17 Burst results for "Weissler"

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

03:58 min | Last week

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"As I was thinking about this. It's like, what would spit nickels, a slot machine, but that doesn't seem like you'd be mad. No, it's just one of a variety of these things that you spit. You're so angry that, well, there's just the expression I'm so angry I could spit or I could spit. Yeah, people who would say I could spit just meaning they're angry or I could spit tax, I could spit nails, I could spit rust, I could chew nails. I could spit rivets. I could spit blood. Or I could really ten feet. A lot of these. Who spits when they're angry? Well, camels may be camels. Yeah. Well, I don't know if they're angry, but they definitely spit. And then I'm going to Australia if they spit chips. If they're thirsty. Chips if they're Thursday. I'm so thirsty, I can spit chips. Some people thirsty. They spit cotton. But anyway, the origin of this is murky, but it's really just about you being so angry that you do something extraordinary that you're out of your head. You're behaving unusually. When we are angry, we don't act ourselves. That is true. That's true. My mom chose to spit Nichols. And the other one she used to say if we were in the car on a motorcycle with speed past this, she'd say, he's going to go head over ten cups. So I have no idea why he would go head over tin cups. Martha, that's one of a set, isn't it? Head over heels, of course. But to rump over tea kettle or head over tea cups and ass over elbow or head over appetites or head over apple cart. All different variety of things. And these go back well into the 1800s. And they're all polite ways of saying that you have fell down and you're discombobulated and probably you felt so so far that your rear end went over your front end. Oh, okay. Kind of cartoon style. It's cartoon style. Maybe even a little bit like what they're today on the Internet they call this the full scorpion. The full scorpion is where you fall down face first and your back legs go up over your head, kind of like a scorpion's tail, reaching for a sting. Landing. Wow. Yeah. So they're both pretty straightforward. They are. And yeah, now that you're saying them, it's like, oh, wait. Yeah, it sounds like your mom had a lot of expressions, juice. She did. And her name was Mary Martha. So I always remember taken by that name. So, yeah. I'll say it again. You can't have too many Martha's. Thanks for calling. I really appreciate it. Well, I really love you too. Thank you again for taking my call. All right. Bye bye. Bye bye. Bye bye. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor Tim Felton, and production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673, or email us, words at wayward radio dot ORG. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. Until next time, goodbye. Bye bye.

Martha Nichols Mary Martha Australia Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler apple wayward Inc Bruce rogo Canada U.S. grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

06:40 min | Last month

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"We got an intriguing voicemail from will hasseltine, who was telling us about the first pep rally he ever attended. It was when he was in kindergarten, and he remembers his teacher getting the kids ready by saying, we're going to a pepper alley, or at least that's what he told his mom later that day that we all went to a pepper alley, and his mom, of course, thought that was really, really funny, that little misunderstanding. But he swears that that's what his teacher said, we're going to a pepper alley, and we'll want to know, is there such a thing? And of course, that's what I thought was an adorable childhood misunderstanding, but the truth is there is such a thing as pepper alley. But it's not the same thing as a pep rally, which you would do at school where everyone gathers to cheer on the team that's going to fight in the big game against their dreaded opponents. That's right. But if you look in slang dictionaries, you'll see that pepper alley is actually a state of being beaten up. It comes from boxing slang, where the verb to pepper, of course, means to hit somebody repeatedly. You pepper them with punches, but it's also a pun on a place in South London called pepper alley, where apparently a lot of this went on. So will is still convinced all these years that he heard correctly as a kindergartner. I mean, maybe his teacher was from Britain or something. But I suspect it's just a mishearing, but it's kind of adorable that he's still hanging on to the belief that he heard correctly. Absolutely. Will there's probably a really good chance that you misheard. But, you know, keep believing brother. Grant and I love to hear about those childhood misunderstandings, and you can share yours by calling us 877-929-9673. Hello, you have a way with words. Hi, my name is Amelia. And I'm calling from Arlington, Virginia. Welcome to the show. Hey, Amelia. Thank you. I have something that my wife said recently that I was wondering if you could help me out with. Well, yes, please. She and I have been married for a number of years now are both in our mid 30s and we're both from the Midwest. She's from Iowa and I'm from Ohio. Everyone she'll say something that I've never heard before never heard anyone else say before. So I get to figure out is it an Ohio thing or just something her family says or something she's made up herself. Most recently, she said she was talking about our neighbor who was wearing these sweatpants that had holes all the way through them and she said, oh wow, he's really getting the goodie out of that pair of pants. And I realized, yeah. See, I could tell that you met, she's getting the most out of them. She's like, get the goodie out of it. And I thought, you know, it kind of sounds like a phrase that people say, but then I realized I thought more about it. I don't know anyone else who says that. And her mom was in town recently, and she said it, and I asked her about it, she didn't know where it came from. And her sister also says it. So it's definitely in their family, but nobody knows where it came from and I tried looking it up online and there really isn't much out there about this phrase. So I was curious if you guys had any insight onto it. Well, I think that that's probably pretty straightforward is probably related to the idea of a goodie being the edible kernel of a nut, particularly Hickory nuts and walnuts. Since the late 18th century or so, the term goody has been used to mean something tasty or desirable, you know, like candy or even hard to get at crab meat, you know, get the goody out of a crab shell. Let's see. It's also been used for the yolk of an egg, so the good part, I guess, of an egg. And the flesh of an orange sometimes. Oh wow. Yeah. So all those words are kind of the same. They come from the same place, like the middle of something. Kind of. Yeah. Yeah, the middle, and also just the good part. You know, like a goody bag has goodies in it, or a goody picker. I love that term, goody picker. It's a pointed instrument for digging the meat out of a nut. Is it regional at all? All over. Goody is kind of scattered throughout much of the United States. The south and a little bit in the Midwest. So I'm not surprised that your wife picked that up there. That's interesting about the nut because her mother, my mother in law, grew up on a farm and her dad had a bunch of black walnut trees and would like harvest them and their stories about her the basement being full of walnuts. So I wonder if they know that we had a walnut tree, whatever house is, I know that feeling. Yeah. They are all about scarred about it. I think this is how much it's stained on. Oh, that's really interesting. Well, I'll pass it along to them. I think they'll be interested to hear. All right. Amelia, thank you for helping us get the goodie out of this question. Yeah, absolutely. Thanks so much. Thanks a lot. Best of your wife. Thanks. Bye. Bye bye. When you marry into a family, you don't just marry your spouse. You marry their language. And there's a lot that you might not understand. Martha and I can help you sort that out. 877-929-9673, or talk to us on Twitter at W ay WO RD. Our team includes senior producer Stephanie Levine, engineer and editor Tim Felton, production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler, and quiz guy John Chanel. We'd love to hear from you, no matter where you are in the world, go to wayward radio dot org slash contact. Subscribe to the podcast here hundreds of past episodes and get the newsletter at wayward radio dot ORG. Whenever you have a language story or question, our toll free line is open in the U.S. and Canada. One 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three, or send your thoughts to words at wayward radio dot org. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Special thanks to Michael Brest Lauer, Josh eccles, Claire rotting Bruce rogo, Rick sidon worm and Betty Willis. Thanks for listening. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett until next time, goodbye. Bye.

