26 Burst results for "Weinberg"

"Scrubs" producer Eric Weinberg pleads not guilty to assaulting 5 women

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

"Scrubs" producer Eric Weinberg pleads not guilty to assaulting 5 women

"An executive producer for the hit TV show scrubs will stay in custody at least for now Eric Weinberg has been denied bail after pleading not guilty to sexually assaulting 5 women prosecutors say in each case Weinberg lured the women to photo shoots and assaulted them instead Weinberg was arrested earlier this month after being charged with 18 felony counts including rape and other sex crimes involving the use of force his lawyers asked that Weinberg be released pending his next court appearance prosecutors objected calling Weinberg a potential danger to society

Eric Weinberg Weinberg
Long-Time TV Producer, Writer and Rapist Eric Weinberg Arrested

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Long-Time TV Producer, Writer and Rapist Eric Weinberg Arrested

"Is it veteran TV producer and writer named Eric Weinberg? He's been charged with 18 counts of sexual assault by LA prosecutors. This guy worked for a long time on the TV show scrubs. He was co executive producer, also worked on California, he was initially, listen to this. He was initially arrested in July and released on $3.25 million bond. Was re arrested Tuesday and again, released on a $5 million bond. Do the tallies in your head. The charges are about a series of rapes that the cops say occurred between 2012 and 2019. LAPD says Weinberg was a predator. He'd single out women in the 20s and 30s in grocery stores, coffee shops, other places and try to convince them to participate in a photo shoot. If they agreed to have the picture taken by him, his MO was to rape them during the secluded session at his home. And of course, the studio is in his home. This guy worked a lot. I mean, this guy has many credits up until the end of the first decade of the 21st century. He was co EP for more than a hundred episodes of scrubs, show ran from 2001 to 2007. 5 time Emmy nominee supervising producer and writer on about another two dozen episodes of that series. His most recent credit was in 2016, exec producer of a comedy show called graves, guys, these creeps are right there in broad daylight. How much you want to bet part of the reason why he does this. I'm sure he has a compulsion because he's a perfect. But part of the reason why he does this, I bet he gets sick and tired and extremely jealous of seeing so many actors wine and darn beautiful women without any hard work at all.

Eric Weinberg Lapd Weinberg LA California Emmy
"weinberg" Discussed on Crypto Voices

Crypto Voices

05:15 min | 4 months ago

"weinberg" Discussed on Crypto Voices

"This is a synthetic media, like some kind of wild percentage of people still sort of think it's real. And I think that just says something about human nature and our tendency and impulse to rely on our eyes and what we can see and it can be very hard to unhear something that we've heard and that isn't necessarily a problem that can be solved by tech, right? That sort of a human problem. And so there's lots of people thinking about inoculation techniques and pre bunking and different ways of enabling people to sort through information more reliably. But it's not just a tech problem. And I think those are the sort of thorny issues that I that I love and that get me fired up or sort of understanding how fundamental truths about humanity continue to persist even in a world that is really rapidly evolving. And has a lot of moving pieces. You know, if you go back to just pre social media or pre ubiquitous Internet to be persuasive, you had to have, you had to have an element of being compelling, right? So you had to have arguments and you had to have discourse and that's not always true, but there was more predicate in argument than maybe now where there's this sort of reptilian appeal to short and engaging videos and clicks and ephemeral knowledge. And the challenge that I see is that if you're going to connect the world in technology or with the Internet or with social media or whether it's centralized or decentralized, you can still aggregate ideas. And so when you get aggregated ideas, you start having cohorts that coalesce around those aggregated ideas and they start taking those as gospel, right? And so then you really have tribalism and thought and then it's not so much about veracity or a verified accounts or fact checking, it just becomes like a battle of narratives. And so one of the things I find super interesting about you and the mission of ex ante is that that's a really hard problem to take on. And yet someone needs to be thinking about how to, I don't know, it's almost like disaggregating some of the power of the Internet. But I'd love to, what is the, is there a solution set out there? Are you seeing things as you're looking in the marketplace? What's exciting in that space? Well, I think Alec and I think you sort of are gesturing towards this.

Alec
"weinberg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:45 min | 7 months ago

"weinberg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Peter king and Richard Weinberg from that studio so far far away. And Lydia, thank you and what do we stand for? Justice and the American way. God bless New York God bless America and thank you for listening. WABC radio is proud to celebrate 100 years from October 1st, 1921 to music radio to talk radio's crown jewel worldwide and beyond. And WLR FM, Hampton bays. From around the world to a round the block, this is a WABC evening news brief. 79° still mostly sunny at 6 o'clock at evening. I'm bob Brown Manhattan DA album Bragg feeling more and more pressure tonight to drop murder charges against northern Manhattan bodega cleric Jose Alba, the 61 year old is charged and the stabbing death of an ex con who attacked him behind the counter over a bag of chips a bipartisan group of city council members saying the DA's controversial progressive approach to law enforcement was rewarding the guilty and punishing the innocent new video obtained by the post showing album trying to avoid the confrontation. What's up with you? I don't want to promote you. The group also calling Bragg's handling of ABBA's case, particularly jarring this in light of his generally soft on crime policies. Fernando Mateo spokesperson for the group united bodegas of America talking to CBS two

Richard Weinberg WABC radio bob Brown Manhattan DA album B Peter king northern Manhattan Jose Alba Hampton bays Lydia WABC New York America DA Bragg ABBA Fernando Mateo united bodegas of America CBS
"weinberg" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

