Are we gonNA be social distancing when we're back in the office and how's it going to work people you know. Eat and you know we. We don't have an answer for that right now but we're talking about and then the other part of it is just inattentive. You have to be hyper attentive to everything every day minute by minute hour by hour day by day and went and if your attention to something that comes up and we have people emailing US sane. Have you thought of this? What about this? How come this does happen? We're not doing this. Then you connoisseur out that you have to go to like how are we going to doubt and then as soon as you can't take some action and don't sit on things because we don't have time to sit on things we've been making decisions where we have to act now or tomorrow and we as sorry? We're screwed so adapt and take some action. I'm curious I mean. Obviously you are a bigger company much beer company than than a lot of the vast majority businesses in the United States. But if you think about this crisis and this is a little bit tricky because it's a sensitive word to use but as an opportunity are there ways to think about opportunities or to kind of focus on on the other side like how I mean because even with your business you're GonNa Change. They're going to be things about your products that change when when we come out the other side of this question. We don't have an answer to yes. Go ahead well. I mean I'd like to take a shot at it. I think long you know it. Does you double down in refocus on the things that matter for us? I think it's refocused us to consider what's really really important like taking care of our people but also how we work being efficient with our time being creative looking at a problem imagining scenarios. That don't exist yet like what if this happens. What how are we GONNA REACT? It's really made us much. Nimble in some ways yeah for sure. this is a question from about supply chain which. I think is is interesting. How are you dealing with your supply chain and and are you looking ahead to because it's you rely on nuts and on oats and on a variety of ingredients mostly domestic but some imported? So how are you kind of dealing with? The the possibility chain will be disrupted. That's another question that we don't have a full answer to because we don't know you know we're hoping that that were on getting close to the other side but it's still going to be of months we right now good and because we were in that essential category so we're not super worried about supply chain but were daily back to the daily attentive to it and always kind of ask our suppliers like we're good right. We're right and we do have our frontier team on our side chain. Every morning we we meet together with recalled the coveted nineteen task force. So were meeting every morning with this task. Force made up of ood manufacturing lead our legal team our HR team Our community team and our communications team. And we're we're doing that. So we can keep track of all these things and so we have teams under them that are tracking supply chain all the cliff bars that are going to the stores are. GonNa want in the future inside of balancing. That out is just a big rash or is this going to happen. You know slowly and then you know what level are being of yet but it's interesting that this is a time. This is the first time that our business models to kind of a full test like it's easy when you're not easy but so we have this five lines business model you know sustain Your Business. Our brands where people are our community and our planet and it's worked but now we're in the crisis trying to keep this model ally We're not just a successful company over here. Supporting our community and giving thousands of hours of community service not no work in the fire and we're trying to continue keeping those values in tap and living values so so far so good but Has Not Been Easy.

Cliff Bar Gary Erickson United States Indiana Berkeley California Emoryville Wendell Berry Brunell Crawford Programmer
"wendell berry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Here in closing is Wendell berry reading from his poetry collection Sabbath not again in this flash will I see the old trees stand here as they did wedi creatures made of light delight of their making straight in them and whale whatever blight our blindness was or made however assault or act might fail the burden of absence grows and I paid daily the grief I owe to love for women and men days and trees I will not know again pray for the world's light thus born away pray for the little songs that week and move for comfort as these lights depart recall again the angels of the thicket Columbine Ariel in the welding tango song drifting down light rain daisy returning in song the lord let art piecing out its own way the blindness may yet desolate invite ruining all after all the years great right subsumed finally in poultry wrong what do we know still the presence that we come into with song.

assault Wendell berry
[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:08 min | 2 years ago

