31 Burst results for "Weller"

"weller" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

05:34 min | 2 d ago

"weller" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"Someone that you've made a major difference for the person i'm thinking of was a Here's a college administrator. And she had been through a couple of different physical therapists for her back pain. She had even I saw her here locally. I shade even driven up to baton rouge which is about an hour and a half away to get treatment up there because somebody recommended you know. She was not messing around. She wanted to figure out how to get better. And it presented in conventional terms very much like a herniated disk and it was quite debilitating for her. And i got her diaphragm back. In the right decision they know through the manual techniques energy techniques and the having her do some exercises and she gets off the table and her first reaction is that she's kind of confused like she's wrinkling her bra because she can't figure out where cain wedge like this is. This is hurt so many other times. When i've gotten up and now it's not hurting what she's looking around a little bit confused and then she was angry because she had. She's like why didn't why wasn't this easy. It shouldn't have been easy to get better. And why didn't this happen sooner. So that's really one of my favorite reaction. That is so interesting. She was angry. Did that anger last very long. No no but all of the leading pain science experts will tell you that they get really excited when somebody cries gets angry when they explained pain to them or work with their treatment. Because then they know they're going to get better because they're getting into that limbic system and you're releasing that the chronic pain and i suspect that not just chronic pain lives in our limbic systems but chronic limiting beliefs chronic habits. That you know because we're all emotionally attached to those things so she just had a big emotional release. She would probably still grumble a little bit but she has a good sense of divine order in the world to that. You always get what you when things come to you at the right time. You're ready to receive the so then. Is it true that you can work remotely with almost anyone. Yeah yeah and that's been just such a joy for me to have that different format and figure it out and so like recently. I worked with an entrepreneur. Who was really for the purposes of making a breakthrough in her business in business terms. I would say that that hip issue is where her inspiration her structure were at odds with each other and she sure enough. Because i picked up energetically. And i asked her that question. I said tell me where you know where you're what you're inspired to do. Isn't like the you don't feel like you can do it because of some system or something that's happening and she had a very clear answer for where she was struggling and she did how some hip pain. It wasn't enough to require medical attention or anything like that but as we talk through it and got it sorted out in her body and in our business than her hip pain went away in that session to trusting and so we be really embodied the stress in these. Yeah i think it's so important to capture it address when it subclinical before you end up needing to be in medical professionals office not that. That's i mean we're all here for that you know and but the but i think that business has a in our public health and their schools and things like that have a real opportunity to front end the so that fewer people and up needing reactive treatment that you know in you know to give people some of these tools so that they can start to figure out where you carry stress in what story. You're literally living i One of my favorite stories That i use and my brother that. I'm writing right now threads how i've lived the story that it's the egyptian myth of isis cyrus. And i'll give you just the nutshell. Version of a cyrus was the king of egypt and his brother sat was jealous and angry and wanted to be king. And so set trick desirous into laying down in a bejewelled coffin. Had his soldiers shut the lid. Nail it carry him to the nile river to send him downstream to his death cyrus his wife isis found out about this and she retrieved his body took them to a cave and breathe new life into him when set found out about this he was furious and so he tracked down. The cyrus chopped his body into pieces and scattered the pieces down the river. And then i again when she found out about this she retrieved all of his pieces and brought him back to the cave. She was able to find everything except for his phallus and for that she made a new one and she brought him back to life long enough to conceive their divine child. Horace and then a cyrus went on to be king of the underworld which for the egyptians was where all life came from an all treasures were found. And if you were close to cyrus in that story you probably would have thought that his destiny was to be the king of egypt and yet as too. True destiny was become the king of the underworld and he literally had to be dismembered to come back together in a new way. And we use dismemberment metaphors in our language all the time. We say we can't get it together. Were falling apart. Our lives are shattered. Our hearts are broken.

Horace isis first reaction egyptian One an hour and a half cain wedge egyptians one of my favorite reaction cyrus egypt about
"weller" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

02:07 min | 2 d ago

"weller" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"And i'm here today with the expert on the vegas nerve. I'm here today with melanie. Weller melania mindfulness. Today absolutely i strive to live in mindfulness mode and not just to have it be a segment at my day. That's a that's a great thing to strive for. And i do the same so melanie. What does mindfulness mean to you. And then we'll get started talking about the vegas nerve to me. Being mindful is really being fully embodied to being like body full or like instead of mindset. I actually liked the term body. Because i think mind is kind of this slippery energy. Sometimes that's not You know our minds don't always have our best interests in mind. I think the But your body will always tell you the truth and to really bring mindfulness into the by really It bridges the gap between our conscious and subconscious and like brings all of our shadow elements into light and Allows for an aspect of flow in our lives that i think we're all seeking in terms of reconciling our inner and outer worlds. Well it's interesting that you say that about the mind because you know i know the mind can bully us quite a bit in. It can lie to us quite a bit. Tell us things that it thinks will protect us but that is not necessarily the case. Well let's get digging in about the vegas nerve you tell us what is the vagus nerve. Where does it live. What's it all about. The vegas nerveless almost everywhere. It is your tenth cranial nerve. We all have twelve of them and so it starts in our brain stem and it goes all the way down into the pelvis. It invades our vocal cords our hearts and our justice systems. When it comes out of the brain stem it actually goes down to the heart and loops. Back up to the vocal cords. So i like to think of it as the nerve that allows us to speak our hearts as it travels down the esophagus and goes.

today Today melanie twelve Weller melania
Man Shot And Killed By Police In Newton

WBZ Morning News

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

Man Shot And Killed By Police In Newton

"Of a holdup in a candy store. Police then opened fire in Newton Highlands, ending the life of a young man. More details now from WBZ TV Snick Ammons officers tried to use a beanbag gun and a Taser to disarm him. But those efforts failed. Both of those not uses of non lethal force were unsuccessful in subduing the suspect to Newton police officers then fired their service weapon, striking the me and carrying the knife. Man was taken to Newton Wellesley Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Indulge Candy shop shared a message on Instagram saying, Thankfully, we're all fine owner Linda Weller. Goldman was the one who called police. Husband tells WBZ. The man killed would come into the shop from time to time, and he suffered from mental health issues. He says. She called 911 while trying to talk him out of the store. Several officers were treated at area hospitals, none of them seriously hurt

WBZ Newton Highlands Snick Ammons Newton Wellesley Hospital Linda Weller Newton Goldman
Interview With Robert Eaton

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

04:38 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Robert Eaton

"Hey welcome along to the i. In our twelve pump brand new punt a series held cutting weller professionals. My name's dome lane hosts off the how to cut it. Podcast and in this new series we could be sharing business tips service ideas techniques. This gonna help drive. You hairdressing business forward and we're going to be bringing onto the show and have well it professionals leading names to kick off the first in this series. I am so excited to have onto the show. Well it professionals. Uk an island technical director creative director at russell eaten and current british hairdresser to nineteen robert. Ayton so ropes coming onto the show today and i. It's going to be really discussing with us. How he's being in tough times in his business. During this pandemic willis how it is being having a solid center has really been suffering due to covid. Nineteen is going to give us tips and advice to that. Then he's going to move this forward to the new growing trend of clients that are growing out. That gray hand will love rob how he's been dealing with this change in client demand by using a new gray blending service is gonna share about the techniques and the colors that he's using to create these look so there's some great ideas here. Get you really motivated going forward so much to get in this app so today and after the podcast can find out anything that we talk about by going to dot com or education. Donghua dot com. So let's get to the. I knew how to cut it with well. Professionals podcast series robert eaton. Hey and welcome along to the very first of a how to cut it with weller. Professionals podcast series. Yes this is where we are going to be bringing you. Twelve episodes over the next year e series once a month. And we're going to be kicking off this with a really special guests and actually somebody had the pleasure to interview now if you're roundabout free times and yet he needs no introduction. Really because all i can say is the current british addresses the year creative director for russell eaten hair and well it professionals. Uk and and technical director so. Welcome to the podcast. Mr rubber ater. Hi it's nice to see you. Thank you for having me might is such a pleasure and we did speak. If i remember rightly we'll see two thousand and nineteen rob where we've done the asks for wealthier as that was the last time that we don't The podcast with yourself. When we brought you on here we are today. We're going to be doing another little bit of a a series built around. Well it professionals. But i mean as much to cover i mean so much has happened to you. It would be fair to say yeah. British hairdresser. Yeah so period of time this bathing winning the british adverse in the world's was amazing with in the midst of everything that's happening with covert as well which has been incredibly challenging for the salons in so many changes in industry is also. Let's talk about today. Have you of emotions being rob in one minute. There was that night that you won pretty hairdresser of the year which i was just so excited when you were that and then a few months later with entered this world of covid so have you been out to enjoy being british addresses the what few people investment and i have actually had a great time. It's been it's an experience that nobody can take away for me something to work towards for a long time. It was such a fantastic evening in a susan. Incredible experience to win So so yeah. That was an amazing ends at the year. And the of twenty twenty and obviously we all as an industry being thrown into turmoil and a real roller coaster mixed emotions with every that's being covert related and so as much as winning. The awards are probably able to maximize as much as possible of lights have done with show was an offense and physically seen people but it is actually being quite an interesting An interesting wave changing that win and thinking of new opportunities and ways of working with a win from there as well. So so yeah. It's been a great few months but obviously really really challenging and stressful with everything that's been happening with with covid.

Russell Eaten Weller Robert Eaton Ayton Mr Rubber Ater UK Willis ROB Robert Russell
Heather Robertson Wants You To Be The  Stylist You Were Born To Be!

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

05:57 min | 2 months ago

Heather Robertson Wants You To Be The Stylist You Were Born To Be!

"Now moving into today's podcast. We have got home have a Robinson on the show and have her is recognized as one of Scotland's leading Educators and Bridal hair Specialists within the hairdressing industry and you can find Heather online at HR hair. Co. Uk, but ever came to my attention during the first lock down. The reason she came to our attention was that she was creating some incredible lives on the Weller Global community and her stars are brighter. What was brilliant and looking deeper into heaven. I checked out so much of a work. I was really inspired what she was I loved the way she presented but what really grabbed my attention with her was that she was running a salon confidence club and this is about teaching hairdressers how to actually develop their confidence that really shocked the coughing. Maybe cuz I've been somebody that maybe has had passed worries of certain hairstyles or dealing with certain clients and your confidence can really wobble. We all know if your confidence looks a bit wobbly in front of a client and that can happen real knock-on effect for you working with that client. So that's what we're going to dive into with this episode today have us going to talk us around how you can develop your confidence. We're going to get Heather's back storage and we're also going to hear how she really wasn't interested in being a salon and why she wanted to be a freelance hair stylist educator. And also what is great in this episode is how much of a geek she is home address in and to hear people really passionate and see her dressing as a hobby. It's so inspiring and I think as we head now here in England into our second lockdown, I think it's now the time to really connect with who you want to be as a hairdresser go in forward. So I think you'll get loads out of it. And remember at the end of this we are going to drop off into the extra shows if you want an extra show remember page On. Com slash how to cut it. So let's get into this interview with today's guest have a Robinson. Welcome to the podcast ever. Hello, how you doing? I'm all right. Let's give a heads-up who you got in the background. You've got some company there tonight. Yeah, I've got login in the background now Logan is about going off all of them. Now if you watch Heather's lives. Yeah Logan has become the superstars the lives and this is f as dog by the way, and yeah, he was he was chilling out earlier when he having a good snort. Yeah. So in the background as always, it's like every time I go live if such stolen I'm like, I don't always try to tell me a little bit. So come on in have a there's a beautiful Scottish accent there firstly song Long listeners around the world. They want to know where abouts in Scotland are you from so I'm from Glasgow. I'm still in Glasgow. Just got Morgan Heard the door. It's fair to go through Thursday is by the way, you could see Logan in the background just a little wander around. Yeah, so I'm in Glasgow and I'm based in Glasgow snacks as possible. Yeah, it's quite yes. It's a little bit. Texas so we're going to today really I want to learn a lot more about you ever because I know so much about you yet. I feel like I know so little about you as well and I think for our listeners but the actual title we going with with this one today is be the bad a stylist you were born to be and I really want to jump into confidence as a hairdresser and how yeah because naturally we all just in addresses are super confident wage, but we're not and I want to go into that but first up just give us a background to you yourself at the hairdresser and the educator that you are so dead silent test for Life vests make an celebrating a thirty years in hairdressing since I went and got my first start to get old job, but I should have I know I can't believe it's not long and I'm not I've grown up enough to get it that long and but I have I've been a free-lance educator for the last four years as coming up to and pring. Is two that I was a full-time well educated as well. I still freelance in a silent a couple of days and a solid know and I feel as forging the soldier about three lines to work for Whaler and I Ramon courses and do and sell and training for silence as well. So you are a perfect example of somebody that works in a very you're not just doing the one part of hairdressing here, which I think is really interesting to hear isn't it? That is quite diverse when you say what you do. Yeah. I like have them back all the one left out as well because unfortunately it's not prominent just no but I'm also part of our wedding company too. So one of my friends just got our wedding can't lease or purchase required me to kind of like high-end weddings for like American guests coming over to get married in the Scottish castles. So yeah, I've got a little bit of everything. Unfortunately. It's it's a little bit quiet or Not Dead. Just now so when you say wedding here because you are multi-talented and I know I mentioned in the pre r i mean you've won so many various Awards having you just again, just listen this through some of those awards that you bought one just because I want to set up the you know, who you are to our listeners. And it's it's more more sleeping within the the whale education sites. So I've won three awards for real education. So of one field technician of the Year back in 2009 and that you also one overall technician of the years of technical educator and then I'll one field technician of the Year again in 2012, which was great home and and I also from that we got to go to Malta and that was voted one of the top three and email which was like year of Middle Eastern Asia, but it went to someone else so I thought it was so great to the nominated. So

Glasgow Logan Robinson Heather Scotland Weller Pring UK England Morgan Texas Ramon Malta Eastern Asia
"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

05:14 min | 3 months ago

"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"Were two hundred and fifty six tennis players in two major events, and there was one positive test. The fans to me are still a little jarring but anyway Let's Let's wrap I. Don't. There's not I mean you know I'm sorta looking for news stories. The ATP looks like for the for the first quarter of the event they're gonNA reduce cries, money. At. Two fifty, five, hundred level advances as you would think given the reduction of fans Andy. Murray had A. Physical. Setback the W. T. looks to be adding. Events They're really scrambling there. Many more ATP EVENTS WT events. Part of that is because this is the China swing for the W., T., a. and obviously The China events were shut down months ago but playing opportunities are sparse and scarce players. looks like players are going to have to depart for Austrailia in the middle of December. So the the off season already small to begin with flick window got even the. Smaller and It's a it's a strange time in normal years. We would say that the second half of October is a strange time. But all the more. So in in two thousand, twenty anything it feels he add Jamie. Now that that's it I mean, yeah I think that the biggest thing I'm looking not looking forward to but just anticipating is the decision making surrounding the Australian Open given that as you said, it's it's right around the corner given that quarantine time and You know be another another major to just see how things are handled and who plays, and of course, as you mentioned, there are some injuries Roger Federer? was expected to be back in two, thousand, twenty one but you just you just don't know given the the situations that it would require for their families and travel, and frankly I I also think that it might affect some players just training generally you know because there they do try and take time off. But I think that's a really hard thing to balance in this time where you might have taken. Time off during the shutdown or maybe you just Didn't didn't train hard or I mean that whole idea of tapering or preparing for a big event I think has been completely thrown out the window for so many players and for me that training arc and how you prepare for a tournament and just prepare for a season which is you know now with tennis..