Amelia Ohio South London Midwest goody picker boxing Arlington Britain Grant Iowa Virginia Goody Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler John Chanel U.S. Martha wayward Inc Twitter
"weissler" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

07:26 min | 2 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on WCPT 820

"I don't think the big guy can let you go. Okay, just because it was hard to hear. Gates said the boss. Yeah. Has still has a very favorable view of you. I don't think the big guy can let you go down for this. Gates at one point told Trump he was working on getting him a pardon, but was hesitant to say more backstage as the event. He said, since there are many, many recording devices around right now. He set into a recording device. Right. So, once again. Dumb, really dumb cross. Dumb water game. I do not feel in a position to speak freely about the work I've already done on that subject. He said into a recording device. The lawmaker also told stone during their conversation that stone was mentioned a lot in a redacted portions of the Mueller report. He said they're going to do you because you're not going to have a defense. Oh, I see. That's him knowing that he's a complete traitorous crook. Yeah. But okay, Mueller's report just a review said that it was possible that Trump had both lied to investigators and about his contacts with stone and was aware that stone might provide damaging testimony against him if he chose to cooperate, which is why he got the pardon. See, because he was stone would have been the one that would have connected him to WikiLeaks into the whole Travis over here pay attention to me. He would have never because he would have gone down for the original treason and not gotten to this reason. Hattie. Okay, so much season. Yeah. That part to be there for Trump. Yeah. It's just my memory. The big guy. The big guy. I'm sorry, the big guy, the big guy. Andrew weissler weisman speaking of which Mueller prosecutor tweeted I on the clock. Oh, I hear the big 60 minutes clock in my head all the time. If Trump is indicted, it will take at least a year or more for a trial to start. And then appeal of any conviction. That is all okay if a Democrat wins in 2024 or the rare Republican who would not pardon Donald Trump. Otherwise, a new Republican potus can end the case. If you need any other reason to get out in 2022 and 24, that would be. Yeah. Yes. Rob Reiner says group politics group hole numbers Joe Biden has a record of accomplishment in the first two years of his presidency that has gone gone unmatched for almost 60 years. Thank you uncle rob. Thank you. I wonder if anybody else is paying attention. That's shop records in 50 years. That's not important, you know. Marianne Chicago. Hi, Mary. I go ahead and take off a secret phone call. Okay. I would love to get your help with something that just sticks in my craw and you've got such a big microphone and audience that I think you could help. With the messaging, I think the single most important thing we could do to get people out to the polls this year is to stop referring to them as midterm elections and start calling them what they are. Congressional elections. Every two years the entire house is flipped, has that potential right? These are all up for grabs and a third of the Senate. So if we start kind of conveying the importance of these elections really can't we can really get people out to the polls, but when we call them midterms, they sound optional. We really need to give them the importance they deserve. Congratulations. If you think democracy is optional, right? You are correct. Yeah. Democracy. Not optional. There's our other tag. Thank you. Also, look at this. I just got one of my sexy liberal state democracy tour t-shirts. Look at it. We have three fantastic designs. It's beautiful. I'm very patriotic. Okay. I'm just saying. We have also in honor of Jared Kushner and Peter Navarro. I would pick up, I'm not going to buy your stupid book T-shirt. Yes. Also, any one of the three alpha liberal shirts. Those are fantastic. Yes. And they're not just on the way. They're not just shirts, you can get them on mugs on clocks on Meg, you know, unmanaged on stickers if you don't want to spend a whole lot of money. I was confused the first time on the website. It comes up on some object and you might think I don't want that thing, but if you click on it, you can see it on the design on everything. Or duffel bag, or backpack. No. All right. Michael and Oakland. But coffee mugs are great. Yes. Hi, Mike. Welcome. All right. I just wanted to comment on this advice of counsel defense that Trump seems to be trying to put together. Right, that he hired crazy lawyers and then took the crazy lawyers advice. Well, yeah, his lawyers have leaked the thing that said that he's got a defense if he quotes subjectively believe that he won the election. Subjectively believe. Right. And then as if to say, well, if I just believe that my neighbor's car is mine Swine back then. Would that have been a defense? Well, in a guy that spent his entire life in New York City doesn't know where the four seasons is instead he picked like a landscaping office to pitch this nonsense at the foresee about the four seasons and the fake collectors. Thank you, Mike. I appreciate it. I don't know who's that would have been a weaker defense. I would have said I was drunk. I can't believe you did that. Okay. I'm just not certain whether it's something you can use at all. Well, it's a chuck Tom. You give us an you give us money to hang out with you. So we have to do what you say. You're paid Friends. Yes. This is more of that than the. Okay. All right. Brian Tyler Cohen tweets the same Republicans who falsely are falsely claiming the veterans healthcare bill has a $400 billion slush fund voted for the same bill in June. They are trying to distract from the fact they blocked it because they are mad about the inflation reduction act. It is a game to them. Why just, again, mainstream media not call bold on any of these Republicans saying that. This is the exact same bill they voted for. Okay. And doctor Jack Brown quickly

Trump Mueller Gates Andrew weissler Marianne Chicago Hattie Rob Reiner WikiLeaks Jared Kushner Peter Navarro Donald Trump Travis Joe Biden stone rob Mary Senate Meg Mike
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:45 min | 3 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Everything in there that's conceivable, you know? Right, okay, because I've only ever heard that and then once I was watching, you know, English show, a British TV show recently. And they said that so and so thought he was all that and the plate of witch crackers. Yeah. Yeah, there are other people have played around with it, a plate of fries, a plate of chips, a plate of green beans, a plate of biscuits and gravy. They've done a variety of different things, but usually all that in a bag of chips is the more common. But yeah, it comes from black American English and like a lot of terms left the speech of black Americans and entered the mainstream to the usual channels of popular culture and it's a little dated now just so you know. And that used by the time. Of coming back around to some who knows. Maybe much younger people start saying it. Thanks to you. Maybe we're transcending right now. As we speak. Maybe. Maybe not. We are all that in a jumbo bag of chips. Thank you so much. I was very hopeful. All right, take care. All right, bye bye. Thanks for calling. Bye bye. Well, if you're slang is new, or you're slaying his old, we'd love to talk about it 877-929-9673. Our team includes senior producer Stephanie Levine, engineer and editor Tim Felton, production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler, and quiz guy John Chanel. We'd love to hear from you, no matter where you are in the world, go to wayward radio dot org slash contact. Subscribe to the podcast here hundreds of past episodes and get the newsletter at wayward radio dot ORG. Whenever you have a language story or question, our toll free line is open in the U.S. and Canada, one 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three, or send your thoughts to words at wayward radio dot org. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Special thanks to Michael Brest Lauer, Josh eccles, Claire rotting Bruce rogo, Rick sidon worm and Betty Willis. Thanks for listening. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett until next time, goodbye. Bye..

Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler John Chanel wayward Inc Michael Brest Lauer Josh eccles Canada Bruce rogo U.S. Rick sidon worm Betty Willis Claire Martha Barnett Barrett
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

09:42 min | 3 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"What book is it? And he said, we'll make it a mystery like that chapter out of it. He was like, his name's Lyman, and we would always refer to him as Lima ism, because he's full of catchy little phrases and such. That's marvelous. I love it. Making a Whipple for reduces poke or a hoot nanny for a sky wampus or a Tim paddle to tie up the moon. I mean, there's so many of these. And I hope we've helped get to the bottom of this mystery for you. You have. Thank you. I can't wait to share it with my dad. Take care now. Hi to Lyman. Thank you. Bye bye. Thank you. Bye. Bye bye. We'll share your family's phrases with us, 877-929-9673 are send them to us in email. That address is words at wayward radio dot ORG. Hello, you have a way with words. Yeah, hello. My name is Gerald. I am in gasby point Rhode Island. Welcome to the show. What's up? I have a question about the word dashboard. I think I can parse out where the board part comes from, but the dash part. I'm baffled by. So you're thinking about the dashboard on a car or a vehicle? Yeah. Yeah, and you're exactly right that dash is the key part of that word. In the 1300s, dash meant to strike suddenly and violently, but over time it also came to have the meaning of to sprinkle or to splatter. So if, say, you ran through a driving rain to get to my house, Gerald, and you showed up at my door, I might say, you know, come on in, your clothes are dashed with mud. And that's the kind of dash that we're talking about here because back in the days of horse drawn carriages, the term dashboard was applied to this panel of wood or leather that went in front of the driver. It was set on the carriage in front of the driver and passengers to keep them from being dashed by water or mud or snow. The term applied to that panel was then applied later to the panel that protected the occupants of horseless carriages from the heat of the oil and the engine. And then over time we kept adding things to it, dials and other options. So it's really this vestige of the old days when you had to protect yourself against mud and water and snow. Nice. Well, that's a great explanation. I kind of expected something like that. But oh, did you? Didn't know. What brought it to mind? Why were you thinking about dashboards? Well, it wasn't, it wasn't actually in reference to a vehicle at the time. I was using a dashboard to manage something on the social media account. Yeah. That's where I wanted to go with this, exactly. It is very interesting that it's now made this third jump into the computing world where it's a screen or interface that shows us statistics or charts or analyses of our underlying data in a human readable format, right? Yes. And who knows? Maybe there'll be a fourth act who can say when we get these neural implants. We'll have middays, maybe. Well, Gerald, thanks for the call, really appreciate it, take care now. Yeah, thank you. Thank you. Bye bye. Is there a word or phrase that's puzzled you? Call us about it 877-929-9673 or send it to us in email that address is words at wayward radio dot org. And if you just can't wait, hit us up on Twitter. We're at wayward. Hi there, you have a way with words. Hi. This is Laura, calling from Dallas. Hey, Laura, welcome to the show. What can we do for you? Well, thank you so much. I'm really excited. I have a question about a phrase that I've been hearing a lot. My parents say it and my mom said, my grandma said it as well. And it is another country heard from. And what context would you hear this in? Well, I have a ten month old daughter. And so she'll be kind of playing quietly and all of a sudden she'll start babbling or talking and my mom will say, oh, another country heard from. Where my same with my little baby cousin, he'll be fast asleep and all of a sudden he's awake and talking and this, okay, another country has from. So it's when somebody just kind of somebody blurts something out. They were unexpectedly speaking and you hadn't expected them to put in any input at all. Exactly, yes. It almost is like their way of acknowledging the baby. It's usually towards the babies, but like that they have joined the conversation and it's kind of like a, it seems like a welcome. Yeah, okay. Have you ever heard them say it in a dismissing way to an adult? Like somebody gives an unwanted opinion or gives an opinion where they weren't asked for an opinion? Not really dismissing, but more of my younger sister if we're all here together and maybe she sleeps later than everyone else. And then she will slowly come down the stairs after everyone is already, you know, talking and having breakfast, then she might get, oh, another country heard from. You finally decided to join us. Yeah, maybe that is a good use. I like that one. She's all where's the coffee? You'll sometimes also hear it if somebody breaks wind or burps. Sometimes you'll hear somebody say that in response to that. But you'll also hear another county heard from without the. And that actually was the original form going back to 1868. And so it's got a long history. Now, I'm going to throw a bunch of stuff here at you. So bear with me, okay? Okay. The expression had a burst of popularity in the 1876 presidential election. Now this was when Samuel J tilden was against Rutherford B Hayes and they had this campaign and even the election tally after all the votes were cast was so close that the ballot recount when it was reordered was like a county by county thing. And some of the far flung counties were very slow to report. So when the newspapers reported on the ballot slowly coming in, they would headline these little blurbs, another county heard from with the results from that county. So we're going to keep up. This was in the newspapers at the time. However, even though a lot of books will tell you that this expression comes from that election, it does not come from that election, although the election may have firmly permanently put it into the lexicon because that expression existed before that election. It appeared before that election in ads and editorials, letters, headlines, and so forth. And it always is like you've used it. It's always like, okay, here's an opinion. Here's somebody spoke up that we weren't expecting to hear from, or sometimes it's kind of dismissively used. That's why I asked about that. Here's something we don't care about with a thing that they insisted on saying. In newspapers, it's like letters to the editors. Here's somebody with an off the wall opinion that we decided to print just so we can make fun of them. That sort of thing. And they'll title it another country heard from. Sorry, another county heard from. But somewhere around 1900 or so, it starts to switch to another country heard from. I don't know why, but my theory is and Martha, I don't know what you think about this, but my theory is, this is when the United States start to be a little more worldly. And we started to get more international news in our newspapers. And another county heard from started to disappear from popular speech and you just don't find it that much anymore. And you also will see variants like another city heard from or another ward heard from. Award is a voting district in the city. Anyway, that's what we know. So 1868. Every time this comes up, Martha and I both furiously look at all the old databases to see if there's anything new and we can create it. We can never find it earlier than 1868. I look desperately, but I can never find any earlier than that. Interesting. Thank you so much. That's great. Yeah. We were happy to hear from your country. So thank you for calling. Oh, thank you so much. Thank you. Take care now. Bye bye. Thank you. Bye bye. And we would be happy to hear from your county or country to 877-929-9673. That number is toll free in the U.S. and Canada. And if you're anywhere else in the world, you can email us words that wayward radio dot org. We will try to get people on from anywhere in the world, believe it or not. And you can talk to us on Twitter at ORD. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor Tim Felton, and production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673, or email us, words and wayward radio dot ORG. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. Until next time, goodbye. Bye bye..