[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett up next Mike unedited conversation with theologian. Ellen Davis. There is a shorter produce version of this which includes poetry from Wendell. Berry that he read for this show. Find that wherever you get your podcasts. I'm just I'm looking. I'm sort in an enclosed blue booth looking at a black thing that I'm pretending as you. Okay very convincing. Just close your eyes. That's what I'll be doing okay. I'm hearing Chris. I think my microphone is pretty hot and I was but I'm not. I was hearing an echo at first but I'm okay now Illinois. Are you hearing me all right. And his any. I'm I'm hearing you fine. And you're without an echo all right Help just in one more second crystal all right just before we start are you well. Is dwayne wells. I'm well yes. Thank you dwayne Zvili. Well HE'S A. He's a year into recovery from hip surgery and it makes a huge difference so things are good. Thank you and and you and your children. Yeah every everything's good I just Have been doing way too much. Travelling at this new book come out the new. Yeah Einsteins God it's It's a it's A. It's it's drawn from my interviews with scientists and it's a lot of fun to be out there talking about but I'm I'm happy to be back in. My kids are happy to have me back. I bet well congratulations on the US. Send you a copy I should. I actually think I had put that down on a list somewhere. It's important for God so Chris. I'm still feeling kind of loud or it went up again. My volume went up again Okay well now. We're hearing an echo on the other end. What's that okay? I think I'm fine now. Did you hear that now? There's an Echo Ellen. I wonder if I wonder if her headphones are up. A little bit high. If we could have allenton her headphones down a little bit okay. Is there someone turn yes? Can someone turned my headphones down. We're not getting any response to okay. How is this Test is tax defense. I think it does yes. The echoes gone. Okay okay Christie and I have also just to let the engineer now. I've also lowered the microphone. Just a bit because it was above the level of my mouth and I was sort of reaching up toward. How does that work? That's fine? Thank you okay all right so Chris I think I could have even a little. Bit less volume. And then maybe why don't I let me ask you something mundane like What you had for breakfast. I had cereal and food doesn't give you much experience. What have you need a little more? Tell me about lunch that tell you what's in bloom and a guy. Yes Virginia Sweet. Spire and the irises Just peaking and going down. The ECHINACEA is coming up. It's actually a pretty time in North Carolina. I imagine it's tulip time in it is to the people don't think of Minnesota as as lush but it really is. Our neighborhood is just incredible. It was it was. It's it's a very special neighborhood and it was. It was kind of constructed to be harmonious with the natural world and creatures and we even have the occasional wild Turkey and Fox squirrels and birds and So I was travelling in April and I missed that period where the snow is gone. But there's nothing growing and I came back and it was all their everything in bloom feeling. I it's beautiful. It is beautiful. Yeah doing good about levels. I think we're great okay. So I- slightly daunted interviewing my teacher like this and I'm going to have a different role with you I think we can get okay and You know as I was thinking about the questions I might want to ask you some of which I always ask people. I realized that even though you and I have had conversations around these things. I've never quite skewed these questions. I don't know all the answers so so so one place. I always start with people. Whatever we're talking about is Was there a religious background to your childhood and actually. I'm not sure that I know the answer to that question. Yes I grew up. I'm a cradle Episcopalian. Okay I've there's never been a time in my life when I haven't gone to church but I would say that church means quite different thing to me over. Religion means quite a different thing to me. Then I think it did to my parents. Anyone almost anyone else in my family I did not grow up in a family that would have defined itself as particularly religious although we would church always when and how did you start heading towards a career in Biblical scholarship and theology. How did that happen consciously? I was an exceedingly late bloomer. I was in my third of four years of seminary before I decided that I was going to teach But if you look at my resume it looks as though when I was eighteen and I went to the Hebrew University in Jerusalem for Year. I decided I was going to be a biblical scholar So unconsciously what they say in Hebrew Elohim Finger of God. I think I sort of being pointed if not pushed in that direction at a much younger age