04:43 min | 7 months ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Are like very talented computer science type people, right? Like Olympic math. I mean, vitalik probably one of the smartest math people in the world. And so I guess maybe to Zack's point, the dollars go in and then the people follow because inevitably we sort of have the lizard brain of chasing opportunities to go make money. And so I think that is kind of the leading indicator of this stuff and it's not comparing it to the average Amazon person or whatever. These are, for the most part, pretty talented computer scientists that are spending potentially some part of their life's work on this when I feel like there might be better uses, but I don't know, I don't have the super strong opinion on that. So if we kind of continue on this path, let's take a vitalik or somebody like that. There's plenty of people who are like hey, these people are really smart. They're choosing to go work here. They obviously are choosing to go work here. As a stated reason because they think they can create quote unquote good in the world. It feels like everyone says good in the world. Whatever that means at this point in public discourse. But how much should people be able to evaluate? Is good being produced in the world? Externally versus kind of more traditional venture capital style of like, let's just go find great people. And then they'll tell us where they want to go spend their time and effort. How do you think about smart people are working on things that aren't actually productive versus the smart people will eventually figure out where the most productive uses of their time are. So we should just trust them. Well, I don't think it's, I don't think those are the two choices. I think in general, you can look at the productivity of the dollars you're deploying by seeing ultimately what comes out of them in terms of companies. What is the output? What's the equity value of the companies that we're creating? And that's a good proxy for like, are we spending our time on interesting things? Because interesting things tend to be worth a lot of money, right? Like that's just kind of how this capitalism one O one, I guess. So I would look at what's the amount of money that we're actually seeing come out of this from an equity value standpoint. Based on the dollars that we've put in. And if you think of the venture life cycle of what, like a typical venture fund, you'd expect to see some early indications, 7 years in, ten years, something like that. So, you know, I hate can't believe I'm about to say this, but yeah, we are a little early in the evaluation of the company. I can't believe I said it's a flip, by the way. We're going to Weinberg said it's early. Exactly. However, you'd want to see long-term real recurring non speculative trading revenue. You have to decouple what a speculative trading revenue from what isn't. And my fear right now is like most of the revenue that we're seeing in the ecosystem, whether it's in the exchanges, which are definitely the best business model out there, right? Whether it's like FTX or coinbase or any other groups. Or whether it's in the NFT trading platforms like open sea and whatnot. Another good

vitalik Zack Olympic Amazon Weinberg
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"Question totally terry. Thank you so much for talking to me. I rip good to see you. You're so smart. I hope you stay healthy. And i appreciate your time and and talking to me about this first of all talk to you about anything because i love you and it's such a joy to be able to kind of walk back down certain parts of our super long memory lane. I'm really excited to hear what everybody else has to say too. I know i know and we really cool. Because i think i get these questions asked all the time and so it's nice that we were able to share it so i love that you're doing this and i'm absolutely the real to be a part.

terry
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"Must see. Tv became a big thing for nbc. Where do you feel like the office fit into that. Legacy of must see tv comedy on. Nbc l. Maybe you know this is Arrogant but were integral to the nbc. Thursday night lineup. I mean we are integral to the conversation about what a seminal. Nbc comedy is. I absolutely believe that. I believe that. We defied all odds of becoming a successful comedy. Who would have ever thought we were going to do. Two hundred twenty episodes. I mean think about it. We got to five episodes pickup and then we got a thirteen episode pickup really. We didn't get a full season so not only define all of those odds but also kind of redefining. What comedy was on television. And introducing people onto a world Might felt different but they also felt like it was so familiar to them and that you could really because people come to comedies for two reasons really to laugh their faces off and to fall in love with a cast a family a workplace. You know but he comedy whatever it is and i think having the extensive cast that we had i mean what did we have towards the end of the run or two characters fifteen garissa. Who does that and every single one of you had people who just loved you. Everybody had their fans. I mean we got our tv land future comedy classic in season. Three or four or something. It's right here yes. So what year is that. Not a date on how we hold on. Now there's a date it's probably on the other side otis. Two thousand and eight thousand and eight so we were classic already in season three to four four and the fact that we were considered that and look at it. You know now. I mean i have young kids. I went to a kid's bar mitzvah last year. They're authored in fourteen. I was accosted. It was like i was a celebrity at this bar mitzvah because these kids were obsessed with the show and we always said we had to hit it hit demographic from the beginning that was under eighteen but now we have the show has had a life and then another life and another life and i really do believe that we are are part of that conversation. What do you remember about the decision to end. The show pain hated it. It was one of the worst memories that i have of our beautiful love story. It's always hard when you're making decisions about when you move forward on the show and when you don't from a business standpoint which i can't respond to because i wasn't on that side of the business at that point but it was really fucking hard. It was hard all the conversations we had you know from from being executive producer sitting with our cast talking to you know the studio the networking. It's kind of a blur now. Because i tried to push it out of my consciousness but it was it was excruciatingly painful and I think it hurt a lot of us. I don't know if really talked about it. But when we shop the last episode. I was so emotionally and physically exhausted. I think i cried for the last but when we were all taking that very last shot i have a book that nbc may press. I'm sure you've looked at it and my face. Is this big. I'm bright red. And i am crying. Might i couldn't believe that it was over. I felt like we had so much more to do. And it was over and took a long time to have a lot of my own kind of internal things about the show that you know. I'll you deal with as a professional. It was excruciatingly hard. Yeah what are you most proud of about to show. How do i put that in one thing dude. Most proud that every single one of us that were involved in the first season of our show. We came to work every day and said if we're only making six total episodes let's make the best episodes that we know how to make and let's come in here and do the work and do it with love and do it with everything that we have do first cells you know and we all show up on that lot every single day. And may i getting shot this and made an incredibly beautiful show. And it was for all of us whether you're in the cast where the crew whether you're in accounting whether you are in props catering whatever everybody came and just like we were on our own island. I think that we all love did so much. And everybody came and did their job and did really well and for each other. I could tell you a million other things. But i think i'm most proud of that being given that opportunity and making our family you cry. I hope here trying to not say anything. I wanted to get your audio there. No it was great. Yeah i Everybody that came in. i played them a clip. And we don't have that ability here. God gannet no but you'll know it's the last line of the show. It's jenna sorry pam. There's beauty in ordinary things. Isn't that kind of the point. I feel like greg wrote that episode. He wrote that last line. that's what he thought about. What did you think it was about. I thought it was. I thought it was too. I thought it was taking something that could have been the most simple and uninteresting idea about a group of people you know going to work in a dying business and turning it into something. That was so much bigger than that was bigger than them. It was bigger than us. All of us yeah. It was finding joy and using opportunities to just make people laugh. You know and be able to escape the maybe the doldrums of their own life and go be with their friends all of those little beautiful jams that all of you guys were able to create every episode. I mean we can still probably go back through. And i'll see things i never saw before and i've seen those things a million times and now is the whole idea you know. Everything was calculated to homer. Simpson was sitting in the. you know. Bullpen all those. Everything was perfectly calculated just to for fun of people being able to find the little easter eggs. That's another thing about greg. He's he's like a grown child. It was uc spoke. He did these things with his hands because it was so fun. You know he always just wanted people to have fun and joy. Even if you're an adult you could still just be a kid. Answer a.

