25 Burst results for "Wellesley College"

Hey, Remember the Olympics?

Why It Matters

05:12 min | 6 months ago

Hey, Remember the Olympics?

"For many sports, the Olympics is the apex of what they can achieve as athletes, and it's a chance for the world to see incredible incredible athletes out there on the world stage. My name is Julius boy, cough and I. Teach Political Science at Pacific University, Oregon. Professor boy cough has written four books about the Olympics and as it turns out. He's also a former member of the US men's Olympic soccer team. and. That is really why the Olympics have stuck around and Ben so successful. Were it not for the athletes? We wouldn't really have the Olympic Games of course the money shuffle has become a big part of that. We can talk about that later, but for athletes in lesser known sports, sake curling in the Winter Olympics or maybe equestrian or something like that in the Summer Olympics, this is their one chance to make big. Now I think we have to remember that. The Olympics the Olympic Games themselves are a value or ideal driven event. I'm Katherine Moon and I am a professor of political. Science at Wellesley College I study issues related to eastasia particularly the Koreas and I love to talk about culture and values in international politics. As much as we say, it is about pure athleticism and fairer competition. It really was an is about ideals, human, being the human spirit to strive for excellence, and to do once best, and to be proud to be wist others who are excellent in their fields. And I think that's what drives people to go to the Olympics and to watch the Olympics. It's changed my life completely. Cultures and values together. Research big. So. It's July and we were supposed to start watching the summer Olympics in about a week, so what the heck happened! Yeah. The Olympics got corona virus and. They had to push back for a year. When you look back at that moment, there were calls to cancel the Olympics. There were calls to postpone the Olympics and the members of the International Olympic Committee seemed determined to press ahead with the games this at a time when other sports were shutting down, world soccer was shutting down various sports leagues around the world, and yet the International Olympic Committee felt like they needed to press ahead and the real reason why the. International Olympic Committee finally acted was because Canada basically said they were going to do a de facto boycott. If the Games were held in twenty twenty, they were soon followed by. The National Olympic Committees from Australia Portugal Germany, and when that all happened the International Olympic Committee had no choice but to postpone, and that's exactly what they did so now. They're slated for July twenty twenty one. To move has finally been confirmed. The signs are all over Tokyo symbols of what was supposed to be the Japanese revival. A comeback crushed at least for now. We're talking about it. Doesn't it seven years in the making millions of dollars. Two hundred countries at eleven thousand athletes. You can't just pick another date on the calendar. The Olympic Games have only been canceled three times. The first time was in nineteen sixteen during World War One. The second and third time we're in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty and nineteen, forty, four, due to World War Two. It's still unclear whether the twenty twenty games will become forth historic cancellation. The current plan is to begin them on July Twenty Fourth Two thousand twenty one. But. Many experts are skeptical of this time line, arguing that there is no guarantee that the corona virus will be fully under control in a year. Still the struggle to preserve the twenty twenty games shows just how invested host countries become an success. What's at stake for Japan as the situation plays out. Well Japan has plunged a lot of money and prestige and human capital into making the Games happen if we think back to when they were originally bidding on the Olympics, they said that the entire escapade would cost seven point three billion dollars, but by the time this summer rolled around, they had spent some twenty eight billion dollars, according to an audit by the Japanese government, and so that's four times what they had originally planned postponing means adding anywhere from two to six billion dollars. Those are the best guesses that we have now. So what's at stake for Japan is they've already spent way more money than they expected and now they might not even get the Olympics to actually

Olympics International Olympic Committe National Olympic Committees Professor Soccer Julius Boy United States Japan Oregon Wellesley College Pacific University BEN Katherine Moon Japanese Government Tokyo Australia Portugal Germany Canada
Remember the Olympics?

Why It Matters

05:42 min | 6 months ago

Remember the Olympics?

"I'll be the first to admit that I am not a huge sports fan. I don't follow the NBA and I tend to wander away from the TV during Football Games, but I do love to watch the Olympics, and that's because it's actually super cool to see whole nations rallying behind one team. It becomes something more than a game. It becomes this uniting cultural moment. It's like a global holiday, and so with a little bit of extra couch time on my hands I was very ready to tune into this summer's Tokyo Olympics the perfect distraction. But the July twenty twenty Olympic. Games aren't going to be held this month. They've been postponed by a full year. This decision wasn't made lightly. And in fact, Japan is working around the clock to try to figure out how to keep their games. Despite a global pandemic, it's part of a long story for decades. Just like their athletes. Countries have competed fiercely to host the Games despite mounting evidence that they usually represent a significant financial loss, and that made us ask why, if not money, what's the games offer that so special and worth so much effort I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today, the Olympics soft power and the deep running politics of the World Games. For many sports, the Olympics is the apex of what they can achieve as athletes, and it's a chance for the world to see incredible incredible athletes out there on the world stage. My name is Julius boy, cough and I. Teach Political Science at Pacific University, Oregon. Professor boy cough has written four books about the Olympics and as it turns out. He's also a former member of the US men's Olympic soccer team. and. That is really why the Olympics have stuck around and Ben so successful. Were it not for the athletes? We wouldn't really have the Olympic Games of course the money shuffle has become a big part of that. We can talk about that later, but for athletes in lesser known sports, sake curling in the Winter Olympics or maybe equestrian or something like that in the Summer Olympics, this is their one chance to make big. Now I think we have to remember that. The Olympics the Olympic Games themselves are a value or ideal driven event. I'm Katherine Moon and I am a professor of political. Science at Wellesley College I study issues related to eastasia particularly the Koreas and I love to talk about culture and values in international politics. As much as we say, it is about pure athleticism and fairer competition. It really was an is about ideals, human, being the human spirit to strive for excellence, and to do once best, and to be proud to be wist others who are excellent in their fields. And I think that's what drives people to go to the Olympics and to watch the Olympics. It's changed my life completely. Cultures and values together. Research big. So. It's July and we were supposed to start watching the summer Olympics in about a week, so what the heck happened! Yeah. The Olympics got corona virus and. They had to push back for a year. When you look back at that moment, there were calls to cancel the Olympics. There were calls to postpone the Olympics and the members of the International Olympic Committee seemed determined to press ahead with the games this at a time when other sports were shutting down, world soccer was shutting down various sports leagues around the world, and yet the International Olympic Committee felt like they needed to press ahead and the real reason why the. International Olympic Committee finally acted was because Canada basically said they were going to do a de facto boycott. If the Games were held in twenty twenty, they were soon followed by. The National Olympic Committees from Australia Portugal Germany, and when that all happened the International Olympic Committee had no choice but to postpone, and that's exactly what they did so now. They're slated for July twenty twenty one. To move has finally been confirmed. The signs are all over Tokyo symbols of what was supposed to be the Japanese revival. A comeback crushed at least for now. We're talking about it. Doesn't it seven years in the making millions of dollars. Two hundred countries at eleven thousand athletes. You can't just pick another date on the calendar. The Olympic Games have only been canceled three times. The first time was in nineteen sixteen during World War One. The second and third time we're in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty and nineteen, forty, four, due to World War Two. It's still unclear whether the twenty twenty games will become forth historic cancellation. The current plan is to begin them on July Twenty Fourth Two thousand twenty one. But. Many experts are skeptical of this time line, arguing that there is no guarantee that the corona virus will be fully under control in a year. Still the struggle to preserve the twenty twenty games shows just how invested host countries become an success.