Chris Dwayne Wells Krista Tippett Ellen Davis Wendell Dwayne Zvili United States Illinois Berry Hebrew University Jerusalem Younger Age North Carolina Virginia Mike Christie Engineer Minnesota I
"wendell berry" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Ways I don't think there is a kind of pastoralist Wendell berry and retreat from the modern world there is for some people in some communities but not for the culture as a whole so in that sense I I do think the alternatives are succeeding in finding new ways to grow or stagnating rather than finding Arcadia again let me just ask two more questions before we turn to the audience for some of their comments and questions so what are some are you entertain some alternatives what is illiberal democracy an alternative here I mean is is what's happening you know arguably in Turkey or in Hungary or in Poland I mean it's not a response to this is this is that a re envisioning of Rian livening of of society or you know is it something else right so my take is that both the revival of socialism and body five figures as diverse as the likely next democratic nominees pending events in tonight's debate and to Bernie Sanders or Jeremy Corbyn or others and of that kind of populist nationalist illiberal democracy mixture on the right are both responses to documents right there sort of summoned up as rebellions against stagnation so Sanders and other socialists are basically saying you know what when we took a wrong turn in the sixties and seventies or we took a wrong turn with Reagan and Thatcher and we can in fact get back to a more utopian perspective on what government can do at the very least the Scandinavian utopia but maybe something beyond that and then the populists and nationalists in various ways are saying you know I mean make America great again is in certain ways a futurist slogan right it's saying we were great in the past we want to get back there in the future and there's a future that we were promised that we haven't been given that we want to achieve again and so in that sense they are both kind of alternatives to the stewardship of decadence right I mean Michael Bloomberg Jeb bush to some extent Obama not maybe the Barack Obama at the two thousand campaign with the Barack Obama who governed Mitt Romney in twenty twelve were all sort of promising the same the same liberal or conservative politics and I kind of stewardship of a prosperous stagnation and Sanders and trump and Orban are all in different ways saying no we can do something different and we can do something better that said if you in the book I I have some skepticism about how far this can go I think one that once as I said once the populist take power and I think with the same would be true of the socialist they are constrained by their own limitations and by the larger structural forces that make it hard to pursue dramatic change even if you want to that's one point and then second you know there are ways in which they're sort of like a collaboration between a figure like Orban and people in the media who are terrified of what Orban represents where he stands up and gives a speech and says you know I represent an alternative to liberalism and everyone in the western press says oh my god he represents an alternative to liberalism and in practice organism seems to want you know the organization of the E. U. that V. you know existed twenty years ago rather than today it once I kind of one party or qualify one party situation for Hungary that you know I think resembles Mexico across most of the twentieth century or Japan at various points more than it represents you know mostly needs Italy so it's sort of all want a democracy with a that is a real democracy but also has one clearly dominant party and you know his social conservatism is then kind of a normal social conservatism of the post nineteen seventies west and you know he's I mean liberalism has obviously changed and so conservative a standard conservatism can look more exotic in contrast with where progressives seem to be going but I'm just not completely sure that you know or vine you see the richer you see a sort of return of history alternative so much as sort of a you know slightly more conservative in ways I like slightly more corrupt in ways I don't like version of the existing of the existing late modern liberal democratic order and I say in the book you know if once you if you crowned a king in Hungary right I mean if you if you if you have these places reaching for a different source of legitimacy right even Putin pretends to be a Democrat small D. and maybe one day in the Sanders campaign large day if they don't intervene if they intervene sorry Russian interference humor is is is not but but he you know put it they're still they're still elections in Russia you know there there is it's it's a qualified one party state that there are certain kinds of freedoms and there's a little there's a lip service to democracy even as Putin governs as kind of an autocrat he's not crown ning himself for having the Russian Orthodox Church ground in these odds are Vladimir he's not restoring the Romanovs and yeah I mean it it seems to me that you can't declare that we're in a post a really post liberal world until you have powerful and important