Gerald Lyman Lima ism gasby point Rhode Island Laura Samuel J tilden Rutherford B Hayes Dallas Twitter Martha U.S. Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler Canada wayward Inc Bruce rogo grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

01:59 min | 5 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Yeah, and she made a shirt for it too. Yeah. Yeah, you have to spell cuppers, see you PPA, but had a tonic cup of cappuccino, ta-da. And there's a wonderful segment where she and one of her music students play pilot, music passages from Bach, which require that you play a passage forward and backward at the same time in order for it to be what the composer intended. And it's quite lovely. Both of them have these burping bed posts as they're called. And it's really quite brilliant. They also have a great shot of her playing the oboe at the spiral J in the great Salt Lake, which is just outstanding. Just wonderful stuff. 877-929-9673. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor Tim Felton, and production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673, or email us, words at wayward radio dot ORG. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. Until next time, goodbye. Bye bye..

Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler great Salt Lake wayward Inc Bruce rogo Canada U.S. grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Don't want to be licking your computer screen though. No. I'm going to lick your Windows 10 installation. And then there's an expression that Martha brought up on the show once, which on one meaning it's Mexican Spanish slang. And one meaning it means to kind of scope out good-looking people in its itar un taco de ojo to throw a taco of the eye, but in another meaning it can mean to look but not by. Of course, window shopping itself in English can also mean to kind of cast admiring glance at all. The good-looking people around you without any intention of really going after them are asking them for dates or anything. But Martha, we have to mention the Canadian one. That's maybe maybe we can just borrow that one. What do you think? Oh, that's a fun one, yeah, I like that one. Twain? Tracking. That's Newfoundland, right? Yeah, yeah, you hear it mostly in Newfoundland. Let's go Twain. It's a window shopping dates back about a hundred years, probably from British dialect term, which really meant to be indecisive or something along those lines. But for some reason, just kind of landed a Newfoundland and stayed there. So why don't we sandy? Why don't we just coin a word right now and we're going to borrow that Newfoundland term and say that if your window shopping on the Internet, you are tracking? Okay, that sounds great. It works. No? Yeah, instead of computer hacks, you have computer tweaks. I like it. Okay, sounds great. Do you have a better idea? Yeah. She sounds suspicious. Yeah, it's just sounds like she's ready to put us on a home, Martha. Well, you know, I will definitely tell her about family. What do you say though, sandy, if you're shopping and you're like, you want to tell something in your family that you were looking for baby clothes and you mean online? How would you just casually throw this sentence out there? I'd probably use browse to be drowsy online. I think I might just say shop. I don't know. I like wacky. I like twerking. I do too. Oh, sandy, thank you for the call. I know we'll get a lot of response. We'll ask everyone to send their suggestions for a new word for shopping on the Internet, all right? Okay, I appreciate you. Thank you so much. You guys have a great day. Bye bye. Thanks, sandy. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor Tim Felton, and production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673, or email us, words at wayward radios dot ORG. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. Until next time, goodbye. Bye bye..

Newfoundland Martha Twain un sandy Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler wayward Inc Bruce rogo Canada U.S. grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

03:49 min | 8 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Welcome. What can we do for you? I'm curious to know about a word that my father always used and then my sister reminded me also my mother used and that's what you call the end piece of the loaf of bread. We always refer to it as the couple. I never really thought much about it. It wasn't until I was older and married and somehow that came up and said, oh, well, you don't need the Cabo and he's like, what? Are you talking about? And he's like, oh, you mean the heel of the bread? I never heard that word, so. Wow, couple. I have to confess, I've never heard that used for the end of a loaf of bread. There are lots and lots and lots of terms. Have you heard that one grant? No, so that's Sue that's cuby LE. I have so that's the way it is. It's nothing that I had spelled. We didn't have that as a spelling word in class or anything. No, that's a new one on me, but lots of people have family words for that. Absolutely. For the end of the loaf, the last piece. The heel is the usual word. Correct. A lot of them have to do with parts of the body, like grant mentioned the heel. Some people call it the bread, but the nose. Oh. Right. Elbow. Yeah, in Spanish, the word is co though, which means elbow. There are a lot of family words as grant mentioned like bunts and tampi and then there was that come from people's different heritages like skulk, which comes from Norwegian for the end of the loaf of bread. So you have terms like buns and skirt and crunch and trona and tummy and canoes. One of my favorites is from Scotland. In Scotland, some people call it the outsider or the outsiders. Oh, well, maybe it's like, you know, everybody has their own name for when they were a kid, what their bottle was or their blankie, you know? None of you. Yeah. Yeah, that may have been what happened in your family. I guess so. Yeah. Yeah, we're just not we're just not coming up with anything that sounds like couple. But you can have it and you can be yours and you can love it. Thank you. And I deleted. Thank you for calling. You welcome, thank you. All right. Bye bye. Bye. Bye. What do you call the end of a loaf of bread? That one piece is it the butt, the heels, something else. Let us know. 877-929-9673 or words at wayward radio dot org. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor, Tim Felton, and production assistant, Rachel Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673 or email us, words at wayward radio dot org. A way with words is an independent production of wayward ink a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett, until next time, goodbye. Bye.

Scotland Stephanie Levine Tim Felton grant Rachel Elizabeth weissler Bruce rogo Canada U.S. grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"877-929-9673 <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> email <Speech_Male> words <Speech_Male> at wayward radio <Speech_Male> dot org <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> go to Twitter at W <Speech_Male> ay wrd. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> We've <Speech_Female> adopted into English <Speech_Female> the word siesta, <Speech_Female> which means a <Speech_Female> little nap, but <Speech_Female> if you go to Mexico, <Speech_Female> sometimes you'll <Speech_Female> hear people <Speech_Female> talking about taking <Speech_Female> a coyote <Speech_Female> in coyotito <Speech_Female> means <Speech_Female> a little coyote <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> they're referring to the <Speech_Female> fact that coyotes <Speech_Female> are nocturnal <Speech_Female> animals. And <Speech_Female> so you might <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> take a little <Speech_Male> coyote <Speech_Male> nap. <Speech_Male> That's very <SpeakerChange> sweet, <Speech_Female> actually. Yeah, I <Speech_Female> like it. Just curl <Speech_Female> up and you <Speech_Female> know, I guess if you're <Speech_Female> taking a coyote <Speech_Female> in the office, you're gonna <Speech_Female> do that out of sight <Speech_Female> of your <Speech_Male> boss, <SpeakerChange> you know? Like <Speech_Male> a coyote <Speech_Male> would. 877-929-9673. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thanks to senior producer <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Stephanie Levine, <Speech_Female> editor, Tim <Speech_Female> Felton, and production <Speech_Male> assistant, <SpeakerChange> Rachel <Speech_Male> Elizabeth weissler. <Speech_Male> You can send us <Speech_Music_Male> messages, subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> to the podcast <Speech_Music_Male> and newsletter and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> catch up on hundreds <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of past episodes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at <SpeakerChange> wayward <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> radio dot org. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Our toll <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> free line is always <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> open in the U.S. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and Canada, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> 877-929-9673 <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or <Speech_Female> email us, words <Speech_Female> at <SpeakerChange> wayward <Speech_Music_Male> radio dot <Speech_Music_Male> ORG. <Speech_Male> A way with words is <Speech_Male> an independent production of <Speech_Music_Male> wayward ink, a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nonprofit supported <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by listeners and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> organizations who are <Speech_Music_Male> changing the <SpeakerChange> way the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> world talks about language. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Many thanks to wayward <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> board member and our <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> friend Bruce rogo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for his help and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> expertise. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for <SpeakerChange> listening. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm grant Barrett. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And I'm Martha <Speech_Female> Barnett. <SpeakerChange> Until <Speech_Music_Male> next time, goodbye. <Speech_Music_Male> Bye bye.