Olympics International Olympic Committe Olympic National Olympic Committees Professor Soccer NBA Wellesley College Japan United States Oregon Julius Boy Football Pacific University Tokyo Katherine Moon
Black Americans are twice as likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19

Squawk Pod

07:20 min | 8 months ago

Black Americans are twice as likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19

"In the midst of historic pandemic in America, is entering its eleventh night of protests, following the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis, these two storms as mercy. Oh Ken. Frazier put it earlier this week. Share a common thread. They revealed the deep inequities that run through our society. Tonight. We'll bring you an inside look at efforts to develop treatments to make a dent in this pandemic, but we start with another look into our health care system the fact that these protests are happening around the issue of racial injustice during a pandemic that. That disproportionately affects African Americans in just one example, take a look at this CDC data show that a New York City the death rate from covid nineteen is more than double for patients who are black and African American. Compared with those who are white, and these are trends that we see across the country Dr, Arnn Powell is the executive director of times up healthcare, and previously led the Office of Health Equity for the State of Virginia Department of Health Dr Powell. Thank you for being here tonight. I want to ask you about a really remarkable op ED. Stat news this week. Where you said this situation, this coming together of events was your worst nightmare. You saw this coming. Tell us about that. Yes definitely I did see this coming as a public health professional, and also as a black woman, my biggest fear, essentially that these two moments live would converge together. understanding very early on the impacts that covid nineteen. What have on the African American community? My biggest nightmare was that there would be another shooting of an unarmed black person, and that could lead to massive protests in the midst of a pandemic, and while I understand the anguish and the need, and and the the desire protests and the underlying root for protesting This is still a pandemic, and so that is the crust of my worst nightmares how we still keep people safe in public health emergency. But one of the things you also point out and one of the things you have worked on in your career is the fact that these? Inequities exist in the healthcare system. Have, you seen any evidence that this moment is a moment for progress there. We talked with Dr. she earlier today. WHO said there are both short-term and long-term efforts that need to be made. Do See any progress that is starting as a result of this. What are think you know? We can look sort of state level, and we have to live by state to actually see what interventions are being implemented. I am encouraged by some of the work of the Commonwealth of Virginia. that has a health equity leadership task force in a health equity work group that is focused specifically on mitigating. The health equity impact of Covid, nineteen and essentially very focused on ensuring that populations that are under under-resourced, getting the resources that they actually need in order to come out of this public health emergency a little bit better. We'll stick with US I want to bring in also Dr Paula Johnson, who is a former professor of medicine and Public Health at Harvard? She's also a cardiologist and she's currently the president of Wellesley College Doctor Johnson thanks for joining us on the phone. You wrote a piece recently this week a Wellesley, Alumna. who graduated from Wellesley just five years after I, did actually? She died at the end of April from covid nineteen. You said that her death tells us volumes. Tell us about Rhona Zoe. Negative it's great to be. We can do as well as a you. Dr Powell You know I'm. Very much was a brilliant young writer and a teacher in Brooklyn and had underlying asthma. and. She began to have symptoms of typical symptoms of Cova. went to the hospital. Actually twice, and it's treated for. Asthma was quite ill actually with told that she might have. Anxiety was sent home until the third time you had to call an ambulance and get to the hospital when she was intimated, and we know that this disease quickly turn from a reasonable oxygen level and the. One that is quite low and she never recovered. you know the there was a tremendous attempt to get her to transferred to a tertiary care hospital and and Haton so that she could again on one of the new trials, and with a lot of invention, actually by a lot of Wellesley alumnae. She was finally transferred, so but so sadly, she passed away. and it's it's really a story that is heartbreaking but not unfortunately unusual in terms of women of color, people of Color, but I think the mix of sex of gender and races is particularly toxic. and the lack of taking people. Consume seriously. and even care is accessible. It nearly not the adequate. And I. Know that you both have done work. Also around gender issues in healthcare is well and one of the things you wrote Dr. Johnson is that it wasn't until the nineteen nineties that women's started being included in clinical trials, and that came about after women were elected in in larger numbers to Congress after the Anita Hill Clarence Thomas hearings. Do you see this as kind of similar moment a pivotal point in history that could actually stir some change. This is such an important moment in time when we have seen both issues of sexism, racism, and the combination the great inequities in our society, really laid bare by this epidemic, both from a health and health care perspective from inequity in in in what's happening in terms of. Income. And the unemployment rate. And and on top of that to experience. the additional tragedies of killing that the seen recently on top of so many others. It's really are coming to their their of so many insult that it is a moment I think the wake up moment, and we're seeing that seeing their you know across the country and as we think about. And and women of Color, and there are health status, and their treatment It is a moment where I think there will be a greater call for more active engagement at the tables that make the decisions and I think that's where we're missing. if we are not at the table making decisions about the trials about the analysis Alpha,

Wellesley Dr Paula Johnson Arnn Powell Medicine And Public Health Office Of Health Equity Virginia Department Of Health Dr Powell George Floyd Wellesley College Frazier Minneapolis America African American Community Doctor Johnson CDC
Arlene