Roger Federer China tennis Andy Murray Austrailia Jamie A. Physical
"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

05:03 min | 3 months ago

"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"Appreciation for. Entertainment and how fast it can all go Like on an life in general, you just later appreciation for everyday life not to get too deep philosophical. Simple pleasure going to a sporting event without a mask. This is great. I'm glad we were glad we did this and I think people will wait for your book if the Marcelo Rios Story is chapter one keep going. You've got something here. John I, appreciate it I I. Hope we can do this again sometime. Louis this was we'll. We'll. We'll check in soon and we'll see hopefully sooner rather than later. I John Take care all right take it. Easy. Thanks again. Thanks to well or for the for the wide ranging conversation always enjoyed talking to him on the road someone who again a straight shooter who really knows the INS and outs of the sport and? The players have confided in for years and you can see why thanks to Jamie our trusty. And Co conspirator odd Jamie I'll bring you in I will bring you a now I I, don't know if you've ever. Meta Weller Evans but one of those essential figures at all workspaces in all sectors have that just know where the bodies are buried. Be Know How things get done. They have institutional memory they are. Pragmatic One of those figures that sort of keeps keeps the wheel rotating. Yeah, it was really interesting to hear him talk about everything I. Mean You guys covered a lot of different topics you know from those crazy stories he has to you know about. Bailing people have jailed to how people perceive the unquote athlete life and lifestyle and all that how he had to deal with that and how you know experience he had so that there was a lot of different interesting topics yet his job You know I think it's funny when you asked. What's your? What's your story because? I feel like he definitely has one of those jobs where it's hard to explain but people are really interested once they hear at least his title or the people he interacts with. So definitely an interesting conversation as you said from a long time tennis insider. I think it would probably mean burning if not a firebombing bridges that there was a great book in there somewhere just a war stories I mean the other thing that struck me and strikes me quite frequently is just how tennis have different tenses from other sports especially team sports and you know you you look at a media guide for a team and it looks like a conventional or chart like we would have a sports illustrated or like any business would have tennis. Doesn't really have that It's knock set out like. A team, but the flip side is I. Think People Sometimes underestimate how many people are part of this ecosystem and.

Jamie John I tennis Marcelo Rios Story Louis Weller Evans
"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"I, Agree John I I don't know where the movement stands since the tour shifted over to Europe. But you know the group that I saw assembled on on the grandstand court at the US. Open last month that I just referenced it lacked the critical mass that one would have hoped to have had I think and and I I. Don't think that group. Would have. Very much credibility and probably no leverage with you know ten is's other entities. So. I also found it a bit insulting. for anybody to equate gathering with the the nineteen eighty, eight parking lot press conference. I mean. Let's good. Why don't you point out the differences? I think that's important. Well. The first ten years of my career I worked for the ATP when it was a players association. and. I will tell you that we as players having three votes on a on a nine member governing body We didn't win many votes. We didn't. We didn't make too many gains or advances as you can imagine. And so You know the. We. Finally, we not only the players but even the tournaments we. Convinced, to go along with us. Finally decided look there's a better way to do this and. We each have a stake in. The other partner successful. So, why don't we break away and form our own tour and the ATP can go from being just a a noisy players association to having a a real presence within the sport and so that's really what the nine thousand nine, hundred, eighty, parking lot press conferences is all about it was a a landmark event which initiated real change and it gave you know the players an opportunity to take. Responsibility for equal ownership of the tour. And and so to equate. What happened. With. The P.. T. T. P.. A.. Assembly at the US Open with that. especially for me who fought so hard for the creation of the each I founded. Founded as I said a bit insulting. What do you think? It's obviously someone more nuance than this, but basically, it's a partnership between..

US Europe John T. T. P partner
"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

05:56 min | 3 months ago

"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"Everyone John. . With was were so streaming tennis podcast everyone twelve, , our guest as we do Beller Evan any insider will recognize sellers name the consummate timoth insider he worked for the ATP Tour for many years his. . Was Tour Manager for the most part, , but he also was. . A fixer, , a pragmatists they council guidance counselor. . One of the tour employees who work with the players week in week out was in the locker room and really knows that the mechanics of tennis mechanic of the tour better than anyone he also briefly served on the. . Board, , last year and part of this year. . So <hes>, , this is a a wide ranging conversation with a crew tennis. . Insider we talk a bit about <hes> tennis in twenty twenty the we talk about this more stories from. . Welders career in also been about how to get into tennis <hes>. . There are roles into score even if. . You do not hit a ball at a professional level and weller someone who spent his whole career in tennis and only a few of those as a player. . So <hes>, , here's a wide ranging conversation with a true tennis insider. . Here's Willer Evans first of all Weller Evans thank you for. . Thank you for doing this I appreciate this. . Model John It's <hes>. . It's a pleasure. . I have to congratulate you in that <hes>. . You know it's to be quite Khuda get both Jerry. . Seinfeld, , and Weller Evans. . As interviews within a month of one another. . Low Bar just <hes> make a few jokes in Yiddish and everyone everyone goes home. Happy. . . No but <hes> we passed up no opportunity to talk tennis and I was saying in the Intro I feel like you are. . You're the perfect person to help make some sense of these strange times because you are someone, , it's always understood the mechanics and have the insider perspective. . and. . Our Voice of reason and I figured I wanNA hear a bit about your backstory in some sort of historic progressives. . But but help us make sense of tennis in Twenty Twenty <hes>. . How How are you sensing? ? This is going and what's your take on sort of gray tennis in this work around year? ? Well I think we're fortunate to be playing tennis at all and <hes> to actually have had. . Three of the four slams played. . This year I think is a remarkable accomplishment. . Don't you? ? Yep Absolutely. . especially. . Given the challenges of of tennis compared to other sports <hes>. . You know it's it's not it's not as simple as. . You, you've , got thirty teens in everyone's GonNa, , lock themselves in a bubble together. . To, , two hundred and fifty six players from all over the world is is a big challenge. . What do you make about the rest of it? ? I? ? Mean we have. . Cologne one in Cologne to this week, , which sounds like <hes>. . Competing. . Hugo boss. . Fragrance collection we have carry over points we have. . To joke of, , it's not playing Paris because he's disincentivize because of the point structure what's your take on? ? Tennis outside of outside of the three majors we were able to play. . Well just. . To sort of focus for a second on the ranking system. . And and what we had to do and I apologize in advance for referring. . To. The . ATP as we but when you work for an Organization for twenty five years and you stay so closely connected to it <hes> it's inevitable that you end up referring to what they do as as we but. . You know. . The ranking system has to be addressed. . Once we took such a long off from tournaments. . and. . You enter. . That challenge you know with the premise that there's not going to be a perfect system. . Heck. . Probably, , our current ranking system is not perfect. . But realizing that there's probably not even an optimum way to accomplish all that needs to be accomplished. . So is it? ? It really was a challenge for sure but <HES>? ? You know I think the ATP's priority was always to. . Try to continue to have a fair and accurate evaluation of. . Player on court performance, , which also has credibility with our fans and I think if you look at the rankings as they currently stand <hes> I, , think the ADP has accomplished. . You know accomplish that goal. . With Roger. . Not Be fit enough to play the world tour finals I would. . Like to think that a a guy who's been really hot since we return to the court Andrei Rubel who actually was was. . INFLA-. . Go even before the suspension is going to make the world tour finals I'm sure there are people who? ? Are. . Going ask. . Why Medvedev? ? is going to be in there when he hasn't really. . You. . Duplicated. . The success that he had last year <hes> an-and. . CARNOT boost has. . Left <hes> back into everybody's consciousness and. . He may or may not make it to London. . So I'm sure they'll be people who. . You might question that but I think on the whole <hes>, , the ranking system and the rankings that we have currently even given the <hes>, , the cogut accommodations that were made. . With with our fats. .

tennis Willer Evans Twenty Twenty Tour Manager Beller Evan weller John It Low Bar Jerry Seinfeld
Longtime ATP Tour Insider Weller Evans

Beyond The Baseline

05:56 min | 3 months ago

Longtime ATP Tour Insider Weller Evans

"Everyone John. With was were so streaming tennis podcast everyone twelve, our guest as we do Beller Evan any insider will recognize sellers name the consummate timoth insider he worked for the ATP Tour for many years his. Was Tour Manager for the most part, but he also was. A fixer, a pragmatists they council guidance counselor. One of the tour employees who work with the players week in week out was in the locker room and really knows that the mechanics of tennis mechanic of the tour better than anyone he also briefly served on the. Board, last year and part of this year. So this is a a wide ranging conversation with a crew tennis. Insider we talk a bit about tennis in twenty twenty the we talk about this more stories from. Welders career in also been about how to get into tennis There are roles into score even if. You do not hit a ball at a professional level and weller someone who spent his whole career in tennis and only a few of those as a player. So here's a wide ranging conversation with a true tennis insider. Here's Willer Evans first of all Weller Evans thank you for. Thank you for doing this I appreciate this. Model John It's It's a pleasure. I have to congratulate you in that You know it's to be quite Khuda get both Jerry. Seinfeld, and Weller Evans. As interviews within a month of one another. Low Bar just make a few jokes in Yiddish and everyone everyone goes home. Happy. No but we passed up no opportunity to talk tennis and I was saying in the Intro I feel like you are. You're the perfect person to help make some sense of these strange times because you are someone, it's always understood the mechanics and have the insider perspective. and. Our Voice of reason and I figured I wanNA hear a bit about your backstory in some sort of historic progressives. But but help us make sense of tennis in Twenty Twenty How How are you sensing? This is going and what's your take on sort of gray tennis in this work around year? Well I think we're fortunate to be playing tennis at all and to actually have had. Three of the four slams played. This year I think is a remarkable accomplishment. Don't you? Yep Absolutely. especially. Given the challenges of of tennis compared to other sports You know it's it's not it's not as simple as. You, you've got thirty teens in everyone's GonNa, lock themselves in a bubble together. To, two hundred and fifty six players from all over the world is is a big challenge. What do you make about the rest of it? I? Mean we have. Cologne one in Cologne to this week, which sounds like Competing. Hugo boss. Fragrance collection we have carry over points we have. To joke of, it's not playing Paris because he's disincentivize because of the point structure what's your take on? Tennis outside of outside of the three majors we were able to play. Well just. To sort of focus for a second on the ranking system. And and what we had to do and I apologize in advance for referring. To. The ATP as we but when you work for an Organization for twenty five years and you stay so closely connected to it it's inevitable that you end up referring to what they do as as we but. You know. The ranking system has to be addressed. Once we took such a long off from tournaments. and. You enter. That challenge you know with the premise that there's not going to be a perfect system. Heck. Probably, our current ranking system is not perfect. But realizing that there's probably not even an optimum way to accomplish all that needs to be accomplished. So is it? It really was a challenge for sure but You know I think the ATP's priority was always to. Try to continue to have a fair and accurate evaluation of. Player on court performance, which also has credibility with our fans and I think if you look at the rankings as they currently stand I, think the ADP has accomplished. You know accomplish that goal. With Roger. Not Be fit enough to play the world tour finals I would. Like to think that a a guy who's been really hot since we return to the court Andrei Rubel who actually was was. INFLA-. Go even before the suspension is going to make the world tour finals I'm sure there are people who? Are. Going ask. Why Medvedev? is going to be in there when he hasn't really. You. Duplicated. The success that he had last year an-and. CARNOT boost has. Left back into everybody's consciousness and. He may or may not make it to London. So I'm sure they'll be people who. You might question that but I think on the whole the ranking system and the rankings that we have currently even given the the cogut accommodations that were made. With with our fats.

Tennis John It Willer Evans Tour Manager Beller Evan Twenty Twenty Weller Hugo Boss Medvedev London Low Bar Jerry Andrei Rubel Cogut Cologne Seinfeld Paris Roger
"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

02:07 min | 3 months ago

"weller" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"Was were so streaming tennis podcast everyone twelve, our guest as we do Beller Evan any insider will recognize sellers name the consummate timoth insider he worked for the ATP Tour for many years his. Was Tour Manager for the most part, but he also was. A fixer, a pragmatists they council guidance counselor. One of the tour employees who work with the players week in week out was in the locker room and really knows that the mechanics of tennis mechanic of the tour better than anyone he also briefly served on the. Board, last year and part of this year. So this is a a wide ranging conversation with a crew tennis. Insider we talk a bit about tennis in twenty twenty the we talk about this more stories from. Welders career in also been about how to get into tennis There are roles into score even if. You do not hit a ball at a professional level and weller someone who spent his whole career in tennis and only a few of those as a player. So here's a wide ranging conversation with a true tennis insider. Here's Willer Evans first of all Weller Evans thank you for. Thank you for doing this I appreciate this. Model John It's It's a pleasure. I have to congratulate you in that You know it's to be quite Khuda get both Jerry. Seinfeld, and Weller Evans. As interviews within a month of one another. Low Bar just make a few jokes in Yiddish and everyone everyone goes home. Happy. No but we passed up no opportunity to talk tennis and I was saying in the Intro I feel like you are. You're the perfect person to help make some sense of these strange times because you are someone, it's always understood the mechanics and have the insider perspective. and. Our Voice of reason and I figured I wanNA hear a bit about your backstory in some sort of historic progressives. But but help us make sense of tennis in Twenty Twenty How How are you sensing? This is going and what's your take on sort of gray tennis in this work.

tennis Willer Evans Twenty Twenty Tour Manager Beller Evan weller John It Low Bar Jerry Seinfeld
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 4 months ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Stephanie Fleming on organization, life hacks, and how she built 'The Happy Planner' and 'Me & My Big Ideas'

The Here for Her Podcast

51:55 min | 6 months ago

Stephanie Fleming on organization, life hacks, and how she built 'The Happy Planner' and 'Me & My Big Ideas'