governments claiming some source of legitimacy that isn't just a version of you know I I a version of the normal liberal democratic view but I could be wrong we'll see Ross Douthat being joined by Joseph could PZ a professor at the Catholic University of Arizona someone may ask about it so final question for me at least the book starts the moon and ends with the stars yeah and you have this almost like sheepish you know I'd be a bad Christian if I didn't mention faith essentially comment to begin the final chance not sheepish well I I mean all the simple modern now so I would be a bad Christians on both so we're the book ends with hope more or less right and the way in which faith can provide hope for people if there is not really the force of your argument more or less that really what's at the root of a jacket decadent society it is that it is a hopeless society and I I I think there's a go go head on and I ask that in part because it would be that would be a theme I would I would love to sing carried out a little bit more you know in the book but maybe maybe that's partly tactical right because you're not writing simply for you know either you know believing Crowder so on but I mean I've written like two books about religion and I figured I should you know dial it to become a little more sheepish no no I I think that that I use the church I think right I I think that I think yes I think that you know bars soon again to go back to his definition is as a lost the decadent society faces is that of possibility and I think implicit in that is a sense that like with the loss that it faces is a loss of confidence that you know that that this particular society is part of a story and has a particular destination and that isn't exclusively a religious idea but it is to some extent a religious idea and in other books I have made the argument that basically you societies can't escape from having some sort of religious impulse or religious direction I think that's yeah I think that's true certainly in this case I think the more specific thing I want to claim though is that you know we should be we should be cognisant we as human beings but particularly we as you know those of us who are religious believers and those of us who are specifically Catholic Christian should be cognisant if we are in a story this is a really interesting point in the story right so this story starts from a Christian perspective with an admonition to fill the earth you know in some do it and for better or worse with some you know environmental catastrophes along the way and some further risks ahead we've done that and from a Christian perspective that the prior hinge moment of history came when there was not a true world empire but what seems like a world empire that had you know similarly had a Republican period and was entering an imperial period and was sort of exhausted seeming and that was the moment when you know god entered the world right and so here we that was an interesting if that was an interesting moment then this moment of sort of world civilization is an equally interesting moment and so and what I draw from that is not just the idea that you know okay we need a recovery of faith and we need a religious revival I obviously would be in favor of that and that would be a sort of force pushing against decadence but yeah I go a little further and become a little more speculative and say look it's not you know maybe it'll just be a Christian revival but this is also a moment when we should expect something stranger to happen and maybe that thing that stranger thing is figuring out a way to sort of leap into the stars and Peter Thiel in his review of the book said well you know douse it really doesn't give enough space to the reasons why we we probably can't build a warp drive and that's you know that's that's fair right but but I do think right you have this we filled this one place and we don't know if we can go further but there is a huge universe out there and maybe we are supposed to go further or maybe this is a moment when it's not us going up if something unexpected coming down and that's the strange place where I am the book but I think it's it's justified place it really is the case that we have sort of reach some moment of the human achievement that seems to have some limit on it and if you believe that the human story has a purpose and a direction then you would expect a really interesting plot twist to come along maybe not now but somewhere in the next two hundred years or so so it's a great place to turn to you guys I'm going to stand up and approached the lectern because I can't see this side of the room and I would never ask anybody over here to speak if I don't okay so you have questions just raise your hand and we will bring around a microphone there's many with one and we have one over here which I can barely see okay Ross style of the new York times fielding questions at the Catholic University of Arizona his book the decadent society when we started right here perfect we mentioned decadence and disaster apocalypse and so forth and also the radicalization of politics with Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn my question is what kind of where it is where we going what kind of house is going to end up are we.