nbc garissa otis jenna pam greg Simpson uc
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"First minute and a half of the show so it was having to maneuver a little bit differently as becoming a kind of network person as opposed to his partner on the shell fascinating. Yeah i never put it within. That context that at that moment the people that he was having to do this. Push poll for that episode. Was you guys. I was the person. That would call the network greg or the studio and say he's not doing that or we're not changing miss or 'cause he did not like those confrontational moments and i always said you want confrontation. Just bring it over to mama. And i'll take care of it now. I'm the person on the other end of the phone getting you know. Will we want to do this. We need to do that. You know and giving notes you know on scripts was crazy but it wasn't. It was a you know. My instincts didn't change his knew. That was way smarter than me. And i you know i could. Only you know the one thing that greg said to me way back in the beginning when we first started this relationship and he started developing. The show was what's important to me is that you tell me how you feel. How does the episode make you feel. How did the relationships of the characters in this episode make you feel you know. Do you feel moved enough to feel motivated enough. Do you feel and so. I would look at the scripts and just think about. How did it make me feel. I didn't look at it and say what all the structure isn't so much blow la roses about. Are we accomplishing this. Really quiet moment between jim pam. Is there something going on with the accountants in the in the corner that were peaking in on you know but the rest of the offices insane so those little things. Are you feeling them. Are you picking up on. Them is really about how it made me feel and i. That's how i continued to produce from that point on how to characters.