"Are so excited to. To introduce incredible Stephanie Fleming. She is a creative entrepreneurs speaker of and wellness seeker. Most notably, she is the CO founder of me and my big ideas creator of the happy planner, and what began twenty years ago as a tiny garage business is now an industry leading lifestyle brand and offers a wide variety of products that inspire customers to live creatively and plan a happy life. Please welcome Stephanie to the show. Okay, we'll Stephanie. We are so excited to have you on the here for her podcast. Thank you so much for joining us. And we are so curious about everything that you've created and your and so I think. Our audience is going to be very very interested in the business aspect of. Everything that we're about to talk about some super excited cool. I'm so excited to be talking to you. Guys for those who don't know. Tell us a little bit about your health. I'm Stephanie. Fleming and I'm a creative entrepreneur. I actually call myself like an accidental entrepreneur. I started my business me and my big ideas with my mom twenty actually over twenty years ago started in my garage with an idea of just one idea for making stickers for the scrapbooking industry at that time and. And really just kind of wanted to do it too. I needed a creative outlet. Yes, but I needed to pay the bills like I. was you know a young mom and struggling to make ends meet, and just really wanting to like. Go out there and I would do anything because I you know I wanted a better life for myself, and for my kids and and so I was definitely you're. You're? The definition of a hustler like I was like I have no money, but I will put in the sweat equity so. We been hustling with me and my big ideas for. Over twenty years now, and we've created everything from paper stickers and now planner, so planners is our latest the happy planners, our latest product line and It's just been such a a wonderful thing for us to get into because we get to share a love for creativity for positively, and that's been kind of where I have fallen in the last probably five or six years which. Not only being an entrepreneur in a business person, but also being able to be the spokesperson for our product and our brand, and that's something that I've been totally passionate about. It's amazing. I'm curious. So, what did you do before you started your business? Were you a stay at home? Mom? Did you have have a job, so I was? I was pregnant when I was eighteen. Not Married had had a baby, and when immediately from high school to I need to find some way to take care of my son and I did in home daycare for eight years, and was daycare provider for six kids usually at one time and it was you know it's honest work? It's hard work. It's eleven hour days for you know for eight years and you know all I to do is be a good mom, and and so I didn't have a college education. I grew up in the craft industry though my. My parents had a manufacturing and distributing business so I grew up from picking orders in the warehouse. To you know watching my parents who are entrepreneurs basically navigate the craft industry and come along with them to trade shows and things like that so I always had that creative bug, and and even as an entrepreneur as a kid I was making little catalog, so you can buy these cards here, my designs and so, but then life hits, and then you have to go out, and you know and do the best you can and and so at the time. In one, thousand, nine, hundred eight. My mom and my mom had sold that business, she and my stepdad divorced and they sold their business, and so she was kind of at this place in her life where she was like okay. I'm ready to start over, I need. She was probably my age now, and it was like thinking I need to start over and figure out what life looks like for me. Now and I was saying I just I want to start something something I want to do anything and so my mom had some seed money and. Like I said I would do. You know so. I stayed up all night trying to find just hustling to find hair. Competitors are advertising in this trade magazine. So that's a potential a mailing list for so anything possible. I was willing to do so. Yeah so it was not like I had this pedigree of an MBA, and I'm going. Go start a business, and that's why I say I'm definitely. An accidental entrepreneur, but I've I've loved it. We'll story. It is very very cool. It seems like you had it in your blood like raped in the beginning. Though like it was something that you're meant to do. I, think so. I think without knowing that that's what it was like. I was just cleaning out. One of the things we've done in quarantine is cleaning out our garage and so all my memorabilia. That's where I found my card. Catalogue of here are the things you combine I'm like I always was. Experiencing entrepreneurship right in front of my is growing up but I never really knew it. In fact, my mom was in charge of all of the creative side of the business, and was the one in charge of new products, and out there trying to find out what creative women were doing next, and so when my mom would go on an rnd shopping trip and take all of us with her. We didn't realize what we were doing was watching her shopping trends and seeing what was out in fashion, and how we can bring that into the craft and creative industries, so when it just seemed like something natural, and now I'm trying to identify people go. Where do you find your trend Mic-? Just Watch I. Just look and so yeah. We were Kinda groomed without knowing that that's what was happening. So cool and so. You had your first business you? You began doing that twenty years ago. And then you landed to the happy planner, which has been a huge success and It's a it's a beautiful book. It's something that you want to. Hold in your hand, and just like carry with you all the time. It's so cute and fashionable. Where did that idea come from? And how? How did you of get to that point? Where like I want to be in this market of making planners? Happy like honestly we've had a lot of great products that of sold weller mckellen's pretty cool, but the happy planner is like it's so me. It's totally me so the the way we came up with. It was pretty much the same process that we did it with anything. As we and my sister is heavily involved in product about men in our company as well, but we watch in decide okay. scrapbooking was huge for a while, and so we were able to kind of ride that. That wave and we've kept coming out with products and line extensions and and then you kind of see that it was kind of starting to taper off. It was not as popular and the products weren't as weren't selling and going doing the having the sell through that they did before, so we're like okay. We need to know what creative women are doing next. which is what my mom did, so we would always be looking for what. What what do i WanNa do what is something that's interesting for me. and and then also kind of searching pinterest looking around water, creative women doing so for some reason on pinterest people were taking just regular planners from staples, or whatever and they were putting our scrapbooking products, stickers and things and making them cute but the scrapbooking don't really fit like they don't fit size-wise. They didn't fit if you're you know the stickers we were. Were to commemorate memories and things, and that's not necessarily the things that you need for planning so I kind of just you know, and they were boring to staples like office supply things. They have black brown different color bays. You know really great. You know what I think. Someone would would think the businessmen would like. And then there was like three designs that were like purple. Paisley or some ugly grandma color. You know I'm a woman, I. I don't want that, so we thought definitely we could do better in design. We could get them more affordable. We could create accessories that would go specifically for them, and then you could put in those accessories like things that are positive so that every single day when you're planning when you're having fun putting stickers out ever, there's this creative positive message that makes you happy that keeps you going, and so it was just a kind of another. Offshoot into what we normally do. What are creative women doing? And at this point? It was like people are busy, and they want to be creative, but they need that little bit of licensed to say it's okay when you're planning your schedule. You can kind of put a sticker downer. Says you can do it or just. Those little positive affirmations make a make a big difference. I love that so much were all about positive affirmations and There's something that I still love about having a planner in front of me like an organizational planner. Where where I. Can you know touch the pages and I can mark things off. It's so different than a calendar on Google you know and I've always I've i. still have a planner, so I love that, but I'm curious because you have built such a successful brand and obviously. You've separated yourself in so many ways by having something very unique You offer as something that's very I would say year to the millennial woman. But how how have you separated yourself with your branding? I'm just so curious about like where your sales come from utilizing social media, you have a huge social media following. So, how what kind of what was your? What was the method to your madness at that point when you started thinking ahead? Yeah, so at that point. We had we had a very successful company in the craft industry and up? Until that point, we had what I figured successful products. We didn't really have necessarily like brand. Following social media was just coming up, but you know there was something about the happy, and I think my own personal passion for the product helped in planning it. No Pun intended. because. I feel like we got to this place or like this product line. I just feel like we need to be able to have a brand. There's gotta be a message behind because the message of the product is so powerful and so really. What happened I mean there wasn't? A Master Plan I love this product so much. That I just started talking about it and sharing on social media back in the periscope days. You remember, periscope yeah. Remember. About it and I just said you know what I would anytime we would come up with something, or we had something new exciting happening in office. I'd like I'm just GONNA share. It's just going to be I wanted to our product and the brand to feel like like we were just friends sharing like. If I was you know to call you up and say Oh, my Gosh I'm so excited. We just got this prototype in, and here's what it looks like. Here's how I'm going to use it and every. Every new products came in. We previewed it on periscope did live Q. and A. is, and and that's before people really doing that and we were sharing the process and the product, and sharing my excitement, geeking out over stickers and a paper planner you know, so. It became I thought there was really no plan other than to share authentically, and that was really before, but you know everything authenticity be authentic was just such a overused catchphrase, but that's what it was because I didn't actually want to be the spokesperson. For our company, and because it's such a team effort, and so I'm not. I'm not maybe maybe I wouldn't had the idea for. Let's let's look into to paper planners, but I didn't create designs, and I not the artist, and I'm not the one who source the product and sold it in such a team so but. In order I felt so passionately that. Don't have relationships with companies. They don't have relationships with products, but they have relationships with people and brands, and if I could be that conduit. To Give A. Personality to our land our company then. I'm like all right. I'm willing to do because I was the one before it was like no, I don't really want to know I'm just I'm fine to not do it, but when I was sharing something, I was so passionate about the following just came. We did not say hey. We want to get to I. Think we're over six hundred thousand on instagram. We didn't have a plan for that. I mean eventually to grow. It takes you get to a certain point. It's like okay now. You have to plan, but we grew our numbers very very organically, and by just engaging with them. You know true engagement and it's. It's not even just the number in the plan, but it's like. Are you engaged? Do you care about your followers? Do you care about your customers and deal you know? Are you engaging that way? Are you doing it for the rise near following? Are you doing it for the sale? Are you doing? Are you doing it because this? Just feel so right to you know. Yeah while you're on that topic, too. Because so cool that you grew organically because. I mean it's such an easily marketable product, but also like how how do you stand out amongst your competitors are? There's other planner companies out there. So what's your differentiating factor with your product? So at the beginning? We were the only ones pretty much doing what we did, so we stood out really quick, and it's almost like I. Always say like it was like. Like when I had my first when I said WHO's very well behaved typical. I am such a good mom. And then my daughter came a second, and she is like great, but she's you know totally like wild spirit and I'm like oh my gosh. I need to to work at this little more. So when we did when all of a sudden you're like It's growing and you're thinking. Oh, my gosh is great. People are just listening, and then all of a sudden when you're onto something, people and other brands and other companies go. They're onto something I. Think I'm going to try that, too. And then what you were doing so authentically is being duplicated right so. So what we have always done I think and even back in the scrapbooking and paper. Crafting days was just advice. My mom gave me is just really don't worry too much about what other people are doing. Find out what you uniquely do. What is it that your company or your brand do what do you? How do you stand out and for US There's a lot of people who have high end stationary and people. People that are saying a professional and I want it to look like this or I. Don't like this about your as well. This is who we are. We are colorful and fun and were affordable. We have a disc bound system where you can change things in and out, and those are some things honestly and with the brand that will turn people off when you really claim like who you are. Some people are going to say. Well, I. Don't know but I. don't like that well, but this is who we are when you can really find that those are the things that just kind of narrowed down, and you nail it down so much that these are the things that make us unique, and so for us. We embraced all of that. That is who we are fun and colorful, positive and an interchangeable, and all these things about the product and about our messaging. That's what we focused on, and I think even especially going forward when it becomes harder and you. Maybe at this point, we're going like you see a slowing in not just gaining followers as fast when you get up high. And there's more people in the space so for us it's how can we find? What, we, what is it that we offer? That's unique whether it's the message product. And, you kind of have those pillars of our being authentic. Is it something that's different or are we just white noise in the space? Should we be making a change? We be pivoting. Right now do. Is there something we need to be doing to be more aware of the surroundings of the economy of this of society so You're constantly looking for you have to just be aware. Of who you are where you're going and not being paying too much attention to. The competitors and the people aside. It's really hard though it's hard to do because you find yourself looking. They're doing so good over there. Maybe I should change and go that way so knowing who you are is a huge part of that success for us. And, I love how you really made an emphasis on. Being okay with not being a good fit for everyone, and you know we talk about this even on social media. How you know people always give us questions on. You know my Gosh I I lost if I don't post for three days. I'll lose one hundred followers well if those people want on, follow you because you haven't posted three days. They're not your people. Like they were never people anyway, so I love that you have you have a focus and you understand your branch so well. The you know who you're catering to, and also you mentioned pivoting when you need to because. You know I think that people get so focused on the end goal, and if it's not if it doesn't turn out exactly how they anticipated that it would be, they give up right, so I think that's I. Love that so much and it kind of brings me to my next question on. The hardships entrepreneurship because I think that when people look from the outside, they see this beautiful brand that you've built a successful mom who's who's doing it all, but it takes so much work and behind the scenes that the people don't see. Can you walk us through some of those hardships that you faced in how you've kind of gotten through them? Oh yeah and I think. I'm so glad you brought that up because you especially on social media, people will see their, so they'll say. Where were you because I'm pretty active on my own, and then also I with the happy planner, but it like where were you? We Miss John there. I'm like you guys like if I would have shown. What I was doing for the past seven days, it was get up in the morning. Go to work. Stay there till seven o'clock have like meetings altay come home barely figure how I'm going to get the door dash before I wanna fall asleep, and then you know over it over and over again and I'm like it's not glamorous. It's hard There's a lot that goes into it. You know and you have to love it if you are somebody who has your own business or your own brand? You have to love it because it is not I mean I would say. Ninety, eight percent of it's not glamorous, but it's rewarding. You know it's something that you love, but you're GONNA have failures. You can't be afraid to work hard and fail. Because, you're GONNA. Do both of those all the time? And you know and learning from your from your failures for me. It's like you know we've had products that the ones that you've mentioned like happy planner that quadrupled the size of our business in the matter of two years But in the in between, and we had already had like a pretty successful company, and we were like well, but what you don't see, are all of the things where you come out with the product and you're like that's a dog. You Know Kate next. What do we? Can we learn from that? You know that's what you can't. You can't shy away from it, but nobody wants to see that nobody, but those are the lessons. Are you know what you're seeing? When when you see the happy planner is our success of you know Gosh over twenty we did that. It was fifteen years. I think into the our business before we hit that like Grand Slam, we'd had several. You know that was. This product was a triple. This one was a strikeout. This one was a base hit. And then you know, we never know we not. Even we're not even. Promise that we were going to have that big of a success that we just kept going and every time we did we learned something like Oh we didn't do. The packaging wasn't right or you know. Maybe we rent to too early into that trend, or maybe we didn't research it enough or maybe we learned something every time but I mean we've had. We've had product failures. We've had really difficult times in the economy I've been around here through September eleventh through the two thousand eight crash where the business was doing great, and then all of a sudden we've had were having to like have layoffs and figure out how to make the hard decisions. To keep your business healthy and around and surviving, and that's really hard. I mean that's something that right now we're going through. You know we have. Luckily we've got a great basin. We've had a very successful business, but this is a gut punch, and for a healthy business like ours. This has been really difficult and I can only imagine if you're struggling before this, but you just have to figure out you. It's almost like a business as almost like being a parent. You've got to make those tough decisions. Decisions you know that not everyone's going to understand. That's going to be hard. It's going to keep you up at night. and those those you don't see those on social media. No one's sharing like we had to really hard today and or have been meetings all day, and if they are, they're showing you the picture of themselves looking really cute, and you know here I am with my thing and it's. It's just not always like that victims hardly ever like that, so I think it's sometimes i. I've shared lots more real version especially on my own personal social media on instagram. Especially because I, think we do a disservice to. Everybody but to women's in general specifically where it's like if you're trying to be an inspiration and trying to share with other women, this is what if I can, we can all be here for each other. You, know in business, and this is how we can succeed. We are doing a disservice if we are just showing what our lives really never looked like And how how then do those? How'd you push through? How do you push through at the worst times for people that are listening that are entrepreneurs have launched their business or not seeing success right away. Like what have you learned to cut has kept you going. I think i. mean this sounds like something that my husband would go. No, if you can't measure it, you can't manage it because he's. My husband was our CFO CEO and. But for me, I, it's so much into an instinct. And then pushed through because I believe in my instinct very strongly. There's a thing like I feel like you know for us. We were very fortunate that the business that we started stayed healthy, and was viable forever, however I. Kind of look at our product launches in our product releases and different product types almost like many businesses, because there comes a time when you know this isn't working, you know there comes a time when you're like. We just need to let this keep going. We need to work at market. We need and you just you kind of. If you're really being honest with yourself, you know when it's like am I pushing too hard for something. That's not really making. Any headway or do I just need to keep working harder and I feel like You know if we ask ourselves how we done everything. HAVE WE EXHAUSTED EVERY OPTION? That's what I think. We need to kind of listeners, though because I just feel like if you are sitting here like. With a struggling business, let's say whether it's from the economy or just like I'm just not going anywhere It's hard because some people will say just keep going. Just keep going all the time. I don't think you should do that all the time. Sometimes you want maybe need to move onto. Something different doesn't mean you're not going to be. In business or start your own company, or but maybe this, isn't it? Maybe it is? Maybe you're just sitting there going. You know what this is going to be tough times, but I believe in this business i. know we have and we're going to keep going, so you kind of have to listen to that. You know you're got to say. Where are you? Are you? You know? Do I need to keep pushing through this, or is there something else that I need to be? Doing are exploring. It's such a weird time to because with everything going on I. Mean People are obviously doing less news less really to plan but I think there's still an opportunity and it's great that the product isn't just a manner planning out your daily activities that can also be used for intentional set goal setting in just writing down thoughts that you have journaling so I love that it's it's I town that regard Have you guys thought of ways to during this tough time? Kind of still sell your product in different ways or maybe thinking about different product lunches. Were you know what kind of has been brewing in the last few weeks, so it's like a perfect example of. Of evolving and pivoting right so like. Yes, when you're when we're looking at people that are planning your days just filled. My days were just like I couldn't even have the whole damn thinking. How tiny can I right because there's so much going on, but you know one of the other things we have in our product, minus positively journaling and guided journals, and then when you you know for us, it would be so tone deaf to be talking. Talking about we know you're busy. Let's just talk about busy busy busy schedule Hustle. Let's go because this is not the time for that, so we had to look at. What do we have in? You know in our offering. And what do we have What do we think is important or is there something else we can offer so for us? you know slowing down journaling 'cause for me. It's all about putting the pen to paper. I Love I love my. Technology and I. On my computer as well, but there's something to me about writing stuff down whether it's my schedule and prioritizing key efficient or whether it's like you know just journaling what I'm grateful for writing that down I did a whole like wellness like year in two thousand eighteen, where every single day for the entire year I journal. Like what am I feeling I thought it was going to be like more. Of a fitness thinks I like. My cholesterol is high, and I needed to lose weight, and I was going to do all these things I'm going to travel the stuff and what it became was. Oh my gosh, I'm realizing that I'm tagging my emotions now like when I would write things down the journaling became the biggest part for me is what I was feeling like I was really I felt very marginalized that meeting today, and I came home, and I think like I was going into hibernation. You know and I was angry and I was, but I was identifying my feelings. Why was I instead of just going like writing down my food log? You know it's like it wasn't helpful for me. I. Know How to eat healthy. But to realize that when I feel angry, I don't