PODSHIP EARTH

08:05 min | 10 months ago

Arlene

"Dr Arlene Blum is a biophysical chemist and author a mountaineer and Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute Scientific Research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals like pizzas in children's sleepwear furniture electronics and other products worldwide. Arlene blum received a PhD from UC Berkeley and has told at Stanford University and Wellesley College. But that's only a fraction of Alino story arlene the first American and all woman ascent of an opponent. One considered one of the world's most dangerous and difficult mountains. She Co lead the first women's team to climb. Denali completed the Great Himalayan traverse across the mountain ranges of Bhutan the Pollen India and height the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She's the author of Ana Pana a woman's place which was named one of the top one hundred best adventure books of all time by National Geographic. She also wrote the highly acclaimed book breaking trail. A climbing. Life. In two thousand eighteen bloom was inducted into the California Hall of fame. She was chosen by the Guardian as one of the world's one hundred most inspiring women. Dr Bloom is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And if that wasn't enough Eileen was elected to the whole of mountaineering. Excellent Hey uh keep me from getting. You remember the day where we're sitting right now. I mean we're sitting in Tilden Park on. Trail called seaview with a wonderful view of the bay. While flowers greenhills Gorgeous California. And why so many people on the trail today? Well it turns out that everyone has been ordered to stay home or go outdoors and everything's closed so there are a lot more people outdoors than usual. Which is a good thing and you walk every single day. Tell us about that routine and and how you got into it. Well I do pretty intense work and I work really hard because I have so many opportunities and I've discovered that if every day I take a walk with friends or colleagues or sometimes even the chemical industry executives with whom I do not see eye to eye. It's extremely good for my physical health. My mental health and my work. You have an incredible history of climbing of mountaineering. Have you always had a passion for climbing and mountaineering? How did that start? I was raised by incredibly cautious and conservative Orthodox Jewish grandparents in Chicago and was not allowed to do anything and I push push push to just be able to take swimming lessons and so I guess I started early with coming up with things I really wanted to do and then pushing to be able to do them. When I was a Grad student at Berkeley I heard about an expedition to Denali Mount McKinley. The Highest Mountain in North America. And I'd been climbing a lot with my friends from Reed College and had climbed higher than Denali in Peru and apply gone the trap and was told that women could go as far as base camp to help with the cooking. And when I called to say well I've climbed higher than Denali. They said. Yeah you were the only woman. You probably didn't do your share you know. Women really can't time high mountains. I wonder if a team of all women could climb high mountains and I found five other women and we went and kind to Nali ourselves. All women were the first all women's team and indeed not only. Did we climb it? But our leader had altitude sickness and became unconscious just below the summit and at that point. I was twenty five. I was the deputy leader because I'd organized and suddenly I was in charge of our Denali expedition with an unconscious person at twenty thousand feet and a big Arctic storm. Coming in and We actually made a stretcher dragged her down the mountain and it was really empowering to me. I mean I'd had a lot of negative messages in my childhood about what I couldn't couldn't do and I thought wow we got grace down from Denali Alive. We can do anything. We dream up so that was really inspiring for me to realize sick. We can all do things and we believe possible when we have to then. You just kept going though. That wasn't the end of your mountaineering. No I love being in the mountains. I love being outdoors. I love being here. I seem to like challenge. I was on a nineteen. Seventy six expedition climbed Everest. We were the second American expedition in those days. Hard to believe we have the whole mountain to ourselves and I climbed to nearly twenty five thousand feet and on the way back. I thought at that point all the world's highest mountains over eight thousand meters. That's kind of a magic height They all had been cleaned by men but no woman had ever climbed eight thousand meters and people were saying maybe women couldn't and I thought well we climbed. Denali got twenty four Everest. Let's give him a chance. So on my way back from I I applied for a permit for Anna Purna one and it was the first eight thousand meter peak ever climbed. It has the highest fatality rate. And it's now considered the hardest climb and we did not know that and so In nineteen seventy eight. I did organize an an all women's expedition and we were successful. We were the first women and indeed the first Americans to climb out of that reinforced my belief that we can all do seemingly impossible things and I'd say now is a good time for all of us to be doing seemingly impossible things because it's it's tough right now. Your experience shows me and the tough things that I've done in my life is that you can move past them that they're not insurmountable and even if they are to continue moving forward with with those challenges. I've never been above eight thousand meters. What what is it like? I mean the physicality of losing that oxygen. Do you get addicted to that. It feels like a very rarefied club of people that understand and know something that the rest of us don't well first of all it's the most beautiful place ever being above timberline with clouds on your feet the extreme beauty and peace and so it is so beautiful. But you know being here until the park is so beautiful to you. Don't have to be on top of Anna Perna and there's a huge amount of focus. You have a goal and you get a great team and everybody shares ICAL. But I'm always kind of looking for family and a climbing expedition is like a family but perhaps better family dynamics and some families have so you have a family of people all focused on a goal. And you're in a beautiful place using every bit of your physical energy but your mental energy problem solving. So it's it's super focused. Every since I became a mom didn't want to risk my life because if you know this but the chances of dying about one in ten climbing those mountains so it seriously dangerous so for me as a mom. I don't want to risk my life on the other hand what I'm doing now which is reducing harmful chemicals that are in our bodies and our products and our planet so it's got a very similar similar feeling of of getting a great team family of people who share a common goal and then persevering through avalanches and storms and Yetis. And what have you

Dr Arlene Blum Highest Mountain Denali Mount Mckinley Denali Ana Pana Great Himalayan European Alps Alino Green Science Policy Institute Institute Scientific Research Executive Director Guardian Anna Perna Stanford University Reed College Dr Bloom Wellesley College Tilden Park Berkeley
STEMinists: Annie Jump Cannon

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:56 min | 1 year ago

STEMinists: Annie Jump Cannon

"Stars changing the way we see the universe around us catalogue included two hundred and thirty thousand stars meet annie jump cannon any jump cannon was was born in eighteen sixty three she grew up in dover delaware where her father was a shipbuilder and a state senator she had four older step siblings and two brothers as a child and his mother had been fascinated with the night sky and she passed out of stargazing to anne anyone to school at the wilmington conference academy adamy. She was an excellent student and was particularly adept at math in eighteen eighty. She was sent to top colleges for women at the time wellesley college in massachusetts. She majored in physics. Anne didn't do well in the cold. New england climate she fell ill with repeated infections and came down the scarlet fever causing her to go almost completely deaf still she graduated in eighteen eighty four and then returned home where life was pretty boring. She found the career options for women at the time on interesting and she was older and more educated than most of her unmarried peers annie's hearing loss also made it difficult socialize so anne found a hobby photography in eighteen ninety two. She travelled through europe and took pictures of the blair box camera pawn her return. Her photos and writings from spain were published in a pamphlet by the camera company. The pamphlet entitled in the footsteps of columbus was was distributed at the chicago world columbian exposition in eighteen ninety three in eighteen ninety. Four annie's mother passed away any then wrote to one of her a former professors at wellesley to seek employment. Her professor hired her as an assistant giving anti access graduate classes in physics and astronomy the the professor she was working for also introduced anne to spectroscopy spectroscopy is the study of how matter interacts with electromagnetic radiation and is used in many scientific fields today it particularly helps astronomers understand what materials cosmic bodies are made of and how a particular body is moving. Anne was hooked on the stars. She enrolled at radcliffe college. The women's college connected with harvard for access to a higher quality telescope hope in eighteen ninety six and he was hired as an assistant by the famous director of the harvard observatory edward c pickering pickering occurring hired a group of women to map and categorize every star in the sky of a certain photographic magnitude the people involved in this massive endeavor had different ideas ideas for how to best tackle the sorting of stars ranging from extremely complicated to quite simplistic. Annie's plan fell somewhere in the middle. She devised a scheme mm to measure the stars and classify them by temperature. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this classification system as it was the first attempt at creating any kind of comprehensive catalogue of the night sky. It was like the dewey decimal system for stars despite the fact that any other women working at the harvard observatory tori. We're doing groundbreaking work. They were only paid twenty five cents an hour him. That's less than what the secretaries at the university earned at the time nevertheless last any continued her scientific work for more than forty years she published additional star catalogues discovered three hundred variable stars yourself in one thousand nine hundred eighty one she won the henry draper medal from the national academy of sciences and in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. She was named the william seat bon astronomer at harper harper. After an illustrious career anti cannon died on april thirteenth nineteen forty one tune in tomorrow for the story of another stellar feminist

Anne Annie Radcliffe College Harvard Observatory Wellesley College Wilmington Conference Academy Harper Harper Cannon Delaware Henry Draper Spain Massachusetts Wellesley Dover Europe National Academy Of Sciences Senator Harvard Fever
Who Was Marjory Stoneman Douglas?