Wendell berry
"wendell berry" Discussed on Exvangelical

Exvangelical

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on Exvangelical

"The Democrats tend to be strong on those issues. It just felt like the right. According to me you bring up a good point. I think some people feel guilty that they didn't feel guilty and like that. That isn't necessarily the case just because has plenty of other. People have a sense of guilt like that. That's just one response. You don't need to feel that there's no obligation feel that. Yeah honestly like I would say it was more of a liberation lead lifted off of me and And I felt more kind of in my own skin and more in line with my the core values that and that's that's really great. I mean that's that's so wonderful to sort of discover. Cover that about your about yourself and also the sort of work that you WANNA do. A you mentioned that you you were having these debates with your with your dad over the dinner table that sort of thing did you ever explore the theological arguments for ecological stewardship and that sort of thing. was that something that every ever became a focus for you personally. Yeah it did but it was a took a wile I kind of well. It actually were studying communication. I I studied rhetoric was actually my major in. The first thing that you learn is like a student of rhetoric lake. You're only you can only be persuasive if you know your audience audience and you know and so it just occurred to me like as I was senior by this point I was like okay and I knew I wasn't wasn't stupid. I knew how politically important evangelical were and I knew that it was strategic to engage them on on my issues like climate change so I did my senior thesis project on on Evangelical Environmental Discourse and also is very personal. You know like I just. I really couldn't understand why my father who claimed to live by these Christian values. Oh you wouldn't wouldn't want to do something about are hurting earth and God's creation and are the fact that people are impacted by environmental environmental harm and so it was. It was very much like a personal endeavor as well as an intellectual en- strategic one but so yeah. I did that I that paper. I think I did like maybe the first half of it was on. Why historically at least the modern version of evangelicals haven't Abbott Been Great on environmental issues to put it mildly then the second half was really looking at the biblical narratives that do speak to why Christians should care about the environment and that the because especially at that time you know everyone wanted the evangelical load and so I it kind of launched me into this very niche career of faith based environmental activism where I worked with a variety of nonprofits specifically working with Christians and other people of faith on environmental campaigns which yeah so? It's funny I joke. That like my environmentalism brought me back to guide but there's a lot of truth to that cling it was it was connecting with people. You know people like Peter Elliott and encountered in these kinds of theologians and activists who do self identify as Christian but also cared deeply about this earth and people here that made me realize that not all Christians and not all versions of Christianity for harmful. And so yeah and and sort of reopened it reopened me to to maybe taking a anew and different looking at the faith that I was raised in. Yeah absolutely speaking personally for myself. Like one of the things that rekindled and a desire to explore Christianity originally was was discovering the writings of people like Wendell Berry and the various Christianity and the survival of creation is one of my all time favorite essays like Yeah Yeah I love. There's a part I think it was in the essay but it was definitely Wendell Berry tax about like you know I could become a Buddhist sure you know. Ah Pantheon or any number of other spiritual traditions. Battling for better or worse this is born into. I feel called to make it as beautiful as possible in paraphrasing but that that really resonated with me yeah and there is something to like those strands of Christianity. It is actually quite affirming and and really build into essence of wonder and reverence for the natural world and anything that might extend beyond.

