35 Burst results for "Welby"

On Christmas, pope prays for pandemic's end, peace dialogues

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 8 months ago

On Christmas, pope prays for pandemic's end, peace dialogues

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker Christmas Christmas is is being being celebrated celebrated around around the the world world as as the the faithful faithful return return to to some some annual annual religious religious gatherings gatherings from from the the Vatican Vatican to to the the UK UK to to the the US US more more not not not not pope pope Francis Francis prayed prayed for for an an end end to to the the pandemic pandemic during during his his Christmas Christmas day day address address at at the the Vatican Vatican for for a a few few thousand thousand people people seated seated in in a a rain rain soaked soaked Saint Saint Peter's Peter's square square the the pontiff pontiff also also pushed pushed for for vaccines vaccines for for the the poor poor health health care care for for all all people people and and to to resolving resolving the the world's world's conflicts conflicts at at a a crowded crowded midnight midnight mass mass at at St St Patrick's Patrick's cathedral cathedral in in New New York York where where the the wire wire wore wore masks masks as as they they sang sang cardinal cardinal Timothy Timothy Dolan Dolan said said every every mass mass is is a a live live nativity nativity scene scene again again Jesus Jesus is is reborn reborn in in our our hearts hearts through through faith faith the the head head of of the the church church of of England England the the most most Reverend Reverend Justin Justin Welby Welby called called for for compassion compassion the the Christmas Christmas story story shows shows just just how how we we must must treat treat those those who who on on like like this this who who have have far far less less than than the the US US ship ship up up Canterbury Canterbury also also spoke spoke of of the the climate climate crisis crisis describing describing the the damage damage to to the the planet planet as as human human sin sin Julie Julie Walker Walker AP AP news news

Julie Julie Walker Walker Vatican Vatican Pope Francis Francis Saint Saint Peter's Peter's Sq St St Patrick's Patrick's Cath New New York York UK Cardinal Timothy Timothy Dolan United States Church Church Of Of England Reverend Reverend Justin Justi Jesus Jesus England Canterbury
"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

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"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

"Brandon was doing a webinar that night and you were doing a webinar and the webinar was about flipping homes in about apologized. I don't remember exactly but it was about how to properly approach buying a home. Bright so and it said sign up so i put my email in their signed up. I call the poor my friends my family because my phone rings like crazy and i said do not call me do not checks me bother me for the day. I'm going to a webinar class today. I'm going to go to a webinar class. And i'm gonna watch these bigger pocket guys. So i said to myself you know what will be. I'm gonna take a pen and a pad and i'm gonna listen to what these people say while he poses as questions. I'm going to answer them before he gives the answers to the public. And let me see how i do so i come home. Lock myself in. My basement turned off. All the lights are put on my big screen tv. And i'm watching the webinar start so as you stop posing the questions and giving out the examples that you had a whole mob of people on their home of people's on it so as you give the example and asking the people to follow through and you start putting out the answers. I was in one hundred for one hundred one hundred for one hundred and then i started crying as a grown man. I started getting the motion. And i started pumping my fist. And i said you've got this got it. Why the hell you keep doing the same crap over and over again. Swath said why you keep doing the same crap. My biggest issue. That i had was that i kept skipping the process. I kept trying to find the easy way to do it. So going back with all mama stakes. I was betting on other people. I wasn't betting on me. I was waiting for other people. Tell me how to do it so they every time. I was waiting for other people to show me how to do what they were finding succor and it was taking advantage of me so here. I am now these hundreds of thousands of dollars the story that i lost. I would bet on other people. And i said to myself why the hell welby. You won't bet on yourself why you're not going to bet on yourself but to let these other people these other people saw so i'm gonna take this ninety thousand dollars and i'm gonna lose this money. That's what i'm going to do. So i never knew nothing about connecticut. I've never been the connecticut all my us being in the tri state area. I've never step foot in connecticut. I had a friend of mine that that lives in connecticut. I told them that. I didn't want to work in the city of new york because the prices were ridiculous. I didn't wanna get caught up into that shark tank. He says to me well. Why don't you come out to connecticut. Come and see how connecticut is. I.

ninety thousand dollars Brandon one hundred today Swath new york hundreds of thousands of dolla that night connecticut
"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

"Dot com slash. Bp the bp is forbidden pockets. So with that said. I think we're going to get anything you want to add david before we jump in nope. Let's do this all right. Let's bring in welby a celie all welby. Welcome to bigger pockets. Podcasts man at the often have here. I appreciate it man. I can't even believe i'm here. They can got so much for this opportunity for sure man. Well let's dig into your story. Let's go to the very beginning. I know you went in real estate and several phases so to the very very beginning. What was your first venture into real estate. Investing my first venture in the real estate. If i could maybe go back a little bit of mind my first idea of ever being in real estate is when i was about maybe seventy eight years old. I was living in the projects in brooklyn where my parents my family and my godfather he was doing pretty good for himself what he would come and visit us and you would always have these nice fancy causing dress. Nice and later on us. When i found out an understood that he was in real estate he owned one or two properties yet his own brokerage and stuff like that and i would be able to go visit him in the suburbs of long island and i was always intrigued by the fact that i was able to ride my bicycle in the middle of the street versus where we would live in that. We couldn't do things like that. From that point when i understood that that's what he did was in real estate. I knew that some way somehow somewhere in my life i was going to be involved in real estate somehow so fast forward my first time actually purchased them our first home in real estate sometime around two thousand and four is when i purchased my first home. Was that the house for yourself to live in. No actually. I live in new york and i decided to buy a multi unit in atlanta..

new york atlanta one brooklyn four david first home two properties first time first idea first venture seventy eight years old around two thousand long island Dot com
Welby Accely: Scammed, Cheated, But Still Coming Out with 50 Units

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Welby Accely: Scammed, Cheated, But Still Coming Out with 50 Units

"All welby. Welcome to bigger pockets. Podcasts man at the often have here. I appreciate it man. I can't even believe i'm here. They can got so much for this opportunity for sure man. Well let's dig into your story. Let's go to the very beginning. I know you went in real estate and several phases so to the very very beginning. What was your first venture into real estate. Investing my first venture in the real estate. If i could maybe go back a little bit of mind my first idea of ever being in real estate is when i was about maybe seventy eight years old. I was living in the projects in brooklyn where my parents my family and my godfather he was doing pretty good for himself what he would come and visit us and you would always have these nice fancy causing dress. Nice and later on us. When i found out an understood that he was in real estate he owned one or two properties yet his own brokerage and stuff like that and i would be able to go visit him in the suburbs of long island and i was always intrigued by the fact that i was able to ride my bicycle in the middle of the street versus where we would live in that. We couldn't do things like that. From that point when i understood that that's what he did was in real estate. I knew that some way somehow somewhere in my life i was going to be involved in real estate somehow so fast forward my first time actually purchased them our first home in real estate sometime around two thousand and four is when i purchased my first home. Was that the house for yourself to live in. No actually. I live in new york and i decided to buy a multi unit in atlanta. And this is right where subprime mortgages were going crazy and as long as you had a pulse you'd be able to get a mortgage so i was able to get a mortgage hundred and six percent financing so didn't really come out of pocket. Anything and i was able to acquire a four unit building and from the day. I bought it. It was a disaster from the day aboard.

Welby Brooklyn Long Island Atlanta New York
"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

"All welby. Welcome to bigger pockets. Podcasts man at the often have here. I appreciate it man. I can't even believe i'm here. They can got so much for this opportunity for sure man. Well let's dig into your story. Let's go to the very beginning. I know you went in real estate and several phases so to the very very beginning. What was your first venture into real estate. Investing my first venture in the real estate. If i could maybe go back a little bit of mind my first idea of ever being in real estate is when i was about maybe seventy eight years old. I was living in the projects in brooklyn where my parents my family and my godfather he was doing pretty good for himself what he would come and visit us and you would always have these nice fancy causing dress. Nice and later on us. When i found out an understood that he was in real estate he owned one or two properties yet his own brokerage and stuff like that and i would be able to go visit him in the suburbs of long island and i was always intrigued by the fact that i was able to ride my bicycle in the middle of the street versus where we would live in that. We couldn't do things like that. From that point when i understood that that's what he did was in real estate. I knew that some way somehow somewhere in my life i was going to be involved in real estate somehow so fast forward my first time actually purchased them our first home in real estate sometime around two thousand and four is when i purchased my first home. Was that the house for yourself to live in. No actually. I live in new york and i decided to buy a multi unit in atlanta. And this is right where subprime mortgages were going crazy and as long as you had a pulse you'd be able to get a mortgage so i was able to get a mortgage hundred and six percent financing so didn't really come out of pocket. Anything and i was able to acquire a four unit building and from the day. I bought it. It was a disaster from the day aboard.

David cinderella today instagram Today one Starred over fifty rental units lena david cinderella later today seventy flips brennan turner welby
"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

"What's going on and on it's brennan turner host of the bigger pockets. Podcast here with my co host. Mr david cinderella story green. What's up man. how you doing. Thank you for that brand. But i think the real cinderella man is going to be. Today's guest who has a story that will leave you inspired at the edge of your seat at just might get a little bit here out of your eye and this was an incredible interview was an incredible interview. Yeah i'm super excited to bring you guys. Welby he's awesome dude been instagram friends for awhile. But i'd never heard a story like his full story and he has a tremendous story of of losing everything multiple times. You're gonna hear about that. And and some of the reasons why that he lost everything in real estate so you can avoid those things. He talks about. How like literally. Fbi probe against a business venture. He was involved in where someone went to prison. And like he's got this crazy story but in the end you're going to hear how he's come that stuff. Today's gone over seventy flips. He owns over fifty rental units. He has this amazing model. Where is advice on finding and developing contractors is something you've never heard on the show before it could change your business forever now. There's a lot of good stuff in the show. Starred has wanted to get to it so before we get into the interview welby. Let's get to today's quick ten. David tip today's quick tip is don't look for shortcuts like finding the perfect property right out the box or finding the perfect agents or the perfect employee. If you want to be successful in this life you have to make the deal. Not just find the deal now. This philosophy goes across many different aspects. But what we talked with welby. Today is ways that he is taking the contractor that he needs a developing the person to play that role in his company and he went through agency that the same thing he found the right agent. He taught them how to help him with what he needs now. He's got the faithful employees. So when you're frustrated at things aren't working out as well as you like. stop thinking about. I wish i could just find the perfect person and start thinking about how you can help develop the perfect person. Yeah we do talk about that later today. Show as well so make sure you guys are lena for that before we get into the show. Let's hear a quick word from today's show sponsors these days more and more real estate investors are realizing the potential of short term rentals especially in super competitive markets. I'm one of them for good reason. To short term rentals can have significantly higher revenue than long term rentals but many investors won't touch short term rentals because of how time intensive and difficult managing them can be also. I went through that as well cleaning. Maintenance and turns between guests can be a major headache. That's where i trip comes in. I.

David cinderella today instagram Today one Starred over fifty rental units lena david cinderella later today seventy flips brennan turner welby
Yes, our workdays are getting longer

Talking Tech

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Yes, our workdays are getting longer

"As we've all learned over the past twelve months due to the pandemic tools like zoom in slack at made it a lot easier to get our work done without being in the office but there is a downside to all this money. You're right bret. It feels like your workday has gotten a lot longer and if you feel that way you're not alone because we have tech nearby to help us work. It's become a lot harder to call it a day at the end of the day which we never get to. Sometimes joining now is usa today. Tech reporter terry collins who wrote a story about our longer work days that you can read on tech dot usa today dot com terry. Good too heavy back in man. How bad is it Man well thanks for having again and bread. I appreciate it. It's bad because you know it just comes down to the to be having you know for many of us. We restarted decide when it's time to turn off the switch. It's one of the things we're all experiencing you know and we may be in denial about it for wine. A urine pandemic grape will be working and having jobs in order to pay our bills liberal lives and whatnot and then to. it's just also been a great distraction. Take our minds off of well. We'll still in this pandemic you know trying to ward off trying to be safe from this deadly disease subjects in my story Tina schweiger said quote sometimes to take a shower. Or sometimes i don't. It's still not to do things because of kobe. And if you enjoy working ten scale it up you'll say oh i'll do a bit more. Research knocked email out. She basically said it's very easy to slip out of work. My story i mentioned a harvard business school study of more than three million people worldwide said average workdays increased by almost forty nine minutes from the pandemic early stages now by forty percent and a gartner study damaging story about forty percent. Say the workdays become longer and and gonna research spoke to Alexa cameron said turn workdays are somewhere between the two or three hours longer when we were back mcgrew working in the office. So that gives you an indication that some many ways we were we are working longer. So are there specific trends. That experts have spotted that are pointing to why we're working longer days while we're all remote while some of those reasons. Are you know we have problems disconnecting and we have like digital attractions Overloads hurt bringing noise. We were as as i was talking and the research. I spoke to mix to working longer. It's well said up that there's a growing consensus that That we're we're more more times in stressful working together working Apart from where we were in person and it one of those reasons were having more virtual meetings in debt therefore to be harder to the gate coworkers body language there's more vigil visual information to adjust included slide shows graphics and also being seen on camera curbs need to have you know quote unquote an on air personality. Well that yeah. I think i've felt that way to you. Know yeah hold on you know we get more phone calls for tax. Were emails more messages. Almost what you said. Mike and and you know we are seeing each other in a workplace. So we're always just have this no always on mentality. Why also wonder if you know. Sometimes since i'm working at home i take a break to put a little andrea. Enter to go make a sandwich. And then i feel guilty. When six o'clock comes that. I'm don't stick around longer to any advice. These folks gave you that you found from people that you interviewed that. I'm how to cut back on some of these extra forty nine minutes or two to three hours depending on what craziness year involved in. Yeah yeah they. We should really try to take a break one possible. Whether that's a series of by timothy breaks across the day edition of maybe taken an hour hour long lunch at teachers said than done especially in our line of work. I like one of my subsequent story. Kelly christoffersen who works at a houston based opera company. Said that quote we were just ourselves becoming available as multiple worse are always online whether we admit it or not. And i said we're more vulnerable. And says that i guess is more of a share experience through the pandemic raw trying to adapt and get through it. She example Talked to her depth shit april meetings on on platforms or you can zoom will meet. Microsoft teams webex. Her meeting her. I mean again at seven and then she purposely disconnected by pm and she's doing virtual the following day she tries to go poor rhyme or take a walk and she has her poem with her but she tries to not take a look at her. Feel it when when it's going up. She wants to check. Take that break and so we just have to just try to find the strength to know when when to step away and there are some employers. Who are trying to help do that. As well as i mentioned a company in iowa tech engineering company in austin texas there were gonna initiative to create a better work life balance one things. They've done in begay their workers two weeks off without impacting their vacation time and some of the departments are tested. A no me fridays. It's as we've got into this a year ago to work remotely and we've also got a way to continue to work remotely but also without jeopardizing our welby. I'm sure a lot of listeners would love a no meeting monday in a no meeting tuesday and meeting wednesday and run down the week but thanks as always for joining us. It was great having you and look forward to having you on again. Big appreciate it

