33 Burst results for "Weisberg"

"weisberg" Discussed on Lakers Nation Podcast

Lakers Nation Podcast

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Lakers Nation Podcast

"Make a jump shot. So that credits to the pelicans again. I don't think that's all LeBron's ankle. I thought LeBron, I mean, granted, he did just say it's awful, but throughout the game, I thought LeBron's fine, even in the second half, just credits to the pelicans, making things tough. Yeah. That certainly part of this, the pelicans really amped up their pressure, Malik monk, even mentioned to you that he said, look, the ball stopped moving and our defensive pressure let down. And Russell weisberg was asked about it. Why did that happen? And he said, I wish I could tell you. Doesn't know. Doesn't know. Ball hog sports said our defense was amazing in the first half when we started the game big. I don't understand why we finished the game. With puny ball, having mellow with the 5 in the fourth that kills our defense, I don't get it. I agree. I don't think mellow at the 5 should ever really be a thing. You can have them at the four and he can give you some floor spacing, but here's the thing with Bello. We're seeing teams very consistently target him defensively. They go right after him, which they should. They absolutely should. The gamble is always Ken mellow hit enough threes and give you enough on the offensive end to make up for whatever's going on on defense. Sometimes the answer is yes. When the answer is no, which I think that was the case tonight, you've got to be ready to pull the plug on that pretty quick. And I don't think Frank Vogel did a great job of doing that mellow. I mean, 15 minutes, but still, he was struggling out there, didn't seem like he really had it going. So that's why it was surprised Vogel went back to him late in the game, even knowing the team needed some scoring. Mellow just wasn't having the best game. I would have preferred him to look elsewhere rather than Cambria Anthony in that situation. I don't think that the main reason why it's addressed the star of that question or comment, whatever. I don't think the main reason was the fact that they went big. I think it was more the energy and effort and they came out with a great game plan to start the game. I think, honestly, if that was when you Gabriel, instead of the white, I think the starting lineup was like winning and Stanley as you're in LeBron. LeBron went against daily as you're three, four, 5. I think it would have been just as good. I actually you have some more switch flexibility as well on the outside. Now I do agree though. Carmelo Anthony at the 5 is probably the thing that I hate the most or dislike the most about this Lakers team and Frank Vogel is that he'll constantly say, hey, Melo. Every single advance in the.

LeBron Malik monk Russell weisberg Ken mellow Frank Vogel Bello Cambria Anthony Vogel Gabriel Stanley Carmelo Anthony Lakers Melo
"weisberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But lost a lot of work during the pandemic. She says her landlord's raised her rent, but she couldn't pay. And so they intimidated her. In May. Despite state and local eviction moratoriums, she says her landlord's changed the locks on her when she called the police. They told her to find somewhere else to stay. Yeah, not any absolute something That really know, says that night, she slept in her car with no blankets or any of her things ever since she's been bouncing around between her car and friends' homes. Well, who knows? Landlords did not respond to a request for comment. Leah Simon Weisberg is a lawyer for Ella Hanno with the group action, she says this lawsuit sends a message. This really shows landlords that if you break the law, they're going to be consequences. No one is going to just look the other way and, you know, give up thinking that most people are following the rules. Simon Weisberg says the group is pushing for other cities, including Walnut Creek and Antioch. To pass anti harassment laws like the one that passed in Richmond. I'm Kate Wolf. KQED NEWS. The police chief in Antioch, is leaving to take another job. That announcement comes amid major police reforms. KQED Sandia, Dirks reports Tammany Brooks became Antioch's first black police chief in 2017. He's been on the force since joining up in 1995. His police department has been under increased scrutiny as of late. From the in custody death of Angela Kintu late last year to hiring officers who left other departments after controversial uses of force, But ENIAC has also been passing major police reforms. This summer, They became one of the last cities in California to get body cameras, and they just banned use of the needle neck hold for officers. Brooks is taking a position as deputy chief of police in Boise, Idaho. There's no word yet on who will take his place at the helm of a rapidly.

Simon Weisberg 1995 Angela Kintu Kate Wolf ENIAC Tammany Brooks 2017 Leah Simon Weisberg California Richmond Walnut Creek Brooks Antioch May Ella Hanno Boise, Idaho This summer KQED NEWS first black Dirks
Allen Weisselberg Removed as Officer of Trump Organization Subsidiaries

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Allen Weisselberg Removed as Officer of Trump Organization Subsidiaries

"As an officer at some of the company's subsidiaries Less. Goldberg's removal comes after prosecutors recently accused him and the Trump Organization of a 15 year tax fraud scheme. Wall Street Journal reports. Weisberg was terminated last week as director at Trump International Golf Club. Scotland. President Biden will travel to Philadelphia today to warn Americans that the constitutional right to vote

Trump Organization Goldberg Trump International Golf Club Weisberg President Biden Wall Street Journal Scotland Philadelphia
"weisberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Pressuring a key witness. When your particular white collar crime case you need insiders to go back to Enron. It took prosecutors while but they finally got handy fast. I'll the CFO once they had him, you know, they had a key to the safe to the vault, the black box and they were able to demonstrated that trial Alan Weisberg plays a similar role here. He knows everything about the finances. He knows where the money was paid. Why was paid and why wasn't paid etcetera, etcetera. And yes, there was a pressure campaign. It was clear that by calling certain witnesses in etcetera prosecutors were sending a signal that that Weissenberger should be wary. There were as far as we know, Never any discussions about cooperating, but this is how the dance works. And so they hit him with a series of charges and once again to go back to what I think the Trump organization's lawyers expected was something that was very much small ball just like, okay, so he got the use of a Mercedes. You know, year and year out his wife. They didn't report on taxes. Big deal. Um, but the indictment cast a much longer shadow than that. It was not just the Mercedes who was a bunch of these other things that were enumerated. And most I think damaging to Weisberg that was that one charge grand larceny in the second degree. Most of the other charges that he was hit with our 3 to 4 year, Max, and if you're convicted on all of them, it's not like you have to serve 3 to 4 years times. You know, six or however many charge that they are for a total of 20 years. No, they tend to all get to be served at the same time, and maybe The maximum actually serving jail would be two years. But the grand larceny charge is what exposes to maximum two of 15 years. So if he could get as many as you know, be convicted on that, and he gets a half of it eight or 10, and then some of these other charges. It's like for a 73 year old guy. That's real time. It is for anybody, but he's you know, he's a guy in his called in years. So the grand larceny charges key here and it's it's very interesting. It's in some ways the smallest amount of money involved because they enumerated total of $1.76 million in funds that Weisberg didn't pay taxes on but enjoyed the benefit of and got to start Akio Ira with etcetera, etcetera. But of that 1.76 million There is a sub set of $94,000 and change almost $95,000 in federal tax refunds that Weisberg God So in other words, Most of these other crimes are tax related. He failed to report income or, you know, didn't report it properly, etcetera, etcetera. That's the whole pattern. But in this 11 He submitted his tax statements to the federal government and because he under reported income, he got a refund, so he's not basically just hiding or You know, disguising money that he's you know, earned or received from the Trump organization and not paying a full taxes on it. He's actually going and sending a document to the federal government and getting.

Alan Weisberg two years $1.76 million 3 1.76 million 20 years $94,000 six eight Enron 10 Trump 4 years 4 year Weissenberger Mercedes second degree Weisberg Akio Ira 73 year old
"weisberg" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Seattle's Morning news. And it's Tuesday time to go to the nation's capital and the man who last week was easily the busiest reporter in America. The Washington Post's David Fahrenthold. The Trump Organization case hit the headlines, Big time and I saw Your byline and on at least three extensive stories. So just just tell me what the week has been like for you. Well, you know, it's it's nice to have some activity. Finally, I think we've been hearing about what was going to happen. You know all these predictions it was nice to actually see what the prosecutors had. So we got confirmed on Wednesday night last week that the Trump organization and its CFO had been indicted. And then Thursday morning. We were, you know, deployed all around the courthouse. I was watching one door for wife number two. Come in. Somebody else was camped out in the hallway to for like six hours to get the shot of him walking by So it was a It was a real We get to feel like real New York City police reporters. Good for you. Did you get Did you yell questions? Adam as he walked in, Oh, yeah, I ran. I Jeez, after him unsuccessfully yelled questions at him. He didn't answer anything. So Yeah, Full xperia guys. You're merciless. Um, alright. The company's statement is that what we're seeing here is an inappropriate use of a local prosecutors vast and unchecked power to target a political opponent. And the point they're making is that these are charges like this tax evasion. I usually handled as civil infractions and with a fine, but they're talking criminal charges here. So explain why this is a criminal case. The difference usually between civil cases in criminal cases. Is that the civil case all you have to do is prove that somebody evaded taxes. They didn't pay the taxes. They should have a criminal case. You need to prove that they knew what they were doing, and they did it anyway. What prosecutors have said, is that they actually got a road map to the criminal case from the Trump organization itself. That the Trump Organization kept a secret set of books in which they basically detailed all the money that they were hiding from the I. R. S And by finding that second set of books. They got proof. Prosecutors got proof of two things they needed. A They've got to prove how big the fraud was, because they could see exactly how much money had been hidden and be that they understood that Trump or knew what they were doing was wrong because they kept this other set of books and hid it from everybody else. Okay, So what was the the whole idea was to get out of paying taxes? Is there a way you can explain clearly to non accountants? What what the Trump organization's secret recipe was for allegedly evading these taxes. Bible try. So take out one. Weisberg, who is the CFO of the Trump organization. They set his pay every year at $940,000 a year Uh, but with the prosecutors said, was that they then just scheme for ways to hide as much of the $940,000 from the IRS as they could. And so they did things like they paid for an apartment for Alan Weisberg, and they took that out of the 940,000. They bought cars released cars for Weisberg and his wife. They took that out of the 940,000. They paid tuition for his kids, his grandkids school and bought carpet for his house in Florida. Every one of those things was deducted from the 940. So then they got down to you know 700 was left. And they paid him 700 in his paycheck. But then they only told the IRS about the part they put in the paycheck. The 700 the rest of it that they paid out all those other ways, even though to the Trump organization. That was Alan Weisberg's pay. They didn't tell the IRS about it, and they avoided taxes on that chunk of his. So as they wrote, those things off is like a business deduction. Exactly. Yes. Like holiday gifts, rent expenses, all kinds of things that were not his pay. But they then kept the spreadsheet in which they were, like, explicitly. Yes. This is his pay. We're just hiding part of it. Okay, Now I just want to stipulate that's bad. You shouldn't do that. But we're only talking about $200,000 here. No more than that. The they say that Weisberg alone got $1.7 million of untaxed income, and he should have paid $900,000 of taxes on that. It's not billions of dollars, but Talking to tax law experts the last couple of days, they said. Look, when you stumble across a case like this, where a company kept two sets of books you prosecuted and there's two reasons you prosecuted. One is that's easy. The company has given you a roadmap to prosecute them. Number two that it if you don't do something like that, if you let people get away with two sets of books with that kind of blatant tax evasion, you undermine the whole tax system. Dave David Heather boss, You're quick question. They kept books on what they were doing that was allegedly illegal. Why would they do that? Uh, well, I think this is a collision of two of Trump's values. One was not keeping records. That's usually his M O. Remember him in the White House? He made people tear up their records and not take notes on his meetings. But the other one was cheapness and the the cheapness one out here. Let me explain why Alan Westerberg, you know, they said his his his salary at 940,000. They didn't just sort of pay him fringe benefits willy nilly. They kept track of them because they wanted to make sure that in this scheme, Allen didn't get a dollar more than he was supposed to. And that's the purpose of these records is to make sure Alan doesn't get extra money. As part of the scheme. He only gets the 900 forty's promised and the course of tracking that and saving themselves money. They allegedly created a roadmap for prosecutors. Okay, So you're saying they didn't target Trump just because he's trump. They targeted him because he made it easy. Yes, well, they targeted him. Originally because of Michael Cohen, Michael Cohen goes to on television in 2018 and 2019 and says, Hey, listen, I'm a turncoat from the Trump organization and they're committing crimes right and left. And that gets them that prosecutors interested in the Trump organization, but they stumble across this the second set of books and again. That's what we've been told. If you're a prosecutor, and you find that you got to prosecute it, because it's easy. Okay. What if you know that Trump was not named in this? What if it turns out that Trump told his lawyers? Hey, this is what I want to do. You guys take care of it? I don't want to know. Just make sure it's legal and that you tell me it's illegal. If that's going to be. The crux of the next phase of this case is questions like that, as you said Trump CFO is charged but not Trump himself. Trump's company was charged but not trump himself. To go from the charges we have today to charges against Trump. You would need some kind of proof of Trump's intent that he that he said. Okay, I know this is illegal..