know what to do with those feelings and to eat them you know, or and I'm like an eye stuff them and I. Try and do anything in Canton. and that was like a realization for me, so we're kind of leaning into that and saying hey, right now when you're stressed or you're afraid or whatever it is that you're going through. What can you lean into? And how can you get in touch with your feelings whether it's do journaling or if you really do maybe you're a mom who is trying to work fulltime at home and also. Also home school your kids to the distance learning the. Maybe you need to be really efficient, so you need to you know. What is it that you need and listening to that? Do you need to be productive? Do you need to be kind of moving a little more inward, and then just writing it down and really getting out of your head and onto paper, so you can help process it. Yeah I need to start journaling. That is something that. I know he's for the whole year. Did you notice that it had a huge impact on? It changed the way I thought it totally and I'm the same way because I'm like I'm so famous for starting a journal. And then it's really good for like a couple weeks, and then it's empty, and I keep it and all these like you know journals that have a little bit done in the beginning, and then like I wish I could combine them all. And are they now? It's like so I just said I have never made like a year long commitment to myself I. Will I mean I will do anything for my kids. My husband, my family, my, you know the team of me me and my big ideas, but for me. It'd be like I'm always the first one to get shoved off the list and so I, said I need I was stressed because just like what you were saying. Our business was. Wildly successful that year, and the year before that but I was so stressed out. Because when you quadruple the size of your company, and you're trying to do the same things that you did before scaling it and learning how to do that so quickly is really stressful for a for a creative person who likes to do things like. As I'm inspired. And so. So dealing with that was huge, so all of these things that I saw which were gaining weight having high cholesterol, not sleeping at night, having hiring Zaidi I was thinking, it was because I'm out of shape or this and I didn't really realize accepted the journaling. which that's not what I started to do. That it was more than just that and so this journaling process just gave me. Such clarity and insight into my own feelings that I had no idea and I don't think if I if I just tried to do that at the very beginning for just a little bit I, don't think I would have. Gotten as deep because like doing it every single year someday the destroy today sucked. He knows the worst day ever and I didn't know how to see it through, but then as I got used to journaling just as an exercise every day. I learned to go. You know to just kind of. I guess like look a little deeper. Really. Shed light on stuff that I had no idea I was looking for. I feel like now. I'M GONNA. Go buy one of your journals because I'm so inspired by that by just what you said and I think that I'm someone that just keeps everything in my head and I talked to myself all day every day just. All the things that have to do all the things that should you know that are behind me? That I should have done yesterday it's that's great. I love that with you. You know you don't realize that when you're not like kind of emptying out. It's like for me I was not able to. I was not able to like think of I was kind of creatively blocked, and then I was like even motion. Lee blocked and they just didn't realize because I'm the same. I am an over thinker. I like I process everything and I just I kinda hold onto it and I get very wrapped up in my own head, and so it was just almost like an emptying of it and helps me sleep. Helped me do all that stuff, so my guys. I think you'll love it. Okay. I'm sold. journaling. Borsch, now let's talk a little bit about living intentionally, which is very much related to what we're talking about now, bite. What does it mean for you to live intentionally? And how can people cultivate a more meaningful life? Because obviously you found your passion, you work really hard at you. Know keeping your mind rate, and it seems like you're a very self, reflective person, but how how have you gotten there? I think. I've always been somebody who really likes. Growing looking inside I ask a Lotta questions of myself and. Other people like I. Try and tell my husband like I'm not really trying to psychoanalyze you. Even I would love to just get into everybody's head, but I think that there's so much we can learn. And one of the things that I have learned just by trying to grow as a person and being teachable. Has Been You. Know there's nobody in the world that is going to take charge of my life, my happiness, the things that I want that me. Matt what happens around me it doesn't you know we can all we can all be complaining about what's happening in the world with your job with your relationship, but when it really comes down to it, you're the one that's responsible for what it is. You want in your life and how happy you are. And so for me, it started with number one. I needed to. Learn how to love myself because I didn't love and accept yourself believe you're worthy of all those things, and then once you believe that those things started kind of coming into my life and a realize it's like you know. That was something that I had to really focus on. I had to work on with myself I am. We're a project, so if you go out there, and you really want a job, or you really want to start a business, or you want a relationship. You have to almost I think. Go for the life that you want with that same passion and I mean for me. It's just been about really starting to identify. What is it that you want? What is it that makes you happy? And how do you need to get that? I think that's why I'm a planner at heart, because living intentionally as really planning, you're trying to like you have to identify something first and then figure out how you're going to get it right, so it's like for me. Identifying. What makes me happy? What the name of our podcast plan? Happy Life at the Tagline for our company. Or for the for the happy planner, because really feel like you know if if for me, I need to identify what it is, that makes me happy right, and so I'm not somebody who is an Adrenalin Junkie I'm not someone who needs a lot of activity in my life, I need I need serenity a need. Calm I need a place to be creative I want to go travel I want to be with my family so when I. Start to really identify Granular Li, like what it is, that makes me happy and what I want I can easily say you know okay well. Then I am intentionally going to make the choices that get me closer to those things that I want and. It's really a responsibility. You know it's really taking responsibility for For the actions that we take and you know and I think it's empowering I actually feel like instead of going like Oh. My Gosh I'm responsible for all of these things in my life and no one's going to do about me that makes me. I think it just gives it gives me the power back to say you know. Stuff can happen all around me. Crap can just be going on like everywhere and internally I can live intentionally with what makes me happy, which what? And I can be. Responsible for especially this stuff that's going on in my head. You know so setting intentions of you know whether it's daily whether it's setting an intention for a year or whenever you're feeling like you need a little more clarity into. What am I working for I think it's a really powerful thing to do and I know sometimes when things get more popularity. They gained that whole like people in Oh. Yeah, okay. Setting intentions are doing all this, and it sounds a little Wu, and all that and I'm like it, but it really really makes a difference in how we live our lives, and the decisions that we make yeah, and it's all it all goes back to taking accountability, right and totally nine I. always talk about this on the podcast where a lot of people struggle with that I. Think they kind of have this. Poor me, mentality or you know I could never accomplish that I'm not ex- enough. I'm not educated. Enough I'm not. You know fast enough smart enough pretty enough whatever it is, and I just do I. Hope that if pe- when people listen to this episode, they really if they take anything from it. I really hope that they listen to what you just said. Because it's so powerful, that's such a like. I can't I've had a lot of things. People will ask me like well. Of course, it's easy for you to be happy because where you are today, you know and I said, but but here's what you don't understand is that? The reason I'm happy is not because I have all the things that I have the reason I have all the things that I have is because a happy positive person who believes that I have. that. What happens in my life is a result of you know of the way that I go about it and what I believe I deserve and how and then I can have those things I'm happy. And I'm positive period. Doesn't necessarily. Happy happy I just mean like I'm going to be content and positive and optimistic in my life. No matter what is going on and I have lived through a lot of things I've had like I said I shared with you. Guys had some traumatic things in my childhood that have happened I was had a child eighteen I had a lot of money issues. I'm growing up. I was in an abusive relationship with physically and mentally, and there's a have been drug abuse them I mean lots of things that I've had to deal with and. I could very easily any of those instances been. Why did this happen to me? I could never start a business because I don't have a college education and they don't have any money, and they don't have this and you know. What will people think of me and you know a? Growing and believing that you can do something, no matter what like having that resilience and having that. Like I'm just going to figure it out like I said I. It pretty much anything now I'm probably going to be more of a of a jack-of-all-trades master of none but that's okay. That's who I am, and that's really has gotten me where I'm at, but yeah. I just I think if anything I totally agree with you. If I share anything, it would be that no matter what your circumstances are in life. I think optimism and. And believing that no matter what happens to you, you will get through this, and you make something of yourself, and you can get the things that you want in life If you know if you're working, you work hard. You have to be willing to work hard. You have to be teachable if to learn to be confident, but all those things are things you can control. And it doesn't really matter what your circumstances are. So that would be something I mean. Yes. I love the product. Yes, I love our brand. Yes, I love all these other things, but that's just something that I think everyone can take with them throughout their lives. Such great life advice, and it's so true I feel like there's been looking back and reflecting on my own experiences to and the hardships that you know everyone has different forms of adversity, but how you respond and react to that is I think all the difference and I think it was a murray furlough that said everything is figure out. That just. When you said that because it's true like if you have that drive and that hustle enough to do what it is that you WanNa, do you can figure that all out and I think Alex also reiterated several times. There's this concept of just start now. Figure everything else out along the way as you go. Otherwise, you're never gonNA start. You're never going to achieve those goals but in terms of goal, setting and just organizational tips. I mean I feel like the ideal buyer of the happy planner is a very organized individual, or maybe they're aspiring to be more organized. So what are some good organizational tips just in general that people can start practicing and then apply to the happy planner. And I am not a naturally organized person. At like what you see back there on this video that we're recording over is not what it normally looks like I'm a creative person so I'm very like. Just kind of scattered and I will follow an idea like if I have an idea, I'm like I'm down that rabbit hole and. There's a chaos and mastic usually follows so being organized and using happy planner and using organizational tools is actually been essential for me to be like a productive society member of society or running a business, so one of my favorite tools and I think we kind of alluded to this a little earlier was getting things out of your head in getting him down I use a master What I call him Master Action Item List, so it doesn't matter if like you are thinking of I've gotTa. GotTa do cupcakes the Kids School I've got empty. The dishwasher I have a huge project that I'm working on. That's do every little thing. Take space up in your head and It doesn't really you know you're not really. They all have the same weight, so you're thinking constantly of the Dishwasher, the cupcakes and all of these things and you don't have the space to really think about Give yourself like. Hey, now. I'm really focusing on the project because there's so much stuff spinning in your head. And, so I think David Allen I think is his name he said you're. You're headed for having ideas, not storing them so like for me. It's like Oh, my gosh, that is so perfect so I take and had this one massive list actually I have to, but it's ones home in one's work, but usually for most people one will do and. If everything that comes out of my head is something that I have to do if it's an action item. I put it on my list and then I work from that list. Would plan my weeks when I plan my days, so I look at Monday and I think okay. I've got five meetings not lot. Stuff's going to be coming off that to do list, but on Tuesday I have one meeting in the morning and I had the whole day that I. have so I'll go off of my master list and then start working from there. I'M NOT GONNA forget my tasks that way. It's not going to be like oh shoot cupcake sting it. You have your your things that have due dates and everything so when I'm working from it I don't have fifteen sticky notes everywhere and a piece of paper that I wrote over there. That I got lost cause. I left it in my car and you're constantly then figuring out. How do I remember where it was that thing so keeping everything kind of in one place has been a big tip for me. the second organizational tip that I use I plan every Sunday I plan my week out every Sunday so or whatever the day before the start of week.' In for me. Mondays the start, so I sit down I. Take a look at what are all of the to the must do's appointments. The the deadlines that have to happen that week and get all those things in there and I. I plan everything out from date night with my husband every week. we're putting that in their first wins the time that I need one of my GonNa. Go exercise. When am I going to those put in appointments, and then I start to fill in again with things from that master to do. If I don't do that, then you know, there's things that come up and they're just time. Thief's and they come in to take in all of a sudden. You look and you've spent. Monday and you're thinking I've done nothing you know. It could be a week and you're going like shoot. There's nothing off my list. conversely you can take a look at that, and if you've been really productive, there've been times. I had no idea I could get that much done. So those are two tips for me to stay on and just to contend me. Being organized means being productive, because if I'm not productive, my stuff's all over the place. I get very easily overwhelmed, and that is not a good place for me to be. I was GONNA ask as well with with your master. Master list you add everything from like emptying the dishwasher doing laundry like every task so usually I have like if those are ongoing I will have just started doing this, which helped a lot, but all I kind of assign like if something that occurs every week for me I have a list. That's basically recurring tasks, so if you're if it's a cleaning thing, it's like an you know you've got changes sheets. You know the bathrooms or whatever I've got empty Roomba. because. Just, all those little things that are like take the trash out. Those are of things that I put off to the side which are more recurring tasks. And then when I sit down. Unday, I think you know empty room by the today's the in the evenings and do my meal planning here and those things happen all the time. The the Master List for me is you know the things that are their projects or their like like for me for my work one. It's like every time like I need to talk to him about this Call up this person and make sure I return this thing and check out on. All of the let's marketing meetings scheduled out. Make sure to reach out and so then I can cross them off. On Cross them off. And then when they're done, they're done, and of course you know once it gets to about halfway marked off at create a new list because it's prettier. And I like doing that, but yeah, the reoccurred things I keep separately. Of It, so we're GONNA. Get this all in. Your home about really what you're saying is it comes down to time management skills right, and yes, you know like you said there are some days ago by and I'm like. How did I just spent two hours scrolling through instagram? Checking emails bearing bearing myself in emails that really don't I don't need to get back to these people right away and you self reflect and go like that I see I'm busy, but to hours of that time was wasted. Time management is huge, and that was another thing that I uncovered in my memorabilia box that said think I was in like fourth grade and the teacher says like Stephanie needs to learn time management. Because it is true, because I do the same thing and I feel like there's so many times when people say I just don't have enough time and I'm thinking i. just spent four hours binge-watching. Whatever I. We. Do have the time and that's okay. If you're going, you know what I'm going to. It's going to be a binge party like I am going to be watching and It's fine but I think we need to be aware like you don't WanNa miss out on the things that you either want to be doing our need to be doing because you're not managing your time well and like I said it's a constant struggle. This is going to be something that I'm GonNa be. Be doing for my whole life. Because you know because I'm just not naturally inclined to be that way even, but it's a habit you know, and it's easier for me now, but managing your time well and scheduling it out is is a habit that we form you know, and it's just like it just becomes easier and then yeah, you find him. There's nothing to me like when I look at a list I'm like. Oh, my gosh look! How productive I was this week! That is such a good feeling when you even when you finish the day, and you're like man I was on point today like I knocked this off the list and I. Did this and you just feel good? There's just this feeling it brings. There's something about they say like an actual like I don't know what gets release, dopamine, or whatever that when you cross things off your list. That, yes, go. It is what? What are some other resources that you? You've enjoyed yourself or that? You would recommend to listeners in terms of time, management or building, good habits, organizational tools and practices. I think that like to meet. Okay decluttering. Making sure that you like you don't have because again. The more clutter at the worst and I know they say you know a messy desk or whatever they say, but the MESSI dozen. Beans or whatever and it is, but it's probably one who's just driving themselves crazy 'cause they can't find anything so developing somewhat of. Of A protocol for how you're GONNA. Plan your weeks and then also. One of the things I don't know if it's not really a resource, but it's something that I learned that. I kind of tend to first thing in the morning. I want to like answer all like you're saying I. Want to answer all my emails, and then of course I go down. Somebody's asking you know unsubscribe to all these things now and then I started subscribing, and then I go down, and so somebody told me to block off your days and at the beginning. Do the most important thing for you that you need to. To get done in the morning or whenever it is that you work I work best in the morning and freshest van, and then about three o'clock, I'm looking for anything else. I'm looking for something to snack on or any distraction and it, but some people are not also if you're like going, this is when I do my best work. Then make sure you can identify those times because you're gonNA. Find that you have. You're going to get more done. You'RE GONNA feel more efficient more. More productive and I think that's going to help I. Definitely, figure think that if you can figure out how technology and productivity work for you. I am kind of a hybrid between outlook and all of the technology that we can't. We have that really does keep us I've got when I have meetings. All my stuff is stored. I, don't WanNa. Right down the zoom. Call Identification Number and the password, and all these things you know, that's all stored in my outlook and I have a really good relationship between paper planning and my tech, you know. And then but I have a process every time I have like a nice system. I think I think that works I've been I've used a lot of productivity tools into honest with you. Nothing's really kept me more productive than just keeping it simple and planning things out and getting stuff done I mean it. It starts off great, but then it's just something else for me to. Keep track of so having something just right in my face whether it's my outlook, calendar or or my paper planner I just like I, said I've tried I've tried them all I've tried. And I know they were really well for some people, but for me it's just all about keeping it really simple and just getting stuff done. Yeah, and you know what I love the realness because we get questions, sometimes of like. How do you have a business and you work fulltime in your mind like? How do you do all the things? And I always kind of self reflect in its and I always think you know. You make time for what's important to you. That's the bottom line. We all have twenty four hours a day. I think that that hustle mentality isn't always helpful and isn't always positive, but at the same time if you have something that you want to accomplish. You just have to do it. You have to figure it out and do it. That's the bottom line. So Yeah? I love what you said on that. You know what I'd like to ask you Stephanie. If there's some sort of book or podcast or resource that you'd recommend for our followers, I don't know if you have any in mind that something that is is really impacted you in some way. Yes, so two different two different things so a book that basically just changed my life completely were was the gifts of imperfection by Bernard Brown. And it was one of those things where I just realized I don't have to be perfect I'm worthy of just the way I am, and that just really kind of just her whole. I love her so much that book. When I started to believe those things about myself, things change. They think changed in my life. They changed in my business That's why I think that no matter what you're looking at doing that. Inner work is I. Don't don't try and like. Get the promotion or getting the relationship, because you think that's GonNa make you more successful or happier, or whatever, because if you're not okay with that first step I it's all going to be empty. You know you're going to get the promotion, but it's not gonNA. Feel as great as you thought it was. Because you're. There's there's that whole in there that you're trying to fill so. That personally was amazing for me and then I love how I built this by Cairo's and. The podcast and for business. That's something that I listened to and I just. If, you're ever wanting to start a business and you think well I don't fit the typical either entrepreneur or business owner, or whatever I don't fit that mold listen to those stories there from every walk of life and every kind of story. It's so empowering to listen to them, but it's also really interesting to see how some of those people dealt with you know the setbacks, and how they how they innovated, and how they funded their businesses, and it's really interesting, and so, and they've covered just about like every aspect of business so I love those, too. Such third-rate episode actually heard how I built. This I've never listened to it, but I've heard it is great good, so that'll be one that'll that'll be added to my podcast list. podcasts our life right now in quarantine. Basically do anything and just have headphones on and listen to podcasts. For sure so good. Well this has been great. We are so happy that we have had the chance to chat with you and an answer all of our questions. Where can people find you on on social media? And where can they purchase happy planner? So they can find a me personally and INSTAGRAM's. Where is my John? That's what I love the most. People over it Instagram, so you can find me at Stephanie Score, Fleming. And then you can find the happy planner, which on Instagram, as the underscore happy, underscore planner or the happy planet Dot Com. I also have a podcast called planet. Happy Life that host with my daughter, sharing tips about how you can choose to be happier and planned to be happier and. And we love that, so that is planned a happy life. You can find that. At Planet Happy Life Dot Com so and then the happy planner you can buy at craft stores all over Michael's Joanne. Hobby Lobby Walmart and that'd be planner DOT COM, so we're all over. Love it. It's awesome. That is so great. We will link everything in the show notes, and it has been such a pleasure Stephanie you offer so much wisdom. As it relates to not only business but life so thank you for sitting down with us today. Thank you appreciate it. It's been fun talking to you.