greg jim pam la
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"You were in the room for the george. If not all of the casting sessions. Was there anyone who walked in right away. That was ultimately cast that you went. That's the person john. Steve steve's different story. he didn't really audition. It was a really interesting dish process. Because i don't think any one of us had ever really kind of been through anything like that before because actors would come in and read a scene and they would improv. You know in greg with throw ridiculous little lines out and say go. Tell me you just got into your refrigerator this morning or disease really kind of weird random things and we saw so many actors greg myself can howard ben allison and phyllis would be in the conference room. Reveille for eight or ten hours a day. Just just a constant and allison. She had such a deep knowledge of you know standups second cities in groundlings and people bet we'd never seen before and so there were so many people that were so interesting to us and i think as we whittled things down and he became all of you. We knew it was all of you because everybody didn't fit and mold that we were looking for but they brought something special and beautiful. It was like making a puzzle. Everybody just fit in so beautifully. For jim and pam and dwight etc talking a little bit about doing screen filming them in the office as opposed to doing regular studio in network test. How rare was that. At that time we were the i. If i remember correctly and the reason was very it was selfish on our part because a we thought they will never make this show to actors because at that time actors used to walk into the president's office and there would be twenty people behind the president and two people would be asked to perform a scene or something with all these eyeballs on them and it was the most unnatural process. Anybody could ever imagine. And then i remember when i went to nbc and became a programmer. And we were asking people to do that. I counted is not wanna do that. I want to put people on tape because it doesn't you don't get the real person because they're so busy performing for room and so so yeah i think we were the first of its kind and i think because of that it started kind of shift the way people were auditioning do you remember phyllis course know i mean reading and anything about the discussion around casting her. Yes i mean. A part of the process was either she would run the camera or alison would run the camera and nfl ascendant. Feel like reading. Phyllis would read and then fill started reading more and more and remember if it was ken. That said i or greg but said god we. She has to be in the show. She's so funny. And we all said. Oh my god yes and i remembered us asking alison. How do you feel about if we steal villains. And she said oh my god you know yes tweak. Her and i remember us telling her and it was. It was pretty amazing. What do you remember so thinking about the office and what that show was the styled no laugh track all that. What's landscape of television. The dodge show was born into like what was popular what was done on broadcast. Tv at that time frame fails cheers. All of this. Seminal comedies that were so smart but the thing about that time is i. Remember that ratings. Were everything eighteen to thirty four. Was everything you had to have. You know a twenty share or something so having five million people or six million people watching your show announced harder you know it had to be twenty million and our audience was very very concentrated in the eighteen to thirty four and it was very hundred k. Plus but it was small. And so that's the challenge was. How do we keep ourselves on the air when a pilot tested worse than i think any other pilot had ever tested on nbc. Besides i think seinfeld didn't test well either and You know we only had six episodes to prove ourselves and we were kind of at that time also scheduled in kind of the okay. You're dead it was in march. And that's when people said will wire shows starting to air after the prime time fall in midseason shows and so we kinda felt like they were just getting rid of us right so the pilot bombed when it was tested. Were you concerned about that. Yes because it was. You know at that time if something tests really bad it's do you know and if it's not deal a good luck trying to convince your network that it's a pilot that they should bet on. And so if not for kevin reilly show would not have a life. I really do believe that. He put his career on the line. So yeah we're very concerned. And i think part of the reason why tested so cordless just because it was something that people never seen before and those groups that come in to do the testing you know they get paid seventy five dollars or fifty dollars or whatever and then they judge your material based on twenty minutes of something and tell you if it's good or it's bad that was a real learning experience for me and something that i thought god if i could i think when i went to nbc. We didn't care so much about testing. We care more about instincts. We cared about the shows that we loved monitor program so i think that came into a full circle as we went from producer to programmer. That testing serves a certain purpose. But it shouldn't be the be all and all of the success of something right. We'll speaking of that. How did your relationship to the office change. When you move to nbc. The only thing that changed was that i could be an even larger advocate for it inside the network. Not that i needed to be because at that point you know we were. We were just a well oiled machine. It was interesting. Because then i became greg's executives and to switch from being partner and fighting for certain things over here and now being you know had programmer having to fight for things that i knew were in the best interest of the network without interfering with the integrity of the show. And here's a perfect example. We wanted the office to to air after the super bowl and We needed to make sure that if whoever was watching the super bowl had never seen the office before that we had to do something completely outrageous to let people say. Oh my god. I have never seen this show. I love this on staying. And greg had pitched a cold open and i remembered. Say you know this is kind of cool but getting a little pressure from giraffe band to make sure that we have some celebrities in there. You know we never had celebrities on our show. It was always about. You know making sure that it felt like we were dropping into a world of just human beings and in greg's brilliant. Fashion found a way to bring in celebrities without having celebrities. Feel like they were really a part of the office and i challenged him to do the most outrageous called open that he could. You know people were only going to see the.

greg Steve steve howard ben allison phyllis nbc alison allison dwight pam george Phyllis jim john kevin reilly nfl ken seinfeld super bowl
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"Really was about the love that created.

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"Were the most incredible cheerleaders one could ever have. I mean they were absolutely dream partners and they literally just sat back and liked fans fell in love with the show. I'll never forget. And i'm sure you'll remember it was kind of a blur but when we won the emmy and we were all on the stage and greg reached out and said ricky and steven. I know you're out there somewhere. You know because of you. You're really. I can't remember exactly what he said. And then i remembered. Watching the telecast fat and ricky and steven they were so proud but got so shy and didn't want to take any of the credit for it. It was beautiful and they never had egos about it to say this is our thing and more lending it to you. This is our thing. And we're giving this humor trusting you to go and do your own thing. Yeah so at what point in the process when you were working with revelead. Did you become aware of the office. The british office. I mean it had to be in the beginning. Because ben had the rights he had already secured them. And i remember ben showing it to me and said look at this and tell me what you think and i remember watching said. Oh my god. I have to. We have to do this. I don't know what the fuck we're doing. We have to do this. I was absolutely obsessed so is very early on and then then we put the time in to try to find the rights voice and in the conversations the bennett had with ra. Greg's name obviously came up. And i'm sure he probably told you this but he just would not watch it. I mean i think he sat on it for three weeks or something like that. And then finally ban talking ari and said is this guy ever watched us. And i think ari said the same thing to greg. Are you gonna fucking watch this. you know. because they're gonna move on a man greg. I think watched it over that weekend and came back and said oh my god i hope to god. They didn't move on. Because i have to do this. That's awesome. What was your initial impression of him. Introvert brilliant. What are the nicest people i've ever matt. Collaborative open you know. Unwelcome didn't bring any ego respected us and me. Even if he knew how much i'd ever produced in my life and immediately just treated us like his partners fell in love with them immediately. And that my god we get so lucky. This man is just bringing you know greg. He's thoughtful. He is tactile in his hand like he thinks before he. You know there's a lot ruminating in here before a with sharon idea but it was incredibly thoughtful in very very respectful format in a regain stephen and cautious because we all knew we were stepping into gigantic pile of. Are you kidding me that you're actually going to attempt to do this. So yeah i. I only have them most and still the fond memories of greg. Was there anybody else that you feel like you seriously considered or was greg it. Is it ricky and steven told me both separately that what sold them was that greg saw it is a love story. Yeah it was a. It was a love stories about humanity human behavior. It was all about people. It was all about heart. The thing that we can all relate to is that in some form or fashion we've been in a workplace where you're not necessarily happy about the work that you're doing but you fall in love with the people it's love and hate relationship. They become family they become. You know you see them more typically in your life than you do your family members so it.