David Fahrenthold Michael Cohen $900,000 Alan Westerberg 2018 $1.7 million Adam $940,000 Florida Alan Weisberg Thursday morning Weisberg 2019 940,000 America trump six hours last week Dave David Heather two reasons
"weisberg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And maybe media. I like this. Matt. How you do is treat me back. Oh, I am leaving. Oh, you know what did By making Good morning, folks. Good morning, Dominic Carter here with you in for Bernie and said, Good morning. Good morning. Good morning. 7 39 7 39. We should all be in a great mood folks, considering what we collectively have just gone through with this pandemic, And here we are with the Macy's fireworks display is 48 hours away. Things are returning back to normal. Dominic Carter here with you and for Bernie and said, We're talking to you folks all morning long A number of issues going on this morning. We're taking your calls at 1 808 for eight W. ABC 1 808 489222. So Donald Trump Jr is blasting the indictment against the Trump Organization against the company's long time chief financial officer, Alan Whitesburg as Banana Republic stuff. And so the indictment was unsealed yesterday, Mr Weisberg was led into the courtroom area in handcuffs. And here is what Donald Trump Jr had to say. Penn Station's like a war zone. The city's going to hell and this is where they're focusing because you know it's easy to go after your political enemies in deep blue states and cities like New York City. Okay, so That's one side of the argument. All I am saying to you folks is we have to put the entire thing on the table so that you can make your own decision and put this In perspective. So the Manhattan D, a Cy Vance and the New York State attorney General Leticia James, I want you to listen. As some of the things she said about President Trump. Prior to this indictment will never be afraid to challenge this illegitimate President..

Dominic Carter Bernie New York City Alan Whitesburg 1 808 Banana Republic Weisberg Matt Trump Organization 7 yesterday Donald Trump Jr 48 hours Penn Station Manhattan D Leticia James this morning one side 1 808 489222 Macy
"weisberg" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on 710 WOR

"W. O R. Well yesterday, the The indictments were unsealed against the Trump Organization and their chief financial officer, Alan Weisberg. Primarily a tax case. Uh, I have a hunch There's more to it than Apple. Let's bring in our buddy Jesse Weber. Jesse is a host on the long crime network. He's also co host of WR is always in fashion that areas tomorrow night at eight o'clock and Sunday at seven in the evening. Uh, Jesse, Welcome back. I know you read the whole indictment and the What's your take away? Well, we knew it was going to be first smoke Morning, guys. We knew it was going to be about fringe benefits kind of these paid paying import employees off the books. They weren't declaring it. I was surprised at what the charges were when I read grand larceny scheme to defraud conspiracy That's very serious. And when you add that up for Y Solberg, if you were potentially convicted across the board, that's significant prison time, and I think that was the biggest surprise for me. Now, having said that We didn't see anything in the indictment about bank fraud or insurance fraud, which we were expecting to see. Now the question becomes. Your prosecutors still have evidence of that, But they don't want to show it yet. They might have it in their back pocket, maybe against Weisberg or what I think is they really want to get trump on those charges, and they need y Silberg. Remember, they need y Silberg to build a case against Trump or his family members. Nobody cares. About Alan Weisberg. They care about the Trump family. So I think this is step one and a very big step for the prosecution. Jesse they care about the Trump family because they hate Trump. This is a witch hunt. And what is going on here is Democrats want to punish their political opponents? And I think what's fair is fair. I think Republicans should be going after progressive causes like black lives matter. I would love to know what the fundraising situation is like that black lives matter. We've got a war going on in this country and republic. Should give as good as they get. Well, I think there's a couple of things there one. I never liked the idea of using the legal system for political means. But I will say this, you're right. No one would have cared about Trump if he hadn't run for president became president. Having said that if someone breaks the law of someone commits an offense, and you're just discovering it now because they put themselves in the spotlight whether it is BLM, whether it is, uh Trump or his family. If you break the law, you break the law, How you discover it. If you're a prosecutor is that's just the way it is. It's not as if they're fabricating charges. Now they do have to prove their case. This is just step one. If it ultimately you know the job. Issenberg Trump Organization beats that. Going to be a very big day in a very big win for Trump. But having said that these charges are relatively easier to prove than other kind of charges in the past. Well, I mean, the argument is going to be that most companies do stuff like this. So where does the no they do? What is the grand larceny? Come in, Jesse. Stealing money. That's the basically I had the idea here is that and by the way, a lot of this is when you read the indictment was documented in kind of accounting spreadsheets, which again it's kind of hard to argue against. If the idea is you're paying employees, they're receiving benefits. They don't declare it. They don't pay taxes. The company doesn't pay payroll taxes on it. How do you explain that? Now? There are loopholes. There are the loopholes. There are exceptions in the fringe benefit law. It just becomes really hard to explain that away, particularly when Y cell Or didn't declare himself a New York resident. I believe until 2013 and he had been living in New York for years before then how do you explain it? I'm going to be very curious to see how they explain it. Jesse If this were any other company besides the Trump organization, do you really believe that side? Vance would have had Weisberg handcuffed when he was facing these charges? Come on. That's funny. You should say that I've gotten a lot of questions about the handcuffs. You can you are convicted. Excuse me. You are accused of a crime, whether it's a white collar crime. Whether it's a physical, violent crime. You get handcuffed. That's the proper procedure. They took the handcuffs off. He was released on his own recognizance. Passports were taken away. There was nothing that I saw that was done out of the ordinary, however. Seeing that image of the Trump organization, CFO and handcuffs walking through court. It was a very stirring image. And yes, uh, there is a part of this that the Trump organization would never have been investigated. As I said, if Trump never ran for president. Having said that we have seen other companies in the past, we didn't have a political connection that were brought down because of taxes because of These kinds of stealing money. These kinds of Ponzi schemes. No, I'm not think this a Ponzi scheme here, but these financial crimes or something that we've seen inflicted upon large companies in the past. We're speaking with Jesse Weber, Our buddy who is a host on the long crime networking, also co host with his dad. W. O R is always in fashion airs tomorrow night at eight o'clock on Sunday night at seven o'clock. Well, how typical is that I happen to think, and I'm not the lawyer. But I happen to think, uh, Weissenberger is not the big fish here. They're going to go up the food chain. Maybe hit Trump's kids eventually try to get to trump. How typical is it to come out with indictments like this that are relatively lower on the wrong and they don't reveal all their cards. Difficult. They needed something against Weissenberger. They needed something to pressure him. And at this point, remember, it's we're in July five Answer isn't leaving for several months. There are ideas. Okay, Let's get Weisberg to cooperate, and we would put more pressure on and say, Hey, we got stuff against your kid, Barry as well. Maybe he'll cooperate over the summer. Give us more information. We have that We have Trump's taxes. We could build a case against Trump and his family by the hall. That's where they're going right now. As I said they might actually have more against Weissenberger. Although I think if they had more against them, they would have really come out with it yesterday. This is significant form, and he has to decide if he wants to beat the charges if he wants to fight it, and if he wants to stay loyal to the president, because Alan Weissenberger guy who's known Trump, since 1973 has all the answers. He knows everything about the financial dealings of that family. And if you want to build a case against the former president, his family That's you go after Weisberg. Well, I mean, do you really think this guy is going to flip? He's been a loyal soldier in the trump Empire for a long, long time. Um, And you know where everything we know about the trump people is their fighters. I mean, he could fight this and and could win. Will say there's probably no one more loyal than while Silberg. Having said that the prospect of going to prison the prospect of your family getting in legal jeopardy. I don't know who is that loyal that they would turn on their own family to save someone else. Now, I'm speculating. I don't know anything about Alan Whitesburg. I just see it from the outside. As the case progresses as they look more at the evidence against them, he's going to have to make a decision. If you want to fight this does he think he can beat it? Does he think even if he gets convicted that he might not go to prison? Maybe you'll get a probation. Maybe you'll only spend a year behind bars. Is that something he can take? And maybe Trump Trump has said to him. Listen, you know, I'll support you'll support your family..