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

10:00 min | 9 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Would use it is to compare to things, so for example, if you asked me to cook a Thanksgiving dinner and I'm a terrible cook, then I would say, oh, I can't even cook for myself. Let alone cook Thanksgiving for ten people. So I would compare what you're asking with something that's even less than that. And say, I can't even do this. So forget about this other thing. And I would put the more extreme thing at the end. So that's how I always heard it used. And that's what makes sense to me. But I feel like lately in the last probably two or three years, I've been hearing a lot of people using it the other way around. Where they'll put this thing in question at the beginning and then the lesser thing at the end. So they'll say, oh, I can't cook Thanksgiving let alone cook for myself. To me, this just sounds so wrong. This is like nails on a chalkboard for me. I could just feel totally backwards. I'm hoping that you can just settle this for me officially. Yes, we can provide you some relief. Doctor Martha, we can help her, right? Yeah, so we have some great magazines while you're waiting. Yeah, I think you're really nailed it exactly right, traditionally, the harder things should come last. In your version, you said that I can't do X, which is an easy thing. And let alone Y, which is a harder thing. And that's pretty much how it has been and ought to be. And you're right. People do often put the difficult thing first. They say I can't even Z let alone X but what they should be saying is not even X so kind of what they're mixing here is these little idiomatic expressions all which are used to provide this range of possibilities of what they are are not capable of doing. And let alone, let's admit it is kind of a weird expression, right? Alone is not. It's idiomatic. It's hard to break down. What is alone mean? It's not really a modern phrase at all, right? So it's kind of opaque when you hear it being used. It's pretty easy to misunderstand it. Yeah. Right. True. That's true. But they're different phrases like that. It's the same kind of construction to say nothing of never mind or much less. Yeah. Yeah. And all of these can be used in the same way or they can be misused in the same way. So it's kind of an understand when it was like particularly with let alone, especially with let alone. Because let alone is just this odd little bird. If you saw this and you had your camera, you would take a picture of it because it would be the strange all the little Brown birds and this brightly colored one, you know? Look at this little bit alone over here. Yeah, look at this little let alone and you'd be showing to all your bird or friends. So I think you really nailed it. And I think it's a forgivable mistake, but it is an error. You're not the only person who's noticed this. Linguists have been researching complementary alternation discourse constructions. That's what they're called. Yeah. And we'll link to some very highfalutin academic papers when we post this to the website. They're pretty heady stuff. Yeah. But when I said there were magazines in our waiting room, these are not those. No pictures. These are the things we give you when you haven't been following the diet. We give you. Taking the pills like we recommend. I would expect no less. But we'll link to anyway because you might find some benefit. So just to be clear, since we said so much, let's make sure we talk about this one last time. It should be, I can't even toast bread, let alone cook Thanksgiving for ten people. So it's the easy thing first and the hard thing second. Yeah. Right. Perfect. Well, Stacey, thank you so much for calling. I'm glad you feel better. Thank you. Thank you for the matter soon. Come and see us in 6 weeks. We'll take the cast off. Thank you. Happy holidays to you guys. Bye bye. Bye bye. Well, if there's a word a phrase you're wondering about, give us a call. 877-929-9673 or send it to us in email, the addresses words that wayward radio dot ORG. Hello, you have a way with words. Hi, grant Martha. This is Jonah calling from Baltimore, Maryland. Hi, Jonah. Hey, Jonah. I'm a private music teacher. And as one of my ten year olds was packing up after our lesson, we somehow got to chatting about states we visited. So I asked him if he knew his state capitals. And he's a really confident kid. So he emphatically said, of course I do. So I said, okay, so do you know that capital of Maryland? And without missing a beat, he shouted MD, which I lasted. I laughed at, I said, no, I mean, the capital city. And then he just looked at me confused and went, oh no, I don't know those. That's so cute. So he used the initials and capital letters. Yeah, he used the capital letters. And you know, I guess it's an honest mistake. And when it comes to different uses of the capital, the word capital ending AL, I guess he was justified in answering the question that way. He just chose a different sense of the homonym. But then I got to wondering about the two different spellings of capital ending AL and OL. Which there are obviously two related words, but with divergence spellings. And specifically, I was wondering if you could clarify how we ended up with those two words and why when we heard a capital city, it's not spelled with an O's, since that's where the capital building is situated. Right, exactly. Yeah, you've zeroed in on the big difference that confuses a lot of people because as you suggested you only use the O for the capitol building, whether it's the U.S. capitol building, where Congress meets in Washington or in your case, the state House in Annapolis. That's the capitol, where the legislators meet. But it's in the capital city AL. And a lot of people have trouble remembering which is which, but the trick I use is either to picture the round dome of the capitol, which sort of looks like an O, or you can think about the letter O standing for only one that one instance of when you use the OL in the case of the building and all the other uses of capital are AL. And you're right that there may be a connection between the two, the AL capital, which we use for a lot more ideas like the main thing or a capital letter, it goes back to the Latin kaput, which means pertaining to the head. And so you get all kinds of meanings coming out of that kind of capital, like great or capital in money, as a matter of fact, like venture capital. That's originally from Latin parr's capitalis, the first part of a loan that's not the interest. And then the meaning expanded. The OL version capital goes back to Ancient Rome, where the great temple of Jupiter, which was this magnificent temple in Rome was located on the capitoline hill and there's a story in antiquity that is probably apocryphal about them starting to dig the foundation for this temple and they found a head when they were digging, and it was belonging. To somebody named Talia's or something like that. But that's probably just an etymological myth. But basically, they go back to the capitoline hill, which was with an O and then caput meaning head for all those other terms. Okay. So Jonah, I'm going to repeat that story from your student. I think that's hilarious. That was a great one. Yeah. Thank you for the call. A good luck with the students. Yeah, thanks for taking my call. All right, take care. Thanks, Jonah. All right. Bye bye. 877-929-9673. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor, Tim Felton, and production assistant, Rachel Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673 or email us, words at wayward radio dot ORG. Away with words is an independent production of wayward ink, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. Until next time, goodbye. Bye bye..