greg ricky steven ari ben emmy bennett Greg matt sharon stephen
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"A lot of the cast. I will say look we do really still you know. Keep in touch air like Our fantasy football league is still going like fifteen years later. So john and rain and me and some of the crew is good at this year. Exactly but you know. Oscar and angela and rain and i and john and that's part of the thing too about this co businesses. That people are reaching out mar. You know my birthday was on monday. And i spent the entire. Dan's mean the entire day. You know but people you. You're learning two things one. We're working harder to stay connected with people and then you're also learning crew wants to stay connected to you. You know fathers. I heard from people like others day. Like what nobody ever reasons why. I'm not sure their account like everyone's reaching out. I don't know that's been really great. Okay so you were so omnipresent through all of the beginning so if you go all the way back now's nineteen years ago. Yeah how did you meet ben. When did you start working for reveille. What was the transition there. I'm at ben in two thousand. I two roommates at the time. One of my roommates who had known for some time who i think he dated for one second ryan introduced him to our other remain now. Ben was still working William morris. I think he was still in london and he would fly out to l. a. And he would be out here every month and he would stay for a couple of weeks whatever so she introduced one remain. Introduces him to the other. They start dating a true ben fashion. He is to stay at the lerma towns. I think it was for three weeks at a time. Either she would stay the taj with him or he would stay in our duplex. And so i started to see him a lot and got to know him just socially and at that point my roommate that he was dating and knee. I just left. Icm and i. We started a skincare company. I would be up all day all night. Making all skin care products in my kitchen. And i was talking about you know what my experience was that i see him in. Whatever we just snow each other really well and it was in march. I think of two thousand one. He pulled an all nighter. I think at the oscars came home. I'm up at four or five in the morning making these things. He comes walking in his oswal. Tang corals suits right and We just started talking to you. Said you know what. I'm i'm gonna start my own production company i've been bringing formats to the states and i really just want to have more of a creative experience. I wanna be producer. And when i do that i want to work for me and i said okay what i have no idea what you're talking about but okay ban talk to me next year because i didn't take him seriously but he kept bringing up and he always said to me. You know i really appreciate your work ethic. I like the experience that you have. I have no idea what you'd be doing yet. But i know that i needed be a part of my company so cut to next year where he made the deal with vivendi. Universal was berry diller at the time and he bri- howard owns mark. Coupes and chris grant from new york they were all still in new york and he said i'm bringing any street guys didn't know them. We have a bungalow at universal. So i want you to go and set up. The office. And i need a house. Go find me house. This is no surprise. No and we will be there in two months or something like that. So what do i do. I go on a lot. I get the whole entire bungalow up ready to go. All they had to do was walk in and pick up a pen and go to work phones. Everything i'm navigated my way through the entire universal every department you could possibly imagine anyway they come out and we all just learned how to produce just the five of us you would have thought that one hundred people worked at that production company and it was five and so ben mark and howard. You know we're focusing. Mostly on international in had nashville star was being developed. And because loser just kind of you know looking at formats and kind of touching on what that stuff was going to be which i really didn't have any interest in and we have the format to coupling that was our first Show that we started to produce in scripted television. And so i just kinda cut my teeth in that process. I would just sit in a corner you know in a room enlisted the conversations i went to every i did everything with ben. I went everywhere on every phone. Call do everything you could possibly imagine. That's really how i learned is listening to executives listening to studios listening to creative people. I certainly had deep familiarity with script. Because that's how i was raised at. I see him. And then i just each day. I just kept immersing myself deeper and deeper in that process and that's really how i built the scripted department at reveille. What did you learn from your experience on coupling that you felt like impacted bringing the office over. We learned a couple of things. One you know there was so much pressure on that show because it was being coined the next france and we realized that oh shit. That's a big problem because people are going to have an expectation that we are trying to be the next france which we had no intention of being so learning about how critical marketing is a show and also we pretty much adhered to every script from the british version. Instead of kind of making it are on and so we also learned that. That stuff doesn't necessarily translate so. I think we learned that going into that process. We needed to have a voice we needed to. Have somebody come in that you know understood the rhythms and the uniqueness of what that show was had to bring in their own voice and make their own rights even actually said to me that he felt like his greatest contribution was actually one thing he said. Ricky was step back like they know culturally about what's happening in america org rhythms or specific sensibilities or whatever so the more we could stay out of it the better. I mean the most beautiful thing. About what ricky stephen did was exactly that they came over met the cast spent time with greg and just talked about the things that we really cared about. How did you create these characters. What made you want to be in this world. How did these rhythms like all of the things that were more important instead of. Tell us exactly how you get the shot or whatever it was really more about all the impetuses on creating the show and then they.

berry diller chris grant john William morris ben mark ben angela Oscar howard Dan oscars football vivendi ryan new york Ben london nashville france ricky stephen
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"Brian baumgartner but i bet you guessed that too because you are all very smart as my wonderful guest. Today teri weinberg tat was a transition. Now terry was an executive producer of the office and a longtime partner of ben silverman which truly makes her a saint. Let's be honest but she was definitely there from the very beginning in the room where it happened as they say the room were. They grew the office from tiny seed of an idea into the crazy popular. Show that it is today as you will hear all about momentarily terry was involved from day one in the casting and in really the creation of the show. But what's even more fascinating to me. Is that in the later. Years of the show terry jumped over to work on the network. Side at nbc. So she saw things from the inside and then also from the network side and how the network was dealing with the show. She has a really unique perspective on the whole story of the office. And this conversation kicks off another miniseries that we're doing highlighting just some of the many talented hilarious Super smart women who made the office what. It is both in front of the camera and behind the scenes. this is a great bunch of interviews. If i do say so myself so i am. I'm really excited to share them all with you. So let's get started shall we. Today with teri weinberg..