Alan Weisberg Jesse Weber Alan Whitesburg Alan Weissenberger Barry Trump trump New York Apple Trump Organization 1973 Jesse Democrats yesterday Weisberg 2013 Republicans W. O R. W. O R Vance
"weisberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:45 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Charges against the top Trump executive. U. S special Envoy for Peace in Afghanistan discusses the impending troop withdrawal, we examine the state of the U. S economy and more with the head of the International Monetary Fund and much more. This is the PBS news hour from W. To studios in Washington and in the West from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. As we reported earlier, former President Donald Trump's company and its chief financial officer were indicted on 15 criminal charges today for alleged tax crimes. Yeah, Michelle Sender looks at what it means for the company and for the former president. 25 page indictment against the Trump Organization and CFO Alan Weisberg alleges that since 2000 and five by Stalberg evaded some $900,000 in taxes. It also says he did so with the help of the Trump Organization and its payroll corporation. Help us break down the charges. I'm joined by Adam Kaufman. He formerly served as a prosecutor and chief of the investigative division in the Manhattan Da's office, Working with the current district attorney, Cyrus Vance. Thank you so much Adam for being here. So talk to me about the significance of Wisenberg being charged today. And what does what does this mean? For former President Trump and the Trump Organization. So, um What does it mean for the president, former president of the organization. It's a substantial blow. What we see here is the CFO of the organization being accused of not just receiving benefits, but also orchestrating the payment of Tax for orchestrating attacks fraud scheme over more than 10 years, resulting in the non payment of $1.7 million in taxes. So when we were talking and thinking about this earlier today, this indictment is actually a lot bigger and more severe than I anticipated seeing today. And when you look at and when you look at the 25 stages, it's it's false accusations is defrauding. It seems as though this is calling. The Trump organization is sort of criminal organization. Well, it's certainly calling it a criminal tax fraud organization. That's literally what it has done. Um, it's interesting. If you read the indictment, it really spells out the many different ways that the Trump Organization and Mr Y Silberg orchestrated this tax fraud. It's not such an unusual indictment. I know that the Sort of sound bites coming out of the Trump camp would say that this is unheard of unheralded. They've never seen such a thing charging a corporation. The reality is that when I was in the investor running the investigation Division, I probably authorized dozens or scores of indictments. Very similar to this one. Um What does he hear? That is a bit unusual is almost a scope of the fraud and agreed that it represents. So you have, um, you have the benefits, the non payment or the payment rather of of Apartment car and so forth. But you have lots of different ways. The tax fraud we're committed. You also have writing checks to employees from different trump organizations and cashing those and taking cash back. You have payment of year in bonuses and and for some employees, declaring it And for other special employees, not declaring it. What's also interesting and it speaks to the exact intent of tax evasion and tax fraud is that internally the Trump Organization and Mr Y Solberg as CFO or keeping very careful track to deduct from Mr Weiss Aalborg's salary, the value of the goods that he was receiving and the services he was receiving. So internally, they're keeping track of it. But externally when they go to the tax authority, they're not declaring it. So you really see a clear dichotomy between what's being you know, it's almost like that. The classic two sets of books, which I think is very interesting. Two sets of Brooklyn. Also, President Trump is calling this a witch hunt. His lawyers were calling it a political prosecution. Associates of President Trump former President Trump Tell me that he'll feel pretty pretty protected from all of this as long as he isn't charged. So what do you know? And what does this tell us about the possibility of other people being charged in particularly the former president, possibly being charged? You know, we just really can't know the scope of the investigation. At this point. There are a few things in the indictment that we can sort of parse out that might give some idea we see. The indictment refers to Mr Wiesel, Berg and other executives in the Trump organization, so that's some indication that there were others involved. We see you know the fact that the tuition payments were came from the Donald J. Trump Trust and were signed by the former president himself, so those are sort of interesting little little pieces, the other the other thing I noticed and I, It's sort of in the weeds. But if you if you look carefully at the indictment, the last three or four charges involved falsifying business records. That's a very common white collar crime charge that prosecutors bring and it reflects creating some type of false century and in the records of the business. Two or three of those charges are false tax records, which you would expect to see in a tax fraud case. False W two's 10 99 things like that. The final count in the indictment, though, says that they destroyed a record. It's that they destroyed and obliterated a record in the Donald Trump personal ledger. And to me that charge really sort of it sort of stuck out from the rest because it it sort of pointed to something much more on an intimate level, a personal level between Mr Trump and Mr Weisberg. So you know some clues there, but As far as the Penelope of crimes that we've heard about false valuation. Stormy Daniels inflated inflated valuations, false losses coming from international companies. There's been a lot out there that we just haven't seen yet. The question is whether This investigation is going to go on to look at those or or, of course, if it's done and they've looked at that, and they've decided there was no criminal activity. So there's a lot to be seen in the four months that we still have to go in this grand jury term. And in the text 10 seconds that we have left here talk a bit about where this might go next. I know as a matter of law, grand jury investigations are secret. But where might this go next? Well, I mean, you know, I just I just sort of laid out a bunch of other areas that I'm sure the district attorney is still looking at. So I would be expecting them to keep going through the records. Keep calling witnesses who might be able to shine some light on exactly the scope of any criminal conduct in the organization and, of course, who was involved. Thank you so much. Adam Kaufman, former former prosecutor. We really appreciate you coming on. Pleasure. Over the next few days. The U. S.

Adam Kaufman Michelle Sender Cyrus Vance International Monetary Fund 25 stages $1.7 million Alan Weisberg Adam Weisberg Berg Washington PBS 15 criminal charges 25 page Trump Organization Two sets Wiesel Stalberg President 10 seconds
"weisberg" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KOMO

"Northwest only 24 hour News Station Co mo news 1000 FM, 97 7 and I'm Rick fancies with ELISA Jaffe, Our editor is Jeremy. Great. Now almost old habits right? Bill O'Neill sitting in and the editor's desk the Trump Organization's longtime CFO Alan Weiss. Alberg pleaded not guilty today to grand larceny and several other crimes, including conspiracy. ABC is Aaron Contour, ski joining us on the Coma, Newsline and Erin. These indictments on Sealed alleged this pattern of tax avoidance at the Trump Organization that's orchestrated by the most senior executives. What are they saying Why Spielberg did and how are they saying Donald Trump is connected over 15 years. Prosecutors here in New York said that Alan Weiss Silberg led a scheme to defraud tax authorities by really trying to move compensation. Off the books so that it would lessen the companies and ultimately, the executives own tax burdens. Weisberg himself allegedly benefited to the tune of about $2 million and this was systemic. Prosecutors said. Weisberg was not the only executive to benefit others did, according to prosecutors, though they were not named, And these were things like school tuition and rent free apartments and and other expenses that were run through the business rather than properly accounted for, and the way prosecutors portrayed it. Ran for for 15 years, and they unsealed 15 separate charges against the company itself and against Y. Silberg. Chief financial officer Donald Trump is said to approve every single thing in this organization. But prosecutors would have to prove that he knew about these perks and the spending. But more than that, he'd have to know that y Silberg was dodging taxes was his name on the checks. His name was on at least some of the checks, according to the indictment that there were some checks for school tuition that were signed. According to the court records by Donald Trump himself. Although he was not named in this indictment, the former president called these charges against his chief financial officer and his company, a disgrace. And really, it sets up a stunning prospect that a former president of the United States now has to defend the company that led to his fame and fortune and ultimately to the nation's highest office. He has to defend. That company against these criminal charges, And just because he did know about the perks doesn't mean he knew that they were dodging taxes. That's where the burden of proof would be. Well, certainly, and the the prosecutors remember are not accountants. They're not interested in near irregularities or mistakes. Even though the Trump organization through their lawyers sought to portray this as better resolved civilly an unprecedented type prosecution. This is fairly boilerplate. Type white collar crime prosecution company tries to reduce their tax burden by moving certain compensation off the books. That is what prosecutors called secret pay raises subsidized by taxpayers. Is y Silberg. Really the key to this case, or are there so many documents that they have, and and are they doing this now? Because of a statute of limitations? Why now? Well, they've been looking for the better part of two years and went to the Supreme Court twice to get a hold of the former president's personal and business tax returns. They were Prepared to bring this these charges for quite some time, And I think the indictment here is noteworthy for what it does not talk about. It doesn't talk about some of the things that first piqued the interest of investigators. Things like hush payments to women. Things like property valuations in the way that Trump Organization in the former president may have valued their holdings one way for banks when they were trying to get loans in another way when it came to paying taxes. And the former president. While not directly tied up in this particular indictment, certainly is in the crosshairs of of prosecutors for potentially future charges. Michael Cohen flipped any signs that Weisberg might and could. This also spelled trouble for the former president's Children?.

Bill O'Neill Michael Cohen Donald Trump Aaron Contour Alan Weiss Silberg New York Y. Silberg Jeremy Weisberg 15 years Trump Organization ABC two years Rick ELISA Jaffe Alan Weiss 15 separate charges Alberg Spielberg over 15 years
"weisberg" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KOMO

"Floors, Sports and your money News live now to ABC at 1 30. In New York City, Alan Weiss Silberg, the Trump Organization's longtime chief financial officer, pleaded not guilty to tax crime charges. The filing at the grand jury indictment unsealed in court also charged the company. ABC s Aaron Carter Ski was outside the courthouse. The indictment says that Alan Weisberg was able to avoid taxes on nearly $2 million worth of income. Isil Berg pleaded not guilty. So did the company itself. Represented by lawyers. The former president call the case politically motivated. NBC's political director Recline says the indictment is detailed, saying that it's all political doesn't change the facts of the case. And even if he's getting scrutiny that he wouldn't if he wasn't the former president doesn't mean that that these things were perfectly legal or perfectly fine and That's the part that's going to be caught out and that I have to imagine the court result. Ultimately gonna care about is what the law was and whether people broke it and who else is involved in it, And there's certainly enough just in this indictment to suggest that this isn't the end of the story. The grand jury remains seated in the case. Michelle Franzen, ABC news Homo news 1000 FM 97 7 Good afternoon Come on news time. 1 31 I'm Taylor Vance Ice. Now our top stories from the coma 24 7 News Center. Pandemic restrictions are being greatly eased in Northwest residents can return to their pre pandemic routines in many cases. Including their work out routine. Brian Calvert has more. Yesterday we celebrated the return of full capacity stores and restaurants planned to have a full capacity and no more masks. But some of us present company included spent the better part of the pandemic eating takeout. So it's a good thing. Gyms and workout facilities have also fully reopened, honestly, super exciting. You know, it's been a long time coming. Neil is pretty happy to be getting back to his routine don't want for mass. And it's just normal again. Just like.

Michelle Franzen Brian Calvert Alan Weiss Silberg Isil Berg Alan Weisberg NBC New York City Aaron Carter Ski ABC Recline Neil Trump Organization ABC news Yesterday nearly $2 million Taylor Vance Ice 7 News Center news 1 31 1 30
"weisberg" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KGO 810

"This is a crime and I'm going after it. And if I didn't go after the Trump organization strongly enough before the banks before, while I'm doing it now. I just have to say it just sounds like there really are two different systems of justice that if you're incredibly wealthy, and if you're a corporation, or if you're the the entity that owns a corporation, it just seems as if you can get away with bloody murder with very little recourse. And I'm not happy about that. I'm not happy with a monitor when you've already perpetrated the crime and the crime is already and you know what you're doing. You know you're violating the law and you do it anyway, intentionally, But they're going to put a monitor on you Just say You don't do it again. I mean, does the average American get that kind of deal? I think that's a real fault in our system, and I've never been involved in one of those monitoring cases. You know, my practice is pretty much people who are in trouble. Generally, individuals and like I said the case in New York, my individual client he never got charged. But again, that's not selective prosecution. How come Trump's controller got charged? And David Katz? His client didn't get charged. Every case is different. And this one does seem to really have. This is a 15 year long conspiracy. It involves a lot of money and it was a very public company. There is something which is not selective prosecution about making an example. Of certain certain industries, as long as it's not being done for politics, and I don't think that anything, you know they have an insider here. There's a daughter in law was having an ugly divorce with the son of Weisberg, and she is told a lot of tails, so they have an informant and that's normal. That's not selective prosecution. You'd be surprised how many income tax evasion cases start. Without an angry spouse and angry ex significant other, Um you know, some family where everybody falls out, and somebody drops a dime at the IRS on another family member? Yeah. Well, let's get a couple phone calls from our listeners here, David, Let's start with Lee. He's calling from San Jose. Highly Welcome to KGO. You're on with David Katz. Go ahead. We're moving forward, and there is known for a long, long time. The New York And I will go there. Also the history of the one your system wants. You know what? Okay here. Your quality, pat. Yeah, I'm having trouble understanding. Um, uh, Lee, your phone sound really muffled. Um, are you wearing a mask right now? No, no, I'll walk to the door. Okay, they know and they don't go all long. Come In New York. You mean they've They've known the criminality they'd known the kind of shenanigans that they've been perpetrating for a long time. Well, we're talking about 15 years is what's being alleged here in that pretty much is a long, long time. Let me ask you this, David it, you know, we we noticed that in the indictment and mentions federal taxes, But like you said they can't indict on federal taxes in the state court. Will the federal prosecutors then pick this up and charge Y Solberg and the Trump organization with a federal tax evasion. I think it's a little bit unlikely. Number one. There's been a state prosecution and especially if the federal taxes are included in the sentencing there. There's an idea that while we have dual sovereigns that coming after the same person for such similar conduct, especially if they received some punishment in state court, like at the federal taxes are added on Is that that is, although constitutional that's kind of a double was worth looking double where they they jump on a person twice. Um, and so I don't think that that's too likely. And remember, they were looking at y Silberg for potential perjury because he said he didn't know that the money that was paid to Michael Kohn was going to be used by Michael Cone to be immersed. The two actresses right to models, and they apparently believed that Weissenberger really didn't know because the federal prosecutors did not charge white Suburban with perjury. They apparently accepted his testimony that he really didn't know what Michael Cohen was supposed to do with that money. Although White Silberg was part of giving that money from the Trump organization To Michael Cone at that time, so I don't think that there's any more that's awaiting wife Oberg. Assuming Weisberg doesn't do anything between now and then I think he's staying away from Trump now pretty much. I don't think he'll be charged with anything new, but your listeners should be called even if he goes to trial and loses. That doesn't mean that it's over. He could always cooperate later. You can cooperate after something to try to get a sentence reduction even after sending, and of course, the person they want to know about is Donald Trump. And what did Trump do on his taxes? Because he's having trouble getting to Trump's taxes to charge Trump without Weisberg Rich Silberg was also his personal account. I think he's the one who actually signed Trump's Personal returns as well as the corporate returns. They're sort of. There's a bit of a difficult impasse pad without this wife, Oberg fellow because he was so integral to not only Trump Trump Organization but to Donald Trump himself and Donald Trump's taxes. All right. David Katz. Hang on. Um, I am going to go to a break here. We will come back and get another caller to, uh, so you are listening to Dave Katz, I should mention is my guest. His Twitter handle is at David Katz Law. He's a former federal prosecutor. He was assistant U. S attorney in Los Angeles. Now he's a criminal defense attorney, and we're talking about the indictment that came down today against Alan Weiss, Ahlberg, the Trump organization at all, we'll be right back. No.