Tina Schweiger Alexa Cameron Terry Collins USA Bret Mcgrew Harvard Business School Terry Kobe Kelly Christoffersen Andrea Mike Timothy Houston Begay Microsoft Iowa Austin Texas
"welby" Discussed on DivaSpeaks

DivaSpeaks

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on DivaSpeaks

"Like nine minutes and fifty six accounting. Second there okay so we were discussing earlier. We were preparing to. Hey hey i love. That's my classmate hometown friend. Thank you for tuning in stephanie. So we was talking earlier in preparation for the show. You know who will us women get together when to divas get any set of divas get together and we decide to have a conversation about any and all relationships if they can get dangerous and my sister said something that i needed to push forward. I wanted to expand on that. so miss ivory. I'm just going to bring them up to see so we were talking about being one enough and mature enough to acknowledge or what you brought to the table in terms of the relationship now being in distress an example. Okay so i know i. I'm just giving an example. I tend to over talk you. I don't let you finish your sentences. I am confrontational. I do not respect boundaries. And i'm totally. Dismiss it of your feeling. These are just some examples. Perhaps maybe a person could be guilty of so talking and she was like. Yeah yeah yeah you. Now is the be accountable. Whatever and then she starts talking about this and she was like once we had that conversation no matter how many times we had to have the conversation with your partner your spouse your significant other and they just don't get they wanna stay in that sunken place remember. We talked about last night after ivory. What does the woman get out of it when chief own in her shit. She's taking accountability for the things that she has done wrong. She is acknowledging the areas that she also short i asked you what does she get out of it if her counterpart if her man does nothing if he gets to continue his bad behavior. He doesn't take accountability for the shit. He's done and get that diva yet but keep in mind that we are focused on. We're focusing on our accountability and as we carried over our conversation today as we were having lunch spoke on how important it is to not look for anything. Being accountable is just where it lies being accountable. So that's where that's where she puts because last night you were talking about. There should be no expectation. It should be more of a character being gigging to a knowledge. What i've done wrong by. Here's here's what we different. Because i think even if there's no change behavior on the part of the man in the relationship and mental i expect for gifts. I expect forgiveness. Because here's what's going to happen. If a woman takes accountability for everything. She's ever done wrong in the relationship and he's just on the receiving end of her acknowledgements right. He's on the receiving end of her wanting to better herself to be a better partner to him. He's just sitting there taking it all in. I'm asking you to actually give me the consideration of that platform of listening to me. Why they noticed that. Ask for your forgiveness and you choose not to do anything on your end and you choose not to forgive me. I really think that that is pretty much the benediction because what you cannot do as a woman is stay in a relationship where you're the only one taking accountability. You're the only one apologizing and you're the only one asking for forgiveness and you're the only one see even issue in the relationship affairs nights a joint effort on both parts to make it better and that makes perfect. And i think that's why a lot of women don't i think that's wild. Women don't own up to their shit and these with him because one i do that. There is a level of expectation. That i have from you but go ahead get it. It's perspective so if perspective you know you have to be real it yourself and where you are in self growth and as we're going into these relationships we need to understand what purpose is in the relationship. We're both coming to the table with an expectation of the very best from heating from she. But all i can be concerned about is she. All i can do is bring my very best to the table. Every single relationship we choose we choose to put ourselves out there with the possibility of disappointment. Now that can be taken two ways. It could be looked at as well. Come on since you just go to this relationship and going to be toxic from the beginning and you just don't think about being disappointed or you going to go in optimistically and realized that i'm going to have grace. Where's the grace. We're not giving each other grades. Not only do. We need to be accountable. We need to offer grace. Don't give you some resistance here. Okay grace can only last for so long because all right relationship cannot stand. A relationship cannot continue to function welby healthy healthy begali be spiritual be thriving if there's only one person putting in the effort to take ownership of bad habits bad behavior and putting the work too restore the relationship to a happy place in that restoration process. Each person needs to be accountable for the fact that they played to get to a place where it's broken even be was talking about what is wrong. All the woman's role we're talking about in this position rock is to restore will. She was broken. So if you've come to the table and you've broken something on that tape. We got a set of dishes. We got we got four. And i took. That dishes slammed in and broken in half so now my partner wants to know. Where's that being driven. Far whole story that in the dating process i chose not to share. So now let's.

stephanie welby
"welby" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"welby" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"I will say this of the guys that I've known friends I've had that I've had In this case, knee reconstructions, The other part, obviously, the rehab But what point did your confidence That's what I was gonna say Knowing I just You think what a quarterback does think about just to drop back just like just that last step. How When did you get that confidence back to know I can do this and make a threat and not not think about it? Because if you're out there on, especially in a professional football field, thinking about injury or thinking about is this gonna hold up a second? You're done. So that's the thing. You know, my good friend of mine tank Williams when my best friends Hey, had that and he recalled. It came eventually. But okay yet strong. It's actually stronger than my other leg. It's this and that I'm running the same 40 time but out there on the field when things were not in a controlled environment, that's that's the big hurdle. The mental hurdle has got to be overcome. We shall see. All right, Get some traffic. Rob, What do you have? While Marcus Welby you Are you too young to remember that? I know. I know. I am too young to remember that I'm getting that was a great show. I'm playing my age here from the youth Civil War dock with the Ford Ever. Saul's in the in the bag and the bottle of bourbon and, Yeah, Opium. Yeah, all that Dr Kremchek exit. From the UC Health Traffic Center, home to the nationally recognized pancreatic cancer Center. Our care plans are backed by scientific research and physician expertise. Call 513584 89 100 to schedule an appointment. They are. They're still working on some police activity on outbound Albarran. It's closed between Bassett rode and West Eighth Street. Also 1 33 remains closed south of Todd's run foster Road out of Williamsburg that is due to a serious accident. And just now got word that Albarran that has been reopened. Between Bassett rode and West eighth Street to the police activity has been cleared there. You're heavy on westbound to 75 now between the double agent Taylor Mill and again from Turkey Foot onto South 75 eastbound Stop and go from Taylor Mill to 4, 71 and North 75 Heavy Dixie Highway to Donaldson then through the single lane traffic from the cutting hill up to Fifth Street. I'm Rob Williams News radio 700 wlw in the forecast tonight mostly clear alot of 23. Then tomorrow, Sonny.

Rob Williams Bassett Taylor Mill Albarran UC Health Traffic Center Marcus Welby football pancreatic cancer Center Saul Sonny Dr Kremchek Opium Donaldson Todd Williamsburg
Children are especially vulnerable to extreme weather

Climate Connections

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Children are especially vulnerable to extreme weather

"Hurricanes can cause dangerous floods and other hazards such as down power lines and shattered windows. In the chaos, young children are particularly vulnerable because they cannot protect themselves. Children are completely dependent on adults to make decisions for them, and their welby is can be especially important when there's a threat of immediate physical harm like in the case of extreme weather events, data DDR net of the National Environmental Health Association. She says very young children like to crawl on the ground. And often put things in their mouths. To win floodwaters lead contamination in debris behind children may come into contact with and even ingest hazardous substances or objects. In, kids physical health is not the only concern during extreme weather. Major storms can harm the mental health of children and their families by causing distress during the event and anxiety or depression after. But what we know about storms and mental health that the earlier one can evacuate and the further they can get from the site of the disaster the better mental health outcomes will be.

National Environmental Health Depression
Pompeo: Chinese threat may be worse than a 'Cold War 2.0'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:08 min | 2 years ago

Pompeo: Chinese threat may be worse than a 'Cold War 2.0'

"US Secretary of state might compare has bill named middle of Oprah this week you warning that the threat from China good welby worse than that posed by the Soviet Union at the height of the cold. War Mr Pompeo's visits is taking in the Czech Republic Austria, Poland, and Slovenia. This is what he said yesterday. The contrast between free and unfree society has never been clear. Free nations must work together to confront authoritarian threats. Chief among those threats is the Chinese Communist Party and its drive to control people and information at our economies. When a Balkans correspondent guided Loni has been following his journey. Welcome back to the program guy good to have you with us. I wipe out the with Slovenia with no disrespect obviously to the nation itself. I think far enough I mean it's only two million people live here. So it's not exactly huge, but it is a NATO member and there is a family connection of course, Emma and Mr. Pompeo made that point in his opening remarks saying that he brought greetings for Melania trump who is noticeably absent from her homeland. She was born in San Nitsa as Melania canals and she doesn't come back here very often. But Mr Pompey's said she was very envious about him visiting nurse Levin in particular Lake bled where he was doing his news conference but. The rather factors as well. So Slovenia is at at the moment and this is I wouldn't say was out of character, but it's just a matter of where how the political winds blowing here at the moment at the moment in the Prime Minister's office you've got somebody who thinks Mr trump is rather smashing fallow where prime, minister. Yannis Yansha uses twitter almost as enthusiastically as MR trump and spends quite a lot of that time. Enthusiastically, retweeting Mr Trump's tweets. So if you're going to have a friendly audience in Europe at the moment of your representative of the trump administration then Slovenia's an office place to stop off so more than simply passing on greetings from floaters and enjoying a slap up lunch at Lake bled we've just heard there a clip from Secretary of State Pompeo. Making China the real focus of his visit. He really did, and you only speak for about three or four minutes yesterday bend and I think at least two and a half of those minutes were spent really having a good old dig on against China before that. He was speaking about well, he was actually signing a declaration with the Foreign Minister of Slovenia about five G. Security, and this is all part of pushing what the trump administration calls. They're clean network program, and this is an attack on Chinese. Telecom. Companies Chinese tech companies hallway in particular Zeti threatening for the Balkan they've both been very high profile targets of the trump administration and leave you signing up to this five of this clean network program. You'll basically making a commitment, you'll knocking to use any untrustworthy. Vendors in your five G. Systems and the United States is saying it wouldn't have any of these vendors anywhere near any of its embassies went allowed anywhere near any of this State Department. Systems. A lot of come countries, of course are not signing up to this, but Slovenia has and it's got its five G. Network installed by. As of last month, take that way well has replied China Chinese commentators of wounded central and eastern Europe shouldn't be fooled. What would describes Mike pompeo embracing an entirely entirely cold war mindset it is. It is a dangerous thing. Isn't it when you start going into the likes of the Czech, Republic and Poland and Slovenia, and START TALKING ABOUT IDEOLOGICAL THREATS Yes I'm you know he really has gone the full evil empire on? Am You when you talk about Cold War rhetoric either way that he's he's talking really as I mean, as you heard in the clip there, it sounds like something from the nineteen eighties a talks again chief among these threats as the. Chinese. Communist. Party. It's drive to control people and. Information and our economies, and it's it's again talking about freedom loving people and becoming a five G. Clean country as Slovenia has done today as solidifies staff position. In this fight, the tide is turning against the Chinese Communist Party in its efforts to restrict freedom for all of us and I think what's interesting guys of course he's not saying China he's specifically saying. The Chinese Communist, party so he's criticizing the the system of government and control rather than country and the people itself, and that's I suppose the GATT out card But this is the way that the trump administration is going I recommend everyone to have a a good read of the clean network program just to see what they're saying in that and. Quite apart from anything else it does make it clear and not that it's part of the trump administration's drive and it's very interesting phrasing not the United States, not the State Department but the trump administration. So a spot of electioneering perhaps

Slovenia Mr Trump Chinese Communist Party Mike Pompeo United States State Pompeo China Foreign Minister Of Slovenia Lake Bled Europe Yannis Yansha State Department Poland G. Systems Mr Pompey Soviet Union Prime Minister
Archbishop of Canterbury says Church needs to reconsider portraying Jesus as white

Thank God I'm Atheist

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Archbishop of Canterbury says Church needs to reconsider portraying Jesus as white

"I WANNA. Do a follow up a little bit on. Something that we've talked about. A couple of weeks now on the show or at least come up and then we kind of really addressed it. And that's the idea of like white Jesus right why Jesus Jesus so this is an ongoing saga. of people rightfully pointing out the fact that the European and North American version of Jesus is. Racist. Wrong. It's wrong, and it's an an and it's. Definitely leads to sort of this white supremacy sort of thing right because like. Devoid surpremacy leading-edge. Yeah absolutely well. As? The arch. Bitch Bishop of Canterbury one Mr Justin Welby He's the head of the Church of England of course He was on the BBC. BBC Radio Four. And he was asked about what he thought about the Western image of Jesus, and maybe if it should be reimagined. And goes sure, yes, of course, it does right. And he, which I guess probably is not all that surprising. When you know a few things about you know Church of England, but he goes on. He says that he has seen Jesus portrayed in different countries during his travels. You go into their churches, and you don't see a white Jesus you see a black Jesus or Chinese, Jesus or Middle Eastern Jesus, which is of course, the most accurate. you see Jian Jesus you see Jesus portrayed as many ways as there are cultures languages. An understanding's is what he says. Okay, and so I've never seen a Figi Jesus. Will. Have you ever been to Fiji? I have a feeling he might have been. Sure why not but nonetheless the? This caused a little bit of a stir in the UK, you know. People are going to disagree with any sort of thing. Anyway. He was denounced by all sorts of types I'm sure they're conservative types, or whatever right, but one of the things. That I think this raises. Is. It kind of a question of if you know. If you can create your God basically in your own image, right? Right like what? What does it matter? Doesn't that just backup the whole thing that you are creating your God own image? Always you're. You're like like right, so it's just made manifest this thing that people already already do and it's just so just so happens it. It's little problematic. Extra problematic perhaps with white people. Really to think we're the best you know. It's just so funny it's just like I. If you are unwilling to just go with the historical guy that you're pretending is, the is the reason for your whole religion like there's this. That you're super into. He's your, do yeah. If. You can't just go with him right. then. You're making it up. You're admitting that you're making it up. So I think you got a bit of a problem there. Guys let him be Middle Eastern what's the problem? You know what he looked like. We all know if you if I showed you twenty two pictures of. dudes from different parts of the world, said point to the guys that might be Middle Eastern. You're probably going to get it right. Yeah as four you know. Which one of these do you think Jesus actually looked like? ooh, that's. Why is that so hard? That, why is that so hard?