Brian baumgartner teri weinberg terry ben silverman nbc
"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"Looking for guidance motivation and variety from world class experts and your fitness and wellness journey. Find it with the fitness out. That's right for you and your lifestyle no matter where you are and your fitness journey. Active can match your experience level and goals with over six thousand wellness classes on demand. Try a seven day free trial. Find your way to your happiest and healthiest life and have fun at the same time. Try it free for a week. Download the app and go to additive dot com slash iheart. That's aa p. T. i v. Dot com slash iheart management concepts power federal leaders at every career level. They're six leadership programs. Include courses aligned to opium ec cues and fundamental competencies taught by experts with federal experience management concepts programs combined. Live instructions with experiential learning personal assessment. Coaching an online collaboration to deliver the real world skills. You need over. Ten thousand government workers a year twos management concepts for their leadership development needs learn why at management concepts dot com.

"weinberg" Discussed on The Best Advice Show

The Best Advice Show

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Best Advice Show

"My advice is to pull out a lot of time into choosing doctor. It's a very important decision. You have to research it. You have to meet the person to find the right chemistry. I've talked to patients of mine. And i say who's your primary care doctor and they tell me i say while that's the part of town. I really don't know anybody. Maybe i should refer people to him or her and they'll say i don't really think so. I'm not that crazy about him. I begun to them for thirty years. But we don't seem to communicate. Well i mean it's a big decision which doctor us. It's it's right up there with who to mary and how to buy a car and how to buy a house. You don't do those things by just walking in to a showroom and say. I need a car. I'll take that over there. You investigate it. Which would that. Until what could that. Until it entails network game it entails asking people who their doctor is it involves going online and seeing what comments are being made it involves if you know other doctors even socially saying to them. Tell me about dr sewn so etc so it involves any possible thing you can find out about the if you know somebody that works there if you know other people that have gone to him another thing to interview the doctor. You go there with your little recorder. I hope you don't mind. But i want to ask you some questions to see if you and i can form a relationship and i hope you don't mind if i record it so i'll remember what are some questions. I should ask. Perspective primary care doctor before committing to them whether or not. They're available all the time whether they have people covering for them when they're out of town how often they like to see what is their philosophy about healthcare those types of things but most importantly our personality are they looking at the i do. They really seem to care about their answers or they just doing something they have to do. And that tells you something about them right then. Thank you dr weinberg. This is honestly something. I've never thought about but definitely should in fact i'm looking for a new primary care doctor now. I will have my notepad already. If you have some advice for me. Please give me a call. The hotline eight four four nine three five best. That's eight four four nine three five best. We'll talk to you soon..

mary dr weinberg
The Things We Eat For Others

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

The Things We Eat For Others

"We're closing off our six part series talking about food and relationships with writer baker and fellow food lover. Zoe dent berg. We recently published an essay from. Zoe called. never again will. I go vegan for a man about how in pursuit of a romantic connection. She stopped eating meat and dairy almost entirely. I found it's so relatable it's just part of being in a relationship that we don't really talk about a lot and usually for my experience. The person with the stricter diet tends to influence the other. so today. we're gonna get into all of that and more with zoe as well as ben. Weinberg the man who's zoe tried going vegan for welcome to the podcast. Both of you. And i am excited to get nosy. Things manda beer. So if you haven't read zoe's essay yet here's a bit of background. Zoe and ben went to the same college. The even had some mutual friends but they actually didn't meet until they separately moved to birmingham alabama for jobs after graduation. So tell us now about the first time you hung out one on one. How did that happen. We talked a little bit about how much we both liked cooking so then invited me over apartment downtown to cook. It was like this super-buick when you are when you're having this conversation does say he's vegan. His veganism was a running joke. It was one of the things that i learned about. Van nuys like. You're actually vegan. So i i did know that he was again. I did not know how we would cook together considering. I was allergic to half of his diet. Okay wait what are you allergic to. So i'm allergic to gnats in sesame all nuts all nuts and meanwhile i put like i love homocide. I love putting. That's is one of my favorite spices which zoe taught me has sesame in it. A lot needs in that one. Yeah yeah okay. We're gonna do this together. We're going to hang out and we're gonna cut. Yeah and then also do not tell me what you're gonna beforehand. He just like call me and gave me a gris relaxed. Because i didn't know what we were to cook beforehand. You know three hours before you're gonna hang out of van. I remember. I got there and you had the recipes pulled up your laptop and i was like oh like we can go off of this and you know we have to do the recipe when ben has a recipe is very adamant about sticking to it. Even though he's very chaotic in the kitchen. I feel the same way. It's all or

ZOE Zoe Dent Berg BEN Weinberg Baker Birmingham Van Nuys Alabama
"weinberg" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on WTOP