David Katz Dave Katz Michael Cohen David Michael Kohn Donald Trump New York Michael Cone Lee 15 year San Jose Los Angeles Oberg Rich Silberg Trump two actresses Trump Trump Organization Y Solberg Twitter today
Trump Org, CFO Plead Not Guilty to Tax Crime Charges

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Trump Org, CFO Plead Not Guilty to Tax Crime Charges

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting the trump organization and that see a full pleaded not guilty to tax crime charges the trump organization and its chief financial officer have pleaded not guilty to tax crime charges in New York charges against the trump organization include conspiracy grand larceny and tax fraud CFO Alan Weisberg was arraigned one day after a grand jury returned an indictment charging him and of the trump organization with tax crimes the seventy three year old Wiesel Burke has worked for the trump company for decades former president Donald Trump was not charged it is the first criminal case arising from a two year investigation into the trump organization by the Manhattan district attorney's office hi Mike Rossio

Mike Ross Alan Weisberg Wiesel Burke New York Donald Trump Manhattan District Attorney's Mike Rossio
"weisberg" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on AP News

"Pressure over the Northwest made worse, they say by human caused climate change. I'm Jacki Quinn. This is a P news. I'm Rita Foley, The chief financial officer of the Trump Organization has reportedly surrendered to authorities, and we expect to hear soon about charges that will be filed against him and the company Alan Weiss. Solberg was seen walking into the courthouse in Lower Manhattan early this morning with his lawyer. Here's our Jackie Quinn. The charges are expected to alleged tax evasion, including unreported company benefits provided to top executives like cars, apartments and school tuition, Trump said this week. The company's actions are standard business practice. The charges against Weisberg and the Trump Organization are the first to arise from the two year investigation, led by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. A Democrat who's leaving office at the end of the Year, the Trump Organization says y Solberg is upon in a scorched earth attempt to harm the former president. There's no sign at this point. The former president Trump will be charged in this investigation. A stash of illegal homemade fireworks exploded in South Los Angeles this morning as it was being destroyed by a bomb squad. 17 people injured one man under arrest. President Biden is on his way to Surfside, Florida this morning to comfort the families of the dead and missing a week after that condo building collapsed. 18 people are known dead 145 missing. Miami Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine. Cover our community,.

Rita Foley Jacki Quinn Jackie Quinn 18 people Solberg 17 people Trump South Los Angeles Lower Manhattan Trump Organization Alan Weiss Democrat Miami Dade County Surfside, Florida Weisberg one man this week this morning first President Biden
"weisberg" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on KOMO

"Man With Greg Herschel to manufacture the chief financial officer of the Trump Organization, Alan Weiss. Silberg surrendered to authorities early this morning ahead of expected charges against him. And former President Trump's company. Weisberg was seen walking into the courthouse in Lower Manhattan about 6 20 this morning with his attorney, New York prosecutors are expected to announce the first criminal indictment later today in a two year investigation into Trump's business practices, accusing the company and Weisberg of tax crimes related to fringe benefits for employees. Today, the president and first lady will head to Surfside, Florida If you first had the partial collapse of that condo building, at least 18 people are dead. ABC news correspondent Elizabeth Scholesy. Is with us again this morning. Elizabeth. What's the agenda? Look like today for the President? Yeah. Hey, Good morning. Well, the president is on his way. Now on on route to Florida. He'll be arriving later This morning. He's going to get a briefing when he gets on the ground from the Miami Dade County mayor and from Florida Governor Rhonda stand it. So an interesting photo op there between the Florida Republican governor and the president. Most of the day will really be spent thanking the first responders, thinking the teams on the ground and the meeting with the families of the victims. The president got about three hours in his schedule this afternoon to meet with the family members, and notably, this will be taking place at a hotel in Miami. Farther away from the site, the White House has really said. They don't want to visit to be interfering with the actual rescue efforts on the ground and we will be hearing from the president just that around four o'clock this afternoon. He'll be making remarks from Florida from Miami are heat wave here in the Northwest has the president's attention and yesterday he was talking about what firefighters should be paid because we are expecting a bad wildfire season. Yeah, That's right, you know, And the president is as acknowledging that, he says, we're already seeing that this could be record wildfire season. Essentially, the president is asking what can the federal government do to help states? In the West help with this and one of the efforts they have announces steps to try to improve retention among firefighters raising wages of federal firefighters to $15 an hour. The president said he was surprised to find out that most federal firefighters actually makes $13 an hour right now. Essentially, he said, that's just not okay. That's part of this kind of step there. Also announcing bonuses to people who can stay on for longer, really trying to keep those seasonal workers in place for longer to and you know, admitting in some ways, the some of the steps already coming too late. They're already thousands of firefighters, as you well know, deployed so far to try to help with this threat. Elizabeth will be keeping track of your reporting later on today on the president, NBC News correspondent Elizabeth Scholesy Philadelphia is reporting the nation's first case of rare blood clots, possibly linked to Moderna's Covid vaccine. A man in Pittsburgh died at the hospital. He was admitted within 10 days of his second shot. Officials say he also had a staph infection, which could be to blame. It comes as the death toll continues to climb from the historic heatwave here in the northwest 11. More deaths in King County have now been blamed on the heat. Bringing the total death toll in this state to at least 20. But the state economy has now fully reopened. Governor Jay Inslee will be making several appearances today to celebrate that fact. After numerous delays. SpaceX successfully launched Falcon Rocket from Cape Canaveral yesterday to fun. Zero ignition. Rocket is carrying.

Greg Herschel Alan Weiss Cape Canaveral Florida Elizabeth Scholesy King County Pittsburgh Elizabeth Weisberg Miami SpaceX Today ABC Trump Organization NBC News White House Governor two year yesterday Miami Dade County
"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

Chatter with Alex Fennell

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

"Appreciate it. I think like i guess three things i did with. My platform is be consistent. Like show up for yourselves like be consistent especially on tiktok because they reward people who are consistent. I mean you need to add value and be consistent. But as long as you're not value and values can be anything like having a laugh cry being angry Value is anything that like engages your audience so my first few things as a be consistent like And be like adding value and like believe in yourself because people aren't gonna watch you if you don't wanna watch you when you need to like be able to like like what you put out and not but i'll things because at the end of the day people are gonna see right through that And you're going to get burnt out and exhausted like do it because you enjoy it and it's something that you think that will provide value and screw what anyone else thinks so. I think though list probably would be the three things that like have really helps me in my journey on on social media thinking about doing it and you're not sure like just do it like who cares what everyone else things like if you make a fool out of yourself which i have done like everybody on that then like you got a good story to tell So that will be my piece of advice. This big it's really big. You know what. I mean like a lot of people need that and like there's a lot of people with stories like yours who like want to be in the position. You are the platform that you have. You know what i mean like. What did you start off like you start off just like immediately. Call your followers because he understood like that but the concept of adding value or like. Was it like a slow journey. No i think it's all a process. And i think like say like i think going viral is think is overrated. And it's different for everyone. I kind of think it's kind of like getting a job like i. You go for the interview and he get that one viral you and you're like oh my god. This is great. Like i want this feeling against you. Like chase for the job and it doesn't mean that you're going to get the job. It means that you have a bigger chance now that gone viral already but it doesn't automatically be Mean that you're going to get the job. And i think that light going back to the basics of like who you to target Creating and experimenting don't be afraid to like think outside the box of y you're creating and what the other people who you fight not copy but try to recreate it in your own way. So i think like with that i think is also really helps me kind of create my paid like just like not being afraid to experiment With different things and if they fail they fail late. I had fun doing it. So it's all that matters and don't get so caught up in the numbers they don't mean anything but you can still have a million followers in soviet shitty person might don't worry about the numbers have fun and enjoy yourself. 'cause that's the main point of like what i'm doing is just how fun musset and educate and hopefully helps me along the way right. That's the biggest thing i think by bus. was so easy to just offer free value. I guess like another time. How why would people want to stick with. You like how. I would be just wanna follow like just prompt them to follow. And there's no reason for you to all right. Like i feel like there. Should be like reuse. Exactly what you just that consistent posting value that you can give some other people in value can provide your audience to make them like one at stake. Is this consistent value at like helping them or it's making them happy or whatever you said like the before it's actually giving them value like what was an example of value. You could provide somebody else like well. What does that mean like the value. Just be like a a story or could ephron like value could be funny picture or like a funny situation. You could be a sad situation. It could be a happy one. I think the term value is like very vague. And it's it's different Depending on the person like for me. I just find value in has controls off worry lake creating some content but like for the next person it could be totally different so i can't really give you on. What definition are what you should. What value is i think. That's up to the individual and lay house they want portray themselves or what they want to create a community around. So i don't have an answer for you for that. Like value is very for me individualized. Yeah yeah Is you know it's a lot of stuff into into tiktok. And whether it's growing social media whether it's adding value to people whether it's earning your views into friends or you know being able to have that support in there it's it's a very versatile app in school that you've been able to be so successful with. I'm sorry about your school and where you're get it ball. I get it though again. It because like there's some crazy fucking people on on in tiktok and on social media. Like i've heard all the stories of people coming somebody else's house in like not getting their own need a way with the light. You're fine if anything made me uncomfortable. Alaska lake hung up the call. What would have not heard a. Don't worry about it. I was just saying like there. There is crazy people out there. And like i don't ever run into people like that like if i ever get like a place in house i can see why tiktok and instagram people or like anybody. That wisconsin craters. There are various careful about like where they post like what they say about their location because they get a following and you never know like one percent of your following zero point zero five your following could be one guy that is dislike nuts and like you for some reason like freaks me out old people definitely have it out for me on social media bus. Why i'm not gonna share my location people. Ask me for room tours and stuff like even get nervous like because they do take outside but like no one's gonna like. I don't think anyone would recognize that. But yeah i never do it because you never know. Who's watching fucked up like scary situations. Are dino any skirt button. My best wishes that lying. Oh my god that they're not serious. I don't think anyone would ever act on it but like you never know so dots. What exactly do you know. Anybody has issues. Because i've heard like tons of stories of people who have like issues with like legitimate. Maybe giving too much information or people that come third. One of my friends had people like. I think i can't remember what happened. I don't want. I'm like no not you like i remember what exactly happened but yeah like i issues. Better to be safe than sorry crazy app. Felony right now. You know I know it is What recording this podcast. That the eight forty. Es t right now so It's a getting decently late monday We're recording the mondays posted on a thursday. So on monday right now tomorrow. The new.