Wendell Berry Peter Elliott Abbott
"wendell berry" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Most beekeepers on an older be by all money beat biologists. Oh It's absolutely incredible. Incredible and of course you know you mentioned previously that the sociology and And really the communication That's unique is also really the key to their success as a species and and that they have been quite a successful species accounting for are you know almost half of of pollination that said we also know that human activities as is so often. The case are really threatening the honeybee right now so I would love to maybe take the last bit of our chat to talk about what some of the the threats that these organisms might the facing. What's the difference between the threats that kept bees are dealing with versus? What's going on in the wild and kind of what can we? What can we learn from from these BS? B.'s that's these and you've put your finger on her a really important subject regarding the human honeybee human being honeybee maybe relationship right now. We're doing a number of things that go with the bees that are living under our management and beekeepers hives reduce the number of things things that are making life harder and harder for these. These beautiful Bee's One is is very is very simply described were were spreading reading poisons in the environment Using lots of pesticides and in the fields where the beezer brought to do their pollination work and that's that's that's deadly hedley combination of bringing bs and then spring the fields with insecticides of these would be spring in in orchards and things like like that. So that's one one combination another is in love. We're we introduced on some parasites sites Particularly a little might from an Asian species honeybee was introduced to the European and African species. Vichy's of Honeybee and this little might is very good at transmitting. The bees viruses. It's a great vector for sore some nasty viruses of the bees. And that's that's been a that's probably been equally. Bad killer of Honeybee. Colonies both managed colonies wild colonies So that's that's another thing that we've we've done to make life hard for honeybees and then there's a long standing aspect of the human being honeybee relationship is that we've always been unintentionally in it and thus inadvertently We've been making life hard for them by just putting them in hives and managing the colonies to be very productive honey complicated topic topic. But there's a lot of things about the life of of a honeybee colonies. They're made more difficult when they're living under human human management. C'mon yours just one example beekeepers for an eye in the beekeeper for our convenience. We put the we put our hives together in groups which feature called Apiary so be arts and that's convenient for the human being but for the B.'s. It's it's not so great because it means if one Connie get sick. The illness the pathogen parasite it's causing that. Illness spreads easily to the other colonies which it can be just a few feet away. So that's not that's not good for the bees and that's very different from how they live in the wild where they're usually living about anthem mile apart from between one hollow tree housing to be calling in another the so another is that we as we so often do. With agricultural animals. We we manipulate them to be extremely productive for the things that we want in the case of honeybees. Guess what that is. It's honey a lot of a lot of the technology and skill of beekeeping of or trade of beekeeping making honeybee colonies into very large urge units Having the colonies grow to a larger size than they would in nature instead of growing to twenty or thirty thousand to grow up to sixty thousand or even more bees to have a huge workforce so they can make and then they will make up Mr up lots and lots of honey so that and that means that the colonies are even more prone to diseases. Because they're they've got all these resources inside them for the parasites and pathogens to who exploited. So that's another thing that we do and then another third thing one that we see very traumatically north. America's we we we should. I think it's close to two thirds of the honeybee colonies in North America are transported every spring from wherever they are whether it's in Florida or a New York state or Wherever out to California into the Central Valley of California for the allman pollination and that's that is just just very hard on the bees and I think statistically only about half the colonies that are taken out to those almond? Orchards are healthy when they come out or or still alive when they come out because it's just so much spread of disease and the trip itself is is apparently pretty hard on the beasts. It's being trucked thousands and thousands of miles. Gosh I had no idea I knew almonds were really intensive when it came to water usage surge and that that was something that was like I don't know if almond milk is the best alternative But I had no idea what kind of impact Almond farming had on on bees. Yeah Almond Pollen Almond productions is knowing water-intensive. It's be intensive in needs off every every flower. It's GonNa make the fruit or seed and nut on Esta pollinator show up and and move the pollen from one one plant to another. So yeah. It's it's it's it's really hard. All beekeepers loved their bees. But they don't always we they're not every action that beekeepers take. His is a what you'd have. I have to say as a loving or carrying action even though and that's something that we're just starting to realize because one of the curious things about honeybees and bees and beekeeping is that it's only in about the last few decades we've known anything about the natural lives of bees beekeepers. Beekeepers developed hives thou- sturdy starting thousands of years ago as we talked about. And we've never an once. People once human beings go visit hives then. They focused on their lives of the bees and the hives and how to manipulate them. And how to you know. I got to say honest exploited the lives of these BS living in the beekeepers hives with those could be boxes. EXES or SCALLOPS. Whatever log hives whatever so our focus almost every beekeepers focus has always been on the bees living in his or her hives which is very unnatural? And so now were we've gone back and looked at how bees are living and and Wendell Berry. Put It really nicely I paraphrase. What one of his famous quotes and user into agricultural practices generally says? We've never really known what we were doing doing. Because we've never known what we were undoing. We only can know it. We're undoing if we would see what nature is doing if we were doing nothing. And that's talk for bees and beekeeping beekeepers have not. We don't know what we're doing that because we haven't known what we're undoing because we didn't know what their natural lives were like. But that's so that's what I and others have been looking at intensively for as`safe route past about forty years. Now and that really ultimately is kind of the thesis this of of your notebook the lives of bees the untold story of the Honeybee in the wild because in understanding kind of the the success assess of this species in the wild we can actually learn from them and maybe apply some of those strategies that have been you know honed by hundreds of thousands millions of years and utilize them in in our beekeeping. You I think that's I think that's Roy Right. And that's one of the things I I the ideas that I present in this book. It's not GonNa be this idea of letting beast lift more naturally probably will not who will certainly will not apply apply to the commercial beekeeper with thousands or tens of thousands of hives of bees but it is very relevant to the to the hobby beekeeper. That might have a handful of colonies where they can let the they don't need the high production they're not trucking their colonies around they can be they can give the beasts let them live kinder gentler lives And so that's yes I think so. One of the positive aspects of the of this a growing body of knowledge of the natural lights of bees and most beekeepers are small-scale beekeepers are hobbyists and they have the bees interests first first and foremost. That's for them. It's a lot like I like to like to compare what I see. Is that two kinds of beekeeping and it's like the difference Prince with one on the one hand you've got the small skill beekeeper and on the other hand you've got the large commercial in. It's much like the difference between people that enjoy watching birds or birdwatchers birdwatchers and people that grow birds for eggs and eggs and meat and poultry farming. And I think there's room for there's certainly room for both both of those approaches and they're very different. They're very different and they're both. They're both valid but we have to recognize that there is there. Are these two ways of working with the bees not just not just managing it for maximum honey production or maximum pollination belly but but it's perfectly valley to to enjoy a colony of bees just as as a living system it is beautiful in its own right even if it makes no hunting produces only it's pollination.