Jesus Bitch Bishop Middle Eastern Church Of England Mr Justin Welby BBC Fiji Canterbury UK
Pomp and social distancing

Native America Calling

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Pomp and social distancing

"And it is my honor to introduce you to some of the class of twenty twenty joining us from Hayes. Montana is CAITLIN carry water. She is a haze lodge logical high school senior. And she is a Cinnabon Caitlyn. Congratulations in welcome to native America. Calling Hi thank you and so as a recent graduate how you feel. Kinda shock tough ride. I Bet I bet and for you. What does it mean to get to this point in? No that you're turning a new chapter Oh we had a kind of plotted out for a long time. But we knew it was gonNA make it in any words to your fellow classmates about Graduation and just getting to this point We just need to keep moving forward and we need to keep with our education and make a better future for reservation. You know all right I hear you Kaitlyn And also here with us today out of Gallup New Mexico as Dr Key Smith. He's a university of Minnesota Medical School graduate and an incoming you see. Sf University of California San Francisco Resident and he is day my pleasure to have him here and Thank you for being with us. Casey and I'm just GONNA to keep saying Hello Dr Smith. Welcome thank you for having and another great accomplishment and feel to be referred to as Dr Smith Now I think it's a while to get used to but I think there's been a lot of like challenges and sacrifices and also a that went into being able to say that and so it definitely feel it feels good But I take a lot to get used to that and so Dr Smith your thoughts about getting to this point in knowing bright now. The entire country is Looking to our medical professionals more doctors are needed. And now we can say we have another doctor Adding to the workforce in just your thoughts about getting this accomplishment especially during these times. Yeah really the question so I think just what I was saying earlier. I think as native people We tend to make a lot of sacrifices leaving our homes and our and our nation and going on to care education and so Being able to be at the point that I'm out right now and overcoming those sacrifices and challenges and being able to Say I'm a doctor now? it's just very exciting very humbling. I feel very honored to be a native person in medicine and I'm a little nervous and scared to be Kind of moving into the next journey next part of my journey during this time. But I also feel like I've been equipped with many skills and the knowledge to be able to to Treat patients and being able to learn a lot of many awesome doctors. And so I think it's An exciting but also kind of nerve wracking time but also to be on the front lines and to be able to do what I've been wanting to do for a very long time. I think I'm looking forward to it. Into what discipline are you going to be going into? So I applied to internal medicine Welby Training in internal medicine. And so you will definitely be there in critical moments in Casey just thinking of getting through all your studies in getting to this point where now it is more of the practical side where your thoughts I think I don't know I feel like at least the first part of Med school year in the books into taking lot of tests. And there's not a lot of patient interaction until toward the end of Med school. But I think I think now as you have mentioned being able to apply a lot of this knowledge and these skills that able to gain and being able to actually make changes in individuals lives is is very powerful and and and honoring into so graduation is truly a moment where you are transitioning into something new Leaving behind space that maybe you got very comfortable in. And so I know how How big of a moment. This can be for many

Dr Key Smith Casey Med School Caitlin Hayes America Montana San Francisco Minnesota Medical School New Mexico Sf University Of California Kaitlyn
Ding Dongs in the Way

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:57 min | 2 years ago

Ding Dongs in the Way

"Book back to almost famous minute. Where we're discussing. The two thousand Cameron Crowe Film almost famous. One Minute at a time. I'm Eric Nash. From feels like weezer foresight from. Let's say edge of tomorrow minute. Mcc pleasant From the World. I'm a comedy writer and Just elated welcome. Suzy glad to have you on my. I think I became most aware of you at least kind of recently from a star wars minute and and then then even recently. You're on bull. Durham in it. I got I am tearing up the minute scene. Yeah it's pretty great. You're knocking out a wide range of genres to hear from. Yeah yeah to the sports to the Rock Rock Music Rock Music David. This is your first time with us too. I shouldn't they certainly shouldn't forget you but you're kind of our our unofficial co host happening. He's cuppers minutes that we're going to have you. Yeah good good to be here Big Fan of this movie some. I'm happy to do as much. Co host duties. You need me for saying yeah thank you. Yeah we always have. We always have either of you back For other minutes but this man is meant forty six week and it starts with Russell getting electrocuted and ends with Marc Maron yelling at the band in the electrocution scene man. That's pretty grisly. I think Russell does a pretty good job of well not Russell. But you know that actor's name thank you. Yeah it seems to try and say it disappears from Ed. Bill does a good job of making me feel like he is a real lump of meat that just got cooked on a state of man. It's it's disturbing Yanni really keeps it up to. I mean it's there's there's parts during the sped next to especially Where he just he just really continues to be really out of it really well that they didn't know one called it an ambulance. That's buried the seventy lake. We're like mine. You're just got electrocuted a little bit. Because because I've got a little bit of a morbid streak I had to look up other famous onstage electrocutions. Ooh Yeah so Turns George Harrison was electrocuted in the let it be documentary so you can actually watch him put his lips to the megaphone and get like a little shaky doesn't collapse or anything like that but he does sort of back off shows a little bit of visible pain and you can find that clip on YouTube Keith Richards I was thinking I was going to have to wait until Peter Jackson's done here with Dr. Welby reassembling of Lee keeping it in keeping that part. Maybe that'll be the focus of it. Now lose be like the movie where George gets electrocuted Keith. Richards was also electrocuted. But it was much more like what happens on stage here In nineteen sixty five in Sacramento. His Guitar bumped into an ungrounded MIC stand. Apparently sparks flew in. There was a loud bang and the manager actually thought that Keith had been assassinated. They did rush him to the hospital unconscious and heap. He did not wake up until I think it was later that day in the hospital and he woke up and said man that was good. Probably Rush. I think I'll do that. I thought of. I haven't seen a movie since it came out in theaters And so I forgot. I forgot everything because I know a larger memory and yeah so when I watched the minute before I went back in like watch the rest of the movie And I was like Oh if he on drugs flake I was like are they pretending to be elected because he's on drugs like I couldn't remember if there was like a drug thing so anyway but but it makes sense that he gets electrocuted. I guess it's just like because you don't think about rockstars. Getting electrocuted probably happens a lot less than it did in the seventy S or sixty S. Or whatever when you know now that technology is pretty good like but I wonder if anybody has recently only guess you looked it up like actually. Isn't that famous? Still have you for sure there? I mean there's a long string of them from the seventy so it was definitely like a you know we quit and quite figured out how to ground these things yet. like As freely was electrocuted from kiss and he actually wrote a song about it called shock me later on and then but there are actually people who died from electrocution In the seventies. Yeah Yeah let's Harvey from stone. The crows which was sort of a pub rock band in the early Seventies. He died in in Wales from poorly grounded. Mike Electrocution and Keith Ralph. From the yardbirds died in his basement recording studio from an improperly grounded guitar apparently but yet there's actually a kind of a grisly video. You can find of the band. Hot Hot heat Playing an outdoor festival in Ohio. Somewhere in I don't remember exactly what year it was like. Fairly like the twenty tens. I think where the one of the guitar players get electrocuted and collapses and it's very similar to this like no one really realizes what's happened until he's been laying on the ground for a couple of seconds and then you know the music kind of slowly fades out and everyone in the crowd was like what's going on and it so it's it's still sort of a modern problem. I think trying to put on an outdoor show with you know. Weather conditions in long runs of cable across a field and things like that makes it more dangerous. But Yeah Yeah. I didn't realize how dangerous rock and roll lists the threat and there's other I think really good acting and decides besides just Russell Billy's You know I mean there's there's all this confusion is going on you know and then that's that's actually what jeff bb says. Hey what's going on we here? We also hear like this. Maybe I got it from somewhere or some Transcript site whatever but stinking stinking roads you know so. A roads roads fender bass wise at coming roads. Some some kind of Either Anchor Guitar. Some sort is the root. It's like a brand name erodes Oregon too but I didn't see any of that hanging out instead. Yeah and noticed that both Jeff and Russell. Have like to have two microphones on their MIC stand Sort of tied together which was kind of a weird seventies thing that they did do. That was Sometimes if they rip especially if they were recording the show. You'd have one Mike that fed the PA in one that went to the recording stuff But apparently the grateful dead also did this sort of a weird early form of noise canceling because they would they would put their speakers. Grateful dead put their speakers behind them and did a lot of like weird separation so like the base when we came out of this portion and the guitar came out of his portion to train gift. Things a little more dynamic separation but apparently if you put too close together and you do one in positive polarity in one in negative polarity sort of does some fancy noise cancelling thing on really know but apparently is common in the seventy s until we figured out you know plug ins and laptops and things so very cool. I'm writing so much I do have been baby myself. I was GonNa say you wonder if he's ever seen that before but yeah well the the big thing I've seen is that You know it looks. It seems like there's there's a there's a fair amount of duct tape that I think has happened there at at at Russell's microphone and I've seen lead singer do that before I've done sound work with a few bands quite a few years ago. There was one that Kevin just started going crazy with taping like okay. If you want to do that you're that that's interesting. I wouldn't at seems unsafe. Well I don't know. Duct tape is Great. I guess no don't don't don't know absolutely. I never thought I came from the south. Everything's held together with duct tape. I'm the other thing that that that's at. The very beginning of it is the that the plumbing song is ending. I mean it's not really ending. That's not supposed to end but it's ends because of everyone leaving their instruments in running towards wrestling then than certainly away getting off the stage but You know in the draw. I think in a normal fashion. I think the drums are kind of the one that kind of goes along. The drummer can just be on his own groove and I mean he's sexy Griffin centrally and. Yeah he and he can't maybe can't see what's happening sunders obstruction. Yeah Ding dongs. Away can't Ding dongs meaning drums. Let's that's what I'm gonNA call them now. You know what I'm talking about the hidden things drummers love it when you call me being Donner's I think too so. Oh Yeah Yeah. They totally loved that. Because it's very cool in rock and roll.

Russell Billy Keith Richards Mike Electrocution Keith Seventy Lake Writer Eric Nash Suzy Durham George Harrison Wrestling Marc Maron Jeff Bb Bill Wales Sparks Sacramento Peter Jackson Donner
Q&A with Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn

Plant Strong

06:23 min | 2 years ago

Q&A with Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn

"We recently put the call out and you responded in a huge way. And this week. We're going to go straight to the top with a question and answer session with my father Dr Welby Hustles Tin Junior now. A little update on on them like most of us. My father and my mother are currently practicing social distancing from their home in Cleveland Ohio. So we recorded this over zoom and. I'm sure that many of you are becoming very well. Acquainted with Zoom and the technological challenges that are inherent in in the platform but whatever lack of quality. There is in the recording. I want you to know that it will be made up in spades with the information and the answers that my father provides to your questions ranging from cholesterol how to order food at restaurants the effects of caffeine on the body the importance of six servings of green leafy is a day and of course nitric oxide and a whole lot more than this always educational conversation with my father. Dr S Allston. So strange times are honest right now. I loved it. Well let me just start by saying for this. Episode of the plans drawn podcast. I thought it'd be really nice to have you Have you onboard a specialty considering everything that's going on right now and Along with talking a little bit about Cova Nineteen. I'd like for you to answer some questions that some of our podcast listeners sent in So just to start Kobe. Nineteen you know Corona Virus What what are your thoughts surrounding this very kind of unsettling virus that right now a sweeping the world. This is Kobe. Nineteen has really got civilisation by the throat. it's it's really kind of rather vicious Virus which is highly contagious. And it makes people ill and and some more seniors can be seriously ill. It really has got everybody's attention and it seems that when you have these sort of pandemic situations is the best that everybody can do is to try to Use this social distance. That is really avoid. The crowds and interact interactions. Because that's that's how obviously how it's how it is spread so we'll just have to foul the really directions the instructions of our our experts and really take it on a week by week basis. What water but certainly the things like handwashing the avoiding the The crowds Avoiding shaking hands and these are all very important So what what are what in particular are you in and doing hydrate staying hydrated and staying isolated Yeah and Do you have any thoughts about eating eating a whole foods plant based Diet and how that can help with the US? You WanNa keep your immune system optimal and that certainly gonNA help to help. Fend off any of these infectious agents but There again we go to the emphasis on the green leafy vegetables. A nice round of spectrum of whole grains legumes all the red yellow and green leafy vegetables. Answer away be white potatoes sweet potatoes and some fruit. And if you've got the foundation for the parole is wonderful recipes. That are in your book in our book and Jada Mummies Book and John McDougal's books Neal Barnard's books so that's a lot of a lot of information out there. Yeah well so have. You heard this whole term about flattening the curve. Yes right and and can you. Can you explain in? You know from what you've read and understand what flattening the curve means exactly why this will will help us out well. Each each culture has a certain limitation on the facilities that they have to contend with the with the virus. And if you can kind of keep from having that tremendous surge in cases which occurs. Where were you have a huge amount of illness all at once? That's the surgeon. That's what overwhelms the ability to people to care for these patients. And that's what one has to really try to avoid. And that's the whole emphasis in this social distancing because when you isolate you tend to avoid these surges and you do not overwhelm. The healthcare facilities of the particular culture had a much better time A better opportunity to deal with this With this virus runs its course