BrainStuff

04:27 min | 1 year ago

Who Was Marjory Stoneman Douglas?

"After the horrific parkland florida's school shooting in february of two thousand eighteen marjory stoneman douglas became a household name for all the wrong reasons but let's take a look today at the woman for whom the school was named marjory stoneman douglas undertook a legendary in dairy fifty year crusade to save the florida everglades born in minneapolis in eighteen ninety and educated at wellesley college in massachusetts douglas moved to south florida in nineteen fifteen fifteen after a brief and disastrous marriage to join her father who was editor and founder of the newspaper that would become the miami herald she was an accomplished journalist short story writer writer and an outspoken advocate for women's suffrage anti-poverty campaigns and ultimately because it would make her famous. The everglades douglas's nineteen forty seven owed into those wetlands. The everglades river of grass was published the same year that president harry s truman dedicated the everglades national park long before environmental scientists fully understood the fragility and interconnectedness of the everglades ecosystem douglas railed against efforts by the us army corps of engineers to drain divert parts of the sprawling wetlands to to make room for agricultural and urban development. These efforts continue today. The school was dedicated in nineteen ninety when douglas was one hundred years old and still going strong along with her book. Douglas provided a new way of understanding the one point five million acre wetlands preserve rather than seeing it as merely a sprawling swamp douglas rightly described the everglades massive slow moving river of shallow water draining north to south from lake okeechobee down through the sawgrass prairies and emptying into the florida florida bay in moving pros douglas road of the hundreds of species of birds fish and flora that thrived in the precariously balanced ecosystem of the everglades the largest subtropical wilderness in the united states. She rightly recognized that this area was largely responsible for the rainfall in south florida are book begins. There are no oh other everglades in the world they are. They've always been one of the unique regions of the earth remote. Never wholly known nothing anywhere else is like them a tireless and often intimidating advocate. She founded the organization friends of the everglades at age seventy nine to fight a proposed jet port in the middle of the wetlands lends. The airport plan was scrapped. Douglas spent the rest of her life. Defending the everglades jon rothschild edited her nineteen eighty-seven autobiography voice of the river described her in the book's introduction as she appeared at a public meeting in everglades city in nineteen seventy-three. Mrs douglas was half the size of her fellow. Speakers were huge dark glasses along with the huge floppy hat that made her look like scarlet o'hara's played by eager stravinsky when she spoke everybody's stop slapping mosquitoes and more or or less came to order. Her voice had sobering effect of a one room schoolmarm. 's the tone itself seemed tame. The rowdiest of the local stone crabbers plus the developers and the lawyers on both besides there are two seasons in the everglades. The dry winter and the monsoon summer and scientists now understand that seasonal fluctuations in water levels are key to maintaining the delicate equilibrium between competing plant and animal species but that balanced spend dangerously disturbed decades of habitat loss and short-sighted water-management tactics tactics. The river of grass is no longer a free flowing sheet of water but sliced up and boxed in by dams and dikes creating floods in some areas and drought in others congress passed the comprehensive everglades restoration plan back in the year two thousand but the funds to implement the plan never secured in the meantime lake shelby obi historically the water source that fed southward flow of the river of grass has become hopelessly polluted largely by agricultural runoff in two thousand sixteen high levels of phosphorus is a nitrogen in the lake caused a toxic algae bloom. The prompted the governor to issue a state of emergency eric eichenberger c._e._o. Of the everglades foundation and one time student at douglas's namesake high school says that congress will have to reauthorize funding for the restoration but if everything goes well the river of grass could be restored in as little as eight years he believes the douglas who died in nine hundred ninety eight at the age of one hundred and eight would be energized by the effort among douglas many honors and awards was the presidential medal of freedom conferred conferred by bill clinton in one thousand nine hundred three in the year two thousand she was posthumously inducted into the national women's hall of fame. Douglas ashes were scattered in the everglades national park over the marjory stoneman douglas wilderness area.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Florida Everglades Everglades National Park Everglades River Everglades Foundation Everglades City Writer Florida United States Miami Herald South Florida Harry S Truman Florida Florida Bay Massachusetts Lake Okeechobee Wellesley College Minneapolis Eric Eichenberger President Trump Bill Clinton
Who Is The Neoliberal Shill Of The Year?

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Who Is The Neoliberal Shill Of The Year?