"China Forbes, Max Weinberg's jukebox and more tickets at Wolf trap dot org. Jack Taylor. W T o P Traffic. Matt Raiders got to look at the forecast for us. The Cold Front will continue to move through the area, bringing the steady rain with it. Just an isolated shower or thunderstorm this afternoon. Turning less he would later today highs in the upper seventies low eighties. Clear, cool and comfortable tonight lows in the upper fifties low sixties. My unpleasant For tomorrow, Just an isolated shower or thunderstorm house will be the upper seventies student or 80, mostly sunny and warmer on the fourth, but still comfortable highs will be in the low to mid eighties and Monday, partly sunny, hotter, more humid house in the Middle Eastern or 90. Store team for meteorologists monitor patches of rain showers. Now it's 70 in Chantilly in Penn Quarter 71 outside of our studios in Friendship Heights we've got 69 is brought to you by mattress warehouse. Buy with confidence with the one year price guarantee only at mattress warehouse sleep happens dot com 6 41 now and National Weather Service crews will be out today in the area, assessing whether the storms that blasted through the area last night and during the day yesterday included the tornado. Forecasters issued several tornado warnings yesterday at the height of the storms, Tornado or not, it was enough to force people to take cover and quickly among them. W T. O P S Dave build in who waited things out near the Lincoln Memorial just an incredible number of green neon green power flashes over Arlington as the tornado horn storm. Moved over Roslyn and across the Potomac. And as soon as it did, it went to zero visibility. With very, very strong winds. I could feel my vehicle rocking back and forth. And at the height of it, a number of large trees toppling over. These are mature, healthy trees near the volleyball courts near the Lincoln Memorial, and as I'm driving around The National Mall, I found several more healthy looking trees that were brought down by very, very strong winds in downtown Washington. Dave Golden w. T o P. News. You can see Dave's photos and video from last night at w t o p dot com. Also the extreme weather disabled an American Airlines plane at Reagan National Airport, a tow truck was jammed under an airplane during heavy winds about 9 45 last night Now nobody was injured, but crews had to work into the night to dislodge that truck. Makes some major progress was made this week on infrastructural legislation before Congress left town.

Max Weinberg Matt Raiders Arlington Dave Jack Taylor Potomac American Airlines Roslyn Monday Congress tomorrow Lincoln Memorial today Reagan National Airport Friendship Heights one year tonight yesterday last night this afternoon
"weinberg" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Product Experience

"Higley what did you have for breakfast today. Well i had coffee that. Why do you want to know. Oh i was just thinking about that line you know. Culture eats strategy for breakfast and kind of got me thinking about what culture actually is and also kind of got me thinking about. What's going to have for breakfast tomorrow. Okay i guess you're talking yoga or something which presley i think is a bad the weird breakfast but anyway yeah coke. No culture is interesting and creating a great culture is one of the hottest but also one of the most satisfying job. Yeah so making jokes about yogurt and culture. I mean that's just the fringe benefit of having the podcast. Right good thing. We get to talk with our weinberg today. She just ruined the entire book on this topic. Not about yogurt. But it's called a culture of safety. I loved this book. it's short. It's practical and it's really relevant. I mean she even uses As an example that's can even see why any f. i n. They we didn't get on to talk about that but we did cover a lot of that great stuff. A at your last job was in wales but you still can't pronounce committee but we talk battle a lot of great stuff in this chat. So let's just jump straight into it. Product experience is brought to you by mind the product every week we talk to the best product people from around the globe about how.

tomorrow wales today Higley one
"weinberg" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Product Experience

"But i actually believe like in tech organizations for example starting in the middle like middle management is where we will see a big change if middle management. Decide okay this you know. I want to shift the culture. This is where it needs to change in. How can create more safety. So i'm actually starting from the middle. I don't and i have not seen good evidence that it can start from the bottom and stick because The organization in itself has already momentum in the way things are being done and it in if if you go against it too much It's kind of like an antibody that organization is sort of Kill that curtin initiative and so it has to come from. I think from middle management is where a lot of the power is. That's where they're the closest to the icees end at the people doing the work so you don't think it should come from the top because they genuinely that leadership level he set the tone for the rest of the business and the way that they behave sort of filters down through our inner. The behavior is kind of set the the culture for the business. I do think there should be support from the top and kind of coverage from the top but to make actual change it that needs to come from the middle so a lot of times. What i see is people just working with the c. suite Let's just change. The culture of the leadership team right. will make the leadership team or save from inclusive or more diverse. Or whatever it is and think of is going to trickle down. Culture does not trickle down. It just doesn't. I haven't seen that work and so i think if leadership is on board and supportive and empowers middle management to make that change than the middle management can make that change can actually put it into operationalize. Put it into action than the change will actually happen. But i haven't seen change trickle down. That's kind of what that was actually kind of unpopular opinion. I think.

"weinberg" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"weinberg" Discussed on The Product Experience

"Higley what did you have for breakfast today. Well i had coffee that. Why do you want to know. Oh i was just thinking about that line you know. Culture eats strategy for breakfast and kind of got me thinking about what culture actually is and also kinda got me thinking about. What's going to have for breakfast tomorrow. Okay i guess you're talking yoga or something. Which presley i think is a bad the wig breakfast but anyway yeah coke. No culture is interesting and creating a great culture is one of the hottest but also one of the most satisfying job. Yeah so making jokes about yogurt and culture. I mean that's just the fringe benefit of having the podcast. Right good thing. We get to talk with our weinberg today. She just ruined the entire book on this topic. Not about yogurt. But it's called a culture of safety. I loved this book. it's short. It's practical and it's really relevant. I mean she even uses As an example that's can even see why any f. i n. They we didn't get on to talk about that but we did cover a lot of that great stuff. A at your last job was in wales but you still can't pronounce committee but we talk battle a lot of great stuff in this chat. So let's just jump straight into it. Product experience is brought to you by mind the product every week we talk to the best product people from around the globe about how.