Dr Welby Cleveland Dr S Allston Ohio United States Caffeine Cova Neal Barnard John Mcdougal
Tara Brach: Radical Compassion

The Wisdom Podcast

10:11 min | 2 years ago

Tara Brach: Radical Compassion

"Known for her pioneering work integrating western psychology with eastern spiritual traditions in this very moving discussion tower talks about her dedication to social activism and how it fueled her interesting meditation and the transformation of consciousness from a young age she shares. How living in an Ashram for twelve years laid the groundwork for several Buddhist Meditation Practices. She would later. Discover such as Jonah practice. The Pasta in Zog Chin Tower compares the benefits of each of these. And how each has deeply informed the development of her own unique practices especially those focused on self compassion tower and I also discussed her thoughts on radical compassion and what it means for compassion to be an all inclusive active and embodied expression in the world tower considers how we might shine a light of awareness on both personal and political biases and furthermore. How might Konate this aspiration despite our deepest conditioning? I so much enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too. I heard something interesting. You said you led to an Ashram for a while I did. I wish an Ostrom community. It's kind of a Yoga Meditation Ashram for about eleven years. That was in Boston. It was in Boston and then in Washington area. Also there were ashrams around the country as very intense Saad Nar spiritual discipline and we'd get up at four in the morning each morning and do two and a half hours of yoga meditation and chanting and Prayer and then work for community businesses. You know so service was really T- and teach yoga. It was really built in part of part of it. What tradition what. You'll go traditional Clinton lead yoga. All the group was three eight. Joe Healthy happy. Holy Oh wow yeah so it was that Yogi Bijon. Yes yes so was he the Goo at the Ahead internationally there were teachers in different local communities also and so. How do you come across those teachings? Well it's curious because I didn't think I was on my way to that when I when I was in college. I was a very much of a social activist. I was involved with tenants rights organizing community organizing and very much kind of my family. My parents were very liberal and engaged so I was planning to go to Cornell law school and carry forth and then I started doing yoga for health. You know it just seemed like a wholesome thing to do and I would go to these rallies or meetings and people would be in. There'd be a lot of aggression a lot of them and then I go to a yoga class. And I'd there'd be this peaceful feeling that come over and kind of unitive feeling. I remember one nine in particular right after Yoga class walking in the spring evening and I paused and it was like my body and my mind or in the same place at the same time and I just had the sense. This is what I cherish. This is what I really need. And then there was a pause. And then this is what the world really needs so I went from kind of radical politics radical inquiry into the nature of awareness and compassion and rather than going to law school. I went and joined an Ashram where I'd been doing the people that were teaching. Yoga and the next decade shift dry in terms of external. Going to your plan to go to law school you're involved in activism activism and then you found this place of peace. Hell were you a distant. I must've been about nineteen ninety. Yeah you know I was. I was very much into wanting the world to be a peaceful more loving place but what became so clear is that that transformation is only possible by transforming consciousness. So that's what kind of turn my attention inward more. It's like how am I at peace? Am I living from love? Those kind of questions and it just became clear that that's where I needed to pay attention and felt like those like two different totally different experiences. There's this place where there was a lot of energy worked up energy the activism and it sounds like maybe. I'm putting words in your mouth but it was like this idea that division will division sort of helps solve division in a way or and but then there was also this other space in the yoga world where you were feeling personal unification between like your mind and your body and somehow you saw that as an answer to what you were trying to solve with the activism as well beautifully too. So you are. You're still had the same mission in a sense absolutely would just picking up different tools the mission if I had to say what it was is transformation a world. That's more you know just loving happy place and of course I was very aware of my own suffering and realized that both for my own healing and for the world's healing that we need to be paying attention to how internally we judge Jim we blame and we're aggressive and we're grasping and greedy and it just became more clear to me that that needed attention. I very quickly. I found myself wanting to be engaged in the world again in more Political ways but I but I did go slow at it and I have reentered over the decades so what was Ashram life like. Because you said you were getting up at four. Am Doing Asada. What does Assad no look like in that tradition tradition? You take a culture. That's the first thing. That's very yogi. Yogi yeah take a cold shower and then gather with in this case sixty other people and do some very vigorous yoga we were. It's a linear Yoga's are at least at that. Time was very athletic. Yoga how very energetic and then do meditations are creosote chant and you come into silence also and some prayers and and go into the world and be of service that was that was the notion so then when you also training to be a yoga teacher as well very quickly. 'cause I took to the Oga. I love the ogre and back then I was super flexible and it came to me really naturally so I came very actively yoga teacher and teaching in Boston at the center there and and loved it. It was great. There's an irony to it that I I looked like this fabulous. Yogi back then. 'cause I'm My joints are very. Everything's very elastic. It turns out I have a genetic disorder that leads to hypermobility so that over time. Not only was yoga. Not Good for me. It was actually now. I have to be really careful and it was. It was quite an ego teaching. 'cause I was rather proud of I was in vain Yogi so it was very humbling to you know. Find out that I got to a point that I got very sick. Where when the disorder actually really showed itself more fully. When I was in my early fifties and to the point that couldn't really walk up inclines. My knees were so bad and for about I was in a downward spiral for about eight years and then seemed to Plateau and now I've built up out of it so actually doing okay. But that was one of those life experiences it actually gave rise to writing my second book true refuge because I had a face that I might not have a body that lasted long. While it was alive. Couldn't do much. And so how could I find peace and love and happiness? No matter what you know sense at the at the Ashram Your Yoga and therefore your body was in a sense. You're refuge at that time in a way you might say right. It was. It was an easy access to feeling good because I do the yoga and feel really energized and vibrant and alive. And then I'd sit still and meditation I. I also took well to concentration. I would practice concentrating and I'd get very still very fast and it was very rewarding while so many so did you have experiences of the subtle body through that practice in terms of Kunda lenient. Those sort of things that did was that part of that experience of the Ashram for you. So I'll take care and language here because I think there's a lot of misunderstandings about the the different levels of subtle energy bodies and so on sign. I don't WanNA claim to be some master subtle energy body experience so more. I would say that the the Buddhist understanding of Jonah is actually more useful in this. Which is that. There was enough collecting and settling when. I get quiet that there are feelings of tremendous piece welby and one s unit feelings and then when I left the Ashram and started going deeper into mindfulness. It produced more wisdom

Ashram Yoga Meditation Ashram Yogi Bijon Ashram Your Yoga Boston Jonah Zog Chin Tower Buddhist Meditation Practices Cornell Law School Hypermobility Ostrom Joe Healthy Clinton Assad JIM Washington Area
Take Your Shot with Robin Waite

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

08:54 min | 2 years ago

Take Your Shot with Robin Waite

"All right Robyn. Can I get it. Oh Yeah Oh yeah nice. Nice Nice first of all robin like we do every single time I wanna say thank you for taking the time out to talk with us because as I know. You're busy entrepreneur. Business owners so there's about a thousand things that you could be doing right now but you decided added to take some time out to talk with us so thank you for that. It's my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me on your show. The next thing I like to do is to ask you to tell us about about yourself now when I say that still free to go all the way back to the day you abort or you can start more. Current Day tells us about Kumaon. Yeah basically I live in the south west of the UK. I've always lived out in the countryside. We have a teachable. I'll take the call twelve and if I need to go listen to visit the the UK they should definitely come and check out the proper like yolly welby costs. Well how does everywhere. I like chocolate box type stuff but now fast forward kind of went through school always wanted to set up a business but didn't really business. I wanted to say so. I worked for a medical device company for about four years systems. Unless I'm a numbers Guy Elti propagate at the gate love my mouth and that point we managed to double the ten Brunei ended up pretty much running the company by the end of the four years so we grew to about a million and a half pounds a year in terms of ten AIBA and being systems analyst. I ended up. I suppose anyway. Firing about half the workforce so we actually work for Stanford about fifteen people down to about seven right because of the systems which I built so very good. I'm list but didn't realize the negative impact on coming on our work or people even at jobs which was fantastic side instead talking and four I started with marketing business. Run that twelve years we agree. That's about a quarter million pounds at ten A.. managed to get up to find employees within that business. That's really great. That will business point. My family was growing so I already had a daughter and then my second daughter is about to come on and I just had that you only have that sort of moment I call it kind of the shit moment where I realized really the agency with great but it wasn't really fulfilling me so I took three months off claims the agency see down and took three months off to spend time with my family and my daughter and you have been a paternity leave on during that time. So we're talking to two Thousand Sixteen fell into the coaching. Actually some people said. Oh you're really successful business. That's in Khost Day in that. Can you help us with that. We don't need to do any of the work. We want you to tell us how to do it so I feel as business business which is what I do now. The coaching practice already built that too similar. So this is actually my marketing business. Not GonNa go to amazing coaches and a couple of other people helping me now and I haven't looked back accurately there's been a real roller coaster ginny. Wow there's so much unpacked there that I don't even know where to start but I'm GonNa take a step back and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do? My favorite thing is the thing so which the U. K. isn't really well nine for itself and you'd probably be looking at Hawaiian someone. uh-huh actually about forty minutes away from where I live now. They've just opened up a wave garden. So that's my Kinda like guilty pleasure disappearing off down there plenty times in the new year. So yes I think. The biggest I've ever said his didn't sound very grandpar- pretty big at the time of fifteen foot waves to Morocco. I call the first. One wasn't quite lucky with the second one and ended up going under the water. It felt like forever but it was about forty seconds before I go back up again and they were very scary. Surreal experience parents. Probably one of the best experiences in My life actually now surfing a fifteen foot wave in Morocco may not seem like a big deal to you Robyn. But that's that's kind of a big deal. My friend tell you what we did is. I went out surfing with a couple of buddies and my friend called me into. And he's like he's like adult paddle paddle and then all I had I was coming off the top of the wave with. Oh Yeah I guess it was more of a big but it was like live the moment that you realized the power of the like. You're you're not point it's just GonNa do what is going to do with you have absolutely no control over it. That's a really good segue to my next question. I'm curious I heard in your intro. The businesses you start it and we're able to grow them in how you were started at a company as a systems analyst and ending running the company talk a little bit about surfing as it relates to that mentality of how you've been able to be successful in business. Joe Funding go on the other day about like if I could align myself with Perry he would not like well. It'd be mass boy again sandwich. Sounds like super nerdy. But I don't know why but I never got the radio bond stuff so you're never going to become like an engineer or something like that but one of the things I did get very early on with uh with the the basic economics on how to run a business in terms of kind of you know not just you know piano profit and loss type stuff ten by not properly sanity but cash is king and cash is one of the things which I kind of understood right from an early age not just to earn it but also have to keep it which is a a thing which a lot of progress really struggle with you here entrepreneur say things like oh I've got cash flow problems but it's not a cash flow problem. The tool the cash flowing into that business is also flown straight back out of the business so he's not cash. Play that issue. It's actually about being up to make more money but also being to keep some of that money so that you can then put towards growing a business and I got that in that first business because the the A business owner at the time. He's a great guy he really got the product innovation side of things. But how do you know understanding pats business so I kind of got into Kunar forced to kind of had to learn it as an eighteen year old school. And I've been out to take sort of fool with tweet to the businesses lifestyle runs in so I'm curious to know a little bit more about that period of your life in career so you end up starting at this company as a systems analyst and you said I think by year four year running the company and end up having a let half the people go because of the system that you put in place. How do you reconcile it? Well I mean the thing is going on since obviously and they got. They got jobs at the time. So that's fine but at the time it was like a you know when you're twenty one twenty two and realizing I like that you'll making people redundant it's actually really hard to stomach because you realize at that point that people hate you and I kind of when I started to run my own businesses businesses on. I realized that if just course this is just part of the journey going as a business owner having to make those really tough decisions kind of hiring and firing people and one of the the things which one of a mentor of mine said this really stuck with me for the United again from the very early on in my business career he said you need to highest level and five so people aren't performing properly. They're things that coming along through replacement then adopting you kind of need to get them out of business because typically the people of the most expensive business but the rules are the most important part of the business and I had this moment I realized I should work for that company and things weren't going well. Ten were wise. But I just wasn't enjoying it. I realized I shot a Graham changing. Take that piece of knowledge. And that's at my marketing business and see thousand four and I'd won so at that point I wanted to roam my marketing business. It'd be big enough. I the hiring people instead of having to find them. Got It so obviously over your career. You've had many things that you've had to overcome. Do you have a methodology analogy or a method to how you overcome challenges me. It's always been about having somebody to because if you try and deal with a lot of this stuff and business on the Rhine. I mean like you're dealing with things that you don't have experience in dealing with this. I have a mental or coach. Who got your back? You know no matter what when the irrespective irrespective of whether you're paying them or not like it's super important you have people around you who understand business because businesses we live in a day and age. Actually where the ten sometimes number businesses that were like the star of the Internet age so here in the UK. I think we had about half million businesses in the guy at the door of the night. Now there's six million serpent comes into business thinking it's super easy to get business. Stuff is a global marketplace clients your fingertips dot she ten number people. Doing whatever your listeners do are you right now. Which means it ten times to get found and so for me? It's always once you have those little moments of realization actually business. It's pretty tough. And you've got my support network around you so that when things do get haunt the wheels fall off and you can. You can go Nassir bit of advice. That's when the magic happens has a great offer. You probably read the book. Thinking Rich Rich Hill only talks about and there is about the mastermind effect and having groups of knowledgeable. People around you. Ron could work all this stuff out on your because you you're working out and you're conventionally but it's much easier if you can do a bit foster