Stephanie Fleming Co Founder Married Google Pinterest Bernard Brown Wanna Weller Mckellen Dopamine Paisley David Allen Kate Cfo Ceo Kids School OH Canton. Zaidi
"weller" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

04:44 min | 7 months ago

"weller" Discussed on Bigmouth

"And bang out. Didn't. Need. Don't. WANT ME I. Them, can be, different. If, Donald. But. One of. The? Put Him on. A breakdown. Most root. For the money however. Donald. He's a changing man built on shifting sand. Right on sunset is his fifteenth. Studio Album Paul Weller has the burden of being his own mess, and yet he is still changing is release of twenty. Twenty was a music conquest. EP on the Independent Ghost records. This inserts good off the pastoral true meanings album a couple of years ago. Forty decades I think in the music business come well still keep it fresh while pleasing his army who've extremely storms We know who they are. Let's listen to the track more. But. Our small. How? It. Is of course for decades, but it feels like. While they're, the album starts with miracle, which is an epic. Almost eight minute long opener goes the changes in tempo and style, and also some back again. Michael that this have you hooked the opening track didn't miracle on the rest of it I thought was completely charming, an absolutely lovely for wandering around London in the sunshine of early summer, the opening track as Andrew looted to earlier is sorts of Prague promote Contrary and it is going sixteen nine twenty seven eleven time signatures, but it it persistent changing styles to know a pirate rhyme or reason, but once you get through that fairplay. You know you pull. You'd be doing a long time forty decades as we. Can See that you've earned the right to do that. The rest of it is much more traditional, but absolutely lovely I mean kind of go just soft bucolic pastures so once again I think traffic who cast a long shadow of what is work for two or three decades. Casting a long shadow here you expected to best forty thousand headmen any minute. But the melodies so good, the arrangements a great. His voice is sounded interesting. Now I've never been fun of the a voice. This would've stood. Here the something. Aged and weathered about it than that. I really liked with on the songs I'm not sure everything Zach right equanimity. Which I think? An Exit Patrice identified as his tribute. David Bowie. The period day. It's not it's. It's every single one of those sixties. People who decide that they were going to do musical dominant. Davis was doing before wasn't. I'm not sure that one really works well. I was talking to read the lyrics and I'm not show his limit writing. Is that great? Just at the moment was a lot of platitudes on this record, but as a record. It's it really is it's she sounds lovely. Everything about it sounds like this. The instrumentation, the arrangements were done with the specific intention of making you feel good about yourself, and just among actually a piece of music who sold attention to make you feel good feels like the best thing in world. The one thing that has been puzzling me. I won't snow what Paul. POGBA lockdown Harry's it's. Site Yeah. It's quite nice to shoulder-length at the moment looking pretty up from the front of. The.

Donald Paul Weller David Bowie Patrice Zach Davis Michael Prague Andrew London
Ryan Seacrest's Rep Responds to Concerns He Suffered a Stroke During American Idol Finale

Colleen and Bradley

02:36 min | 8 months ago

Ryan Seacrest's Rep Responds to Concerns He Suffered a Stroke During American Idol Finale

"Going on with Ryan Seacrest I didn't see the American idol finale last night but apparently during the show remember you know everybody's at home right so are the contestants are appearing remotely from their homes and during the show towards the end of it Ryan Seacrest appeared to be a little bit off so viewers noticed that his words seem to slightly slurred which is odd for him I mean he's very professional and he's really pulled together his delivery and in his right hi appeared to be a little bit larger than his laughter so lots of people on Twitter were concerned that Ryan Seacrest wasn't Weller had suffered some sort of neurological episode or like a stroke or something like that a rep for Ryan Seacrest said Ryan did not have any kind of stroke last night like many people right now Ryan is adjusting to the new normal and finding work home balance with the added stress of having to put on live shows from home now Ryan was not on live with Kelly and Ryan today so the rep went on and said the live with Kelly and Ryan American idol on air with Ryan Seacrest and the Disney family sing alongs specials he's been juggling three to four on your jobs over the last few weeks and he's in need of rest so today he took a well deserved day off seem to run at a pace that seems unsustainable if you ask me well I mean it can't be good for you it's a lot yeah that does seem like a lot of stress you know and he was trying to deal with eight it's a stressful show because he's trying to move from all these places to home and there's delays and you can't see everybody and he can't hear everybody and I'm sure his producers were just like soul beyond stressed that's a stressful show to put on yeah the way that they're doing television right now I can't even imagine right and and again like you said it doesn't matter that he's doing all of these things from home meaning doing all the jobs that he does live and because he doesn't have all the help exactly and my own and it still is a ton of work it's a time that is a lot of work yeah it's a lot of mental energy yeah I mean there's definitely and just that added worry of I know I feel like this whenever we have technical problems it just like raises the worry level a little bit it makes it hard to be like in the moment and really enjoy what you're doing if you have technical issues you could go ahead but ours gonna say or god knows what distraction right yeah if I could set Ryan Seacrest down and have a little heart to heart with him yeah I would say to him you don't have to say yes to everything I don't I know you don't have to say yes to

Ryan Seacrest
A Tale To Warm The Cockles Of Your Heart

Gastropod

07:16 min | 10 months ago

A Tale To Warm The Cockles Of Your Heart

"We drove about an hour south to visit the Manchester Research Station where Jodi Tuft and her colleagues are based for the untrained eye. Us is just a random collection of buildings that a federal facility tucked away in Manchester Washington. Which is a semi rural area? Not too far from Seattle but really this is the heart of where shellfish research and restoration happens in puget sound. We walked into one of the buildings with Jodi and her colleagues Stewart. Disease them cockles. Right now Stewart is going to open up this kind of funky basket jovic purse. What's going on here so? Yeah these are a handful of cockles. That are roughly one to five millimeters and look like tiny little pebbles. Yes these were from spawns. That happened in early summer. June baby cockles are adorable but it turns out. They're not that easy. To produce at least in a federal research facility has robin found out when she tried to find examples of research on local cockles. Nobody had ever tried to breed them. We have some magicians on staff here. Who are really good at breeding shellfish and so we collected some cockles. Brought them back here. Nothing happened there was no magic. There was wonderful people doing great work and just a whole bunch of cockles sitting in buckets of water and they were not making any debacles. But even before. Jody and the team tried to get the cockles to spawn. They had to make sure they had healthy. Cockles and Vivian. Says that wasn't so easy. Either because some of the cockles had cockle cancer and they determined that they had a communicable cancer neoplasia. So they could all be brought into the hatchery right away. So they had to be quarantined for two weeks in a lab about fifty miles away and kept in a each individual in a separate bucket while they were tested for neo plays see even shellfish have to be quarantined. We really are all in this together. After quarantine the cockles had to be tested to see if they were sick sound familiar or generally there were enough tests but it turns out when you test a cockle for cancer. Sometimes the stress makes them spontaneously released all their spawn in a last ditch attempt to leave a baby cockle behind. And we certainly concerns that we were GONNA do a great job screening for Neo pleasure and then we will have spawned Oliver Cockles. And then that would be that because once a cockle spoons it takes months before it's ready to make babies again. Luckily the cockles did not shoot their load and that was in part because the team had another magician on staff with a very gentle touch to get the blood. They needed for their cancer tests. She was kind of kind of got the nickname the the cockle vampire because she was so good at drawing blood. After the cockle vampire had done her thing all but five of the cockles tested clean which left Jodi and her team with thirty cockles to make babies from this was their brood stock and then the fun really began so we tried. The first time around failed tried again failed. Maybe we could call it. We learned not failed but yeah we failed. They didn't produce anything and then the third time around. We brought them in and use a technique. That's pretty common. And other kinds of production of shellfish other commercial techniques and injected them with Serotonin and they they were off to the races and this also took a gentle touch because the scientists had to inject each cockle by hand in the gonads with a personal shot of Serotonin the Cocco Viagra test to make things even more interesting. Jody and the team had to set up a group sex situation because cockles have a tendency to fertilize themselves. It's actually called selling so. Yeah so the the the cell thing which your face is not making it easy for me to laugh but you know we're professionals here. We are such professionals that we are going to say it again. Just for the GIGGLES. When a cockle does the baby making thing by itself that's called self ing And that's because cockles are actually hermaphrodites. The same animal can be at different times either male or female so if a cockle is alone and it releases eggs than it can release sperm next and fertilize its own offspring. So the thing that comes from the Hem afforded expanding of the cockatiels also great sentenced to get to say is it can be a challenge for maintaining genetic diversity if a cuckold creates thousands of baby cockles. And they're all exactly the same genetically. That would not be a good thing as jody. Says there'd be basically no genetic diversity so with the group sex tank and the cocoa Viagra injections the setting was finally right and the result was cockle. Babies about a million baby cockles. Many of which are out with partners out squamish now growing bigger. Bigger bigger the took all those cockles and put them out in the shallow water of the sound in a floppy an acronym for floating up Weller System. It's sort of like a nursery for clams that is outside so there's water flowing through twenty four seven so they have food all the time and oxygen all the time and that's where they are right now once the baby. Coco's get to about the size of a quarter they can start living where. Coco's belong in the INTERTIDAL zone. We thaw that. They would have been ready by now but they're growing very slowly. There's not that much food in the water right now. Although they're not dying they're just kind of waiting waiting for spring waiting for the big phytoplankton bloom and I think they're really going to start to grow soon. Some of the cockles they raised. Were extra tiny stragglers. Those were the ones that Jodi and Stewart had in the building to show us. We wanted to see them jump. Coco's don't do anything on demand. Apparently okay let's see. Oh Yeah I just I don't. They're not opening and just the shells. The shells are beautiful and I have a whole bucket of shells that the I will show you in a bit because as exciting as You know five millimeter baby cockle is it's not exactly a meals worth now. We only looking at it. You can imagine what they'll look like when they're big they're miniature version. I mean the crazy thing about looking under a microscope is they. Do Look back at dinner. No one's really fun to see. Miniscule baby cockles under the microscope but we really wanted to know was. When will they be ready to eat? So that's the question we keep asking are. Biologists are constantly hearing from us. So when will they be ready? When will they be ready because people talk care about like medicine in terms of food as medicine and Sometimes people say I need to feed my Indian and it's that old school Indian ancestor piece inside you. That really needs these foods. These sovereign foods that we've had since time immemorial to last time I had cockles was about three months ago but that it had been about two years because I just don't Wanna eat them before we can save them. But we're had to have some gotta feed Indian sometimes

Oliver Cockles Jodi Tuft Jody Coco Stewart Viagra Manchester Research Station Seattle Manchester Washington Neoplasia Cancer NEO Robin Vivian Weller System HEM
The NRA files a lawsuit against Los Angeles, stating gun stores are essential businesses

Pat Thurston

02:20 min | 10 months ago

The NRA files a lawsuit against Los Angeles, stating gun stores are essential businesses

"The governor of California made a decision our and that is to shut the gun stores which are not critical to the nation immediately the national rifle association and other gun owner groups decided to sue the governor and other officials after the gun stores were deemed nonessential businesses and ordered to close during a statewide stay home curb during this coronavirus situation the lawsuit seeks to have gun stores declared essential business it was filed by the NRA of a Los Angeles gun dealer a retailer and other gun owner groups in the U. S. District Court of Central District California what do you think of this in addition the new some of the other defendants listed R. Weller too numerous to report but one of them is the Los Angeles county sheriff and of the Los Angeles county public health director and the suit came due to the governor's executive order all gun and ammunition stores in Los Angeles county are not considered essential businesses almost close to the general public Newsom's order allows grocery stores gas stations pharmacies and other businesses remain open during the stay at home order but forces the closure of others considered nonessential a lawsuit filed by the national rifle association and other gun owner groups claims the executive order violates gun owners second amendment rights the circumstances posed by covert nineteen have breaks are noteworthy but they do not excuse unlawful government infringement upon freedom the national rifle association continues in fact the importance of maintaining the ongoing activities of the central business are for the public safety well for California by this point the need for enhanced safety during uncertain times is precisely one plate of some other members must be able to exercise their fundamental right to keep and bear arms

California National Rifle Association NRA R. Weller Newsom Los Angeles U. S. District Court Of Centra Los Angeles County Director Executive
"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