"Couple of weeks ago. I was talking to call him Mortimer. He's college student who runs a competition called the Neo liberal Schill of the year, the wet works. Is you go to the Twitter page at near liberal that's near liberal, but with zero for the O he's put together a bracket kind of like match madness. He's asking people to vote for who they think is the greatest neo-liberal Schill, and Colin told me that Stacy Vinik Smith and cod. If Garcia from the indicator they're going to be in the running, but cut if in Stacey didn't know. And I told khadafy Stacey that I'd love to speak with them in a studio. I didn't say why calling can you hear us? Yes. I can hear you. Colin what's going on can you reduce it south to us? So my name is Colin I am the co founder and executive director of the neo-liberal project. And when new liberalism, basically said was markets are not like an end markets are means to end, we want wanna harness markets to make everyone wealthier to make society more equitable and into make the world a better place, and you run a competition. What does that? So I run the neoliberal Schill bracket, which is an annual competition, which we highlight people that we believe contributed positively to economics and politics in the past year, Iran, the neoliberal Schill bracket. Yes, she'll sounds like not a compliment. She'll is a compliment show me. It's it's tongue-in-cheek. It's means that you shield for position that you stood up. And you said this is what I believe in. This thing is good. Okay. Side of right. And other words she'll for goodness show. That's exactly that's exactly what was Yoda like. Schill for the force iota was a show for the. Stacy I have some good news for you too. Okay. This year, you both been selected the apart the Neal show bracket, really. You both have I've mixed feelings. Committee deliberated Wong over it. And listen to hours of podcasts. And we look through your Twitter's read everything about you. Oh my gosh. So neoliberal is this really loaded word, what does even mean near liberals have been blamed for everything from lowering wages for US factory workers to killing turtles to some near liberalism, Maine's using markets and the government to make a soul, richer and half you to others. It's only made the rich wealthier at the expense of the rest of us. After the break. I'm going to explain what near liberalism, actually means and ask us, stay Cincotta. Neo-liberal Schillt's of the. Planet money indicator is made possible by CFP certified financial planner professionals who want you to know that certification makes a difference. A CFP professional is trained to create a holistic financial plan in your best interest. Learn more at let's make a plan dot org. Support also comes from ADT, America's trusted home security company can help protect you against break ins fires and carbon monoxide twenty four seven emergency response when you needed most more at ADT dot com to understand what neoliberalism means I caught up a historian. My name's Quinn's Loboda, and I teach history at Wellesley college Clin wrote a book about the birth of neoliberalism. He told me you can trace the word back to a handful of economics at one conference in France in nineteen thirty eight there was a gathering and Paris called the Walter Lippmann colloquium, and it was there that they that they took they chose this term neoliberalism to describe what they were doing which is trying to rethink liberalism. After the great depression, liberalism, not liberal in the way, we often talk about left wing liberals in the US, you know, people go online to own the libs, but classical liberalism, it's a collective where all those thinkers who like moving against the church after the nice on. David Hume, Adam Smith, David Ricardo. And and then associate those with political beliefs of free trade free markets are the rights individuals to see their self interests that kind of thing they organized a workshop in in Paris. And they all get got together there were intellectuals industrialists journalists politicians, what kind of things they believe in these imbedded groups of liberals there was a vision of an interconnected world economy that they felt needed to be kind of fought for and restored. They believed in the need for conditional free trade. They believed in the need for the free movement of capital over borders as a way to ensure kind of interdependence that would itself hopefully guarantee peace in the long run.

United States Colin I Twitter Stacy Vinik Smith Mortimer Khadafy Stacey Paris Cincotta CFP David Hume Garcia Iran ADT Neal Wong David Ricardo Walter Lippmann Wellesley College Clin
"wellesley college" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Forever35

"Wellesley college and Stanford law school, no big deal and a former writer for the beloved website, the toast. She's the author of the wedding date, which nylon called effervescent witty and sexy, which is and her new book. The proposal comes out Tober thirtieth. Now Roxane gay said about the proposal. There's so much to relate to and throughout the novel. There is a sharp feminist edge loved this one and you will too and BuzzFeed BuzzFeed, BuzzFeed said with sharp banter, a well rounded cast of characters and plenty of SUNY scenes jasmine gillary defends her position as one of the most exciting rom com writers out there. Woo. Yeah. I mean, those are two very exciting reviews. So I will say that when I saw rushing gay say that about the book, I was in the backseat of a friend's car. A friend of mine texted that to me, and like I screamed so loudly, my friend almost got in a car. So next I'm going to try to do that. If I. Those are a amazing reviews, but I can say as someone who's currently reading the proposal that it lives up to the hype. Oh, yeah. Oh, well, thank you so much, and we're thrilled to have you back. And we wanted to just kind of check in with you. But then also just bring you on board to answer. Some of our listener questions. I'm delighted to do though. So jasmine you're on day three hundred and what of your yoga challenge. I believe I night was three hundred forty nine. Okay. Almost a year almost. And when we first talked you think you were in like the the fifties. Yeah. Somewhere in the fifty s what is made you keep going with this practice of doing yoga in your home every day. You know, a few things that kept me going like I started doing it just sort of on a win like I had just gotten back from chip to New York. And in New York, I find that. I like exercise a lot more than I do at home. A lot less sedentary. And I was thinking, you know, I need to try to keep this up. Maybe I'll try to do yoga today. And then it was like, maybe I'll try geogra- for the next thirty days. And then I did, and I just kept going so few think like it has been really good for daily habit. I mean, a usually sometimes they do it in the morning and at night, but I almost always do that night before bed, and it really just sort of like gets me ready to go to bed. But also, the the thing that I noticed about it was, and I, you know, in that way that we beat ourselves up for like even good things. I've been thinking like, you know, I really only do like twenty to thirty minutes a day. This is not such a big deal. Other people do so much more. But I have really noticed like my whole body feels better which I mean because last year I was I went to in June of last year before I started doing yoga every day. I went to my college, reunion and just walking around campus. Like, you know, I have like as we all are getting old, right? Certain parts of your body hurt. So like, my back was hurting walking up. The stairs. My hip was hurting. Like there was a time. When my friends were all hanging out, and I had to go back and sit down in my room because my back her so much, and then I was back there this June. And I felt fine. Like, I was not taking ibuprofen constantly, my back did not her a, you know, the the beds were not comfortable to sleep on. But like my whole body just feels better which I didn't even realize until I went back in June. And was like, oh, wow. This really has made a difference to me, and I didn't expect that at all. Like that's not why started. But that's definitely why I've kept going. That's amazing. I'm jealous. I'm kind of jealous. Hurts amazing that you had that comparison because I do think it is so hard to see the progress in the changes day by day or even week by week. But for you to be able to say, oh, I felt so much different at this time previously, you know, in this place than I do now is like is very very inspiring..

BuzzFeed New York jasmine gillary Wellesley college SUNY writer Stanford law school ibuprofen thirty minutes thirty days
Missouri Republicans seek Eric Greitens' ouster after Josh Hawley's felony accusation

24 Hour News

02:31 min | 3 years ago

Missouri Republicans seek Eric Greitens' ouster after Josh Hawley's felony accusation

"Radio news i'm tim maguire her husband called her the silver fox many people across the country more barbara bush and former president george h w bush when they were in the white house mike rossier has this on her life former first lady barbara bush has died at age ninety two in a statement a family spokesman says she died tuesday born barbara pearson ryan new york barbara bush was wife to former president george h w bush and mother to former president george w bush who was one of six children the bushes were married january six nineteen fortyfive and had the longest marriage of any presidential couple in american history in a nineteen ninety commencement address at the all women wellesley college mrs bush told the graduates cherish your human connections i mike rossier ntsb chairman robert some old says a preliminary check to the engine that exploded on a southwest airlines flight shows one of the engine plant pam blades broke and showed signs of metal fatigue he adds part of that engine was found miles away from philadelphia where the plane made an emergency landing as the event unfolded later someone found a southwest airlines engine cowling at burnsville pennsylvania which is about seventy miles north west of here one woman passenger a mother of two returning to new mexico following a business trip to new york was killed seven other people were injured some old says it will take more than a year to complete the investigation police say man arrested outside of beverly hills home owned by taylor swift was wearing a mask had rubber gloves a knife rope and amunition and he told police that he had driven from his colorado home just to see the singer who was not at her home at that time he faces a number of charges this is a p radio news missouri attorney general josh hallway says his investigation into a veterans charity founded by governor eric brightens shows felony computer tampering i can't say is we believe that the evidence we have we'll support a finding of probable cause that the governor obtained the list used the list transmitted the list without the permission of the mission continues and he did so for political fundraising purposes gop state legislative leaders are calling on greitens to resign carl castle original newscaster on npr's morning edition who transitioned to the announcer on the.