Business Owner Systems Analyst UK Robyn Morocco Robin Stanford Brunei Aiba Khost Day A.. RON Kunar Joe Funding Engineer Graham Perry
Want a Job in Crypto? Firms are Hiring

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

08:42 min | 2 years ago

Want a Job in Crypto? Firms are Hiring

"The Block and the blockchain association recently released a report on digital asset human capital trends which I'll just put in a plain English by saying it's about employment trends in Crypto. What are the main takeaways of the report? Well I think the most surprising takeaway from the report is the fact that this market is is pretty sizable right. We're talking about over twenty thousand jobs. Dozens of firms with more than one hundred employs always. This isn't an industry of basement-dwelling coders anymore. This is a real market with with major firms. Making good amount of revenue and a lot of that activity is happening here in the United States and abroad and over the past year. We've seen the number for of job. ADS increase and the investment trends over the past. Five years are also increasing right so total venture funding money in dollars. has increase overall since two thousand seventeen right Two thousand eighteen. We saw a major pickup And then a sixty percent declined between two thousand eighteen and twenty nineteen but the job market is still healthy and in growing and when you analyze the different firms for your report what kinds of firms did you include like. Did you include any of the decentralised projects foundations. Because I did see a few but then I didn't see the in theory and foundation which surprised me So I wasn't sure you know what the methodology was while we try to include as many different types absa firms nonprofits To profit seeking firms and foundations for the report reached out to over two hundred seventeen. Obviously it's not a complete league. You know overview of everything but we try to get as many firms as we could included but it does range and it runs the gamut from You know exchanges trading firms to Foundations like maker foundation and many different other types of companies service providers like China has another example and so who are the biggest employers in the space and what kinds of companies are they. Great question and it. It shouldn't come as a surprise that the major employers in this market are the companies that are are making money and that have found product market fit. We're still in. A speculative speculative stage of this market of the crypto market so exchanges and trading firms and service providers to exchanges. Make up the lion's share the of jobs just given the fact that that's where we are right that's where the market is growing so welby global has over a thousand employees coin joint base has close to a thousand employees okay X. is around a thousand employees and Mining firms also make a good chunk of the market from a job perspective So bit main is one of the largest employers as well about forty six percent of the largest largest employers are digital asset exchanges followed by development firms at around twenty nine percent and then mining firms at around ten percent. This is fascinating because I would actually like if you were to kind of put. All of those in their own category very broadly. You could say. They're sort of like picks and shovels type types of businesses. which in a way make sense? I think for the early stage that we're at and there was another way that you analyze these companies which is geographically. Ah where are they based. You know when you do the breakdown that way while there's a few ways we can look at this for some of your listeners. Who might hearken back on the token days of your And they might associate this market. Solely or exclusively with ICO's or token launches at this point in time. Singapore has really become the go-to jurisdiction for those types of companies making up around thirty seven percent To the US is thirteen percent. So I find that interesting. Just because it illustrates how Skittish folks here in the states are about operating those types of businesses given the regulatory reprisal. We've seen over the past two years overall. Obviously the United States is the leader in terms of in where the jobs are making up about thirty three percent to Asia Pacific's sixteen point seven percent and then the EU follows all is closely at eight percent. So the the whole point just the back up a little bit of this report was to illustrate for lawmakers legislators and policy-makers policymakers in DC. How big this market is where the jobs are growing and to sort of pick the brains of industry insiders about the impediments? They face in terms of either expanding their businesses launching new businesses and hiring in terms of job. Growth Right your ear and this is fascinating giving the backdrop of a price action. The United States saw digital asset jobs listening Rothe Year over your increase ninety three percent in two thousand nine thousand nine hundred and I mean so when I saw that versus what was thirty seven percent and the rest of the world world. That surprised me because of as you mentioned you know a lot of these companies are saying that the. US Isn't providing. Good regulatory clarity. So why do you think I right. We are still seeing quite robust growth here especially compared to the rest of the world one hundred percent. That's a really good question and it does it. It is an interesting juxtaposition right. Because you and I both know how much anxiety there is about the regulatory environment in the United States and all the. CEO's you talked to all the CEO's. I talked to list that as being one of the larger impediments. But if you think about the companies that are here here in the United States they are the you know quote Unquote Regulated Compliant Exchanges Coin based crack in Gemini. And at the end of the day. Those are the companies that are hiring so even though firms like let's say labral for instance might face some regulatory Tori headwinds a company like coin. Base pretty you know. They've got their stuff together in terms of their regulated by New York Department of Financial Services. They have their money transmitter license across many different states and they can expand pretty on abated. They have the venture capital to do it. They raised three hundred million in their most recent round. So I think that's why there's that that sort of that's how shaping out and one other thing that you mentioned briefly was The investment in this space. How were we sing? That breakout geographically. That's an interesting question so again. Obviously venture funding has fallen off since twenty Eighteen I mean in total. We saw that go down. Sixty percent percent The way the value is accruing geographically. Obviously the United States is is leading the way the US has two point seven x as many investors sisters with offices as Asia Pacific so the US is still king in that regard but but then again what's interesting racing as many investors have headquarters in the United States but then have offshore entities to gain exposure to investments that they otherwise wouldn't be able to here in the US. Okay yeah in a way that sort of almost like a theme that I see throughout where you you know despite some of the regulatory I guess lack of clarity your uncertainty that we are still seeing quite strong Quite a strong industry here in the US like you know. Many of the most active of companies that are hiring our us-based and even the place where the the employer is domiciled the. US is still the largest. It's thirty three percent so you you know it's it's almost like yeah I I guess it's just sort of saying you know this is the biggest market it's the most desired market. And so even despite the regulatory lack of clarity there's interest in being based here in hiring here

United States Asia Pacific Blockchain Association ICO Singapore CEO China DC EU New York Department Of Financi
Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

FT News

09:07 min | 3 years ago

Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

"For the first time will also be recording this for video on our Youtube Channel so today we're here to talk about Crowell food an extreme file is a microbe that can survive in extreme conditions one star up in Chicago has found a way of turning these microbes rapa creatures into an edible protein part of a growing trend towards a microbial revolution in Food and agriculture could microbes hold the key to feeding a growing relation here with me in the studio to discuss this is Emiko Tarazona commodities correspondent and Clive Cookson science editor thanks for joining today Emiko to start with tell us a bit about this company and what it is trying to do so sustainable biproduct is a start up in the US yes and it's turning and micro that discovered in yellowstone national park into protein so they are going to use precision fermentation and they again A to turn this protein into alternative dairy and meat products like burgers and microbial base cheese wow has it garnered much first from investor's overall the search for alternative proteins is such a hot topic in Food and agriculture these days and comes as increasing income uh-huh in developing countries and when populations become more rich they moved from carbohydrates to prestige products I meet but people can't continue easing me because of the environmental is also health concerns as well so we've had the plant based meat products impossible Burger and beyond meat and the search is on for alternative sources of protein among entrepreneurs and scientists and so yes investors are we interested sustainable by products is raised she three million early this year from companies including France's Danone and Archer Daniels Midland which is an agricultural trade we've got some really serious money behind them what to these products actually tastes like have you tried any yourself when you talk about protein means you'll have a protein which is a source of the product by the vehicle for the taste so I think the idea there is to reduce the taste of the channel whatever you using it sauce itself like pre protein which is used in beyond meat you don't want it tastes like peas yeah so you want the protein to be pures possible with Mike I have not tasted was actually not on the market so I have not tasted volcanic microbial burgers but the other uses with proteins is as food ingredient to enhance the taste of a certain product or change the way the product tastes for instance impossible foods I uses a protein called him which is made from soy and that is made from precision fermentation and it adds the meaty taste gene. The bugah wow so how optimistic are you I mean is this pine sky or do you think this is genuinely changing the way that we wing to source proteins in our food well I didn't think it's Pine Sky Tool because you already have corn for instance that is more not not C. O. R. A. But exactly due to you O. R. N. and that is made from a micro protein which is a sort of fungus and that's been around forever clive you know better than me in Qu'une dates back to the nineteen eighties and it's a good thing to think of anyone has headcorn it is as you said a vehicle for taste quarter is growing out of single celled fungus which you can define `as Microbe F- Initiative Mike Grove is somewhat stretchy incubators any organism that you can't see with the naked eye as the individual cells and you have to onto microscope to identify them that's so interesting I mean microbe seem to be having a bit of a moment recently why have they come into the spotlight now I guess spotlight might be the wrong where maybe under the telescope from yes what's the wider scientific picture here well when it comes to food one of the most important changes as of the twenty first century in in nutrition and even I would say in medicine is understanding that the billions of microbes the bacteria that live in our what's play a gigantic role in our health not just how we digest food that's the most important thing but even welby being psychologically the microbes within our body of vital and therefore there's a big and growing industry you're trying to produce microbes not say much as food but to populate guts with friendly bacteria so that's a very big growth area Another is that might cribs used to ferment foods of being extended a lot everything from Kim Chae to sauerkraut route to the molds are cheeses to bear in wine they depend on microbes one sort or another and so using microbes to produce protein I mean could this be scaled up used worldwide I mean are there inhibiting factors will I think we have to remember uh-huh like all new foods microbial food stamp grow on thin air they will need a lot of input of water nutrients at that try so from the environmental point of view that are not going to be completely benign now they're probably going to be more sustainable and growing card which spends a lot of its energy wondering around fields and belching and burping and emitting methane which is a very powerful greenhouse gas but I think those environmental questions need to be answered and they haven't yet been answered by the new foods companies that are making not only microbial foods CACO's talking about earlier but also sell based meat and fish products web rather than growing a cow will catching a fish you'll grow the proteins and the muscle the fibers hopefully trying to capture the texture and taste in the lab and where does this fit into other types of new food technologies I think they're going to be seen alongside these other cell taste foods a lot of progress is being made in taking for example stem cells from cowes Castle and getting them to develop essentially and to meet and if you combine that with Three D. Printing you can get something that's good texture I mean that's one possibility abass meat but I guess this whole microbial fungus bacterial activity I mean how will consume is really react to it is the uh-huh because it's cruel to animals and I didn't think cruelty to microbes is going to enter the picture remains to be seen sustainable but biproduct CEO has told me that he wants is to get a product out into the market either on a trial basis or onto the shelves at least in about eighteen months in the US so it'll be interesting to see what sort of marketing strategy he takes a certified next Winter Christmas twenty twenty we could be having microbial something on the shelf test smoke it I think probably not in London yeah yeah as a final question I wanted to ask you both do you think there's an argument that time and money would be better spent encouraging food and agricultural offices that are more sustainable rather than creating new products that sort of enable everyone to keep consuming in the same way I think that's a really interesting question but I suspect that the horses kind of left the stable that consumers want convenient food that they crave and also the newly rid sh developing country population they also want that as well they expect that and on the other hand you'd companies and fast food companies won't all that so can we continue killing life is to have diversity I think from a sustainability and health point of view giving consumers as rich and diverse mixture of foods as

Emiko Tarazona Youtube Archer Daniels Midland Emiko Clive Cookson United States Chicago Yellowstone National Park Crowell France Editor Mike Eighteen Months
Why Don't People Trust Vaccines?

BBC World Service

07:08 min | 3 years ago

Why Don't People Trust Vaccines?