12:57 min | 1 year ago

"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Okay with that all right with you. Yeah you know I probably when I was twenty one I was given opposite now. I WANNA be your Peter Weller and you've done a damn good job being Peter Weller. I appreciate your kid and as you know of sending with your kid is one of the most gorgeous smiles on planet earth. The toll that all your life. I just told that I have his smile. We have the same kind of Cheshire cat. Like you know somebody what. What have you enjoyed watching with your eight year? Old Recently Star Wars. Yeah man and he's got to play star wars on a piano and a talent contest on Friday which is making me nervous but he was going to watch number the three because he's watched the new ones shown but he never went back and watched the first three and he was GonNa Watch three. You can't watch them with his dad. I can watch any movie I want. It's my it's my TV. It's my time to watch movies ago. We want to let me finish a seat number one and then mom gets in. My mix is a better number one two three zero one story. It's all one story and if you watch number three one you can understand it. Goes back watching him a one two three and now he's obsessed zest with it. So that's that I just watched. He watched Monsters Inc Movie Ida to Pella Monsters Inc makes still makes me smile. I you know what my favorite is. The secret life of pets isn't that visually isn't that stunning running. WHO's the more the more the more moral of the story yes? It's it's beautiful. It's a beautiful starve visual. That's a blind. Yeah I might was seeing it. And it's a famous artist Eric. y'All credit post production is on character design as well breathtaking. He's a real talent. But that's that's what's fun. You know everything. You're talking about Peter in and being inspired and excited About art it can go to Monsters Inc.. It doesn't have to be you know it doesn't have to be the kind of thing where we're only talking about. Jared Jared. Yeah exactly you're speaking about you. Know I I make fun of Invitations Soda Leonard And I'm not a murderer you can watch that over and over Goya anything away from A. Yeah exactly but but that's that's what I what I find inspiring. Is that if you're someone who loves art you love art so it's not. I only love this I only they love that. It is watching Monsters Inc and being able to say I mean it's wonderful movie in general story wise but in terms of looking at it I remember when it came out and seeing sullies hair move. First Time we'd seen that Pixar has done this many times now. Where every time? I think that it can't look better than it. Does they knock you out. They knock you down tangled and they said this is the most beautiful movie I've ever seen. Then cocoa comes out you go holy Shit. This is the most incredible one forgetting the story just looking at visually visually speaking. Yeah now a very different amount of longtime in a guy in place jazz with me. And he's he plays. He plays Tuba. David Silverman directed that the first month And let me just turn this film's share share. And so I talked to him all the time about how did you how do you do that. I mean how do you I get doing. He's the lead animator on the simpsons. Yeah so I get you can do the simpsons as you draw them. You've got this idea but making those people those those how do you make an eyeball adorable. Yeah you know how do you. Yeah but that's it. Yes you have a little girl. Boo is precious and get Disney Pixar. A lot of them. They do this very well. That door a little girl little boy but in a similar way you watch but we watched bug's life again recently wire ans- adorable a how did you make an eyeball in monsters inc funny and cute It really is a beautiful art form And and I am always amazed by that that they take creatures critters wally you know. He's he's a robot and yet that those sad eyes break your heart. It's love that movie. It's what's your favorite film. Leonard Casablanca Awesome Blanca. How do you get better than that was fifteen years old? It's been my favorite everything aligns. Yeah in that film. What's the you know the Bob McKee's story analysis right and then I took twice amazing whenever started a direct cause that guys gifted by is own admission you know and so so writer but could certainly teach what Aristotle speaking aristotle you know demanded in Aristotle and pick it up. He took it from homer. You know that every story has three parts a beginning. Middle and end in the middle has two parts. So you've got essentially four parts and and You spend the last Sunday taking apart class Casablanca which she says the perfect film perfect screenplay. Yeah the film and I knew what what I mean is ninety minutes long as one hundred thirty eight pages. I mean the target so fast man I. It's amazing how fast people could talk then. Oh Yeah Yeah and how. How does Telstar with not a wasted moment? Not One and not an unnecessary moment. It's you know it's an and using close ups when you need them. None of this the calories. Someone's face I mean you know. That's the sad thing about television. I mean that's the thing about television director too is that you know I just worked with a an. I'm working now As an actor on a show that I direct and a and what the director who I really like and all of a sudden he started shot collecting what I call shot collecting. We gotta do this gotTa do that another day. He never did that. He would save those firm for so yeah saving close up saving. Close Up Stone to cable. TV's coming back more and more with that. Oh no there's many things these are happening and we're very lucky. Because we have a plethora of places but I remember you talking about specifically Daddy. The lighting. The way that they let when they would do her close ups and which is looking to lace. But that's her is the way they got this sort of sparkle in them as is a pitch pinpoint specific right in the pupils of the is used to do for for women in particular for glamour photography. And when you sit there and go yet most beautiful in the world got it. Best in the world is like Hard to beat. Yeah although daughters pretty damn close class. She's right up there. Are Isabella Rossellini. Just stabbed her. Mother can take those close ups and you believe that. We booted her out because she had an affair out of wedlock with an Italian. What are we living under a rock? Let's just like frightening these stupid. And you know the thing that busted busted. I met her once in nature. Is that Vanessa redgrave had a kid with Franklin Niro right Who is a kid with regular was it? I can't remember was it wasn't sadly passed away so anyway she has this kid. And she's a Hottie. Vanessa redgrave sixties and franken euros like Franco Nero Ranga near of it. And she said I'm paraphrasing it. I mean she's almost six feet tall. And this is like ninety four something like that. People say this is going to ruin your career. Salat and you decide to have a child out of wedlock. She says he's the best looking guy in the world. How could I not like I? I wish I had that kind of courage. Man I thought I had courage but for a woman to say that Dan only ten years after we booted a woman out for having legitimate. I'm at a fair right. And not just a couple of one night stands your kid. But like a longtime affair with a guy you know out of wedlock. Can you believe that we threw we're out of the country. I mean my God. You cannot legislate morality. Are you enjoying direction. I love directing. I love directing I people say you know I love acting also but at directing. I'd rather tell a story performance. Yeah I prefer to direct act Well we prefer to have you talk as long as you want to some other time. Come back I'd love to. We'll do it again Mitt. I I have the beginnings of a cold. I have to get it on an airplane largest COMECON in England in Manchester Manchester's other homes for my husband's from really hit. What do they call it? Manchurian as much as they money. Is they pay you for COMECON or pay me and pay some other people including Jeff Goldblum Christopher Lloyd and all that other people The best thing about it is that it it. It gives an actor or performer. The dignity of of shaking hands with a populous who been watching you for the fifty years and go thank you and you get back and there's something fantastic and that just really. It's it's a gift to hang out with the populous. Yeah so leaving. God bless you for appreciating and yeah for knowledge it and appreciate it. I appreciate that Leonard but you know I had to learn because I'll leave you with this. I'm I'm a young one theater actor. I read the longest interview done with Christopher Porterfield Marlon Brando on the set of Missouri Breaks. Somebody's yelling outside some production assistant at paraphrase quarter. What's that and Brandon at some P. P. A. Yelling at another being an asshole which just what the movie business does the theater business does and Puerto says that? When does this is makes everybody for a second and astle right because you can't be around the perks of this stuff without thinking about you and it doesn't matter if you're a nineteen year old? PA WHO's on the board of directors. Got The GIG all the way up to the board of directors right somewhere in there. It's about you and I'm reading this just one of twenty three. That's not going to be me. I am Mr it like a cold water flat New Yorker method actor cut to ten years years later and a whole bunch of money in a Ferrari on this guy. Why is my winnebago not in front of fucking state? Why why do I have to walk? Fifty fucking guards and there. I am the Aso I am that asshole. And it's what Brando said. No no matter what your paycheck slap yourself awake and realize you're doing a nine to five blue-collar Gig in the service of entertainment so I appreciate you saying that God bless me for realizing that but it took some dignity and humility learned and and a a couple of things recalled by my mom to go. Oh yeah man. This is a gift and I'd better thank. These people are going to be with them and so because I could be that prick and a second Roseana humanity I wanNA champion humanity. I just don't want to hang out with them. But hanging out hanging out hanging out with humanities the only thing that gives you some sort of humility and compassion and by the way a exhilaration being alive right. Yes yeah well you exhilarate it us. Thanks you truly did sewed so nice to meet you and to have you here. Well I would love to come back. Well well I have you back on the two of you inspiring to be around. Oh well and a massive. Thank you. Jay DP shave my friend. Who is the person that connected us so thanks to JD? Matthew J D and thank you Peter and thank you Leonard Thank you Jessie..

Peter Weller Monsters Inc director Leonard Casablanca Marlon Brando Aristotle Vanessa redgrave Cheshire Pixar Jared Jared David Silverman Disney Isabella Rossellini Goya Casablanca Eric. Pella Monsters Inc Jay DP Telstar Jeff Goldblum
"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And here's what Mike says. Okay well are. And you'RE GONNA get lectured to and he tells me last name. What is his his name is told me says? Oh my God not him. He's good and I said Yeah I says well here's what we do. You never work with him again and now as serious man because anybody who says they are photographer. Who Calls Ben Nicholas Mooring or Ingemar Bergman overrated and an unimportant? You must never work again. And that's how lethal and intolerant dollar. He was with stupidity so on the one hand. He's a scholar in a giver of knowledge and a rocket tour. And a funny guy on the other hand here. Here's a obliterating impudent assassination of anybody without taste. You know he was not interested interested even in accepting people without taste. And that's Mike so I want to mention another name and I. I don't know I'm not leading the witness here because I don't know what you're going to say but you were directed on stage by Auto Primer Jer. Correct what what was that experience life horrible and there are many story there are and the most of which is I have to tell you. It was really the thing I take away the play with. BB Anderson and BB Senate Leonard. Nimoy Ingmar from Soda Persona She gave me this They couldn't get publicity photographs. You gave me the picture of her Goldman. She says my friend Peter With Friendship Love is in my office wall so but this the the AH premature was huge bald and mean and spitting and he talked it eighty million decibels and you know he would like that. All the time and there was an I would tell Mike later on talking like this and there's a jump ahead about Mike Mike says you know. He's the guy he escaped from. Because he was he was from. Vienna is Sam Spiegel the Great Sam Spiegel. I mean how many great movies he produced and San Diego's German in Ottawa's Viennese together in Berlin or something they escape together but Spiegel Eagle who knew him. So it's according to my with say auto and I I you know if it wasn't for the fact that you're Jewish you'd have gone right to the top of the Reich. That's his best friend telling you could probably say that because has to Jewish kids are on the run that they you know they they random boomer got gotTa January and Split for London but Otto was a you know a collaborative Blue Period Period Picasso behind his chair and always elegant and an entourage of it wasn't like Andy Warhol all those guys. I mean all mazing mazing painters and and the New York Click would follow him into rehearsals and someone I want to ask you. I want to jump around a little bit. You directed short subject and nineteen ninety-three that was nominated for an academy award and the cast is just the most killer Lionel cosmetic. Yeah I I mean I'm I'm GonNa just read from Thomas mcelwain story that's right it's a great guy Griffin Donahue Donahue mentioned mark. Helga Burger Ed. Begley Junior Joseph Gordon Levitt Seymour CA. Sell Charles Fleischer Robert Hays Joseph Mar Kevin Nealon Island Charles Martin Smith and the late. Great J T Walsh. That's right that is a hell of a gated raw. She's on there. No David Rossio. Also who came up with the best line ever heard in the film anywhere and Griffin Dunne has got like it's about paranoia law firm of course. Do you ever got over here that chorus of lawyers talking with JT and China Martin Smith and Alan Rosa Bergen. Brian Gordon and Ed and I I yelled at him I said I need. I need one ad-lib like when he comes over as if you change the subject when he's listening and JT's goes yeah raw. She's got it rushes from Improv theater. And so there's griffin coming to the edge and he looks over it just looks over raw. She says and a cow how was returned to its rightful owner. They all they all walk away. Eighty one of the most brilliant wines. I love onsite. That's it that's those guys. Now how do you get the hang out with them. Leonard is the thing setting up sending upset and they were all sitting in the green room telling doing amazing theater started. Making you imagine Zimmer Kosolin Kevin Nealon and Russia Ed Begley in Bob Hayes in these guys like Charlie Morton. Smith's now doll stories in laughing. I could hear them laughing and having lab four hours and I never heard what they were saying. Where did you grow up because obviously you said enormous Brazil? So where are you born born. Stevens point. Wisconsin my grandfather was in the English department. There was point. My Grandmother was a piano teacher and a kindergarten teacher is born. There didn't spend much time there got pneumonia and I was very young and they moved me out to Gosh the Panama City Florida. Where my one of my uncles was? My father was in the Army Bombardier and then going into helicopter school and so forth so he was moving around a lot and I grew up essentially mostly Texas. Ah We ended up at Texas. What part of Texas San Antonio Austin area? Yeah we went back and forth back and forth through there but to tell you my my father As had a twin brother just passed away ninety six great guy right yeah. And he spent most of his adult life from the forties forties from the world. War Two on in New Orleans so my cousin Frederick Weller really good theater actor and really good actor twos my cousin a Following my footsteps I was always in New Orleans. I just got back from New Orleans and I'm in New Orleans a lot so no one is more of a home to me anyplace anyplace because anytime we're downtime. We're New Orleans with alcohol's anti cousins. Whatever that's where they really with the families of when when did when did all of this become interesting to you? I mean honestly looking through the things you've studied and and the fact that you do a little bit of everything it's it frankly it's overwhelming how much you know and how much you've done but for you as a kid what we did one come. I know I always wanted to be miles Davis worse things. Well you look when Whiplash K.. Two movies came out one year. That just reduced me to ashish. Cash and Was Whiplash and I went to North Texas state always with the four o'clock five o'clock bands. There's like six bands the you you had to really fight to get in them. Most kids could not get into one o'clock band birth. You know Lou Marini in in Bones Bologne all these guys that you see on Leno and whoever back and and just to be clear North Texas state which was then called universal. You know now it's called University of North Texas. Then it was called north state. Okay but Leon Breeden is the first this guy to ever set up a contemporary music school. Like if you're going to study music at judo places before Berkeley School Music Boston Point Four. Miami's emmys drawl is amazing places. The North Texas state was it. You need every band or was You know with through through there to pick up musicians for the summer. Yes showing that Jesse though as we were coming over today just so people understand that that was like the Nape Lou ultra of of jazz acid usually. Yeah that was the ultra of jazz education. That was that was a cynical on non converged and so I have no more Latin at in any case. That's why I went. I wanted to be and I saw whiplash is it that was me. You know you know it wasn't necessarily unburdened but it was his unfurling who in one o'clock weller. Nation forty eight two three four bone. CUT IT Jesse in out and finally after that I think Mike Okay. I'm playing and doing it in a plan doing it. But do I want to go through this for the rest of my frigging life before nine dollars and change and then I realize I'm not going to be miles Davis. What else do the only thing I did was act so I am in the Theater Department Kinda as a loose goose thing not to go to Vietnam so so when I when I saw whiplash and how terrifying that somebody called neponset route? They made a movie about going to jazz school. It certainly sounds sounds like you and I go. Look there's no one who's GonNa make a movie about going to music school anywhere particularly contemporary music. That's going to get it. And then I saw that movie and has reduced as right. I was just reduced to nothing and then the thing that kicked it is a month later. A buddy of mine calls me and says hey man there's a movie out that will really nail you. I've already seen it whiplash. She goes no no no. I'm not talking about that. It's about dignity after action hero finding dignity after action hero. It's really about the actor but it's about you do what does that Birdman. So then I go see Birdman and that just brought me to the end. I thought God God bless you Michael Keaton speaking for you know the five of us who have said no part three right which he I did and I did and maybe some other people did because we wanted to find the other way and that movie just it made me laugh and cry at the same time so two movies one year. Just reduce me man. You know and you you. Somebody's GonNa come up until you that. Hey this is a movie about your life. No Oh it's not they don't know what it is Robo Cop and life after robocop. Yes yes they do. Somebody knows it is a music school. Yeah so that's that's what I want to be. Miles Davis and I wasn't miles Davis so they're not going to be an actor and I never get it I was I was hitchhiking being down also and my father had left. The retirement is going to law school in a guy picks me up. Does this guy and goes Hitchhike right now he says what do you do it out of my mouth said I'm an actor and at and I went that's it. He's just really. What do you act to say? Well now I'm an university but I'm going to go to New York and Those words came out and sometimes the words the words precede yes like Tibetan Buddhism. They call it a Bardo. It's a crack and your reality. He and all of a sudden the world is taking you a place that you're not thinking of right is just it's metaphysical. Yeah now you you. You study with Udo Haagen the Great Great Kutaragi who I got to see just once on stage got US artistic killed me twice as was amazing. Yes yeah so it was very light show but a charming show David Hyde Pierce six. Dance lessons down. I can't remember the name of it. Wonderful wonderful piece Vehicle for these to to find actors. I mean look back at this. I've been doing this for fifty years and all I can do is thank God like like miles. Smile said that the Darryl Jones now the rolling Stones Bass player but that was basically it was discovered by miles it was in one thousand nine hundred miles picked him out of abandoned Chicago. Said all you can do right would call him up in the middle of night. Said Darryl are you on the knees why my husband loves sleeping threes. Get on your knees because only you you do is thank God for your gifts. Click and hang up on him and Darryl must have got that call for six months when he was like I touring with them and so I bring that up the miles miles must have. That's all I didn't know miles of spiritual you know but you could. Betty was all you can do is thank God for the opportunities that gifts and so forth and even if you're like an atheist agnostic thank something because your mind ain't doing all of what I'm saying. There's something out there a world working in your favor or leading you from okay. You're not going to be miles Davis but like you get guess what you get there. Fifty Years Minimum of a theater and film career..