thursday tomorrow Alaska lake One mondays one percent three things instagram a million followers zero three soviet third lot of people one guy monday tons of stories first few things five zero point
"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

Chatter with Alex Fennell

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

"People that are that are doing that. Through clubs eilly only one glades. There might have been one or two but no you. I think you're lonely one. I'm sorry i'm proud. I'm proud to be. The only one should be proud Now that was really cool for me getting to connect with the. I'm glad that we could. You know up on the podcasts together. But yeah like i. I know what you're big into tiktok like rolling without so much. And i know you're clever and with different people off of clubhouse which is great and we you know we we talked about all the social media haters through tiktok and like that how you've been coping with adler honestly think that's incredible because it's such a hard thing for people to go through biak like i wanted to dive deeper. You said With with your to school getting to film and and radio broadcasting like would you want to be on tv show. You want be like a producer. I don't know what you can do with that degree because if let's say you don't get rich and famous. Let's say tiktok has just like your side hustle. I know you will medical hypothetical word Somewhere along the lines in media be producer or like being on a talk. Show like at all a anything about that industry like. It's something i'm interested in. And i don't know what i want right now as they haven't done the program yet so i can't really give you a definitive answer. All i know is goals. We'll i would like to have my own talk show or maybe like a movie or on my life like who's our big dream that i have. I mean if the like there. I would like to go down the line in a few years. Start a family. It's like these are all like goals that offer my life but like me. It's it's about staying in the president and like being okay with not thought when it hosts a single saying the president. I love it. it's super big in. I mean i like that. You have a bigger purpose kind of going forward and you're kind of just not like obviously you're having fun. You're leading to kind of like breeze bile in life kind like work for you and it's awesome you just like no. He wants to continue to pursue these bigger goals. And you will like you have the right support and people around you. That's what you need right now. Is that people around. That are going to take extra mile and support you. And i not super big. Do you have any what is already do talk show like did you have people look up to the head like a talk show or just like basically share your message like something like this where we're just kind of like the interview thing or something like this like i just think that lake i like entertain people. I like talking. I liked helping people like issues. Like all the ingredients of like everything that i like in a job or career is doing this So wherever that may take me. I don't know but like even if i'm not rich and famous that's not the point of why doing it but like it does help. Don't get me wrong and like i'm not saying that life isn't hard it's fucking hard like about the hardest year probably might tire life But i can say that one hundred percent worth it So if you're thinking about doing starting some things or you're not sure you're feeling like you're in the middle. Just do it like you know what already what you're feeling now which already know it matters. What tribe can already go back each angle back to your own. Life isn't go back to what every now but we don't know is like what lies ahead. tha that would be. My piece of advice is just to try stuff. Basically it's like just to be able to to kind of dive into stuff and not be scared like what your reputation is going to look like what you're gonna end up in like ten years or something like even do delay us. You try like you try dots. It like sauna. Failure is not like oh. I shouldn't have done that like imagine like you. Not knowing that like you didn't try only like i'm trying to think of a good thing to say because that's like super big right is just like i wouldn't have any. I wouldn't have done any of the things i have done in my life. I wouldn't accomplish anything. I wanted to make the relationships that have. It wouldn't be worry. I'm right now. I wouldn't have his podcast right. I wouldn't have this five former. Wouldn't have the people in my life. Who i do if i didn't try new things and just kind of dive into opportunities. I'm really big on. That is dislike diving into -tunities and just like doing. That's like a philosophy that i like people who know me know that i'm big on that Going into like like what's the what's the key thing of like. What are people doing that are successful in like better happy in their fulfilled. Like what are they doing. And like the answer is just doing like they're literally just like going out and doing things and acting on new situations hopping into the new things and trying like something. That's like scary to them. you know. Stepping out of the comfort zone is like flato. Just doing what do the do i keep saying. Because it's a super important thing to do. No matter where you are in your life you should just never want to be Like just like say where. You're trying new things. Like i love that. Like what is this school thing to you where you're going in like actually going through broadcasting as alex something that's scary to you or you just like abdu just refund thank like that. Anything is scary. That like requires change while he's fermi so it's something like that. I want to build a career with so like things are on the line on taking a risk wake there is good risk and then there's flake unhealthy so it's just like picking what works for you. Okay so there's good risk unhealthy risk so like like like it's kind of like the defining factor like a lot of people gambling like a million dollars best not a really smart idea like hey might win with two million dollars but like might lose everything you have. That's what i need. Yeah exactly understand. I feel like a lot of people would be like. Okay how do i calculate difference like how can i see. This is a good risk of. This is a batteries. Like what's the defining akers. Obviously you know if you're to go kill somebody if we're gonna go gamble your money but i feel like a lot of people would be like weighing their options. Like 'cause i understand what you're saying like. This is a good risk as the battery. That's not like for people to understand and like figure out if this is a good risk batteries. that's like the the whole thing about the risks. You don't know where it's gonna go right on the unknown it's scary. How how would you like. 'em up with somebody like jamie hyneman office like a good risk your a like how would i go into. It is kind of hard to answer like a super individualized right i. Yeah i don't have that answer but if it scares you and it's not harmful is probably a good thing. I love it. I love it you know we. We share a lot of the same values jamie. I really appreciate you as a person who was really cool you know. I think you're an incredible person is super bowl or to see you in go do incredible bigger things. I like a lot of like what's going on. And we get a continue to see them up there. You're gonna start your own clubhouse room as i feel like you should. I don't know. I don't really like to because then i'm just left with leh starting around but like i've thought about it like but i don't know if it's something i want to. I have a lot of options. And i'm just like taking my time like i'm focusing on my trusting the process and maybe i will like we'll see i've done a couple of rooms in the past but like i don't know i don't know that's what i wanna be. But was the yeah. Okay we've been on the guest for a little bit For a while now. I just wanted to ask like one. Probably maybe one final wrap up question Because i know you have a lot of followers on tiktok. And i know a lot of people have incredible stories exactly like yours and they want them to be shared and they wanna get their story out there. That won't build to know who they are. The one advocate for change and a different arena. Or wherever and i know there's like hundreds of people out there that are trying to do that and they're trying to grow tiktok. How did you get where you are. How did you get to the platform that you have given advice for anybody. That's trying to advocate for change. I know i asked questions. No i.

jamie hyneman two jamie two million dollars ten years five one hundred percent hundreds of people each angle million dollars one one final wrap up question single alex lot of people adler tiktok
"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

Chatter with Alex Fennell

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

"Like something along the lines of entertaining sort of helping people like. That's what i want to do and i already get to do it now. I just need to make a career out of it. So i guess like that probably is my next school But right now. I'm just kind of staying in the president and trying to learn how to be content with the now Because i'm always jumping to the future and like waiting to light something else to change and in the end like it just causes me suffering to do that so my work right now is just to be except where i'm at right now and like trust the process. Okay so except where you're at right now. Are you like a good place right now. Like i'm very happy to be talking to you all through a clubhouse. He seemed like a very happy person. Like would you say you've conquered that insecurity you've had before like will not you. You said it's okay to have insecurities like the the fact that it's okay like have you been able to have that like self awareness that you're like. Would you say you have still farther to go in your journey. I know it's like a personal question. But i would say you have farther to go or would you say that you are where exactly where you want it to get when he started this to cook. Absolutely i'm nowhere near talk- like where i want to be. But i think it's not that easy. I think it's really a lifelong process. I don't think like. I can just be bread off. My insecurity is like it's not like this magic wand were being like poof gone. it's i have to constantly work at accepting the now and being present and working on myself and it's a really hard job and i'm not always gonna feel like that i'm not always going to Be this confident. Or and that's okay. Like dot also is a part of the process is sitting with feelings like sitting with blake. I am depressed today. And that's fine lake. Everyone is allowed to have those days so for me. I feel like i'm in the beginning session medal of my journey and i still have a long way to go at the same time. It's also like i'm on this process for life. There is no like it's over but i do know like it has been easier and i think it will continue to get easier The furnace down my journey aiko under sent. Yeah i mean it is big. It's a really we can talk about. I appreciate you talking about it. On the podcast. It's definitely a big journey. It's hard for a lot of people talk about and i mean like it's insecurities are not a thing that and just anybody would talk about like flat out. It's a huge thing that people have. I think we need to like raise awareness to that. And it's exactly it's great that we're doing this podcast. 'cause there's people that need to step out and be vocal about their insecurities and talk about it with people who do support them. You know what i mean like. It's not an easy thing to do like everybody. Everybody watching everybody should please go check out everything. That jamie has posted on social media. Everything's length down. Please support what she's doing. She's incredible human and helping so many people every day as you can see and as you can hear it going and going through this but it's huge like one question you know jamie like you know. I see a lot of your videos. I watch dog every day. Because i go some on there. I'm just having fun But i watch yours because they come my my page because You post a lotta stuff. Like i always see you like responding to like haters and people that like put people down like on purpose because that's all over tiktok. I've seen that. I've been on tiktok for years like i've seen like wh who those people are what they're doing it. I just like. I think that's a part of tiktok night. I wondered as somebody like who is a crater and it becomes vulnerable and talks about such issues. Like how do you continue to do does does that affect you and like how do you cope with it if it does. I think that like obviously like no human being can say it doesn't affect them like a fi like of course it does affect me sometimes but as i've seen stated before like i'm not here for them i'm here like because i have huge streams and i'm sure as hell Keep a warrior behind the screen by. Tommy how is my life my whole entire life. People told me not exist. For the way i look like i heard it. All like is not doesn't have anything to do with me. It's not a reflection of me. it's a reflection of baton and they're suffering and i must suffer because they are and i think it's your right like i've seen a lot of that lately of this normalization of cyber bullying and especially on check out. Because he want to chase this idea of being viral and popular is doing whatever it takes. Get comments again. You can make a comment. And then people would like it and then they can get their negative high of like. Oh i'm cool. Because like i put somebody down and i am just like everybody else and it's not like that like learning they have Issues going on with themselves at the end of the day like it's their problem not mine and third of all like the insults are all the same like everything they come up with. Is the exact same like you saying. I've never heard like joke about my weight. Or how i look like i'm not i'm not living under a rock no way. They think that that's going to affect me. And they're like. Oh we're helping you. You're helping me by bullying like the doesn't really go but whatever it doesn't but at the end of the day like i'm not here for them. I'm not here for to change people's minds. They have their own opinions. I'm here for the people that want to see me and are getting inspired and l. And those trolls. Just give me engagement booths at the end of the day. Even ritual say to me well one of them said it was like I used to hate on you in writing comments. But then i found out are really funny. I'm like no. You should not eight on anyone. In general let alone because they're funny And people were just like take the time to get to know people like honestly not even be kind just like latte people exist in peace. I mean we learned in kindergarten. Is he don't have anything nice. Don't say it my thing is just say somebody else. I don't wanna hear it. Yeah yeah no. that's big. You know like there's kind of like the culture on tiktok is to make fun of rise. It's terrible it's illegal literally the culture and like people understand how vulnerable craters have to get on tiktok and how that kind of backlash can affect them like. Some people aren't as strong as you are coming out here like honestly that's that's huge it like obviously you say it affects everybody the fact that you said that then you had that kind of mindset is huge like as an incredible like ability of yours to like not that. Let that affect you to the point where it's like you have to quit. Tiktok delete tiktok. You have to you know like completely end your channel like there's people who do that you know people who aren't strong enough to do that and let's just thought about that in the past. Don't get me wrong like i've like. Oh i'm never posting a video again. Like i'm not doing this but i'm like i come around and i'm like you can always leave. Nobody's forcing you to be here. Like you love it. And this is your way of like doing what you want. And if it's not benefiting you and if the cons outweigh the pros it's always leave out at the end of the day like it's not that i've never thought about quitting. Dr someday is like how am i doing lake but like i.