Jonah grant Martha Martha Maryland Stacey Latin parr Baltimore Annapolis Rome capitoline hill Congress U.S. AL Washington Stephanie Levine Talia Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler House
"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:17 min | 9 months ago

"weissler" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Another hiking term I came across in the book journeys north by Barney scout man is hiker midnight, any guess what hiker midnight is? Hi care, midnight. Wow. I don't know. I'm kind of thinking about halfway between when you put up your tent and when you get up, which isn't necessarily the middle of the night since you often set up your tent well before dusk and you often get up well before dawn. Yeah, that's pretty much it. Barney says it's 9 p.m.. You've hiked 20 miles or 30 miles and midnight comes at 9 p.m.. You are just out. Oh yeah, none of this romantic sitting around the fire to the early hours because you're just finished. You're beat. Yeah, hiker midnight. 8 7 7 9 9 9 6 7 three. Thanks to senior producer Stephanie Levine, editor, Tim Felton, and production assistant, Rachel, Elizabeth weissler. You can send us messages, subscribe to the podcast and newsletter and catch up on hundreds of past episodes at wayward radio dot org. Our toll free line is always open in the U.S. and Canada, 877-929-9673 or email us, words at wayward radio dot org. A way with words is an independent production of wayward ink a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Many thanks to wayward board member and our friend Bruce rogo for his help and expertise. Thanks for listening. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. Until next time, goodbye. Bye.

Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Barney Elizabeth weissler Rachel Bruce rogo Canada U.S. grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"weissler" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"weissler" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And makeup and get ready for the shoot and That's you know, that's what we did. However, however, I've got this key to the city of New York and I will tell you there was a lot of celebrating that day, although I had to go back to work at the end of getting that key, But as I went around to different restaurants, Um uh, I took my crew to lunch at 21 to celebrate. They've been with me. You know, from from the beginning to and, uh You know the waiters. They were set. Well, the managements and over champagne. The waiters were singing. I went to serendipity with my daughter and all the waiters upstairs and down. We're around singing. Congratulations. I was In the car, finally going home in the back seat of my car, and we stopped at a traffic late on Madison Avenue and A big truck of New York City. Firemen pulled up next to me how they looked down and saw that I was in there, but this whole truck of New York City fireman lean down to me and gave me the biggest sums up and the victory and hey, so That was there was something you know, you know the story about Meryl Streep leaving her Oscar in the ladies' room. No Meryl Streep, who has won 7000 Oscars, probably more than any other human being alive. Once was given an Oscar and she went into the can, as everybody does, because, after a few champagnes worlds, you're going to go so she left her Oscar in the Can. She left it in the ladies' room and went home and they had to finally finally find her and give it to her. I'm sure you didn't leave yours in the camp. Did you can I did not sure Did you carry with you? Do they give it to you? In your in your hand. I never won an award Do do they give it to you in your hand? Gosh. Uh um, What they did eventually had to go back to them so that they could engrave it, But then they got it right back to me. But when I was asked to do a lot of interviews after that, everybody wanted me to bring my Emmy And so it did travel with me for a while, Uh, you know, and people wanted to hold it and they wanted to see what it looked like and What do you carry it in plastic? I had a canvas. You know, back then I would like a carry on. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. You have also done. Well, I am I not right. Did you not also do Broadway? Susan? I did. That was one of the wonderful things that happened soon after winning the army of so when the M E in May, and in January I made my Broadway debut in Annie, Get your gun. Uh, Bernadette Peters. Won the Tony and a Grammy for that as well. She should have. But I got to be the first one to go in after Bernadette Peters, and that was a thrill of a lifetime. A thrill of a lifetime. Way to go in. What do you What did you know about singing? Only that I like to sing. I had had no formal training at all. But I knew I could think I just didn't know if I was good enough. And so, um Had I had worked with Marvin Hamlisch. I had, uh, done some appearances with Marvin on stage and concert halls around the country, and, uh, he had said to me if I ever needed him that I should just call him. And when the Wastler's Barry at Fran Weissler, the producers of Annie, get your gun offered me this part. I Wanted to sing for them. I wanted them to know what they were getting into. And I wanted to know that I could do it. I had been a little girl in Broadway audiences and I knew there would be kids and I didn't want people to just watch need play Annie Oakley and think. Oh, yeah, This is a stunt casting. Yeah, this this is you know, girls would have their dreams. So, um, anyway, so Was to share to call Marvin My husband was not too shy. I went to Marvin's apartment one Sunday night and rang his bell. Scariest thing I had done and he was a dull he turned, you know, he was just a doll and he listen to me sing and he said, Oh, you could do this. You can do this. Okay? You know what I have to do? They are going to kill me and fire me if I don't stop And do and, uh what do I have to do now? I'm the station break commercial, right? So that takes care of your entire career. Susan. There we are. I love you. Help Call you later. Okay. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Have you started developing.

Marvin Hamlisch Meryl Streep New York Bernadette Peters Madison Avenue Marvin January New York City May Susan first one 21 Annie Tony Grammy Annie, Get your gun Oscar one Sunday night
"weissler" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"weissler" Discussed on AP News

"Someone's life. 147 people are missing, a source tells the AP. The Trump Organization and the company's long time finance chief are expected to be charged tomorrow with tax related crimes. May Donahue, the father of singer Britney Spears, once an investigation into the statement she made in court last week, claiming her conservatorship severely restricts her medical treatment and personal life. I'm Margie Szaroleta with the latest Although James Spears has been his daughter's conservator for most of the past 13 years, he says in court documents for the past two years, he's only overseeing her money, not her person. Jodi Montgomery was appointed by the court to oversee Britney Spears personal life. The singer told the judge she was forced to use birth control, take medicine against her will and forbidden to get married. James Spears says the courts must confirm whether his daughter's allegations are true in order to correct any problems. Montgomery could not be reached for comment. By Mike ROSSI. A reporting charges are expected Thursday against the Trump Organization and a top executive. Charges are expected to be filed Thursday against former President Donald Trump's company and his longtime finance chief. Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr has led a two year probe into the Trump Organization. The charges against the company and chief financial officer Alan Wisenberg appeared to involve non monetary benefits. The company gave two top executives, possibly including use of apartments, cars and school tuition wise Dulberg came under scrutiny in part because of questions about his son's use of a trump apartment at Little Or no cost. Barry Weissler Berg managed to Trump operated ice rink in Central Park. His ex wife, Gen. Y Silberg, has been cooperating with the investigation. I might grow CEO 80.