Davis Mike Mike New Orleans Ed Begley North Texas Charles Martin Smith JT Darryl Jones Leonard Texas Sam Spiegel Griffin Dunne University of North Texas Ingemar Bergman Ben Nicholas Mooring David Hyde Pierce New York Click J T Walsh Charles Fleischer Robert Hays Helga Burger Ed
"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

14:34 min | 1 year ago

"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Out of Africa's brilliant is it old old Sydney Pollack Doing Robert Redford and Meryl Streep and one of her seminal performances. I it's it's fantastic story but that's right yeah contemporary. It's contemporary it is it's contemporary film. Yeah just like artists. What is postmodern after World War Two? It's after drew the nuke after the course after Vietnam it's temporary. Yeah Two twos the likes of you and me but not to not. Everybody know it's but we would call call that Contemporary I mean. That's like I'm supposed to say this. Now right okay boomer Oh you're so hip you're so this. Is this new thing where every time when you complain. My Dad's a real. He's nineteen fifties real l. baby-boomer Where Peter Peter's just a few years it's is that the denigration baby boomers exactly? Yes exactly you you say you. Kids don't know what they say. Okay boomer I would never say that in my life. But it's a thing he loves it. He loves making jokes about twitter. You're very I don't super hit. I think your dad is hip they well anyway. Anyway that's that's the that's the point. Context point of context is by the way. Thanks victorious Dr who I think along with McGraw and my dissertation you know I wouldn't be. I wouldn't have never studied art down and we have to add. That is ridiculous you have a masters. PhD HD both the Master's from Syracuse University in Roman and Renaissance Art and a PhD in Italian Renaissance Art History for Ucla Cla. That's right And and and fourteen different my sleep you know. It's like No the now that does not define man. He's what you do. Though you get up first thing you hit it for fifteen minutes. Play the trumpet. Every day I get up and play trumpet. Oh yeah by the way. He's also a world class jazz. Trumpeter thank you. I used to be great now mediocre but I'm surrounded by six or five guys. You make me look great. Still you know. Because they're session guys is an real real deal musicians who make their living at it and Yeah I but I love playing the trumpet. Love Playing Bossa Nova Guitar Hard. But you gotta do it early in the morning and you gotta right early in the morning and then you gotta do it before you do emails a phone calls or you know otherwise it goes does It goes away. You can't do it. You can't do that one day on Friday. Yeah I'll do it on Friday. Yeah you gotTa do it fifteen twenty. That's how exercises from you have to do as soon as again are also going to put it off and get busy with the day. The other things intrude on your day and other things that they that sucks the air out of the balloon and finally have a day. Ah Yeah Yeah. Didn't you play the Cornet. I play the trumpet. Cornet sister smaller version. But what I play actually is now a Flugel Horn which is love that sound and a great company. That's gone out of business. And Colegio made me pocket fluids doubt about that big but it has the sound of that you play in public or do you just used to play Jeff Goldblum when I Jeff Jeff Goldblum is a Gem Jeff Goldblum and I've played together and Bucker ruin in later on. We got it. Great you mean. In the adventures of buckle banzai adventures a buck rebounds uh-huh across the eighth Tim across the dementia. All of those words and that one title at so jeff and I've been friends since then except that met jeff when he was nineteen and and I was doing play for Joe PAPP and he was doing a play for Joe PAPP and there was a ninety seventy three so we go back a long way and we started play together in the eighties. And then we got together and people's living rooms with a great guitar. Playing Peter. Harrison won a grammy with Hornsby Hornsby another grammy. Chuck Mangione so he's a gifted guy also orchestrator for NBC. So the three of us would play and then miles Davis and I can really drop that name. And that's really really name dropping. You could drop three as far as I'm concerned my lifetime. You could drop Brando. He'll do and you could drop miles Davis And you know I don't know maybe seven thousand dollars. There's about five that you can really. I mean the others. You could say like I worked with Sidney Lumet. I work with Mike. These people you know illeg brought me into the studio. Those people are giants and but miles. Miles Davis's Mozart you know. Miles Davis shifted the course American music. This rap sounds that take his rhythmic sounds on the corner. What I mean is there so mile said when are you in Goldblum going to get out of those living rooms and get yourself a band miles Davis? Yeah well that wasn't there but he knew he reads a lot right and he knew when I met him that he had every album it ever made since I was nine my mother turned me onto it backstage with him into Mother is still living in eight other white bread people. Will you know who are standing with miles. And he booked no editorial all hated care. Who's listening and he said when you I don't know how he knew Jeff and I had a bamboo says what are you GonNa get out of these living rooms and gets a band and I said miles like where are we going to get a band cooking? You dropped the F bomb on the spot for it. Yeah so I said Mas. We're going to get a ban and he screwed up his face at me like that and is is it going to get a ban will buy one get the fucking money any walked out the door. That's used F word we've ever had. Yeah yeah so I ran back to Jefferson Jeff. Miles Davis Miles Davis Miles. Davis said we've got to get a band we've got an event it goes. Well okay. We could buy one. But what do we find this ban. You know. So we asked Peter. Harrison Peterson Peterson. I'm orchestrated from NBC. I'm not even touch with bands anymore. So we go on to play the Liberals and the next thing I knew. I'm doing a movie with Woody Allen Woody Allen plays loves it now woody Allen is a huge. That's a context of film that people look at that okay because he's looked at every film and he's changed his what they call his style. You Know Gordon Willis was with him and then he changed the Carlotta the Palmas moving the camera. He's got a whole myriad of changes of style. So I'm talking to woody And Brian Hamill is. It was his poster photographer. One all what's for Manhattan member. The great brands of courses and Brian is one of what he's talking to Brian and I said I gotTa talk to woody about Jazzman and known would for wild and a cement michaels and I told him to start up miles Z.. said he says well Peter you know. Miles Davis tells you get a band you gotta get man. It's Miles Davis is not guy in a diner man. You know I said well what what are we ready says. Listen take the people you've got and find a place I the band will come. Just get outta out of the living rooms. Go find a restaurant that's empty on the day. They're empty and just ask him if they go in and play and now goes sure 'cause they don't care like two people in place but make sure you get paid and I'm not talking about the dinner the free lunch or the whatever ice tea but they give view money even if it's fifty bucks and it will be the happiest fifty dollars ever made now. This goes back to when I was at school. I could make money but now I made made any money is a musician and neither is Jeff. So Tell Jeff Jeff. It's not just that he was a any all right. Jeff I forgot my mantra great line. You're the guy at the and to tell them that's a woody. Says we gotta get a band and we should just go find a place. I will get the musician. So we went to four on on Broadway. It was empty on Saturdays and me. I'm Peter Harrison. Clint Eastwood. There's another name you can drop with. Son Kyle Up Clint and he said you know Kyle is a great musician quite bass player. Yeah wonderful and he became a player and we play this place and what he said it thirty days you'll have an audience. It's thirty days you'll have on its and musicians will come. Because they'll hear about dot com Zach positions came now jeff plays with his group and he's recording according to bless him and I play my. I played the grain of Anna Room. Which is a Cigar Club High End Cigar Club in Beverly Hills? I played like every couple of months. Fat Jeff Jeff Tours it. Yeah it's just the best. It's the best. Who did you just see this weekend? Roger Kellaway where at Feinstein's at Patillo north. Hollywood with John Clayton on Bass whose magnificent and Bruce Forman on guitar. So that was the trio. Dad's Jazz my dad's a jazz nut. Who Made Me Jazz? Not Are you nuts. Yes I used to big jazz. The Jazz Society things like happiest money is the most most exciting one of the most exciting days of my entire life was I opened an envelope and there was a check inside for sixty eighty five dollars from the village voice. Wow accepting my review of Duke Pearson this orchestra Who would play at the half note Manhattan and I was just over the moon over the moon I wrote to the voice of the next two and a half years? And what you're what years was this. Is the eighteen. Seventy seven nineteen seventies early to mid July started. I started there at the voice at the same time as Gary Giddens. You kidding was who is brilliant yeah sure I was a dilettante. Gary was brilliant and still is and was to write liner notes. I got to do Matt and I and I got a door down beat magazine so I had several years of doing that. But we're here to talk about you. Peter no no no no I. I just I knew that you were jazz. Guy I knew that was Abramowicz. Still writing for the voice thin. No here's going mind mine not to my knowledge He was the Rocker There's the Rock Rock Guy. What are you guys you put up Jimi Hendrix? Sea mentioned. You mentioned Mike Nichols Mike. Nicholls apparently was Godfather of cinema. So many people who worked for him You know like a proselytizer. An educator I think that was his great gift that he was a savant. I mean that he was like an parter of wisdom and but as articulate and the funniest dude. I've never met and man. I mean Iraq on tour and quick A one liner you know one liner quake. But I guess he was. I mean He. I was doing a film shakedown with. Sam Elliott. What are the last New York action in films? New York was filthy but it was dangerous. I mean salmon is that we had security around us. Not because we're anybody like extra famous but be overshooting at crack dens and and all sorts of places where you get killed but We never get cries and whispers. Murderous is crisis Just been restored so graduates. This is what ninety three three Islamic that is the nineteen eighty eight. It's been restored and it's being released so Sam is asking me about Chrysler Whisper. Should he goes see it. He always Bergman was something. You know. Sam's country guy. Hi but he's always curious as a beautiful thing about him. He's almost innocent in his curiosity. I got the direct them and justify a couple of years ago. What a gem of human being you too so he should Peter? Should I go see this cries and whispers right. I suggest SAM. Have you ever see any Bergman Persona assault photography Operator whose name I will not mention. But he's a pretty famous operate in New York. Says Bergman is just Horns in Bergman is overrated. Bergman has you know they call seventh seal. You know it's overrated. It's like hype and spend Nichols this is like who cares. It's static tableaux photography with no particular invention. I said well I disagree. I mean I think that you know this is the post second wave of feminism. Have you see persona that may be the all-time feminist film ever ever I can't think of anything that that anybody of any gender is ever made or written or filmed that tells more more about the dilemma of a woman. The woman in any facet whether it's love jealousy. Envy violence what have you so I say I disagree in our so that night I have dinner we would have these dinners throughout. It would be me. Carrie Fisher and Mike and Carrie Fisher was God bless her was one of my first maybe my first ever in. La Carrie Fisher. I met before star wars came out. I was doing streamers with Mike. She'd come to see it with her best friend and other wonderful guy. Great actor ribbon done Iowa shoe she was nineteen. I think I was twenty six. Something like that. Became fast. Friends took me to Disneyland. And then we would have these seminars with Mike off and on so here. We are at this Chinese Restaurant Front and Mike says moving is he's you know by the way cries and more spurs just released today you know with all we got to see it so I tell him about this this conversation with Sam..

Miles Davis Peter Peter Jefferson Jeff Mike Nichols Mike Jeff Jeff Goldblum Bergman Sam Elliott jeff Woody Allen Woody Allen Peter Harrison Jeff Jeff NBC Carrie Fisher Manhattan twitter Africa New York Joe PAPP
"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

12:43 min | 1 year ago

"weller" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Hi I'm Leonard Maltin Jessie Nelson. And you're listening to Maltin on movies and I'm very pleased to say that our guest today is actor director musician scholar teacher polymath and so much more Peter Weller. How are you Leonard? How are you just fine? We are fine to have you here. I am happy to be here in particularly with like a fan. One of yours for a while now and More intelligent commentator or assessor Don't think I could find so I'm happy to be here. That's it's very kind of you. Thank you flattery will get you everywhere. I I missed a chance to interview you in Nineteen eighty-seven when a little film you'd made call Robocop. Oh Cop came out but I asked a stringer for entertainment. Tonight was in New York where you were at the time to ask my questions for me that I could put into this piece about robocop and about the fact that you fashioned your physical movements in that movie after the actor Nikolai like Cherkasov from Ivan. The terrible part to psycho wait a minute. There's a big mainstream Hollywood movie influenced by a Russian Russian classic and then I found there was a second Russian classic so excited knocking over. And then I found there was a second Russian classic evoked by a film that some and that was the untouchables which Brian depalma staged a sort of a replay of the Odessa steps. Sequence from Potemkin. It's like wow I got a piece I got a story for my TV show for my very mainstream TV show and got all that on the air including you talk a lot of people. Don't I don't know who Eisenstein is though and the sad thing is what I find sad. I just gave a paper on it. At the Sixteenth Century Society is that you can jump into film schools until Zilkha schools. Now and you can go right into say postmodern contemporary film. And you don't have to know who is is is this a renoir. Those guys the guys that I see you hit the floor as an actor or director particularly as a theatre actor or a fan of film in the sixty seventies eighties. You have to look at those movies. Were the cornerstone of the whole art. Nowadays you can go no man. You know what I WANNA do. I WANNA study Uh You know Jim Jarmusch. That's not to take anything with him but you can't start with him now. It's the idea might my dad. There's a quote that swell misquote misquote. But essentially goes around on the Internet where he says if your film education begins and ends at Star Wars than a severely handicapped and that is like say not in any way disrespecting star wars and everything it's done but to me when I meet someone and they tell me they love film and I say okay like what and they list off the avengers films and I get nothing against any of those but it's the idea to me if you love something. Don't you WanNa Watch and consume as much much as possible so that you have a million different Ideas and examples exciting Jesse particularly if you'RE A director. My dilemma and I direct a lot of high end television now. It's have a Lotta Fun because you get you get three weeks to hit a home. Run home run but at the same time I run into directors in actually directors and photography. And I it's so forth who don't have a language for it so subsequently currently the I came up with a couple of amazing people who schooled me and one of them was Mike Nicholls Mike Nichols would bring up a subject. Okay Very Funny Guy. But also various serve guy and he would say you know Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and. I said well I don't know that movie and he goes okay. Weller we will. Oh not discuss for film noir again and he must have done that fifteen sixteen times in my life right and I would go go. Wow I mean how could I see Film Noir when I'm looking at you know Out of the past you know when I haven't seen any of these people started subsequently directing and you go okay when a hinge that means like walked into the room and reveal Leonard. Here comes Jesse's as you walk through the room and you just stay on her. And you've that's a William Wyler technique that he did over and over and over and over again and then go dark. You know bumps it from the With the new the new wave and doesn't like many times he's hinging people everywhere so just discussing this with the with the director Qatar via had no idea that these hint shots are that old. You know that's all you think. This is all a product of postmodern DOC simmers. So it's the vocabulary got the story. Yes that these films give you. But it's the film vocabulary and how they shot it and by the way. Let me just in this out there. One of my favorite films. I saw my dad when I was a kid. I don't know why I liked it. But something about it resonated with me because it it was about likable but evil people and I haven't criterion and it just came on a two weeks ago on a Sunday maybe as we hear on Sunday and I I you know I recorded it and my wife came and sat down my beautiful white shirt and she sat down on Sunday morning. Sun was eight year old kid he was like doing something like would you said look and so. It was introduced induced by the guys on on Turner Classic Movies and they said this amazing thing this that not only. Do we consider this one of possibly the finest film in America about America but maybe one of the three finest American films ever made and it's sweet smell of success. How do you beat that Leonard? I'll you tell you beat the dialogue. And how do you beat Lancaster's performance and Hammy is. Tony Curtis artists who became a friend. Later on as Hammy as those guys could be whole shots with him undressing and dressing in the one thing where he's firing everything they they build up. Burt Lancaster's entrance. Oh my gosh. They're leading up here in the nightclub. Burt Lancaster in this film. which if you haven't seen you should? Now he fifty seven sweet smell of success he plays a really a lethal. Yeah and cruel Broadway columnist columnist columnists in those days held a lot of power. And then Jiechi ruin your make you WANNA learn exactly. So they're building up to his our first view of him in this Copacabana style nightclub and finally the next to last shot is him signing a check a a checkup for the for the Club for dinner that night and then you see him but they build up to it so perfectly so beautifully. And that's the outdoor the exterior photography by James Wong Man. Is that it killer watching New York at that moment in time Manhattan. Forty seven nights. I mean but but these these are like huge cameras right there. Big Mitchell I dunno panavision was just starting to come in. But he's a big Mitchell cameras that he's shooting at night. The the credits are loan dusk. It's not dust. Yeah love love that look and the credits from the back of one of those New York Times is out in. Broadway's lit up behind on you. The film vocabulary in it is staggering and to walk from like back lit neon in black and white. By the way the dark Broadway into the worst phosphorus lit diner where everything is blown out. It's not only just changing the focus on you know. Oh you gotTA stop stops and do that was insanely difficult. But the performance is in it or are amazing and there are wonders where people go growth through rooms. You follow him all the way through rooms and the only other shot is the person watching me wonder means the cameras is following. I don't know I watched that movie and you know it's like watching. Ching certain films like apocalypse. Now let's take that. For example. One of my oldest friends and beautiful reds spent. Thanksgiving with him is is Laurence Fishburne I don't know why he calls me peewee. He's called me pee wee all my life and I call him Lorenzo and we've called it so we were talking about apocalypse now and the people table that net seen apocalypse now because fifteen sixteen seventeen year old twenty one year olds right. They know him from other movies and TV shows but they don't know him that he was fifteen years old doing apocalypse now and we were all discussing my wife about that. No sweet smell of success pockets now. Maybe there's four the films you can be going on a dinner date and then all of a sudden your cable. TV Station when it comes on and you say okay all right. I'll just watch Komo Martin. Sheen go up the river. You know. I'll just watch the divall. Seen a luck luck you're there you're there for the IT IS A. It is a train wreck doc so anyway my point is that I am in Japan in nineteen ninety something or other at the at the National Festival. Tokyo and with victorious Doron the toys Toronto arguably shifted the technique of color film and that is one of the first filter technicolor. And I didn't know you. I WanNa read a great book. Read by Oswald Morris Second Guy but worked with We have a problem Houston about him given The first Moulin Rouge for John Huston. You know a monochrome. The chrome back the bleach it out so it looks like to lose track because I did not know that technicolor was truly the mob. You didn't get your film released unless they sat down and said great three three basketball good released so you could mess with them but they sold a lab to Roman storrow because he was working for people like Dr Gento and and especially if the the car guys. He wanted a monkey around with huge light contrast like neon beer with a bare lightbulb. Now we look at it. You could see that blue. You could see how bear this is. This is like yellowish and you could do that now. In a chip that doesn't matter in the sixties. That was hard to do. You had to Futz with it and subsequently physically a filter technicolor. So when I was with him I said you know me. The modernist art guy said. Who's your favorite painter and studied art and he said Well have you ever been to Padua to see jolt tall in the Arena Chapel Chapel. Which is I? Don't even know who joe tow is man and he took his scarf. I've told us the MINI DEVI is researching like Coppola set to apocalypse now Pakistan. Right off the toys. The only guy could shoot in the mud in the Philippines. Come away in a white suit. Because that's what that's all Vittorio is man so he took his any flipped it and he said we can talk about us being talion guy and Ah I WANNA be but I went up to him and said Toya's pretends does your your. That's pretty pretentious. He goes no you. You are pretentious. Peter you are pretentious because because you have no context you have no if you tell you go into the arena chapel and you see and you see the first one two one six five like a television frame of space depth tears action motion a movie movie the narrative first one ever done since Rome. Everything comes out of that Peter. He was telling me you know because jolt does the one artist from whom all Western art stems and his and his reputation and his legacy has never come into question since Dante mentioned him. No one Picasso. It doesn't matter who you're talking about. Mark Rothko looked at Joe Talk Rauschenberg. They're all joked os. I didn't know who who this guy is. So I'm like the guy who says no star wars or this kid I just ran into God. BLESS HER ON CENTER WIPE IVO she said. I'm going to fill school. Honolulu teaches which is what we're looking at all films now. Like what out of Africa Occa- okay I get it..