California B. Wendell Berry America Connie Roy Right Prince North America Central Valley New York Florida
"wendell berry" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Most beekeepers on an older be by all money beat biologists. Oh It's absolutely incredible. Incredible and of course you know you mentioned previously that the sociology and And really the communication That's unique is also really the key to their success as a species and and that they have been quite a successful species accounting for are you know almost half of of pollination that said we also know that human activities as is so often. The case are really threatening the honeybee right now so I would love to maybe take the last bit of our chat to talk about what some of the the threats that these organisms might the facing. What's the difference between the threats that kept bees are dealing with versus? What's going on in the wild and kind of what can we? What can we learn from from these BS? B.'s that's these and you've put your finger on her a really important subject regarding the human honeybee human being honeybee maybe relationship right now. We're doing a number of things that go with the bees that are living under our management and beekeepers hives reduce the number of things things that are making life harder and harder for these. These beautiful Bee's One is is very is very simply described were were spreading reading poisons in the environment Using lots of pesticides and in the fields where the beezer brought to do their pollination work and that's that's that's deadly hedley combination of bringing bs and then spring the fields with insecticides of these would be spring in in orchards and things like like that. So that's one one combination another is in love. We're we introduced on some parasites sites Particularly a little might from an Asian species honeybee was introduced to the European and African species. Vichy's of Honeybee and this little might is very good at transmitting. The bees viruses. It's a great vector for sore some nasty viruses of the bees. And that's that's been a that's probably been equally. Bad killer of Honeybee. Colonies both managed colonies wild colonies So that's that's another thing that we've we've done to make life hard for honeybees and then there's a long standing aspect of the human being honeybee relationship is that we've always been unintentionally in it and thus inadvertently We've been making life hard for them by just putting them in hives and managing the colonies to be very productive honey complicated topic topic. But there's a lot of things about the life of of a honeybee colonies. They're made more difficult when they're living under human human management. C'mon yours just one example beekeepers for an eye in the beekeeper for our convenience. We put the we put our hives together in groups which feature called Apiary so be arts and that's convenient for the human being but for the B.'s. It's it's not so great because it means if one Connie get sick. The illness the pathogen parasite it's causing that. Illness spreads easily to the other colonies which it can be just a few feet away. So that's not that's not good for the bees and that's very different from how they live in the wild where they're usually living about anthem mile apart from between one hollow tree housing to be calling in another the so another is that we as we so often do. With agricultural animals. We we manipulate them to be extremely productive for the things that we want in the case of honeybees. Guess what that is. It's honey a lot of a lot of the technology and skill of beekeeping of or trade of beekeeping making honeybee colonies into very large urge units Having the colonies grow to a larger size than they would in nature instead of growing to twenty or thirty thousand to grow up to sixty thousand or even more bees to have a huge workforce so they can make and then they will make up Mr up lots and lots of honey so that and that means that the colonies are even more prone to diseases. Because they're they've got all these resources inside them for the parasites and pathogens to who exploited. So that's another thing that we do and then another third thing one that we see very traumatically north. America's we we we should. I think it's close to two thirds of the honeybee colonies in North America are transported every spring from wherever they are whether it's in Florida or a New York state or Wherever out to California into the Central Valley of California for the allman pollination and that's that is just just very hard on the bees and I think statistically only about half the colonies that are taken out to those almond? Orchards are healthy when they come out or or still alive when they come out because it's just so much spread of disease and the trip itself is is apparently pretty hard on the beasts. It's being trucked thousands and thousands of miles. Gosh I had no idea I knew almonds were really intensive when it came to water usage surge and that that was something that was like I don't know if almond milk is the best alternative But I had no idea what kind of impact Almond farming had on on bees. Yeah Almond Pollen Almond productions is knowing water-intensive. It's be intensive in needs off every every flower. It's GonNa make the fruit or seed and nut on Esta pollinator show up and and move the pollen from one one plant to another. So yeah. It's it's it's it's really hard. All beekeepers loved their bees. But they don't always we they're not every action that beekeepers take. His is a what you'd have. I have to say as a loving or carrying action even though and that's something that we're just starting to realize because one of the curious things about honeybees and bees and beekeeping is that it's only in about the last few decades we've known anything about the natural lives of bees beekeepers. Beekeepers developed hives thou- sturdy starting thousands of years ago as we talked about. And we've never an once. People once human beings go visit hives then. They focused on their lives of the bees and the hives and how to manipulate them. And how to you know. I got to say honest exploited the lives of these BS living in the beekeepers hives with those could be boxes. EXES or SCALLOPS. Whatever log hives whatever so our focus almost every beekeepers focus has always been on the bees living in his or her hives which is very unnatural? And so now were we've gone back and looked at how bees are living and and Wendell Berry. Put It really nicely I paraphrase. What one of his famous quotes and user into agricultural practices generally says? We've never really known what we were doing doing. Because we've never known what we were undoing. We only can know it. We're undoing if we would see what nature is doing if we were doing nothing. And that's talk for bees and beekeeping beekeepers have not. We don't know what we're doing that because we haven't known what we're undoing because we didn't know what their natural lives were like. But that's so that's what I and others have been looking at intensively for as`safe route past about forty years. Now and that really ultimately is kind of the thesis this of of your notebook the lives of bees the untold story of the Honeybee in the wild because in understanding kind of the the success assess of this species in the wild we can actually learn from them and maybe apply some of those strategies that have been you know honed by hundreds of thousands millions of years and utilize them in in our beekeeping. You I think that's I think that's Roy Right. And that's one of the things I I the ideas that I present in this book. It's not GonNa be this idea of letting beast lift more naturally probably will not who will certainly will not apply apply to the commercial beekeeper with thousands or tens of thousands of hives of bees but it is very relevant to the to the hobby beekeeper. That might have a handful of colonies where they can let the they don't need the high production they're not trucking their colonies around they can be they can give the beasts let them live kinder gentler lives And so that's yes I think so. One of the positive aspects of the of this a growing body of knowledge of the natural lights of bees and most beekeepers are small-scale beekeepers are hobbyists and they have the bees interests first first and foremost. That's for them. It's a lot like I like to like to compare what I see. Is that two kinds of beekeeping and it's like the difference Prince with one on the one hand you've got the small skill beekeeper and on the other hand you've got the large commercial in. It's much like the difference between people that enjoy watching birds or birdwatchers birdwatchers and people that grow birds for eggs and eggs and meat and poultry farming. And I think there's room for there's certainly room for both both of those approaches and they're very different. They're very different and they're both. They're both valid but we have to recognize that there is there. Are these two ways of working with the bees not just not just managing it for maximum honey production or maximum pollination belly but but it's perfectly valley to to enjoy a colony of bees just as as a living system it is beautiful in its own right even if it makes no hunting produces only it's pollination.