"Thanks as to BBC and used as taking close look at vaccines, and the issues, which make people refused to let their children, have the World, Health Organization, says a wave of misinformation online has contributed to global vaccination rates stalling as we've been reporting within measles, outbreaks never before. We've heard from the Philippines earlier in the program also whole communities built online on anti vaccination. We heard also on this program from one American mum, who knew her science, but explained how she ended up christening, the whole idea of vaccination now, the biggest global study ever into global attitudes to vaccines shows trust is worryingly low in some regions rich regions, and that study was conducted by the Wellcome Trust. And we're joined happy to say about Charlie Wella who's head of the vaccines program. Dr Welby, welcome to the program. The stats are if you want to pick him a we do quite remarkable ninety nine percent of her wendems- trust vaccine. And Kim to their children. Forty seven percent of French people say, why I think before we go into the detail there's one highlight that I want to talk about in that. There are nine out of ten parents globally who say that the children are getting vaccinated and we need to hold onto that, so it's not all doom and gloom. There is some positive there. But if you look at specific countries that you've drawn out there are absolutely some pockets and some countries in some communities, where that is a much lower level. Social media. So there are many reasons why people have confidence in vaccines to do with cultural religious political and an online social media, the ways in which people seek information now this so many different ways and this so much information out there, so we need to make sure that the information that's out. There is accurate because knowledge formation is the same. And the interesting thing is that the mom who we spoke to from Pennsylvania. She said, I grew up loving science. I knew my science and then she's exposed to whatever you wanna call them different facts alternative facts to use the phrase, but the science didn't work for her anymore. Now, if you're going to counter those arguments, how'd you do that if people just don't believe in signs? Well, this is why this survey was so interesting because it was the first global survey to look at public attitudes towards science and health. And so there were specs vaccines in there were four questions. But it was a lot much broader study to understand how and why we can. Best engage with people to make sure that these amazing vaccines that we have the therapeutic that we have the drugs that we have are accepted therefore have benefit to those, their info. But why wouldn't people believe in the benefits because countries? Is the sense that complacency, and laziness comes around, if you live in a country that hasn't had diptheria, outbreaks recently? Absolutely. And I think that we don't see polio today. We don't see survivors of polio. We don't see theory as you say, and we're starting to see measles. So we don't appreciate the devastating impact that these, these diseases can have on people's lives and people's health. And so therefore, we to certain Sentate vaccines for granted vaccines out there, be out there. They'll be a vaccine for any disease. So why do we then pick on it? This is what I don't understand, by all means kind of, like, get complacent about it. But still be grateful for the science actually working wanting to forty seven percent of French people say that there's something they don't trust about the science because that's big. That's not just the science, that's cultural attitude, isn't it? Yes. And I think it comes down to trust who do you trust is a parent give you had vice. And some of the, the survey. Results show that many people have high trust in healthcare professionals, doctors, nurses, also have high trust in Ohio confidence in vaccines. But at the same time Europe is very different Europe. Has he say some of the lowest levels of competence vaccines, but still has high levels of trust in doctors, nurses, and this is what we don't yet understand what dude? Well there. There may be many factors, which are. Inputting into people's decisions. How you trust your government? How you trust your healthcare system. What's happened in the past and what we're seeing is that trust in systems trust in health trust in research may have an impact on trust in vaccines, but not just vaccines, trust in anti-biotics because like ninety seven percent of Bangladesh's, I think have have trust in the vaccine is an idea. They are exposed on a daily basis to the cost of not being vaccinated. And yet, I don't see that there's a correlation in their trust for their government, or their trust, for their health system, which is not one of the most trustworthy in the world. And I think this is what we really need to understand this surveys really a springboard for countries policymakers researches to dig down deeper into those countries in those communities where they're on these maybe unexpected differences between vaccine confidence confidence. In fact, scenes and. Faxing uptake in terms of putting the arguments forward. I'm really interested in the idea of science because I think we assume that affect is a fact and we have done for ages. Now, we know from recent arguments in politics around the world, that facts are contestable, but surely with science, the science isn't contestable, and this is a really interesting point because I think this avai Shays there's a real gap between what scientists have proven through research, and evidence, around vaccine safety in vaccine efficacy public perception is and if we want to try and close, we really need to understand in specific communities in specific countries. What is driving that low low confidence in some people, and then we can find solutions to try and raise that re re show scientists, I'm sure kind of thinking I shouldn't have to prove that the fact, a fact, but somehow fax approved to the satisfaction of many anti vaccination not to be fact. So what do you do, do you go back on social media, too? Proves that factors affect. What should you do? This is the outstanding question. How do you get those messages out there what we know right now is that the messages that vaccines, safe, effective getting too many people, but not everyone? How do we get those messages to the right people? And I think it comes down to who people trust in who people go to advice right now. I don't want you to accused the BBC of having got this wrong. The point you want to make is the we we're talking about this as a problem as an issue. But you also want to emphasize yes, it's a problem. But most people most people, nine out of ten parents say, the children are naked in, in the world. That's not forget that thank you very much indeed, for coming in with the results of the survey showing stronger faith in vaccine in poorer countries amongst other things fascinating subject, which is why we're talking about it for the next few days here on the BBC, Charlie. Well, the found of all affects the head of the vaccines program at the Wellcome Trust many. Thanks,

Wellcome Trust BBC Charlie Wella Polio Europe Dr Welby Philippines KIM Pennsylvania Ohio Shays Bangladesh Ninety Seven Percent Forty Seven Percent Ninety Nine Percent
Chinas surveillance state

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:48 min | 3 years ago

Chinas surveillance state

"One of the crucial stories of the last few decades has been China's extraordinary surge to catch up with the rest of the world in manufacturing technology. And in economic military and cultural power, one of the other crucial stories of the last few decades has been the erosion of privacy in the online era and on that front China is pulling a distance ahead. China is in the process of assembling an immense and pervasive apparatus of surveillance, which will monitor and punish and reward, the most every day of behaviors and interactions of more than a fifth of the world's people, the prophets of doom of the pre computer age. Imagine that any such system would have to be imposed by a dictatorship even George Orwell did not envisage that the population of airstrip one would voluntarily surrender personal information to the state, the communist party of China is assuredly a dictatorship. But has it also understood that a great many people below? Leave privacy to be over rated. What is the reality of China's surveillance state how might develop in future? And is it a case of today? China tomorrow, the world, this is the foreign desk. They intend the system to record every single action transaction by each Chinese citizen, whether it's economic transactions social actions are moral behavior. And then in the end create the system that ideally, in real time can sanction you and censor your or reward. You also, we've known for a long time that Goodland Facebook's business motor profit revenue has come from essentially selling our attention and that requires having a sense of what we interested in also kind of maximize the value of our time spent on decision. But I think maybe we just the fact that for all the convenience truly the enjoyment, we might get from these services. There is a price to be paid into the day some. Oh, my friends, when we want to talk about something that we think, well, public Ed attention from the police, we tried to, like, okay, let's meet offline less meeting cafe. And to have a discussion more and more. I don't want to talk about. Real issues out, like we had wayball. You're listening to the foreign desk on monocle twenty four with me, Andrew Miller on today show on joined by Caroline can and keisters matter, Caroline can is an editor a China dialogue, and the author of under red skies, memoir of growing up in China. Caroline joins us here in the studio in London and Kayce strip matter is a journalist and the author of we have been harmonized life in China's surveillance state. He joins us from Copenhagen welcome both KAI. I'll start with you. Just so we can define some terms here and make it clear. Exactly what we're talking about. China's surveillance state as referred to in the subtitle of your book is a common phrase. I suspect it's one of those, which is rather more talked about than understood. So when we talk about China's surveillance state. What is it exactly? We are talking about. Well, actually we are talking about a whole youth thing now. China was always the dictatorship. It was always a civilian state, but what heating paying. The communist party's doing now that they're basically re inventing their dictatorship with twenty-first-century information technology with artificial intelligence, and with big data and stuff. So basically we're going to see something developing their that the world has never seen that before. Caroline, what's your sense of it as somebody who lives in Beijing? Because a recurring theme of your book, certainly in the time you've been alive since one thousand nine hundred nine is one of state intrusion into people's lives, which would be regarded as extrordinary in most countries. Is it your sense that it is exceleron getting exponentially, because of the technology and the way that Kyd describes? I think when I was younger, there was a time when there was more and more freedom, and especially with the development internet. But then clearly like since the year two thousand twelve or two hundred thirteen I could feel that freedom has been shrinking. And now as kaija said, almost every street in Beijing any city. I you see the sec- TV's cameras catching any images of people whatever people are doing. I also have the fear that Wease the big data technology like people would ever they do Welby, so closely monitored. And to me, that is quite worrying, Koi, again, to return just to the basic idea of how this actually functions. We're not talking yet. Are we about one immense, centralized technological panel to knishes still a, a mishmash of overlapping dot networks? It is at the moment. Yes. Very much. So. I mean, a lot has been written, for example, about the Social Credit system, which is part of this whole effort, but it's only one piece of the puzzle, and there are many, many other different pieces of the puzzle and of course, the central government tries to sort of get a grip on all of this, and maybe especially the state security apparatus would like to have in the end one big database. But of course, the big question is like in all those used bureaucracies, will they actually be able to make it work exactly in that way? But even if they won't I would say there is enough to be worried about Carolina Social Credit system, which is something which is attracted a lot of attention in the last couple of years in particular, again, I think the some of the reporting of it may have focused perhaps overly on the lurid science fiction imagination of it, as Chinese citizen, who lives in China. How does it affect you on a day to day? Level as you go about your life. It is not like something that you see every day. Oh, you feel like getting so close to your every day. Maybe there's something that you don't have access to review your own Social Credit. Like the only thing I noticed in my life, a kind of, related to sort of crowded is, there's alipay like an app by Alibaba and there's a function of borrowing money. And if we repay back the money in time that you cried you score at rising. So that is the only thing I see so far about it about, of course, I heard stories about people who don't pay money in time, and they got the candle blocked from going to buy a train tickets or of flight tickets. And this kind of like being black list, and I don't know how was you up, like least how do you get rid of that list? So that is something that I, I think that will affect the people's live. Corey, how does that differ, though, or how might it different future from credit writing systems that you have in any developed country, really whereby an frankly, not unreasonably if it becomes the case that you are a credit risk? If you have a history of paying back, things late or not at all, then it does become increasingly hard for you to borrow money or get a mortgage. How different scale we talking about here in, in the Chinese experience. Well, the interesting thing is that actually Allah systems, probably were sort of starting point for the Chinese system, but the main difference, of course, is that it doesn't restrict itself to financial transactions the aim of the government in the end is they intend the system to record every single action in transaction by each Chinese citizen,

China Communist Party Of China Caroline Beijing George Orwell Facebook Andrew Miller Alibaba Carolina Communist Party ED Copenhagen Corey KYD Welby Kaija Editor
"welby" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Detectors. In government buildings is the answer. But standing near this memorial Virginia Beach, mayor Bobby Dyer says the city's residents say this isn't about increasing security. You know, we can't let this horrible incident to finance, because, you know, you take a look where people are vulnerable movie theaters malls, and everything this, hopefully, is just a an unfortunate anomaly. And we're going to go back to in Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach straw. Donations are being collected to help victims families with burial costs. This is NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Julianne Welby advocacy groups, pushing, for legal marijuana stronger rent rules and licenses for immigrants who entered the US illegally say they're frustrated with Democrats lack of progress in Albany, as New York's legislative session winds down. In a statement today, the drug policy alliance citizen action, New York communities for change and other groups accused governor Cuomo of blah. Locking bills that have broad public support Cuomo has blamed lawmakers for the delay, but he says he's pushing for progress New Jersey voters head to the polls tomorrow for a primary election all eighty seats in the state assembly or on the ballot this year polls will open at six in the morning until eight o'clock at night. Immigration officials have responded to pressure and mailed medication to a critically ill Brooklyn man who was deported late last month, but it may arrive too late. WNYC's Matt Katz reports Andrew year would was deported on immigration violations. Even though a cardiologists told the federal government that he shouldn't fly because of a serious heart condition immigration and customs enforcement put him on a plane to Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Caribbean nation, and he grew sick. He says he doesn't have access to care there, and he has exhausted, six days worth of medication that he was sent with his attorneys argued that in a rush to deport him is violated its procedures and Yearwood's constitutional rights. And they want him brought back to the US ice venture melt him as medication. But it arrives Thursday and the cardiologists says year woods life is at risk until then the cosmetics chain. Sephora will close all of its US stores, Wednesday morning to host inclusion workshops for its employees. The move comes a month after a singer, Sousa said an employee called security to make sure she wasn't stealing while she was shopping at a California store, Sephora apologized for the incident and said it takes complaints seriously. The company has more than twenty locations in.

Virginia Beach governor Cuomo WNYC US Matt Katz New York Bobby Dyer Julianne Welby federal government Sephora Yearwood NPR New Jersey Sousa Grenadines Caribbean marijuana Brooklyn California
"welby" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Try and get some sunscreen on. Oh, yes. Yes. Well, there's that but okay. So I'm a summer child. Dave. Let's talk about what we're seeing right now in our area. We're seeing showers and clouds and even a little bit of fog. I can see the beginning of the, the skyscrapers in Boston start to disappear. Well, that's right. Yeah. Those conditions are going to persist here deep into the night. We just call it. It's a cage. No rain and drizzle in the bulk of this is actually going to happen. First half of the night. It'll tend to taper off in the early morning hours. Although it's everything's still going to be damp, and there could be a bit of drizzle. The fog probably hangs around as well about fifty degrees. So it's a better day tomorrow, but we don't really clear it out. But it's the least dry clouds and cool. We only get to about sixty downtown. It gets into the sixties farther inland, looks like a couple of showers late tonight, and they're still gonna be a spotty shower Thursday. But that implies like ninety eight percent of the dates dry but still on clouds and cool. And I don't use the word son till Friday, partly sunny, nice about seventy one degrees. I'm AccuWeather meteorologist Dave Bowers WBZ, Boston's NewsRadio always good teams that sunscreen. Thank you, Dave for the reminder, overcast right now in Boston, fifty three degrees. And we have New England business news. The three twenty six. Is a harsh reality from financial experts, you're probably leaving money on the table right now by sticking with your savings and checking accounts. WBZ's Jeff Brown with results of a new survey that shows, we could do a lot better time for a up. Call people earning at least two percent on your savings. It's time to make a change communist, Greg McBride with bankratEcom with some new research that shows many online Bank accounts, will pay you a relative fortune, if you Bank with them, and they'll throw in some other perks to or that, one in four of them, pay a yield of two percent, or better are also available nationwide with no minimum deposit, Milt ballots requirement and no monthly fee. These accounts are federally ensured as well, but most people won't move their money because they're simply happy. Right, where they are, but interesting to note younger, millennials are among the most likely to make more than two percent on money just sitting in a Bank account. But then, again, the same age group younger millennials also likely to earn zero interest, because they have zero savings, Jeff Brown WBZ Boston's NewsRadio that's New England. Business and on Wall Street very quickly. We're in the Red Cross the board searching for on motive information. Listen at four fifty seven PM this Wednesday through Friday for David Rosenberg's prime auto update. Ben Parker next. What does building a better Bank? Look like it starts with building Capital One cafes warm inviting places. The feel nothing like a typical Bank were you can open an account with no fees, or minimums in five minutes. And you'll always find people ready to help you not sell you welcome to banking reimagined. What's in your wallet for consumers only offered by Capital, One eight member? FDIC Kathy's available in select locations, copyright twenty Capital One. AM Welby tourist owner and lead tech.