Jodi Montgomery Mike ROSSI Margie Szaroleta Britney Spears James Spears Alan Wisenberg 147 people Thursday Montgomery last week Barry Weissler Berg two year Trump AP Central Park tomorrow May Donahue Gen. Y Silberg Dulberg Cyrus Vance Jr
"weissler" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"weissler" Discussed on AP News

"I met Donna here. Bill Cosby is out of a Pennsylvania prison. He had served two years in a sex assault conviction. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out the conviction ruling. The prosecutor who brought the case was bound by his predecessors Agreement not to charge Cosby. Attorney and legal analyst Prius. So pre says District Attorney Kevin Steele decided to charge Cosby but Bruce Castro had made an agreement with Cosby. Bill Cosby was not going to be criminally prosecuted with respect to these charges that had been brought by this constant. The court called Bill Cosby, subsequent arrest an affront to fundamental fairness. Particularly when it results in a criminal prosecution. That was four gone for more than a decade. His family says former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has died. He was 88 charges are expected against the Trump Organization and an executive Here's the A. P S. My Gracia. Charges are expected to be filed Thursday against former President Donald Trump's company and his longtime finance chief. Manhattan District attorney Cyrus Vance Jr has led a two year probe into the Trump Organization. The charges against the company and chief financial officer Alan Wisenberg appeared to involve non monetary benefits. The company gave two top executives, possibly including use of apartments, cars and school tuition. Wise Dulberg came under scrutiny in part because of questions about his son's use of a trump apartment at little or no cost. Barry Weissler Berg managed to Trump operated ice rink in Central Park. His ex wife, Gen. Y Silberg, has been Cooperating with the investigation. I might grow CIA for more bodies have been found from the rubble of the collapsed condo building in South Florida. 16 people are dead. Miami Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava says they're actively determining how many people are missing. We need to verify every reports..

Alan Wisenberg Bruce Castro Donna Bill Cosby Barry Weissler Berg 16 people two years South Florida Thursday Trump Organization CIA 88 charges Wise Dulberg Cosby Pennsylvania Supreme Court Pennsylvania two year Trump Central Park District Attorney
"weissler" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"weissler" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"The guys who are tracking toward making up this this clubhouse this year. It's uh it could be a real interesting makeup. Well, what could that do for you guys? Yeah. I mean, it's fun is just I think it makes the camaraderie help out a little bit. When you got five guys with past experience of living together and playing together, and, uh, it makes makes attention a lot easier. And, uh, It's not a whole bunch of new personalities you're seeing, and then you start forming groups and everyone knows each other from various walks of life and all that. It makes the transition easier to get in the camaraderie going to go to the team chemistry going So what's the plan for balance your Seeger and Munsey this year? Yeah, Unfortunately, like my, uh I hate to say that I've like revealed the tricks out of my bag. But I come out to slide by Goo Goo dolls. A lot of fighters. Um, but, you know, maybe I'll throw more fastballs this year, but Now it's fun. I mean, I really enjoy facing those guys. And that's what gets my blood pumping the most is we you go face the Dodgers and that I think we all honestly play them so well because We? We want to beat those guys and it's just it's we always perform well against them. It's just it's fun going into Dodger Stadium, and I think we play him a little bit harder than most teams play him and It's just It's always a good syriza play against them. But it's a lot of fun in the off season of or even when you're throwing bullpens to imaginary batter. Last guy stepping in there, Cody Bell injury and L M V p like Artem out with a cider 01 or try to bust in on the hands of the fastball, and you play these mind games of yourself to prepare yourself when it really happens in May and June. Is that really how you picked your song because of the slider. No, it's Brandon Crawford picked it, so it's actually a funny story. But I was so Crawford picks rookies come up in September, Crawford picked all the rookies, songs and all that. Hey, got the select everyone's and hey, picked. Hey, pick slide for me by the Goo Goo dolls and everyone liked it. I thought it was great. And so they asked on the questionnaire to fill out my walk out song for this year for 2020. And I feel it out and I sent it upstairs and I come out in the first song. They played a slide by Goo Goo dolls. So anyways, ask again, I send up my my pick. I send it up there and they play slide again, and apparently, Crawford kept vetoing it and so I'm stuck with good, we all sides, so everyone liked it. And I guess I guess it's a little change of scene from heavy rock songs or AH, rap song or something like that. But The players seemed to like it in Crawford really appreciate that. I still come out this song they think, What's the song that you wanted to use? You know, I think I used I used some, uh I think it was like a maybe a Rolling stones song or somebody that I get is it wasn't a t d. C but it was something I can't remember off the top of my tongue. What? What It was, but it definitely wasn't good. It'll slide because you hear that hear the acoustics are to take off first and You're getting excited to come in and nine o'clock and in Oracle ballpark, your side of the face 2345 of the Dodgers, and then the acoustic guitar kicks in that kind of takes you down a little bit, but it works so well, take it. Yeah. I mean, you're in the minor leagues for seven years. You're a little harder than Google dolls, don't you think? Exactly exactly, But it's a brat like I was in the minor leagues for eight years, and you could play Beethoven out there, and I wouldn't care. I mean, just let me set. That's that's why he's got veto power. How long does the veto power go? I get it when you're a rookie, but come on. Yeah, I mean, as long as 35 still in Giants uniform, I'm pretty sure it's gonna be played. So keep it for a little while. Hopefully I love it's himself. It is with us, Sam. What do you think they are, They are amassing. Quite a group out there in the bullpen, and you said earlier. It's probably going to be closer by committee. I feel like in baseball. Everything is by committee right now. What do you think about that? Yeah, it Z kind of really fun to see our bullpen come together, and I thought Would a Jew bathe our pitching coach about this? Sometime of just we've amassed a team of Our bullpen of pictures that all come from different angles of we just signed Jake McGee, who's 96.4% fastballs last year, the top of his own. I threw 65% fighters that Weissler who I worked out with this offseason through 78% sliders. Tyler Rogers throws from the floor. Carrot. Caleb! Argh! Our throat. Asphalt at the top of his own hard. I mean, Harlan Garcia wanted for us to get guys out anyway, they come up. I mean, it's just way piece things together, and it's It's not probably the prettiest of the most expensive Bolton, but we get out so It gets the job done. So we're doing that? Well, yeah, I think it's gonna be a real interesting group. It's wonderful to have you on before you go would love to do the big finish with you. Perfect. Okay. It's Sam Selman on the big finish..