White House GOP Attorney Missouri Colorado Beverly Hills Burnsville Southwest Airlines Chairman Ntsb Mrs Bush Fortyfive George W Bush George H York Barbara Pearson Barbara Bush George H W Bush President Trump NPR
"wellesley college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"It's on route one ninety five east by north street details are coming up with traffic on the threes a group of seven industrialized nations including france germany and the uk say they condemn the chemical weapons attack in syria and back the airstrikes carried out on saturday and teachers and arizona are moving toward a strike vote after a porsche for pay raises and increases in school funding fall short in other news now overall a spectator turnout for yesterday's boston marathon was down due to the cold rainy and wendy weather but it was still plenty loud the wellesley college screen tunnel wbz's kim tunnicliffe reports they were drenched to the bone but that didn't stop hundreds of wellesley college students from lining up along the course where they cheered wildly rooting the runners motivate brings everybody closer together your glasses are fogged up a hug the weather's definitely not great but we'll try we'll try to make the best a north carolina woman heard about the scream tunnel came out to support her husband who was running his first marathon in the rain or motherinlaw tagged along it's a great story to tell if you run through this battle through adversity excited to be in this area the most fun in wellesley kim tunnicliffe wbz newsradio ten thirty and it was a return to the boston marathon for a man who won the race fifty years ago wbz's mike macklin spoke with an ageless former champion one boston in nineteen sixty eight at the age of twenty one and b burford toed the line in hopkinton again on the fiftieth anniversary of his win at the age of seventy one he finished the race and then once you've run here and you've had some success and you witnessed the incredible community support then of course you wanna come back as much as you can and be part of it because there's there's no other celebration in running like this it was birth it's twenty four th boston and he was quick to acknowledge his most challenging span all winter getting lean and mean and fit and i should have gotten fat and.

uk syria porsche mike macklin hopkinton boston france germany arizona wellesley college kim tunnicliffe wellesley north carolina wbz fifty years
"wellesley college" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Brad keselowski when glass does your may has reserved ubuntu pete lau the two them in the kitchen kucan buying plan waned oman will nice when we clear be lam main goal hammered attracts of his deal with the ground being are taught me one more monday goran asking what had been the best allround machine with kim at with may mccain saying boy rapid melodrama pleasantly as ma real tall grass from the ts gouami slim has been a very iraq data's i never been a valium pill snippy sized chugai dyson matt allen the headline to the bali make detroit my all bunel smoke unknown at galle on like doing wide mallon speak nick is pete welcome when me to quit john made to put the majors no weapon in rural china take my pretty worldwide like the early part of a west gun santer michael piper wellesley college not quite ways his yacht the mom arteries that open you know we've got a california euro order now we can get the boy you appalling ways is the well the young cottage in joe kelley berber watch call the car will be known accurately boom boom boom boom boom get him in congress in the west as nice place in the west wing some nice brisk sadly past the condemns stack david la rice any kid the rest us as night in the west wing them nights press was mixed signals correct come on these barth operate in shale sale must things that the seige think a one from the hale i'm in a city get gained bang isn't chop bought from where they got the bars it's all fly becker's man enormous transition caused different they know who it like a transmission foam ahead of the biggest walking out wings and again thing is because they run the numbers and watch them base com tools like a bus the rubber work cold.

michael piper wellesley colleg barth david la california iraq mccain becker congress Brad keselowski china john galle detroit bali kim goran oman
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"That's it's one of my favorite films of all time yeah i'm going to actually shot out a tv show uh isa raise insecure i think that's probably one of the first uh television shows that truly is from a woman's perspective from a p o c perspectives specifically black in la um and every moment of that tv show is so beautiful from the visuals to them referencing frank ocean songs in the nile all over again mean leghari don it's such an amazing show so i think insecure is probably my top pick for that time we're gonna talk about muskie they mighty which is one of my favorite alltime leave i love it i don't mind she's amazing and i think that that film beautiful it's hope beautiful and it captures i think the the very complicated process of of of a young of two young women like finding themselves and it's heartbreaking in a dozen have you know the typical hollywood happy ending any deals with some of the important topics like being undocumented in what that actually means but then i also want to talk about one day at a time when the at a time share sleit's they would the netflixing originally yeah the revision yes we matching eight of the old wendy at a time the norman mailer opened at a time because i think it's in the same vein i think as insecure like the fact that you have a story a story about a community serie but a family specifically being told to the perspective of a writer who's in all cuban american woman eight and who surround yourself in the writer's room right with diversity i so that she can create these stories that are complex that are beautiful.

hollywood sleit writer one day
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"But i'm getting used to i don't know i i i need sunshine so today was a beautiful day so as long as they're sunshine i can deal with with the cold um inched you tell me about the weather and then i love it i love the cold because i'm from las vegas so it's really hot there and so it's a nice break so i like a for a little while and i did have a residency actually i had a residency in miami this year for two months and an artist residency in austin texas and that was the worst and it was beautiful hot sunny and humid and mosquitoes that's all i gotta say that's it's there's no mosquitoes here right now it's beautiful and that's what that's the weather what do you think about the weather either it's not that right now and the makes this over with coming so movies with a female i will not drive on the icy roads that is so gray's edited in denver once in almost died so i can't i call you like you actually almost died you have not apparently uhauls donau 4wheel drive guys um but what about the movie with in terms of movies this might be a problematic answer because it's a male um the regulatory to now low not that problem the films of item mobile app and the way in the perspectives he has so many amazing films but of all vet is a specifically one of them because i feel like boats you you can separate his his career into in in the middle its board vet and the way that the women perspectives develops not only women's trans queer everything they way they develop and how they clash altogether into the most dramatic most real most incredible perspective of in its spanish women but it it's like latino women for me.

miami texas denver las vegas austin gray two months
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Luke maye wow girls are sold out i wonder returned my page steve diploma and go back to school just and on that note we're gonna take a little break and we will be right back with some questions from the audience mm deeply depicted in sir blue apron commercial here located than epidemic questions and then we'll do it for the taping one two three four will do five and then we'll added the battlions out we we have four okay cool that's good okay you'll gay debbie need a bathroom break uk all right okay cosima g on it now we're gonna have feelings right now or i wouldn't be crying shout out to i mean we were upto four thirty in the morning and installing that peace in the gallery it was crazy okay the lead the and we're back all right here we are live out wellesley and we have some questions so first one from ashley lastly actually don't let alone we okay get out ahead graduating from ongoing with the nothern one college two years ago the house yeah i'll save been listening to you for like a year oh injured coming and all the time i really need to be with some latino latinos as a means of space for their loss and all this part is just getting giardi yes have you had to pass it how do you feel about the weather for the two of you glen through goals and then my second question as we talk you guys talked about movies that you know kind of focus in the pitch turkey but are supposed back they go they the of yet been of a women is actually about the mass story but are there any movies the us mike that are the office right mother actually would like actual women stories are actually tell a woman perspective and okay movies with a woman's perspective that are favorites talk about the weather when do you think about the weather the weather's horrid.