jamie today one Tommy eight one question tiktok them many people dot aiko
"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

Chatter with Alex Fennell

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Chatter with Alex Fennell

"Going on my name. Is alex fennel entrepreneur business owner and new podcast there. Welcome back to chatter with alex fennel and upcoming podcast for influencers entrepreneurs and entertainers social influencers doesn't really matter anybody in public guy who has a story to share and we want to talk about the This is our second podcast so far. We've got an incredible guests coming out here before we hop into a real quick Just wanted to say thank you. Everybody has been supporting so far following subscribing. Just because i know we are a new podcast off. You're watching this on the day comes out on thursday. Didn't already check out the first one and follow us on all. Social media's chatter pod real it's chatter p. od real and obviously youtube channel as well and i appreciate it so much for everybody that does support and then on new up and coming podcasts. We have lots of plans great and a lot of cool stuff going on so i really do appreciate supporting but yeah i wanted to hop in real quick. We have an awesome guest on today. Tiktok star body. positive body. Positivity advocate Just in all around incredible human Someday i've met for a little bit in clubhouse and just connected with on social media. I'm really happy and honored tavern podcasts. Today so without further ado jamie wisenberg. How is it going or alex is going well. Hi everyone jamie outs already introduced me on. I make body positivity content as well as sharing my story through eating disorder recovery and I only started About a year ago and it's just like blown up to anything i could ever imagine. Wow okay that's awesome. He started about a year ago. Like you just start for fun or was it actually starts to go viral now. I think like. I started Because cove ed. I had just come out of like my second day of like an eating disorder program but i had to leave early because like i started and Late i was like i can do this. Like i have a story to share A lot of people on their mike. I could do a better job. And like like i never like. I always never want anyone to feel alone. Like i did Growing up and not having that diverse representation in the media. Okay now that makes a lotta sense. I mean there needs to be people who share a story. That's why i think. I like watching more on. Tiktok is on people share their store like that. There's there's a a thomas stuff. I want to jump into talk with you today about I'm super excited and before we do. I have everything with jamie's tiktok did jamie's instagram. To all her social media and everything she wants me posted by her linked in the bottom description on youtube or a round all platforms as well so. Please check her out. Incredible human please supporter. I would advocate for everybody to go. Watch or listen to her. Go on tiktok live and say what's up because schilling onto it's cool and i go in there and she says what's up to me. It's it's fun but the at definitely go support jamie. She's an incredible incredible human. And the podcast just just disclaimer. I want to open to a second. We posted new episode thursday and tuesday and thursday every single tuesday and thursday. But that's yeah sorry jamie you were just talking to limit about You getting into tiktok as well and you said you started a year ago. I liked the reason behind it in like you being able to share your story with so many other people super important and like why do you feel the need to share your story. A lot of people ask about. I know it's sort of like a big question. Like why do you feel the need to put on tiktok like you have an audience reach. You have other people you want to help like why would you want to share your story. i like. there's a number of reasons. Like one is like i just like i can't be alone in like the similar struggles like i have faced With just like people Judging me before they get to know me. And just this like internalized hatred of fat. And i never really knew what it was until like i started doing my own research and i started like In my own recovery. And i started finding people who have the same opinions of me and i think like ever since i was a small. I always wanted to do something big like. I always wanted to help people and be entertaining and society. Early kind of dim my light because they didn't like how i look and i turned For a lot a lot of years and at one point. I was just like fuck it like. What's the point of like literally hate on an office screen mike. Obviously it's more quantity Online and people can hide hide behind a keyboard. But like there's so many more benefits that i've seen than there are negatives and it's given me like being able to advocate for myself and like others in the process. Do you think like there's other people who having the same stories you were. You've been you know hated on outside and inside of tiktok like do you think that when you're posting stuff like it's actually like helping them and like you when they see it like it seeing that you know somebody else's being confident at like actually like acknowledging it and making it like the normal instead of like what it is for other people were it's just like so like it's a weird thing on social media how people have standards right at like body standards. I hate it. I personally think it's so incredibly horrible way like beauty standards quote unquote. I think that's like the biggest thing. Do you think like what you're doing. And the stuff that you're posting is like helping them realize they are beautiful inside like a lot of your posts. I love the stuff that you're i think it's targeting those people who are having hard time we would you say that you post stuff for other people as just internally for yourself well i saw like it is helping me and my confidence and how i feel about. My other. People are relating. That's pretty much what it was supposed to do. In just like documenting my journey and making sure like kind of filtering myself in the process like maybe helping one or two people. But i get dozens of messages a day. People are like thank you so much. You're so inspiring. Wrong taught me in my journey and light. That is a major reason why i pushed past the. Hey it and might late the trolls. Because there's something bigger and grayer out there. And that. If i can just help one person than like my job is done so i use saying i have helped a lot of people Along the way. And i think it's blown up to anything i could ever match it. Well and now you have that platform you have the followers like you said you just before like you have. What three hundred and eighty thousand followers on talk. Jianghuai frizzy like that. That's a lot of people if you think about it. Like i know there's people would like millions of followers but three hundred and eighty thousand. People is is more than one thousand audience. I think just because like i. It's cold and i haven't been able to lake lake collaborate or see my friends much as i want to be in the real world like i don't feel it like i'm like oh i'm just an ordinary person and that's the way feel about like any celebrity or any tiktok. Her that is just like their people. And i find like when we put these people on data souls. It's like more than how do i value myself. You don't own a celebrity. i'm not like. I don't feel. I am just mean like people who we look up to. I feel like it puts less value on ourselves. I'm putting more value on them. When that's what i've done in my life and that's what i want to get away. You want to humanize like like other celebrities. Instead of what. It does celebrities. Just like i just want to show up authentically and if it helps other people along the way the mets great respect helping me and it already has helped people Along the.

jamie wisenberg tuesday thursday instagram jamie Today second podcast alex fennel youtube a year ago today three hundred and eighty thous millions of followers three hundred and eighty thous more than one thousand first one two people one person second day About a year ago
Being Victimized by Scams is Solvable [Test]

Solvable

04:38 min | 2 years ago

Being Victimized by Scams is Solvable [Test]

"Episodes are out every friday. This is solvable. I'm jacob weisberg there. Only a few real cons that exist and the bones of the story are the same and they've been the same for centuries also maria conaco. Vince would writing about these number of years book. The confidence game explores stories of con-artists opportunists people who build up our trust and then take everything we have think bernie madoff the late investors who destroyed countless lives with false promises and financial theft but before we pledged to fight to abolish scams. Remember this another side to those familiar. Stories to the flip side of our vulnerability to cons is human connection and trust and all the good stuff. So how do we protect our loved ones in ourselves. We'll scams being enduring part of society forever because we refuse or are unable to learn from our mistakes rather than admitting i was dumb. I felt for a scam you say. Oh no no cure all of the mitigating circumstances and it probably wasn't even a scam. So i think that it takes a strong person. It's embarrassing So can scams be solved. Rea- konakov thanks so being victimized by a scam is actually a solvable problem. Maria has gone from investigating the lies. We tell ourselves to mastering the bluff herself by learning to play poker at a world class level and writing about that too so i started by asking her why she so hooked on these concepts of big and small manipulations. My first book was about sherlock holmes. So i've traveled this gamut from you know. How do you be detective to okay. What are the what are the bad guys doing to kind of being the bad guy myself but within a game right so so so there are rules And one of the reasons that i've that it's been such a passion of mine is that i hate to see in re in reality. Not in a game. I hate to see people being taken advantage of. And how often that happens. And how scammers often will target the most vulnerable parts of our population the most vulnerable people and then we as a society target again by blaming them and by saying oh well. You're just stupid. You were just greedy. You were just dumb. You shouldn't have fallen for it. I wouldn't have fallen for it and that just gets me. Yeah well i was going to ask you because of your longstanding interest. I mean this personal for you in any way of you've been scammed yourself or people close to you been victims of scams. I personally have not been scammed. That i know of but one point i always make is that you know. The scams are ones that you're probably not aware of so i. i'm sure i've been scammed on small things and when you're about to get on the subway someone stops you and says hey you know. I'm so sorry. I lost my wallet. Do you have the fair for the subway for the bus for the train. I need to get back to my family. And there's so many excuses and you can do one of two things you can say. I think you're con artist. I'm not going to give you any money on. Walk on you feel shitty. You feel like a bad person because they actually needed you. I've lost my wallet. I've needed help in the past. And i think we bought we probably been on the other side of that and so the trade off is yom maybe get scammed. But i'd rather take the risk of being the victim of scammer in that particular instance and. I'm sure i've been scammed that way. Well that's interesting. I mean i have experienced instill sticks with me from high school. I remember in chicago where i was growing up walking through lincoln park and there was a guy kinda ragged looking walking with a gas can and he stopped me and told me this whole sad story about how he was trying to get back to florida to see a family card run out of gas and he needed the money for gas. Now was probably fifteen years old or something like that. I think i gave him ten dollars. Which would have been a lot of money to me. At the time and i felt good about myself for doing that and then a week later i was walking through the park and there was the same guy looking around with this gas can And it just it sticks with

Jacob Weisberg Maria Conaco Bernie Madoff Vince REA Sherlock Holmes Maria Lincoln Park Chicago Florida
"weisberg" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"weisberg" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Louis weisberg He managed to get a facelift out of the car on the company time on and made the cover story and my friend. Jason smith was taking pictures of louis during the operation with his half of us face removed and he passed on my. Gosh oh my gosh. Luckily i haven't had to encounter or anything like that. Yeah but when i was just gonna say the producer has held accountable so like no matter. What the anchor wants. Some are how awful and how strong their personality is. You have to figure out a way.

Jason smith Louis weisberg louis half
Why Would the Creator of Graham Crackers Be Horrified by Them Today?

BrainStuff

02:26 min | 3 years ago

Why Would the Creator of Graham Crackers Be Horrified by Them Today?

"Harebrained steph. Lauren vogel bomb. Let's face it. One of the best things about making a campfire is making s'mores. The quintessentially american treat consisting of a toasted gooey marshmallow and a square of melted chocolate pressed between two crisp graham crackers. But have you ever wondered where graham crackers came from or where they got their name. The original graham cracker was a health food developed in the eighteen thirties. From the teachings of an american food reformer and religious teacher named sylvester. Graham who by all accounts would be appalled by what's called a graham cracker today which is typically made with refined flour high fructose corn syrup ended up dab of honey for marketing purposes instead graham's original cracker called for just wheat and gram flour a form of whole wheat flour made by grinding the endo sperm winter wheat into a fine powder and mixing it with the brand and wheat jerem it has of course texture and nutty flavor the resulting cracker contained no sugar fat and often had to be softened by soaking or boiling before eating. We spoke with new york-based food historian. Sarah weisberg johnson. She said it's funny. That of all the things that he talks about with his health reform. That's the one thing that gets widely adopted and has his name. Graham flour gets adopted by people who may not even be aware of him even towards the end of the nineteenth century and persists into some of the twentieth century. You hear about graham gems and gram bread. Cookbooks up to the nineteen forties and fifties graham. Who was not a doctor. Although he sometimes went by dr graham was horrified by the over processing and enriching of wheat flour and believed that the loss of fiber and other nutrients and white flour ruined consumer health in eighteen. Thirty seven graham published a pamphlet entitled a treatise on bread and bread making in the intro. He wrote thousands in civic. Life will for years and perhaps as long as they live. Eat the most miserable trash. The kim be imagined in the form of bread. He was basically advocating for whole-wheat homemade bread and was thus hailed by the philosopher. Poet ralph waldo emerson. As the profit of brand bread. Graham was a proponent and follower of vegetarianism founding. The american vegetarian society eighteen fifty.