Dave Bowers WBZ Boston Jeff Brown building Capital One Capital One FDIC Ben Parker New England David Rosenberg Welby Red Cross Greg McBride Milt bankratEcom two percent ninety eight percent fifty three degrees
"welby" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Jamie Floyd with me this afternoon is our editor Julianne Welby. Hey there. You know, this is independent journalism on WNYC the place where where able to dig deeper because of your member dollars for instance, I reported, yazmin confounder cities child welfare workers are wielding, emergency powers, more often, and in cases that may not be emergencies. Beth Fertig has been keeping an eye on who's winning and who's losing asylum. She's finding immigrants are losing more often in New York, which is a buck to a trend Gwynne HOGAN, you might have heard has been keeping us up to date on the spread of measles on a near daily basis. Why it's happening and we wear and that cats continues to bring us the story of immigrants were detained in county jails, including one who was forced to get an x Ray in a failed search for contraband, these very difficult stories to on earth, and to tell, but, you know that we're committed to telling them on WNYC and your. Remember dollars? Help us do that won't you become a member now. And the day before we end this all the money in half the time fund drive the number to call is eight three seven six nine six nine to call to support independent journalism that goes deep at eight eight three seven six nine six nine to or you can give WNYC dot org. We're really counting on your support before we end the drive tomorrow. I'm Nancy Solomon from the WNYC newsroom. The national conversation is increasingly about what divides us and while there are honest disagreements to be had. There's.

WNYC Beth Fertig Julianne Welby Jamie Floyd Gwynne HOGAN Nancy Solomon editor Ray New York
The fraying transatlantic alliance

FT World Weekly

12:39 min | 3 years ago

The fraying transatlantic alliance

"Hello and welcome to this edition of weld weekly from the financial times. I am answer venture Johnny the world news editor and this week, we're looking at transatlantic relations as the Trump administration appears to turn its back on its traditional European allies in a sign of Washington's shifting allegiances, the US president on Monday, welcomed Hungary's, illiberal leader, Victoria, Alban to the White House days, after his secretary of state abruptly cancelled a meeting with Germany's Angela Merkel joining me on the line from Washington DC is Dmitri, Sevastopol, oh, the F, Washington bureau chief and from Belene guy. Chaz on our between VERA chief my first question goes to you Dimitri. Donald Trump was fool of praises for Victoria ban on Monday. He congratulated him for his quote block up against refugees from Syria, and he's work to protect the Christian communities. Can you give us a bit of details and explain why this visit is so important and telling we'll, I think one of the things that we've learned about Donald Trump over the last two years. This is one of the things that many Europeans have concerns about is, he seems to want to solve up to leaders who are far -tarian strongmen, you know, very hard line. You know, there's a long list, whether it's early on in Turkey or on in Hungary Kim Jong on North Korea, who Donald Trump said he fell in love with or Vladimir Putin in Russia Trump when he meets these leaders at least publicly doesn't criticize them for some of the things that they're doing their own countries to threaten democracy on the other hand, he seems willing to criticize Anglo Myrtle, or Theresa May or president McConnell, France. So there's a kind of cost me come seems to like something to these strong, tough solitary leaders. And yet, he at the same time he seems to be dismissing some of the concern. Means pushing away, European allies of America who have helped maintain the kind of peace across the trans Atlantic now for seventy years. As you said, the relationship has fuss deteriorated since Donald Trump kimchi office. The US needs key. European is have diverge on a number of issues. Can you list them for us? I mean, it's really wide from climate change trade, Iran. Well, I mean, from the very beginning, it's a long list, one of the things that President Trump today early in his presence. He was he withdrew the US from the Paris climate accords which sent ripples across Europe and the rest of the world later on in his tenure, he withdrew America from the around nuclear deal that America and some of its European allies had signed with Tehran in twenty fifteen on that has led to convert more bellicose stomps on Iran. He also has been incredibly critical of NATO now in criticizing NATO. He's not the first president, President Obama and President Bush frequently said that NATO allies needed to pay more for their defense. I remember travelling to your puts on rump sell the Robert Gates and they were constantly sending this message of Europeans. But Donald Trump has done it in a much more aggressive way. And I think one of the most heading examples was last summer in Brussels out of NATO summit, he was very critical. Angela Merkel both in public meetings and in private meetings and he's shocked many of the leaders who were in the -tendance. So I mean, there are other issues there as well to do with hallway and five G telecom networks and other things. But I think there's some of the main ones that have really created a false lines in the transit onto relationship guy intending to, you know, defense. Secretary of state. Mike Pompeo cancelled a meeting with medical less tweak invoking rising tensions in the Middle East. What was the reaction in betting? I think those zoo Hora that it was seen very much as a snub, it was supposed to be his first trip to Berlin, since he became secretary of state, and it was very hotly awaited. And he just didn't turn up. And I think there was shock that he then went on to Britain. And even so they all Tricia Canterbury. So, you know, even just in Welby was more important to him as a priority. Angela Merkel those real dismay, lots of Coventry in the German press, basically saying that the US German relationship is now, basically in TATA's on, what are we going to do about this, this feeling of crisis really in a relationship, which has been one of the main pillars of Germany's post-war identity really for seventy years now. Why do you think that Mr. Trump targeted Gemini, in particular among its European on is what's your assessment of that? Well, they're personal reasons as well as political reasons. The chemistry between Angela Merkel and Donald Trump has never really worked. You know, she really comes across as associate professor, and he's like the naughty boy who didn't do his homework, he doesn't like being lectured, and Michael does have a tendency to lecture, one of the first thing she did when he was elected president. She sent him a message saying will look forward to working with you, but very much on the basis of our shed values of respect for human rights, and democracy, and so on that was perceived. As a real slight to Donald Trump. Basically a smackdown saying you're going to have to behave need didn't take Hymie to that. But there are other aspects. It's not just the chemistry America is very antagonist very exercise by Germany's failure to meet its commitment, which gave in two thousand fourteen to spend two percent of its GDP on defense. It's nowhere near that target and in fact recently published its budget estimates for the coming years, and it looks like it's actually going to go down as a percentage of GDP is spending on the military. So that was seen as a real red rag to Donald Trump's bull. And he's also, I mean, there's a very famous interview he did with playboy magazine from the ninety s where he complained about how many German cars that were on Fifth Avenue in New York, and he's had Macedo and BMW in his science for many, many years. So it didn't surprise the Germans a tool that he started talking about imposing. Import tariffs on European cars, and he's been complaining for longtime about the size of the German, current account surplus, which, of course, a lot of Germany's allies in Europe of also join attention to over the years. What do you think all the far reaching consequences for Germany? What are the Germans, what kind of lesson? They're drink from this facility longer term. Do you think there's a realization that Germany, and Europe must be more independent from a defense point of view, or, you know, foreign policy point of view? What is your sense? Absolutely. I was at a conference, whether we're talking about this and one speaker said Germany's success is built on three elements integration with the EU the transatlantic security guarantee on Germany's access to open Mockus worldwide and Trump threatens all of those three things. So there's a sense, here that there's, it's kind of existential threat posed by Trump's America first ideology tool. All those things that have made Germany, such a huge success over the last few decades. So that definitely is a feeling that they have to respond in some way. I mean it's very tentative at the moment, though, I mean, for example, that talking about developing much more of a kind of foreign policy. Competence in the EU and more of a sort of independent defense posture, and, you know, maybe getting rid of unanimity, and you decisions on foreign policy, so that they can have more qualified majority voting not come thing, but it's all relative tentative. And even when they do talk about building up their defense capabilities that gets them in hot water with the Americans. We wrote the story saying, how America was criticizing the latest initiatives for military cooperation between EU countries, the Pescara the permanent structured cooperation initiative, and EDF the European defence fund because they feel that it's not really compatible with NATO that it produces. Much duplication and diversion of scarce defense resources and it sets up a necessary competition between NATO in the EU. And so the sense of frustration in Europe over this is light. You tell us we need to do more far defense, and then we try and do it you complain. So the relationship has Radi scrunchy at the moment as we can see on the number of different fronts. Exactly. So they have this quantity move from the US. Do you want to jump in Dmitri? It's true that every time Europe speaks about more independence on the security from the US gets angry and gets a letter warning. But on the other hand, you know, you get a sense that the US is kind of retreating from Europe. What's your interpretation? Well stuffing element of Donald Trump getting a little bit of taste of his own medicine, sometimes when the European say that they want to their own defense capabilities. But I think it's also important to stress that this issue between the US and Europe on defense spending it really isn't just Donald Trump issue. And he is the one who is addressing it in a much more assertive, much more aggressive on some people would say overly aggressive way. But it's something that has stretched back now for more than a decade in the US the US than constantly saying to the European countries, particularly Germany because it is the biggest economy in Europe that they need to spend more. So I think it's an issue that's not going to go away, even if Donald Trump loses the election in twenty twenty I think a democratic president will be much friendlier to traditional US allies and I was just in New Hampshire on the campaign trail with Cory Booker and Beethoven, Joe Biden on all of them were talking about the need to rebuild on to strengthen American alliances with Europe. But notwithstanding that I still think. Whoever's president after twenty twenty is still going to put pressure on Europe to spend more money on defense, and if Germany and some of the other countries who haven't miss this two percent target haven't reached it, then I think you're still going to have tensions on that issue just to go back to one thing that guy said, I really do think the car issue is critical. I mean Donald Trump has how the being his bonnet about cars for a long time at the end of this week. He's going to potentially decide whether to put tariffs on imports of European cars. So this really is something that's a trade relationship is something that really gets him. And also when he was in Europe last year. Another thing that he criticized glimmer pool for is the Nord Stream two pipeline that will bring Russian gas into Europe and Donald Trump and some of his team are saying you want us to spend money to defend you against Russia, and yet, you're buying Russian gas on the other hand, the European say, hold on a second. You're the president who has criticized by the Putin, for orchestrating a campaign to interfere in the American elections. So there's a lot of things crossing the Atlantic and. It's very hard to see how any of this gets any better while Donald Trump is in office tensions, are escalating in the Middle East over Iran, with rising threat of war, and some echoes of cheese than three when the US in some European countries disagreed, on whether to war with Iraq. Dictates us Adam Hussain to meet you what all the broader security ramifications of this poor transatlantic relations. Are we entering a new testing phase? Well, the big question that's emerged in the last few days in Washington is are we returning to the early years of the Bush administration where it appears that there was a constant drum beat among Iran hawks for the US to take military action against Iran. Now, we know that on both in the national security advisor has asked the Pentagon to dust off its war plan for Iran. Not the caveat there is at the Pentagon has funds for everything, and there periodically dusting them off. But when a story comes out that they're dusting them off, Iran at a time when Mike Pompeo secretary of state. John Bolton and others are being very aggressive in the rhetoric towards around it raises questions as to whether the US is contemplating taking most reaction, and I think, not something that would be a huge divide across the transatlantic. I mean as much tension as two walls, when George W Bush invaded Iraq. You remember relations then between George W Bush Gertrude or Germany were extra very odd because since the war in Germany. But I think we would see something that will be exponentially worse. If the US did take any kind of military action in Iran. So people are watching very closely right now to see whether this is just on both in on the hawks making bellicose noises. Just too scary round or whether there's actually something fundamentally happening behind the scenes. My thanks to Dmitri and guy that was really fascinating. And that's it for this week till next week goodbye.

Donald Trump United States Germany Europe President Trump Angela Merkel Iran America Nato Mike Pompeo EU Vladimir Putin George W Bush Washington Russia Middle East Dmitri Syria
The electric scooter revolution with Lime co-founder Brad Bao

The Vergecast

03:03 min | 3 years ago

The electric scooter revolution with Lime co-founder Brad Bao

"Why does abuse beneficiary? To everyone beneficial to everyone all of us, and what who is sitting to improve that. And it's more ball. How we improve compared to ourselves yesterday. So we'll keep innovating. We'll keep on improving. The Falk has we should have is what a urban mobility will look like in the future has to be much nimble and a smaller per Taylor to personal troubles. Not a seventy two five six car that take a one person across the street. You has to be shared in order to reduce the occupation of the public space much smaller also share it has to be electric powered any has to be something. That's not on Enviro foldable accessible, but also, you know, readily available so that's reliable for all the users when they whenever they needed and all sorts of things that we want to achieve but we're still far away from that. So I'm more devoted dedicated all the time keep on innovating part and they'll keep on. Talking with cities. Do you think this markets winner take all I mean, you have competitors? Who certainly think it's winner take all or their they'll be duopoly. There were a lot of car sharing services. And now there's two there are a lot of scooter companies. Do you think there's always going to be a lot of scooter companies or just one or two I think the nature of the business does it's so complicated. A won't be hard for smaller player to to really survive. And even today data, we are still coupon improving on the durability of the scooters, the operating efficiencies and all kinds of things. Right. So I won't say it will be a winner take all. But I think they will be limited players dot going to into the future out of Welby providing maturity to survey. So I think that also is good for us as well. He started like struggling, you know, which one to take right? There's always a reliable and and available service for the that is based on one condition that company self has to have various strong values that not. To, you know, use the dealership position, we are leader globally in terms of this arena. But it will keep on reminding ourselves and our entire team that what isn't a vision mission of the company at what value started we live by. So I'm sure you saw but bird just increased its permanent charge and a couple of key markets, Los Angeles, Detroit, and a few others is lime going to be looking at fluctuating some prices down the road as well. Do you think first off all the you know, I set a three things will always wanted to simplify things for for folks to easy to remember that the three as that us as a company to focus on improving. You know, the the first vailab -bility, right? Whatever you needed wherever whenever and however you wanted and the second part accessibility. Therefore, the we lodge like non credit card payment, and we'd launched non-smart unlocks thanks for to increase accessibility. And the third thing that we we committed. On is to provide.