California B. Wendell Berry America Connie Roy Right Prince North America Central Valley New York Florida
"wendell berry" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on KCRW

"Out of the basin stop on top of that but he's also been harvesting for many years nearby there's the rock pool what he also frequently works there are layers of memories here he knows what this place looks like in every season Wendell berry wrote an essay and he asked the question what are people for his answer is people are for preserving memory of place that's what I do here it's the deep knowledge of a particular place all the memories the playoff Hanson says climate change has affected his crop tide pools of warm inviting plants that squeeze out to sea weed he looks out and what has become of his beloved bay and says he's filled with anger he rails against the commercial sea weed harvesters use dragger is that he says destroy the sea weed beds with the plants grow he questions the food that is held sacred here lobster a multi million dollar industry may what's the ratio now between food produced and fuel usage how much fuel does it take to run a midwater troll to get the bait how much fuel does it take to get on a lobster boat and go on home I'll get tarred and feathered for saying this but this is how I feel as you get a very emotional when you talk I don't know how to get up in the morning and think about this world and not having to injure sadness about the condition it's in right now so I get a little frustrated when I'm trying to transmit a whole bunch of information at once and there's so many stories that I want to tell.

Wendell berry Hanson million dollar
"wendell berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Committed to a California where all low income workers have the power to advance economically learn more at Irvine dot org on the way next on KQED it's All Things Considered it coming up on the program an interesting interview with San Francisco's owned the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi she's interviewed by NPR's ari Shapiro on a number of topics and you'll hear part of that interview in the next segment which is just ahead I Michael state fund offer KQED listener perspective Melinda sacks cherishes her idyllic home in its wooded setting but she says the prevalence of catastrophic fires hacer wondering whether to stay or leave I've always loved falling asleep to the sound of rain but after last summer living in hills so parched they seemed about to self combust the rain is more relief than anything else in dry months a cigarette Asher spark from windblown power line could turn our Wonderland into an inferno. oyster fire marshal to help us make our house fire safe this was not a happy conversation between wood siding collecting leaves an overhanging trees it's hard to know where to begin not to mention that four hundred acre park that hasn't burned in a hundred years across the street. a hundred feet of defensible space clear of anything flammable no way. the fire marshal says your house is built to burn I wouldn't live here. I asked what we could do in he ticks off a list remover gorgeous trumpet vine reside or would house with stucco replace our decks with synthetic material and cut back all the trees he says to photograph everything we care about remove important papers put a go back by the door and increase our homeowner's insurance and even if we do all this our real problem is escaping a fire a road is barely wide enough for emergency vehicles imagine all the neighbors getting in their cars once can you run a wildfire not even on a good day and certainly not telling my elderly dog. after the fire marshal leaves I stand on our deck among the redwood city oaks I fell in love with when we moved here I can hear juncos happily chirping these glories of nature drew us here. people all over the world live with the risk of disaster but how much is too much a few lines from Wendell berry poem provide momentary comfort I come into the piece of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief for a time I rest in the grace of the world and them free. with the perspective by Melinda south Melinda sex is a nature loving writer living in emerald hills and we invite you to share your thoughts on Melinda's commentary by going online to KQED dot org slash perspectives support for perspectives comes from Comcast business offering internet.

Melinda sacks KQED ari Shapiro Irvine dot Nancy Pelosi NPR San Francisco Wendell berry writer California Comcast Michael emerald hills four hundred acre hundred years hundred feet
"wendell berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"wendell berry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bag by the door and increase our homeowner's insurance and. Even if we do all this. Our real problem is escaping afire. A road is barely wide enough for emergency vehicles. Imagine all the neighbors getting in their cars at once. Can you outrun a wildfire? Not even on a good day, and certainly not telling my elderly dog after the fire marshal leaves. I stand on our deck among the redwoods and oaks, I fell in love with when we moved here. I can hear Junkers happily chirping these glories of nature drew us here. People all over the world live with the risk of disaster. But how much is too much a few lines from a Wendell berry poem provide momentary comfort? I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief for a time. I rest in the grace of the world and in free with the perspective. I'm melinda. Saxe? Melinda. Saxe is the nature loving writer living in emerald hills. And we invite you to share your thoughts on her commentary by going online dot org slash perspectives. Support for perspectives comes from Comcast dedicated to serving California communities with access to technology volunteering time, providing financial support and connecting people in need to high speed internet at home, more in California dot com, cast dot com. Support for NPR comes from Teradata working to transform how businesses work through the power of data using pervasive. Data intelligence Teradata leverage is all relevant data to deliver answer. Too complex business issues. Teradata dot com. By his cocks, his Cox Taylor's its policies to fit. The unique needs of each small business quotes and information on insurance. Policies are available at Hiscox dot com. His Cox, encourage courage,.

Teradata Saxe Hiscox dot Cox Taylor California Wendell berry Junkers Bag Comcast emerald hills writer NPR