Lauren Vogel Graham Crackers Sarah Weisberg Johnson Steph Graham Graham Cracker Graham Flour Sylvester Graham Gems Dr Graham New York Ralph Waldo Emerson American Vegetarian Society
Election Security is (mostly) Solvable

Solvable

05:00 min | 3 years ago

Election Security is (mostly) Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. So you can talk about fake news and propaganda and ASTROTURF ING. All of those things hacked the greater process that conversation around the election. Election meddling undermines with sits at the foundation of American. Democracy confidence in our voting system. Whether hacking takes the form of masking the original source of a campaign message to make it seem like it comes from the grass roots, so called ASTROTURF. For disseminating intentionally false. It all leads Americans to question the legitimacy of the democratic process. In Two thousand sixteen, we discovered russian-backed hackers will responsible for disinformation campaigns in response Congress directed three hundred eighty million dollars to the fifty states to boost election security, but did it really help. Is it useful to compare electoral outcomes to poll results? You're not gonNA believe it right. The problem of voting as opposed to any other computer security mechanism. Is that after the fact? It's part. Is there a problem with the expectation? We have then that the a winner of election ought to be declared immediately, so yes, a slower process would enable us to do more checking before announcing anything. The American people don't like that. Even going to sleep before knowing is bad. With increasingly long election fees I'd sleep better on election hearing the Mike candidate one, but wouldn't we all sleep better knowing that whatever the result it was guaranteed to be accurate. The tech is real tech assault. None of what you've described is exotic or untried. Why is it been so difficult to convince other states to to put in place some of these already available voting techniques. Cause the problems are not technical, the problems or political. Elections security is mostly solvable. Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologists. He teaches cybersecurity at the Harvard Kennedy School. I Co host Malcolm Bradwell talked with Schneier about the threats that loom over the vote this fall when we talk about elections being hacked. What does that mean I'm assuming that there are fifty different things that fall into that category. So we'll talk about the hacking the voting process. It's a process by which you cast your vote. We also talk about hacking the broader electoral process so when the Hack Democratic National Committee and posted a dump a lot of information online. They weren't hacking the vote. They were hacking the overall election process, so you can talk about fake news and propaganda and Astroturf, and those things hacked the greater process that conversation around the election. And that's one very separate branch, the other branches hacking the vote itself or the process by which you and I go to vote and there you have four places where you can affect things sort of affect the outcome. The first registration process. And we've read about and seen different hacks on the voting rolls so that when you go to vote, you can't at that point. This particular kind of hacking. Is it really about taking people off the rolls? A couple of things in California some years ago, people had their party. Affiliation changed from Republican to Democrat. You can change the address of somebody, so they go to vote. And they were told to go to a different Pole, and some of these are easy. Many states have. Online systems to change your registration aren't well indicated. Others is to Pull people off the voting rolls. Others are to erase the voting rolls. What happens if we get to election day? In a certain state in the voting rolls don't work, and we don't know why, so a lot of things against the voting rolls. The second is the thing we talk about all the time. which is vote itself. Is Your vote recorded accurately? The third. Is the tabulation process matter how you vote? There's this sort of automated sort of manual process by which the numbers out of each machine get increasingly aggregated the numbers in the the building the numbers in the precinct, the numbers in the town of the city, the state all the way up to the national, if if that matters. And then the last which I think people don't think about a lot is the reporting process and we have seen, and this was something that we think was thwarted in in twenty eighteen. Erroneous reporting. where the number right, but the press release says the opposite.

Bruce Schneier Astroturf Jacob Weisberg Harvard Kennedy School Hack Democratic National Commi Congress Assault Mike Malcolm Bradwell California
Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

Solvable

05:09 min | 3 years ago

Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. There is a lack of accountability for police, violence and one part of. Solving that is to give federal prosecutors more tools, so they can actually prosecute this cases. Approximately a thousand people killed during police encounters in the United States every year. And in fact, that number is held steady for nearly twenty years. Around half of those killed or white. Black Americans are more than twice as likely to die at the hands of police. They are killed disproportionately to their overall representation in the population. I'm thinking about. Say The shooting of Philander Castille. CAPLESS Tamir Rice twelve year, old boy, who was shot and killed by an officer when playing in a park in Cleveland. How do we achieve racial justice while protecting public safety? Lawyer Cheer Baynes believes the federal. Government has a key role to play. What exactly would you like to see? Happen there for Congress to lower the intense standard from willfulness recklessness, so that it would be a federal crime recklessly deprive someone of their rights under color of law to recklessly use excessive force for all the Americans who died during police encounters in less than two percent of cases, does an officer end up being charged with a crime? When you were at Doj how many times did specific language of willful thwart possible prosecution of of an officer? You think you felt a done something wrong. Routinely, that was the biggest barrier. It was always the central concern. Kira. Who's devoted his career to ending impunity for officers who commit crimes against citizens thinks we can fix this. The problem of lack of accountability for police violence is solvable. Cheering Baines is the director of Legal Strategies de Moth a racial justice organization before that he worked at the US Department of Justice, serving a senior counsel to the head the civil. Rights Division, that's the division that investigated. Ferguson Missouri and sued the city for unconstitutional policing and court practices. Baynes Co wrote the Ferguson report. Malcolm Bradwell spoke to Baynes about what needs to be done to solve the persistent problem of police impunity at the national level. To critical components are lowering the intense standard for the federal government to prosecute active excessive force criminally and using federal consent decrees to address systemic misconduct. You've been working on this question of how to make police better for quite some time right? Yes, actually. It's been an issue that's been. An issue that I've been distressed by want to do something about since I was a young kid. Actually the Rodney King case happened in the beating of Rodney King. One thousand, nine, hundred, one I was ten years old, and there are a lot of high profile incidents in the hundred ninety s with I'm dirty, yellow Louima and many other high profile cases of police violence police killings. Finish cared about as a high schooler for sure I can remember that were you in high school Chelmsford High School? It's a small town in Massachusetts next to the city of Lowell, maybe about thirty thousand thirty five thousand people. It wasn't like you were. LIVING IN LA or living in the Bronx where Ahmadou was shot, it was you were these were instance miles away. That nonetheless caught your attention. Absolutely these are national stories and I was very interested in. Civil Rights history even civil rights law. The role of lawyers in the civil rights movement. I think maybe juxtaposed that history and the principles underlying that movement with what I was seeing. Play out in terms of police violence in the country. At that time, and actually can remember. An organization called the stolen lives project that would collect information about the people who have been killed by police, disproportionately young black man. That is something that I recall, so. It's something I've. been working on for a long time ended up working on that some more in law school, focusing on it, and then it on my first job after clerking for a federal judge was to actually prosecute police misconduct cases including police violence. How early on you decide that? You wanted to become a lawyer depressingly early? Han actually I think I thought in high school. That would become a lawyer. What did you think of that decision? Well I'm an Indian kid and the child immigrants and so. I think a lot of people in that boat might relate. My mother wanted me to be a doctor. That would million other Indian children. Yeah Yeah. It's a common refrain and. Short of being a doctor, a lawyer was pretty good, so. But you know my family wasn't focused on these issues. These weren't the issues that they confronted him and they cared about it. In the sense research, generally aware my grandmother used to describe all this work as a community service or volunteer work and I'd have to actually get paid to do this job.

Officer Chelmsford High School Cheer Baynes DOJ Rodney King Jacob Weisberg Rights Division United States Baynes Co Philander Castille Ferguson Missouri Baines Congress Tamir Rice Massachusetts Cleveland Kira LA
You have to outwork everybody else.

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:40 min | 3 years ago

You have to outwork everybody else.

"I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lived check from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than it began on a couch. Hey, everyone, the show might look and sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the scam is working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today joined by a powerhouse of the music industry, Julie Greenwald she is the CEO and chairman of Atlantic records during her time in the business. She's helped. Advance the careers of Bruno Mars. Kelly Clarkson at Sharon. Just to name a few chewy were really excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skin from the couch. They you for having me so truly. We're GONNA. Jump in, ask you to skim your resume for us. I went to two lane university go graduated in nineteen ninety wine, and then I did a program called teach for America where I taught in the calliope projects, and then I started working at Rush Management With Lear Coin Your Cohen's assistant from ninety two to ninety. Re Unwind Ninety. Three moved over to detmer hurts and became the promotions coordinator, and then from ninety three to ninety nine worked my way up industrial records, and then ninety nine took over island records and became the head of marketing for island addict. Jam. Then I'm not quite sure when I became president with now it's not to get causey with my dates, but I do know in two thousand four I. I came over to Atlantic records online I've been at Atlantic records since two thousand four Julie with something that is not on your kind of official bio that we should know about you I. Don't think I officially. put down. That I am a mom with two kids by that is probably my most favorite part of my life is that I am a twenty year old and a sixteen year old. That's great I want to kind of just start with the elephant in the room that we're all dealing with which is how to run companies amid stay global pandemic, the music industry is interesting, because in some ways you know, it seems like you have a lot of talented people who are at home, and a moment of reflection in some sorts and I'm sure they'll be a lot of good hopefully music to come out with it. But how are you thinking about this time? So for the artists that have been able to continue to give us, music is been business as usual in terms of. Thinking of Creative Marketing and promotional. For these artists rollout there songs, obviously facing different challenges, which is. Creation of music video photo shoots. We've sent artist green screens. We've sent them ring lights, and so been really just trying to keep everybody focused on the fact that the world is listening to music right now to help through such a terrible time, and so many artists are giving great music to continue out there. They're a bunch of artists that still need to get into a studio. Need a collaboration and those artists. Were just trying to be really good partners and friends to down and tell them that you know. Hey, it's okay. Take this time, maybe just right in a notebook and try to just be you know thoughtful, and in good partners to our artists that are staring at the fact that they may not be able to tour. You know for the. Future and so we're just trying to make sure that they see the light to buy you know. Streaming has really offered us a way to share their art and music and doing these live streams social. That, they can stay connected to their hands. I think we've been incredibly lucky. In terms of all the businesses that are really been affected were continuing to. Market and promote during this time. And as a leader, how have you been trying to set your team up remotely and keep them focused at a time when there's so much uncertainty? So, I personally jumped writing at first and I do weekly email. It's very personal. Email to my whole company every Sunday night to talk about okay. We're about to start in next week. Know Week two week three and I share my stories and I let them know that. Now I'm in a house with two crazy kids and husband and a dog just diagnosed. Diagnosed with cancer and Chemo and and so you know I let them know that I to going through you know challenging situations, and then also set up a time for every department where I call it either morning tea, or after key, where every assistant coordinator manager director on up gets an opportunity to see me on the screen and talk to me in. In us. We questions so I can kind of let them know what we're talking about. Upstairs and keep sharing the fact that we don't know when we're GONNA. Come back when it's okay because we're working. How can I help you and in really like? Let them see that they can. Individually email may call me facetime with me and I'm right there in the. The canoe with them.