Falk Welby Los Angeles Taylor Detroit
"welby" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Fight on Welby right back. There's a difference between do it yourself and do it for a living at the Home Depot, we get that. And we're to help pros get the job done with the products and brands you trust technology to keep your job on track job site delivery to save you time at both pricing on over four thousand items every day to save you money when you've got a job, we're on the job, the Home Depot. More saving more doing. Lows knows the Gardner who does it right to make your flower and vegetable plants thrive we do it right to with deals like five bags of miracle. Grow old purpose Gordy soil for just ten dollars during our spring black Friday sale, grow delicious, vegetables and herbs and save on Bonnie plants now four for ten dollars Flynn, spring black Friday savings like these throughout the store, but hurry because they won't last long. Do it right for less. Start with Lowe's. Offers valid through four seventeen valid Alaska. Hawaii offer valid on one thousand nine hundred talk. See store for details. US only. Springtime tips and fun facts. From Paul Kristen index ter- at total wine and more. Everybody loves Honey, glazed carrots, a great side dish for your springtime celebration and analysis compliment to a sweet bright mosquito line is made in virtually every country in the world. And I'm ready to give you a tour to find the right one serving lamb this season. Try it with a bold cabernet from the trendy puzzle. Robles reach whether you're hosting or just bring the wine, we love to share always low prices 'em ridiculous election this spring at total wine and more. Cheers. Farm.

Home Depot Welby US Paul Kristen Robles Gardner Gordy Lowe Alaska Hawaii Flynn ten dollars
"welby" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on KQED Radio

"South Sudan's, president Salva Kiir. A Catholic was the first to land and made a courtesy. Visit to the offices of the Italian prime minister, accompanied by his own military, general and clad in his favourite ten gallon Stetson hat, Kim, moved quickly through a ceremonial. God. Four vice presidents, all professing Christians who've agreed to make up a transitional government soon arrived at Santa Marta, the guest house within the Vatican. The idea of a spiritual retreat was proposed by the archbishop of Canterbury. Justin Welby and endorsed by the Vatican in the hope that it might encourage the political leadership of south Sudan to reconcile for the sake of the youngest country in the world. Archbishop Justin, Welby speaking to us inside. The Vatican said the gathering had been a challenge for all sides did any of the parties express regret repentance. There is a deep sense of Sarah. From everyone. Of Sarah, what this has down has become and a deep sense that they must take responsibility for confronting. What has happened if persuading avowed enemies to meet together wasn't significant enough the retreat concluded with one of the most dramatic actions of the Frances pump ticket? I he stepped in front of the desk where he delivered prepared remarks and made an unscripted appeal to seek the common good. We my net and stay in peace. Bill kiddo quarry. I'm asking you. With my heart will be struggles disagreements amongst you. Devante Al Popolo, but in front of the people lemonade old hands United then walking towards them. The eighty two year old pontiff. Knelt and kissed the feet of the president Salva Kiir vice president react, Michelle and government minister, Rebecca Garang as such me deeply because these things never happen in the web on in the history of this three denominations coming together for one country. What was your reaction when pope Francis down because you started to cry? This was running down my face because I cannot imagine what we have done dissection have done. In somebody let him consent. So it's something which is touching. People have sensitive. See do you feel now that the opportunity for pace? Is real do you feel that does lead is you can go back and establish this unity government next month me as an individual? I've seen the light at the end of the tunnel. And the shuttle subsidiv have never been brighter than now. And I have to speak for myself. And have made decision that no matter what happened after send the site of might be the final act involve the presentation of a bible signed by the pope and the archbishop of Canterbury with this message seek that which unites overcome that which divides the BBC's Martin Bashir reporting there from the Vatican. Just ahead when Airbnb listed homes for rent in the West.

Justin Welby Salva Kiir South Sudan president Canterbury Sarah Archbishop Justin prime minister pope Francis vice president Santa Marta Martin Bashir Stetson Airbnb Kim Al Popolo Bill BBC Michelle Rebecca Garang
"welby" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on KGO 810

"The mornings nine forty nine. We're just about out of here. Fox's coming up next. She will have more money with easy money tests thousand bucks, basically all day long every hour able to develop show side show guest today. Brian says, and such that's interesting. Always so Val show. Sideshows what we're starting up ten o'clock. That'd be posted probably ten thirty secondary podcast. We do after we get off the air. Walk MS is on Sunday, the Rosebowl. Let's go people. Come welcome. It's free to register going to walk around the Rose Bowl and raise awareness for multiple sclerosis. Are you the grandmaster or something give any like do this year? They should enjoying. They should put you on stage every single year. Have you seen the national anthem or something? I would love that. Let's dream of mine too. Yet. We've talked about this before you guys have we guess can you sing? No, it's hard to sing take lessons. I wanna be legit. And I want to sing the national water mixture at the walk. That's that's Leyrer. Yes. A lot of. Yeah. But I don't know if it's going to take a couple of years to learn how to sing the national anthem. No it is. But I mean, if you practicing probably be reading the month, the nerve and the confidence. Okay. Gotcha. All right. Because if we're getting close to getting the disease wiped out, you don't have much time. You're right. That's a good point could singing something else too. But that's easy on the thing at the walk MS walk. You know, because it's a kind of hurting does anybody ever seen the national anthem at the beginning of this? Okay. Every. A Rachel platinum rise. Right. But I didn't know the national anthems part of Welby said this year ago, you got it under the wire next year. It's. Jill thank you show her show. We show if you ever show favor show. Thank your services, always my friend. Thank you very much. So foxy is coming up next having wonderful wonderful weekend. Tony, jordan. Thank you for your show, the final check the morning traffic.

Jill Rosebowl Fox Brian Welby Leyrer Tony
"welby" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Welby national organization investigates further John Jeffreys NBC News Radio. Researchers say they found a remarkable cache of fossils in China, possibly the most significant fossil find in a century. The discovery was made along a river Bank and China's who bay province the fossils are around five hundred eighteen million years old and more than half of them are previously unknown species. What makes the fine especially remarkable is that most of the creatures were soft bodied like jellyfish and worms organisms that typically never become fossilized. New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft has apologized after he was charged with soliciting prostitutes last month de mutual has more craft issued a statement yesterday. The said he knows he is heard in disappointed, his family, close, friends coworkers and fans who rightfully hold him to a higher standard. It was the first public comment on the case since the seventy seven year old was charged last month. He said he has great respect for women and thanked the love of his life. He hopes to use his platform to help others make a difference. He said he wants to be judged. Not by his words, but by his actions graph closed by saying he wants to regain confidence and respect the mutual. NBC News Radio a new Guinness world record has been set by two men who set out to ride all of Boston's commuter trains in less than seven and a half hours. Alex, Cox Dominic delusional. We're notified by the organization that they did set the new record after writing every Massachusetts bay transportation authority train in seven hours twenty nine minutes. Forty six seconds. Phil Hulett NBC News Radio. What.

Robert Kraft NBC China John Jeffreys Phil Hulett England Patriots Massachusetts Boston Cox Dominic Alex five hundred eighteen million twenty nine minutes seventy seven year Forty six seconds seven hours
"welby" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"For the investigation Welby to recover the black boxes that will be a very high priority for us. We understand that the aircraft was in water that is not not very deep. So hopefully that will be in our favor Hollywood is preparing to reward its own fans are picking their favorites. CBS's Steve Futterman in Hollywood. Who is going to win tonight. The fans here outside the Dobie theater have their favorites. Now, obviously Roma is considered the favourite to win best picture, but other fans have different choices. I'm rooting for stars born and the big star from a star is born is also receiving lots of support. It's just amazing. And then there is last year's box office champion, they don't at all. We will find out the winners tonight. When the envelopes are opened Steve Futterman CBS news outside the Dolby theater. In Hollywood singer R. Kelly spent a second night in jail in Chicago WBZ TV reporter, Chelsea Irving Kelly has been moved to a private self. His attorney says he doesn't have be one hundred thousand dollars bail. He needs to get out. Kelly has maintained his innocence. And his attorney says that any sexual encounters are Kelly has ever had have all been consensual. This is CBS news, zoom video conferencing, featuring video and audio clarity with screen sharing. Free. Accounts are available at zoom dot US that zoom dot US zoom video conferencing. Ever wonder why European seemed to speak so many languages maybe it's because they.

Chelsea Irving Kelly Steve Futterman Hollywood CBS Dobie theater Dolby theater attorney Welby Roma Chicago reporter one hundred thousand dollars
Venezuelans flee to Colombia amid region's worst humanitarian crisis

BBC Newshour

04:56 min | 3 years ago

Venezuelans flee to Colombia amid region's worst humanitarian crisis

"But I main story today is the political and economic crisis in Venezuela and oil rich country that's been brought to its knees leaving many people destitute while nearly three million have fled abroad is against this backdrop to the opposition leader Guido has declared himself interim president and call for President Nicolas Madura to step aside. But step aside, he hasn't despite huge diplomatic pressure for much of the western hemisphere. Many European countries today European and Latin American leaders are meeting in Uruguay to discuss ways out of the current standoff, but stopping short it seems of direct intervention the United States. Meanwhile is offering a direct humanitarian intervention in the form of an aid convoy on its way to the Venezuelan border with Columbia. But it's unlikely to get through I've been speaking to freelance journalist Dylan Purdue who's on the Colombian side of that border. When is it likely to arrive? The aid is expected to arrive at the border today. But that doesn't mean they're going to try and move it into Venezuela today, it's likely going to be parked in the Colombian city of Cucuta for a few days while they come for the plan here and how much aid is there. And what is it? Exactly. I understand it's mostly food perhaps these nutritionally enhanced biscuits made specifically for undernourished children. We don't know exactly how much it is aside from photographs that have been posted by the US ambassador here, which shows several large pallets. That's the only information we have. So what's the situation then at the border is is that being blocked at the moment to prevent that. Aids. Coming across when it does arrive, we won't get yesterday morning to find the bridge where they're staging ground for this operation is being set up blocked by one tanker, truck and two shipping containers that were placed by the Venezuelan authority perpendicularly across the bridge to block it, and that raises a lot of concerns in this operation for how the aid will be received. When it is. Taken across other border points. This message comes pretty clearly from the Venezuelan government that they do not accept this offering and the Venezuelan President Nicolas. My auto also has been posting for example, on Twitter that they will not accept this aid that this is an attempt to humiliate people. So we do not know how this is going to unfold in the coming days what about movement in the other direction in recent days and weeks have have people being still coming across from Venezuela into Columbia to escape. Absolutely, many many people have been coming across aid groups in this area. Logged a pretty drastic increase in the month of January, which according to my reporting does not have much to do with local situation. In fact, most has wetlands are quite uninformed on the political situation as they rely mostly on state, TV broadcasters. It has I think a lot more to do with the new year and the Christmas holiday. And the fact that everyone spent good time with their families and January upon them. Many people figured it was time to finally leave many shelters across this area up to a thousand people per day crossing through walking on their ways across Columbia, and there's no sign that this trend is slow down here. And is it fair to say that that that border where you are between Colombia and Venezuela. I mean, it's pretty poor, isn't it? I mean, there's lots of I mean, despite this sort of attempt to block the age shipment, which I guess has to go through official channels. I mean, there's lots of movement of goods on both sides, isn't that absolutely tremendous the border is entirely Horace, not only is it poorest. But so much of the territory here is traditionally controlled by armed drug trafficking groups who operate on both sides of this border freely. That was journalists Dylan does speak to be from the Colombia Venezuela border. Welby blockade a strong condemnation from the opposition leader and self-declared. Interim president Quang though. Yes, I am contain is a crossing the bridge. We know the tanks are there. It's an absurd reaction by a regime, which is not interested in its citizens. We're going to do everything we can to get some of this aid in. So why is outside help needed a question for the BBC's James Reynolds, who's in the capital Caracas because simply a lot of people here in Caracas can't get by any longer and the situation outside the capitol is just as bad for for many, many people they struggled to get food. They strove to get medicine. I went to the outskirts of Caracas to speak to one family who is struggling to get enough medicine for a twelve year old daughter who has diabetes, and then you can find stories really wherever you go. I decided to to hop on a normal Boston. We totaled around the city for about half. For an hour. And I spoke to people in Austin about their daily lives. I'm face. I love my

Venezuela Columbia President Nicolas Madura Interim President Caracas Dylan Purdue United States Venezuelan Government Colombia Venezuela Guido Twitter Uruguay Cucuta President Trump Boston Horace
"welby" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

Mile Hi Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

"For warm blue. What is your earliest childhood memory? My parents fighting and not noticing that. I was noticing. Do you think you were? I was about two and a half. What do you think this memories? So clear. Because it was so it was so emotional. That memory connecting. You are. Oh, there's a lot about it. Crisis management risk mitigation following happiness. There's a whole lot around that. That's amazing. Isn't it? How it connects? Yes. It is for a slight interpretations rethought created in my mind. Absolutely. Love the concept of sometimes we into field as something that in the kids stopping, but I love your image has shown the value feeling or even the value more accurately in being hoot, seeing what paean can be and to see that you've transformed that where you've decided that you're going to help others understand and also prevent something like crisis happening. It's really. Beautiful for me or that gimmicks. Thank you. That was beautifully said. And I appreciate that move from your workum if we wanted to win you would Welby as what was your favorite song? I don't know that it was probably think I was thirteen. But it's the only one that I can remember, and it was the boy is mine by.

Welby
"welby" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"welby" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"For Panthers hockey Florida Panthers. Brought to you by four go further that his health go where the pros go and BBN T strongest thanks is just around the corner member FDIC. Now, the leader for all the action. Fly. Was. Say. Staying. The. Thank you Martin Welby inside the center, it's.

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