Luke maye ashley the house two years
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"You know they're our ancestors don't leave us they're always with us you don't necessarily see that in the same way um in in a frozen politico no by finance so interesting now that you're saying that um um usually the wacky side kicker the mystical character in a disney movie is a person of colour yes even in terms of when you think of the lion king the only actor that was black that voiced a character was refugee yep and he's like the mystical negro in that movie and we were talking about milan in my class earlier in motion mousse use eddie murphy yeah in their hand he's the dunkin' shrek almost yeah oh my god it is the area and there's any it's a really important film i i paid attention to it after my knees one day she just started taking off the clothes of for her dolls and my little sit my sister goes said what are you doing she goes old we're going to dance like more on it it's so cute but man this is this is something that i i paid attention i paid close attention to these topics but when he comes to to to mexico but i wanna you that way that you are expressing about your students yesterday was amazing and i want you to tell me about why you love what you do in about your students because i feel like that we have very few s.

milan disney eddie murphy dunkin mexico one day
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"How winters hugh no no no no way way way when we went to see up and in the first part of the movie the montage it they show you how this guy has his whole life with a wife and then at the end the wife dice and this kid hanoi earlier this kid do they know what was happening in the kid goes tall anyway clara how old was that kid like five or six that is okay i noticed that kids that are little in are really reacting to the movie by when you go to the movies especially in our hood and there's teenagers there's they're the worst and like talk in the whole time anyway that's what i'm referring to act yeah so sitting cynic in my living room and i was watching it with my partner and with the my son and um and i i had i was watching it because i had to steven tillman you have to see it like i cried sick what are you talking about so you have to see it's like okay so sitting there the very first uh some of the drum navy made me tear up because i thought i've never heard anything i've never heard a different language spoken in a disney like song in a disney film made i've never seen like all of these like people of color i in a disney film in ways that are not like fetish heist eight or orientalist or on all to a wide anxieties right down at your wound were proud they were strong they were they were human they weren't caricatures and i was really struck with and so as i watched the film there were all of these different moments where i actually connected to a disney film in a way that i've never been able to connect windass nissan before raid um in terms of thinking about like the grandmother and this idea of existence after deaths aid when the grandmother spared comes back in helps geider like that's something that's very very close to mexican culture in the idea you know there.

hanoi partner disney nissan hugh steven tillman
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Absolutely well something that i love to talk about and here at wellesley i actually uh got the opportunity to do an installation at with the art department at the art gallery here um and i focused on uh the disney film ah the 3 kallay yet us and um i was inspired to think about disney critically in that in in in the terms of a race and gender because of a some of the syllabus syllabi that you sent me and um we talked a little bit about it um over email about the rep the lat next representation or p o c representation and disney films and how still to this day it's pretty fucked up but um i know that um we we talked about the movie moana a little bit her do you wanna talk a little bit about the about about why but uh that movie and why i think it's important so actually designed to my first year seminar on which is on representations of difference in children's media based on the fact that i wanted to teach moana yeah because when i some on it felt so different even though it follows some very similar tropes and it's still felt very different dan than the disney films that i come before it and i'm a very big critic of disney i have a lot of problems with that conglomeration of everything but insists us title little on but more on it just felt different for me and i think one of the reasons it felt different is the the way the language functions in simona especially in the music like sitting um and i didn't see it in the theater i side at home because i i stopped going to doesn't lose a long time ago and i don't like giving them my money you have to sit in a theater with kids go worsening how are you kidding that's the best.

disney simona wellesley
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Sokaiya incredibly sexist representation of a check on a family which we know is so much more complicated so much more diversity in that now this whole this you know trying to fit in this chic on a family this into this nuclear model of family that has never been the reality for so many families not just you know she connects families lat next emmys but other communities have had extended families and how it it erases all of that in order to fit into this like narrative no of of the american national family and that's toward talking about crease stella the loan so had her own tv show on abc now believe in and the it only lasted one season it's on net flakes if you haven't seen it and it was a really great show but it is a friend of mine in new mexico who also teaches um she talks about that that blackish russia fresh of the bowed increase came out of the same time but we still didn't fulfil that suburban american dream because she was living with his sister i don't remember 'cause i have an um it was the sister and weird found the show of namly she's not nuclear arms you might as well be numbered i think they play with that in the show literally law she's single yeah and as she single inches older she's not like eighteen single yeah i and it's because she is a strong woman as argoand go she's a less india but that showed that in their children make it because it it was in black as she was in fresh of the boat which are the the peel see dream.

new mexico russia american dream abc
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"So we so in my phone calls one of the film said uh we spent a lot of time talking about and we reference back to several times is gergen abbas eight me from media my family refund qatar with like amazing montage of jimmy smith's this likes with so much swagger like street and everyone wanting a him eight or wanting to be him um but me from he goes also really important because that's where a lot of actors actually get a um a lot of visibility in a community and and i think a lot of people also have very like nostalgic feelings towards the film but it's it's another one of those films it's so problematic may like it's trying to insert miss chikouna family right into this nationally imaginary of the national family right and the kind of compromises that it has to make to a story in order to do that made a really problematic like the fact that uh to chou gets murdered by racists cops then gets erased from the rest of the film and no one ever talks about it except for poor jimmy he he's he's when the carries a trauma but no one ever like really talks about the police brutality in the violence that you know this young man whose went through experiences and the fact that the women are again mike accessories in that film and of a more important and it's still a very masculine hyst.

gergen abbas qatar jimmy smith chou
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Len she writes about why there had been no gray women in our history may in art and um she talks about that that every time we talk about a women artis we always talk about the relationship with the father or the fact that he was may she was married to an important um another important artons are always tied to that or the or the tragedy the biography of the tragedies almost like those three tropes that we concentrate and dads when we're able to elevate them to the realm of the men but the reality is that there were so many more people there were so many more cultural producers that would have pay attention because somehow they don't fulfill those three those three um requirements oh my god we can yeah yeah and i also like the idea of like us challenging our own our our our own people in our own i can in an icons right so the movie selena's very problematic now that i'm the of it yeah i love it made it my students love it and i always tell them we have to critique the things that we love because that's where the work is because there's all these law in it's so easy to critique mainstream popular culture because it's terrible but when it's something that we love that really causes us to have to kind of take you no accountability for what are our own communities are doing which isn't always easy so with that in mind what other movies important to the the use to demystify that myth or tv shows drew or tv shows yes that becomes a recurrent um topic in your in your classes oh my god there's so many.