Julie Greenwald Kelly Clarkson Bruno Mars Danielle Weisberg Coordinator Head Of Marketing America Assistant Coordinator Manager Rush Management Chairman President Trump Causey Cohen Official Cancer Chemo
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 3 years ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 4 years ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

podnews

03:40 min | 4 years ago

Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

"Duo, lingo launched today. What the company claims is the first of its kind ever knew and welcome to the dueling. Go French podcast, it's a jewel podcast in French and English aims to help people understand French using compelling stories. It's presented by, and Goffin and Bhutto Boya a journalist, lawyer and podcast producer based in New York City in France guest a group of online publishers has set up a distribution of podcasts, working group to quote put in place. The necessary agreements with rights holders and to define best practice. The group mentions indexing of our assess feats, editorial presentation access to statistics respect for the integrity of the content and more about complete well Jacob Weisberg. Pushkin industries have released their latest podcast making a killing as new premium podcast on luminary this week conviction and new book by Denise Mina. Stars, a strong female protagonist who's obsessed by true crime podcasts and decides one day to investigate one of the unsolved crimes herself. It gets a positive review in the Washington Post one of the benefits of the open technical infrastructure of real podcast is that you can use the app, you want rather than a publishes app. The could have all kinds of other code in it like the app from Spanish football league alita, which listened to your microphone and worked out your location to discover bars that we using pirated video stream. Host read ads best or can you use a pre produced spot at instead, the sonic truth covers data from megaphones, Ken Lagaan ah, in an episode that we linked to today from our show notes, and our newsletter as he says, in an accompanying article some campaigns may require the power of an influence edge, just laying out the reasons why they love a product others may be better suited to a pre produced spot with an orchestral swell halfway through the ad and some campaigns may even require both. Editor spoke at podcast day last week. That's me with three podcasts that everyone can learn from we linked to what he said in podcast form, from our episode notes and our newsletter. Australia's at pro 'em costs offers a special. Podcasting music license is it at last away of licensing music for podcasts? We wrote an article on that. You'll find it links from our episode notes and our newsletter. Quick answer year. Nah, Spotify watch your editor has now been given the new interface, which gives parody for music, and podcasts, which is nice short. Howard points out that the ability to advertise podcast listeners, which we reported on yesterday is only available to large corporate advertisers for now. And we linked to Gustav soda Strom, the chief are indeed officer from the company giving a forty minute presentation on the company's history. I used to have a soda Strom, but I got bored filling up the gas bottles in podcast. Today. CNN films have launched Apollo eleven beyond the moon podcasts. Commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven lunar mission, your episodes of the true crime podcast. The lady vanishes have themselves vanished after two and a half million episodes. The podcast is following up new leads the football history dude, looks at the hundred years of the NFL that football. This is uncomfortable is a new weekly podcast about life in your twenties, and thirties, and how money Metis with it, and spectacular failures launches today, a ten episode season of the most spectacular business failures of all

Editor Football France Gustav Soda Strom Jacob Weisberg New York City Denise Mina Washington Post Ken Lagaan Pushkin Industries NFL Australia CNN Goffin Bhutto Boya Howard Producer Officer Hundred Years
How should we replace the Apple Podcasts Chart?

podnews

01:47 min | 5 years ago

How should we replace the Apple Podcasts Chart?

"In the latest poll news. Spotify has announced sound up bootcamp, Australia for aspiring podcasters who identifies aboriginal or Torres Strait islanders to take part in a four day residential podcasting workshop to be held in Sydney in November, signed up, bootcamp, US received over eighteen thousand applications. Earlier this year, mid roll has released the newest version of the company's listener survey, Eighty-one percent of minerals. Listeners, pay attention to podcast ads, seventy two percent of people who've listened to podcasts for more than four years have bought from podcast advertises as lots more data. Jacob Weisberg is leaving slate probably best known to podcast listeners as the co host of Trump cast. He's off to work with Malcolm plant wells, new audio venture kost podcasts. Now valuable for distribution on Spotify. The company has announced we understand that Acosta ads will benefit from pass through so acoss can still use dynamic. Ads in that content rather than Spotify cashing all of their audience. The apple podcast shot is screwed. How should we replace it as the title of an editorial from pod news is editor James Cridland. That's me highlighting some recent activity around manipulation of the chart, including a Twitter threat from Kevin Goldberg. The question I say is whether we can get a truly global replacement for the apple podcast chart. One less susceptible to being cheated one more Representative of the industry as a whole, a one that is just as acceptable for passion podcasters as for the backs podcast publishes

Spotify United States Donald Trump Torres Strait James Cridland Apple Jacob Weisberg Sydney Kevin Goldberg Twitter Acosta Pod News Representative Australia Malcolm Editor Seventy Two Percent Eighty-One Percent Four Years Four Day
Panoply suddenly closes its podcast content division

podnews

01:55 min | 5 years ago

Panoply suddenly closes its podcast content division

"From Brisbane apple, the latest pod news panoply has announced that it's letting go of its entire editorial staff and is no longer developing new podcasts or handling direct sales. It's focusing on megaphone. It's podcast hosting platform which powers eight percent of the US top four hundred podcasts and which the company calls the clear leader in podcasting technology and advertising services, Jacob Weisberg, chair and editor in chief of panoply. Zona slate group is also leaving the company. He's an ounce. He's launching a new audio company with Malcolm clad well, flatter a company which has been handling micro payments for bloggers for eight years is now handling podcast contributions. It's mobile, I and works regardless of what apple podcast service you use according to Lintas Alsan he told pod news, they'll be supporting the radicals payments emerging standard. Shortly yesterday we repeated the guardians claim that they were about to launch their first daily news. Podcast, John Dennis tweeted that he presented daily news podcast from the guardian for five years between two thousand and five and twenty ten has soon. We forget in an open letter to all podcast apps in early August, Jared, Santo notes that overcast gives the total subscribe account every time it checks your RSS feed and asks for other podcast apps to do the same and many apps have already started to do this. We're seeing feed been breaker. Overcast news, blur in our logs seems like a good idea. It's the first birthday a podcast, one in Australia, grants, Todt hill. The units boss is interviewed him being t, meanwhile, Tyler, moody from turn podcast is interviewed and add exchanger. Molly Beck who runs messy. FM podcast host is profiled by Northeastern University

Zona Slate Lintas Alsan John Dennis Jacob Weisberg Molly Beck Apple Editor In Chief United States Northeastern University Malcolm Tyler Todt Hill Jared Australia Santo Eight Percent Eight Years Five Years
President, USO and President Trump discussed on Dave Ramsey

Dave Ramsey

00:15 sec | 5 years ago

President, USO and President Trump discussed on Dave Ramsey

"With, President Trump the president's former. Personal attorney Michael Cohen this week pleaded. Guilty to campaign finance charges in, connection with the payments Weisberg. Steel comes after the. Head of the National Enquirer David pecker was also granted immunity the tabloid reportedly

President Trump USO President George W Bush Giants Uso Dot Org Council Augusto Pinochet Pinochet National Enquirer Brett Cavanaugh Fraud Weisberg Attorney Michael Cohen Ghana North Carolina Mike Pence Brad Kavanagh United States Derek Holland
President Trump, Trump and Twitter discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

01:28 min | 5 years ago

President Trump, Trump and Twitter discussed on Mark Levin

"In the custody of the United States somewhere around the US, in, shelters special counsel's investigation is taken a new turn reviewing President Trump's Twitter feed according to the New York Times Robert Muller, is said to be, interested in Trump's. Twitter attacks directed at former FBI director James Comey and attorney general Jeff Sessions. At the same time we learned from the Wall Street Journal that Trump's longtime financial chief, Ellen Weisberg Wiesel Burg has been subpoenaed to testify. Before a federal grand jury in? The criminal investigation of former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen correspondent Jeff Zeleny gauges reaction, there's no one who is who knows more about Trump finances then Mr. Weisselberg so I am, told by a Republican close to the, White House said. This to me it's getting closer and closer to his inner circle how do you. Think he feels when I was asking for the President's reaction Arizona authorities are trying to come to terms with the circumstances involved in the fatal shooting of a state, trooper last night authorities, say four troopers. Responded to reports of someone throwing rocks at vehicles on interstate ten west of. Phoenix Arizona public safety director Frank mills dead says when they attempted to take the suspect, into custody he's somehow got a hold of a. Plainclothes troopers weapon for two shots? Fatally wounding one of my troopers And, shooting another one this has has no criminal record but has a history of mental. Illness I'm Barbara Kusak Let's face it.

President Trump Donald Trump Twitter Mr. Weisselberg Ellen Weisberg Wiesel Burg Arizona Director Jeff Sessions James Comey United States Robert Muller Wall Street Journal FBI New York Times Jeff Zeleny Special Counsel Barbara Kusak Attorney White House
1 dead in Southwest Airlines flight emergency landing in Philadelphia - live updates

Howie Carr

01:13 min | 6 years ago

1 dead in Southwest Airlines flight emergency landing in Philadelphia - live updates

"Emergency landing in philadelphia i'm tim weisberg for wbz news forty nine degrees under cloudy skies your abc six forecast coming up a person is dead after a southwest airlines plane made an emergency landing in philadelphia and engine failure forced the plane with one hundred and forty eight passengers and crew aboard to ground after it left new york city on route to dallas ntsb chairman robert some walt confirmed the death in a press briefing short time ago conservative supreme court justice neal gorsuch is helping hand the trump administration set back on its immigration policy course it sided with liberal justices and voting five to four against the federal law that requires mandatory deportation of immigrants for violent crimes the court found the law unconstitutionally vague the decision strikes downey provisions of the immigration and nationality act that defines a crime of violence bridges and public buildings across massachusetts will light up blue tonight and honor in memory of fallen yama police officer sean gannon the thirty two year old gannon eight new bedford native was shot and killed last thursday while serving arrest warrant against twenty nine year old tom the tanna which a career criminal governor charlie baker is director of the commonwealth to light up locations across the state with blue lights in his honor those sites include the leonard jacomb bunker hill memorial bridge in.

Director Charlie Baker Bedford Officer Downey Chairman Ntsb New York Leonard Jacomb Bunker Hill Mem Philadelphia TOM Sean Gannon Massachusetts Neal Gorsuch Walt Dallas Tim Weisberg Forty Nine Degrees Twenty Nine Year
Stocks edge up as tariff fears recede

Howie Carr

00:43 sec | 6 years ago

Stocks edge up as tariff fears recede

"Four teen twenty wbs them thirty nine degrees under cloudy skies i'm tim weisberg wbs news this is a bloomberg market minute stocks closed higher after president trump announced tariffs on steel and aluminum imports that were less harsh than many investors had feared canada and mexico are exempt from the tariffs while negotiations on nafta continue a late afternoon relief rally after the president spoke with the dow up ninety three points to twenty four thousand eight ninety five the sp 500 gaining almost half a percent the nasdaq was up fourtenths of a percent healthcare companies broadly higher today is pharmacy benefits manager express scripts jumped almost nine percent after health insurer cigna agreed to buy it cigna dropped more than eleven percent bloomberg.

Canada President Trump Bloomberg Tim Weisberg Mexico Nafta Express Scripts Thirty Nine Degrees Eleven Percent Nine Percent