Brandon Crawford Dodgers Giants Beethoven Sam Selman Dodger Stadium Munsey Artem Bolton baseball Harlan Garcia Google Cody Bell Jake McGee Oracle Tyler Rogers Caleb Weissler
"weissler" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"weissler" Discussed on 710 WOR

"But what are the protocols like for the actors and the crew and all that stuff when you guys go into film something, Okay, So first of all, you know that any any new person comes into the country in Canada, you have to quarantine for two weeks, I said, But then you get to the set. Everybody not is not only wearing masks. 60% of them are wearing shields. Especially here in makeup, their cubicles that you you know the glass cubicles. Um Cruz, don't Intermix. You know you're with the film crew, but then you're with when you're with the makeup crew. It's a different section. Everyone wears masks, tire time their social distancing in the scenes for any new people coming in. The actors are kind of their own pod. The green room is set up. In such a way that everybody is 60 cross and you're all wearing masks you on Lee, Take your mask off the take before shooting Because the cinematographer has to see what the life is like on your real face. You know you can't wear your shield or anything. Um, the reflection. Very respectable. Oh, totally safe. Oh, my gosh. Yes. And you can have you tell me have X amount of people in each woman and you just see everybody social distancing. It's sort of interesting down, you know, And so it's just everybody is separated you and everyone has a mask. In fact, the director I just worked with, uh, Tony Dean Smith. He's fantastic. I did not see what his face looked like until the final day. I said, Can you just stand away from me and take off your mask? Every wouldn't couldn't even take that in a police lineup. This is easy. It's easy for you to go back in time. I'm just curious about this because you had this. You know, La 13 years on and off affair with John Travolta this love affair with him. What happened? Why? Why do you think it didn't last? Was it Did something happen along? You know what I think? No, I think we were We were. We were the first day we met. We realized we just hit it off immediately. It was in the first national company of Greece. And so that was like a stellar chest with Jerry Zaks and Judy Kaye. And it was like a crazy, crazy cast of everybody so talented, But Johnny and I hit it off right away because we both our families from families of six kids. She has sisters and two brothers. I have three sisters and two brothers. His father sold tires. My father sold cars. His mom was a drama teacher. My mother was a dance teacher, So we felt like we were family. And I think that sibling feeling was always, ah, very strong part of our relationship, And I think that maybe that's what it was more than anything. You know, He's great. He's a couple of times. Great guy. He's a really great guy. Really that first two jobs we did together because we did the national company of Greece, and then we did over here, which also had treated my C all the time you came on the show, and he's part of the Hallmark family, too. And Annie ranking and I see her when I come to New York if she's there, over here, that was the Andrews Sisters. Music. I'm not Mr Yes, Yes. Oh, my good Lord. Yeah, you know, they should have. They should do a revival. Yeah, they should. I don't know why That show has never been revived from your mouth to God's ear. And you know I am God's ear here when I know God put it up Broadway. Oh, you know, it was like one of my favorite human beings in the entire world is Fran Weissler? She and I have caught up during this pandemic. We talked to each other every few weeks. Just to check in, and he's just a force of nature. You know, she's that I'm in areas and she's an area so it's like we're always like Kerry's rule, you know, and she's just amazing. And just, you know, just that spirit and brain 93 years old. I saw her last weekend and she's a counter. Yeah. She's a character in my new book, Singular sensation. The triumph of Broadway, Mary Lou, which I was e Forget it yet. So if you could get it on Amazon time here we go..

Fran Weissler Andrews Sisters Tony Dean Smith Um Cruz Greece John Travolta Judy Kaye Canada Mary Lou Jerry Zaks Mr Yes Kerry Amazon director Lee Johnny Annie New York
"weissler" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"weissler" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"On Our website. So I'm gonna try to get to To those as well. 16 363 11 10. We can line open. If you want to keep your cough. You're welcome to do it with the phones. Me go, Teo Norse in Arkansas. Good morning. Morning, Dan going you good. Then I called you a few weeks ago. And I get a quick Rikard 72. And I told you that I had a K A With that little national And you forget that I move it. And you kill me. You go to Fidelity are Kennedy plan? Then God. So I went on the Internet, and I kind of look that brought those up looked at him. And with a company Kennedy plan. They fit in a package of information. So I'm looking at this booklet and stuff that they sent me. But it's kind of like looking at Spanish with which I don't know. Like a Growth and income craft a class the graphic girls, so I called them a call that's gotten me. No, you You know, so I don't know what to do, I think No. You told me to put it in a regular I R a And you also said I s And use a gift that 30 40. But I fit but I don't know. I'm looking at your stuff and I don't I don't have a clue. And so, he says, And he says, well, We're not a financial planner. We can't tell you what to do. But I'm okay. So You told me another thing to do. So how do I know what I run it over. Give me the more help. You know what So I don't remember. Is this money you're going to be using to draw from to supplement your income. No, no, I don't need a fact I was going to ask you. I have a little bit of extra income. In a month. So I was wondering if I should You know, putting the money into the account of what? No, I wouldn't put any more money into the IRA can at this point. Okay, you know, make sure you have a good emergency savings. You know, case you need it. So build that up first, And then maybe you can start investing into something else. So I think what you need to do is just Put it into I hate Tio. I hate to go to aggressive even though you don't need the money. There may be a time that something could change where you might. Might need that That is your income coming from pensions and Social security. Social here the our retirement when Ah, the disability. So yeah, I have coming in. So Yeah. I mean, one thing you can do is Just put it in some TFC, which you can't do directly to Timothy. But you set up in accounting, Timothy No, I did not. All right. So if you haven't done that yet, I mean, I guess I would. One of the things you might want to do is I mean, I like using some of their fixed income. They have a fixed income fun. That I know you can afford to not have to do that. But at the same time, I think it would be a good idea to have some of the Timothy fixed income. If you want ahead and open that account up there. And put some of the money and fixed income. How much is the money? Roughly 101 125. Yeah. So Some of that money, I think should be in a fixed income, and I think that would be Ah, good idea. Maybe 20 25,000. Into the fixed income. I would be okay with about With 25,000 of it also In their strategic growth. Okay and 25,000 in their conservative growth. Okay, Um Why would I think that would be a good place to be And then maybe another 25,000. In their large mid calf growth fund. Okay? The rest of it. I'd rather see just sitting in a money market account for now. And maybe add to these positions. A little bit. Okay, so Then they would also do the money market. Yeah, they put they can put the balance in the money market account. OK, OK. Um ok, I think I understand. So when I called back and I explain this is what I want to do is set this up. Yes. Okay. He should help you walk through that that account if he's not there, ask for Debbie. She could help you okay? Okay. I have one more kind of Ah. I know they think no questions. Dumb question. But I Maybe I don't know Fidelity Kennedy Vanguard. So do I. I'm I'm looking at this. Like Are the differences I order. Shadyac Weissler is that When I analysed it that way. Well, not really. Because when? When you look at Ford and Chevy, there probably are some distinct differences. I think if you're looking at a brokerage account at Fidelity Dot com and.

Timothy No Fidelity Kennedy Vanguard Debbie Teo Norse Fidelity Dot Kennedy Dan Arkansas Shadyac Weissler Timothy Chevy Ford