Len
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"I feel like hollywood knows where to hit us ride because lines like what does that line at the father says in the buzz about speaking you have to be mexican you have to be america we mexican enough for the mexicans and not american and african americans we have to call as anita so the fact that that that that you grew up and you hear that on the film like you tend to erase all the other problems and you concentrate that because you feel represented yes and then the way the film functions fate is it also does it make a white audience uncomfortable because the the they're in the van in its ab and selena and as soon as he finishes what is like a very important speech in the film like they start laughing and they make fun of it and so there's this like comic relief that happens right after right after one right that keeps it from taking what he's saying seriously you i and i think it's super interesting when you said that it's it's senator around the father because that is history that is what we're always taught it's always it's it's it's all about the patriarchy writes joe thinking about the movie selena and i talk about the movie free to all the time because they buzz based on my artwork on it and term of you if you watch them the two thousand two movie frieda it's you should be called diego it's about an free to happens to be there and and i think it's also interesting that for a lot of us people my age millennials the movie selena we see it as a documentary we see we see it as a piece of of history um and to be honest we don't really differentiate between telling us actual life and her and jennifer lopez is for trail of selena um and then for it to be about the dad i mean it's just it makes him once so much sense which is less a very important art historian the knock.

hollywood anita senator joe america african americans jennifer lopez
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"The the popular culture that we see is is very much invested in upholding those immigrant narratives um and so in my classes i teach a lot of you know film i teach theater literature on and popular culture like music and art to think about like how is it that the cultural producers are creating art that's different right so how is it that you know we can look at someone like i'd my lopez it and and her beautiful a digital work and how a peace like our lady is challenging everything that we think we know about the vision that what a little bit on for those of you who are not on my lopez she has a very controversial peace because she was she exhibited that peace in in phnom in new mexico and this is a it's almost like a digital collage of the reason they were loop after the cold some people called the bikini loop she's have may get and she's challenging those ideas have herman entity especially in a place like mexico where you're lemon lean chill levied can they were lupe when that peace came out that when the peace came out at she didn't she received that threatens it became this whole thing shout out today at the national hispanic cultural centre in albuquerque who curated that show yes out um and so you don't looking at at those kinds of cultural productions but also looking at something like the film selena hate then we all grew up with him we all love and then when i teach it in the context of my class you know i help what what i hope students do and we we appear selena up with new this deal's documentary on selena called corpus and then she has a separate part of the documentary called um com a conversation with academics and so they're very very critical rate of the there it if a selena and so when you look at so leading you can text to is the film eight as part of this like hollywood machine then you get to see that selena's never about selena selena's about her father yup and it's so embedded in this again make this mythology of the american dream and working really hard and achieving success and always being a good girl and i feel like.

mexico albuquerque selena selena american dream hollywood
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Month or so you might have seen it an art department shadow to dave olesen who i stayed with him for a whole week before you actually flew out there said that this beautiful paper installation the you can see on my instagram if you want to check it out but uh eat and it was there she was there helping me like almost every day he saw dow embassies dowden so she was there helping me so she's like fuck it i'm just going to do my office hours in the gallery all and the reverence that her students had for her because they w they went 'cause they should because they should like how many times i dunno like i never utilize office hours before but of a had a professor like eat in there i would die will go yes wanna talk to her to anyways it was so great to see her talking to her students and i could tell i mean from the audience at the live episode that people have so much respect for her account wafer but it listen to our conversation with yudina and i feel like this episode is going to spark so many other different episodes because we touch upon so many different topics that i feel like we need to continue talking about that and we're going to half hopefully it in a here in las vegas we we sza but when she comes back we're going to get into it i mean don't get me wrong this is an amazing episode one of my favorite episodes okay we're going to hear all about her i also want to give a big shout out to my friend thomas will is our friend you know what i'm going share with you i can scr locker room marvelous i've known her sense we were in middle school and when i love thomas so much and he worked at wellesley and he's the one that actually introduced eat in an eye on what am i visits out there and as soon as we man edna that in of youth when it but judge she's she listened to latinos who lunch and i was just gagged those like what you a professor at wellesley listened to open the halla's girl shell down we when the car listen in to the men now elizabeth the got another chink ghana's yeah.

professor yudina thomas wellesley ghana dave olesen las vegas elizabeth
"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Thanks joe this holiday switched to cricket wireless and get a free lg fortune with no annual contract are you looking for israeli government oh cricket wireless something to smile about requires number fourteen serbs activation than thirty dollars from a first months of research and its recognition at the twenty five dollars you would sail texans riches apply one time fees may apply see store for details di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di di geared i'll grant that i saw the well oil star style i am feeling my little girl you really are mom reality oh my gosh and you know what you have the right to because this it has a very special episode i'm full of love man i haven't listen to this again and i phnom wannacry already i know i know okay let's finish the sentence oh this is a very special episode of latinos who lunch and i know you've said most of the last episodes were very special but this one is very very special several times so um we mentioned that we went to wellesley college in the greater boston area that's right a few weeks months ago i don't even remember time has lay yeah so anyways where we did our very first live latinos who on and what a special place to do it adman oh it was a room full of love we failed free we felt like ourselves there was never a hesitation about anything we said it was just wonderful and that was thanks to it and imata dr eat eight in matta who made us feel welcome and who became an really an instant friend not only that he she became an instant inspiration all listening to her tug about her students a changed my life it was just she's in inspiration okay so while i was at wellesley i also is doing an art installations you fewer there in the last.

wellesley college matta cricket wireless boston twenty five dollars thirty dollars
"wellesley college" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"wellesley college" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Mm yeah harada advanced radar mitigation and water came a poll question we have some consumer confidence numbers coming out about ten a m this morning we'll hear from barry armstrong a few moments but are you confident the question is today are you confident in the us economy as a consumer yes or no are you confident as a consumer yes or no hundred percent so far so um that's early what's on our pages and websites so hillary clinton david you might have mrs she spoke at wellesley college did you catch at midoff you know sorta i did not oh boy uh i i just i you know i don't like i never noticed the sometimes changed much since i was younger i i in terms of being like a like formative years in terms of like one year you know you're forming your collegiate big big thoughts in life i've never been one to tell a i so i don't like the like do these glittering glittering generalizations like former former rudd democrats who are former presidents who are democrats are presidential candidates seemed to have a harder time leaving the stage than than than maybe a group their republican counterparts if that's not slot hopefully that's a diplomatic diplomatic way to put it to get you going this morning tuesday's we begin the week but i just notice like president obama's fan you know his no glory days trip to europe the same week that amazingly coincide with the new president's.

barry armstrong wellesley college obama president us hillary clinton rudd europe hundred percent one year