Leonard Maltin director Peter Weller New York Jesse Burt Lancaster Brian depalma Odessa Jim Jarmusch Hollywood New York Times William Wyler Mitchell Tony Curtis Nikolai Sixteenth Century Society Honolulu Potemkin Eisenstein Africa
Eroding trust in vaccines leaves populations vulnerable, global study finds

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Eroding trust in vaccines leaves populations vulnerable, global study finds

"So how do people feel about vaccines for diseases like measles? Well, it depends on which country you live in global study by Britain's Wellcome. Trust finds public confidence in vaccines is highest in poorer countries, but weaker in wealthier ones. This despite medical evidence that shows vaccine save up to three million lives a year co author Charlie Weller is safe, effective getting too many people know everyone. How do we get those messages to the right people? Recent measles, outbreaks in the US Ukraine at the Philippine suggests entire populations. There have lost the hurt immunity that only comes when more than ninety percent of people are

Charlie Weller Philippine Britain United States Ukraine Ninety Percent
U.S. biologists probe deaths of 70 emaciated gray whales

News, Traffic and Weather

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. biologists probe deaths of 70 emaciated gray whales

"The way of, of gray whales standings, strandings up and down the west coast has prompted Noah fisheries to investigate the cause komo's sewer Romero is more estimates that seventy gray whales stranded on the coast of Washington, Oregon, California and Alaska so far this year. That's the most since two thousand biologist David Weller with Noah southwest fisheries science center says many of the stranded whales were malnourished for fitting in two thousand eighteen would result in subpar, energetic reserves, for some Wales, which would become most apparent at this, very time of the year, since they're also looking into a theory known as carrying capacity the ability of the environment to maintain a population of a given size estimates, there are about twenty seven thousand gray whales in the eastern

Noah Southwest Fisheries Scien Noah David Weller Komo Romero Alaska Washington Wales Oregon California Twenty Seven Thousand Gray Seventy Gray
"weller" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"weller" Discussed on WJR 760

"You wanna deal with the company that knows it? There's been doing it for a while to understands how it should be placed and where especially if it's in tandem with water softening. That's always. Yeah. I mean, literally because these things are installed in line or one after another if they're done improperly, you can actually create some problems that you've made out of had otherwise we've got a we've got a company we really like. Yeah. Vote champ water they're out of the Hartland area. But they go to your area all the time during bright, actually. And if you have a pen, I'll give you a phone number, and they can take care of both systems if needed or one, they'll they'll test your water and make a recommendation to you. Yes, I want you to talk to Jared. Are you there? Yes. I am. For my pin? Okay. Okay. They're gonna talk to Jared. Bo champ J E R R A D, And I had a discussion with Jared a couple of weeks ago. And the man knows his stuff. I very very confident that the phone number over there is eight one zero. Six three two two zero zero zero. Okay. I'm you heard of a company called Weller. No man doesn't sound familiar to me. Yeah. That's not necessarily a negative that we have not, you know, there's a lot of good companies that we still haven't discovered yet. So okay. Where out of? Undertaking. I really want to be very careful about, but I hope so. The system I have right now. So. You know, it's funny. You say that we respect the heck out of it. Because water I mean, when you ingest something voluntarily that's a very intimate thing that more of us should pay attention to don't you think? Totally. I've thought about that for decades that people will. Waiting anywhere and call it food and chew on a go. Wow. You know, you really should use of discretion here in water in a house is huge. I agree. I know a lot of people out there. I want I want to put that out there against I want you to talk to Jared from beau.

Jared Weller
U.S. court orders Trump administration to enforce chemical safety rule

News, Traffic and Weather

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. court orders Trump administration to enforce chemical safety rule

"Washington's attorney general says he's got another win. Against the White House Jeep up Ferguson joined with other attorneys general from across the country to, sue the EPA After that agency moved to block the. Obama era chemical disaster rule that rule increases the regulations and procedures, at large chemical plants an appeals court sided with Bergesen saying this is. A matter of public safety and eat must go, into effect according to the hill newspaper the Trump administration believes that rule is too, expensive in unnecessarily burdensome is unclear whether the administration will appeal to a higher

Representative Madman Weller Kim Schreier Komo Manuela Washington University Ryan Harris Dino Rossi Barack Obama Jeff Pohjola Schreyer EPA Charlie Harger Washington Ferguson Seattle Donald Trump Maine Investigator
Israel seeks early re-tender of mining rights to shore up Dead Sea

24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Israel seeks early re-tender of mining rights to shore up Dead Sea

"One the Dead Sea is shrinking about three feet a year in Israel Officials are trying to fix that the? Heavy salt content makes the Dead Sea the only place in the? World you can read newspaper while floating on your back it's been shrinking for a while. Both because the Jordan river's drying up and because Israel Chemicals extracts minerals like potash and bromide now. The Israeli government wants the company to agree to pumping limits. On minerals and using

Dr Jason Downs Dead Sea Lynn Atkins Weller Israel Chemicals Lynn Adkins Assistant Professor Of Biology Linda Gradstein Attaran Jenkins Jordan River Israel Philadelphia Israeli Government Gulf CBS Fraud Kevin Canadian Arctic Delaware Valley University Houston
"weller" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"weller" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Sports in Boston brought me Jim Weller, Allen Cosgrove and the the anti social media, the anti? Yeah, everything guy, Dave Tate. Was there smitty was there so's my first time speaking in front of the big group. I was absolutely the worst speaker ever. I was a nervous. I was starring. I was just horrible. And I said to myself, like I said, talk telling ourselves a story or writing a narrative. You're like, I can't. I can't speak. I'm horrible speaking. I can't speak in front of groups and so I didn't do it probably for five years, two thousand twelve, maybe something like that. And then a couple of guys invited me to speak out at smaller things. And I was like, let me try it again. You know, I'm here I've, I've kind of worked on myself going through that. Journey a little bit, and I'll pretty good and I had fallen at it. And then I sort of doing improv classes at second city Hollywood about four years ago. And that was a game changer for me as this is amazing because you know John Morrison, John Hennigan. Absolutely, yes. So John texted me one day and he's like, hey, I'm doing a show at second city. Not you guys wanna come check it out, and I was like, yeah, sure. I'd love to. So I go watch the show and afterwards in the bars, like dude, that was amazing. I loved it. He's he's wild. He doesn't mind he'll make the biggest. Oh, yeah. Yeah, totally. And then do you know Ryan Neth off sigler's brother? I do not know. Okay. So he was. I don't know if he was at Ohio values in annexed t. but anyway, so it's a Ryan was there. And I was like, man, I gotta do this. And one of the one of the teachers at second city was with us at the bar after, and he said, next semester starts tomorrow. He's a hero register right now registered on my phone allow started and within fifteen minutes of the first class, it was like, this is what I was missing. This is gonna push me and make me better and get me out of my comfort zone. And I was better than I would have been a few years earlier because I had read so many books on communication skills and human nature and psychology. So some of the things we're learning in class listening skills and all that I kinda grasped faster than some of the people there..

John Hennigan sigler Ryan Neth Dave Tate Boston John Jim Weller Allen Cosgrove John Morrison Hollywood Ohio fifteen minutes five years four years one day
"weller" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"weller" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

"Sickle this good good but okay so peter weller he's a he's a great cop great cop the greatest cop way why did the force the episode and then start talking about because it's a movie right you're right but he gets the shot out of him yeah you sure easley's on life support he's not gonna survive unless they augments him they put all the chrome mel's on whistles all the bells and whistles and that's all i wanted to do i wanted to turn peter weller aka new adventures in hi fi into robocop it's still a disaster plus you put revolution on there which is well i told you you could sub in the other one and did you and that's the track list which just the fact that you s of so fast so none so fast enough both come to come three and things the fact that you even temporarily took the best song on the album the office so fast so numb is an epic it's the one at the pre look i know you relate to it because it describes your love making style the pre release kind of outdoor thing at tower records that's the song everyone applauded for okay that's on played in everyone was like holy shit this is like who who who's just playing on the loudspeakers there was that domino's.

easley peter weller domino
US pastor Brunson goes on trial in Turkey after arrest in coup crackdown

24 hour News

02:32 min | 3 years ago

US pastor Brunson goes on trial in Turkey after arrest in coup crackdown

"Engine failures and flight control malfunctions last july five thirty three experienced an engine on takeoff caught on video shady's weller was on board and there was smoke in the cabin and fire coming out of that engine and i just remember thinking then i would never see my daughter again the sixty minutes report questioned the faa's two thousand fifteen adoption of its compliance philosophy which aims to work with airlines to foster improve compliance and reporting issues the faa disputes the report and says it heightened its oversight of allegiant that year but as sixty minutes reported when a near crash happened due to a missing component that was missed allegiance contractor in two thousand fifteen the faa investigator recommended strong enforcement and maximum fines instead the agency closed the case and ignored the recommendations florida senator bill nelson saw the sixty minutes report the department of transportation inspector general to investigate his happened we want this out into the full light of day and we want the faa to crack down to make sure that the airlines all of them are safe the faa says it is committed to pursuing the highest levels of aviation safety and it welcomes any outside review allegiant is also disputing the sixty minutes report the airline says it complies with all f a a regulations and requirements allegiant has reported fewer mechanical incidents as the airline is replacing its aging fleet of aircraft jeff kris van cleave thanks an american christian pastor went on trial today in turkey turkey says he's helped terror groups but many believe that's manufactured charge and the pastor who faces thirty five years in prison has the us government supports holly williams is following this case after eighteen months behind baas pasta andrew brunson was finally brought before this court today arrested after living in turkey for over two decades where he ministered to the country's small christian minority in this church in a majority muslim nation in two thousand sixteen he was caught up in the aftermath of a failed military coup the political enemies the turkish government rounded up tens of thousands pastor brunson was accused of spying and bizarrely of leaks to the islamic group that turkey says was behind the.

Weller FAA Allegiant Investigator Senator Bill Nelson Turkey Holly Williams Turkish Government Florida Jeff Kris Van United States Andrew Brunson Sixty Minutes Thirty Five Years Eighteen Months Two Decades
"weller" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"weller" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"Plays the thing about grigny a on a entourage it'd be like the cameras are on adrian that's the best greenies got in our hey debris now i know that the best he's gone but pockets also does this now to a goes her her throws that in everywhere to make it kind of like to give it a quirk or something audits of any way a third rag narok oh like poorer rain hit rock better than part two not as good as part one visually fun soundtrack was cool digitally i'd say it was a lesser uh doc strange it was trying to do the same kind of neon and a mushroom trip he kind of things but not as effectively i thought they did a good job of capturing that sort of uh the adventures of uh uh faulk what's that movie with peter weller from the eight with out and did not know that's krol like those ever seen he's like fantasy move like they did a good job of capturing the sort of visuals spirit of that thing sure so i i did like that aspect of it didn't give a fuck about the action sequences at all and by the way when whether you're thuerer not you can't just stand on top of a jet moving at three hundred miles per hour however fuck confessed a spaceship goes right you you get blown off of it legates it's shit like that where it's just like guys have some rules to this like have some logic yeah had here too so i care about the character there's no danger there are no so anyway movie sucked but was better in my opinion the last one uh and i did like it better the dr strange a y blocking hated doctor strange i hated it under strange so much better than thor any of the thors i hated that fail doc strange pops up in thor rank rock for like an that's the other thing too is like okay now with any of these other characters enter your shitty movie they all have to kind of lose their personalities as well to suit would move either in what do you mean like doctor strange in hammer kinda like all.

faulk peter weller adrian
"weller" Discussed on E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"weller" Discussed on E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

"Is that like okay jerry weller had a heart attack right and then like i forget if it was last year the year before he wrestled terry funk and threw a firebomb on his face right like how old jerry is maybe sixty dumpson right now you know dad he's out there he still wrestling he doesn't need to russell he's not roughly in because uh i wanna be a big star or because i need to make this money or because of this year because of that he does it because he goes out there and he loves it in the thinking with like terry fung and there are these tools guys who don't have anything to prove to anybody they both had these legendary careers and what do they do they go out there and they're going to do something completely different from anybody else on the show and there he's gonna throw fire voluntary peng space and just like rats king awesome you know like uh and so but you know going back and watching like the the the jury lawler or option and the nick bar stuck in this gene how year in i've been watching michael on a ten ruehe stuff like their styles are part of their personality right 10 wrestles the way he wrestles because he's tenroom not because he's trying to um pop the crowd were because he's doing this he russell that way because that's that's who he is as a person like that he hits people like this because that's who uses the person because he's a sumo guy and because he's not going to stand up to your crap and like all that kind of stuff you know and i think that's what's what's really cool about seeing these uh the independent.

jerry weller terry funk terry fung michael russell