tomorrow wales today Higley one weinberg
Stay-At-Home Mom Starts Bamboo Baby Biz

Side Hustle School

03:17 min | 2 years ago

Stay-At-Home Mom Starts Bamboo Baby Biz

"Thicky weinberg is a momma to based in the uk used to have a corporate job but suffered from post natal depression. After our first child was born she then retrained as a children's yoga teacher in cape local class during her second pregnancy picky had some issues with her hip and back then she couldn't teach anymore. It had to find someone to cover her classes but by the time the baby was born she was ready to do something anything even though she didn't know what one dave vicky was listening to pat plans smart passive income. Podcasts she heard a story about two guys selling products on amazon. The idea of living on the beach with laptop wasn't her kind of lifestyle but having the freedom to work whenever and wherever she wanted that was being an idea sparked to create a brand of high quality baby products that can be used reused and gifted to other families and so when our second baby was only six weeks. Old tiny chipmunk came to life as well. Vicki knew she wanted to create a range of bamboo baby products and use google's keyword tool to research. What would come first. She leaned on baby swallows and used ninety nine designs to find a logo design by. She went to alibaba dot com to search for a supply at the same time. She ordered samples of similar products from amazon to scope out. The existing market wants. Her product was ready. Vicky place the order spent time building her website making an amazon listing. She worked whenever she could which was mostly when the kids snapped and even though it took her about eight months to get to launch. She's glad she did. Tiny chipmunk has become vicki's main work. Bogus bring at least twenty five thousand dollars a year in profit. She doesn't have to work set hours because the business mostly runs itself in fact even though she had to homeschool her kids and cut back on her hours over the past year sales remained steady. Still there have been some challenges. at first. she had no idea what legal disclaimers and other information. She had to put on your packing so she went back to google and ninety nine designs to find a packaging designer but she never received a sample from her chosen supplier before placing the full order. This turned out to be a big mistake because the quality was poor. The cardboard was way too thin and kept ripping which led to products getting damaged luckily option by the time she restocked she could go back in time. Vicky also says she wouldn't have tried to do everything herself nor tried to be everywhere at the same time. Most of the marketing strategy she tried didn't work ended up costing her money and time a better approach would have been for her to focus on one sales channel for example one social media platform and build from there. Fortunately as her business has grown vicky has to nowadays. She doesn't just sell products online. She also coaches other people who want to sell products. She's happy to work on both projects. They feel good. They fit in with your family life. She chooses what she does. She does it for as well as where when. And how as a bonus she's also gained confidence and new connections going forward. The plan is to launch more of her own products while helping other people create and sell. There's no plans to do less one on one coaching. Instead move towards more group. Coaching and courses it all starts with baby steps.

Thicky Weinberg Dave Vicky Amazon Vicky Alibaba Depression Vicki PAT Google UK
Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:01 min | 2 years ago

Lange Twins Old Vine Zinfandel 2017

"Cheap. Wine. Dot Com. Review we put on the. CHEAP WINE FINDER DOT com website Levin years, and going strong. And today we have. Wine. Let me grab the bottle of lane twins. State. Older, by Zinfandel. Lodi. LISTSERV fifteen dollars and I found for twelve ninety nine for this is not an expensive why? And the stateline they own. Several vineyards. ONUM. It's all bears and the Lodi Appalachian, which is the Central Valley. Most. Most wind come from the coast central coast to coast. Lodi Clarksburg are a little bit of different they're. there. They're in the river valleys to the San Pablo Bay, which is the northern part of. This is a fairly well, I wanted to state wine. Not, single vineyard state by. The Lang twins are actually identify wins the. Fourth Generation. Family started. Farming in Lodi in the eighteen seventies in their first vineyard and the ninth eighteen sixteen. which is not that unusual. If you look you look into some of these big name Lodi. wineries they go back a hundred hundred and fifty years. Fairly regular basis and while there are wineries, other Appalachians have. Long Histories. Load is everywhere. and. Why is old vines? And there's a wine axioms. Wine Grapes half the struggle. To become. Complex. And best vineyards in the world are some of the worst land. Almost. No nutrients wraps through. No moisture. Justice not. Survive and thrive. Old Vines since they're old and. On their own without having any additions around them. So you KINDA GET A. Rape fine that is doing what you wanted to do. Donna dependent. From where what? Agriculture land is around. Old Lines are. kind of like highly sought after. These low dial binds are from. Before prohibition and they made communion wines. Church. Oceans communion wine. During prohibition. Kept him going and then the white Zimba trades the sixties planted. Zinfandel everywhere I just keep up the craze in those vineyards which are so so back mid day are sixty seven year old vineyards that are kind of. Little, jewel? How is the? State. Just. Kind of. Like about Lodi. There's a dealt with the same. There tends to be a bit of. A BIT OF A. Local resemblance or they're kind of. The kind of the middle I really liked that. Really High in Norman's infant infantile snappers those fast robles. Tend to, be more classic. Like it when you get this rougher edge to not a lottery rough that just just a little bit. That's my favorite. They tend to be less expensive on top of and there's a lot of great simple producers in California. Really great producers in California. Lodi does a for me may not prices usually right I'm gonNA, take a SIP. Tend to be less expensive clean here you get a single vineyard away a state multiyear Weinberg Thirteen. Don't really find that with some of the bigger producers, their winds there. Are More expensive to not only is it a style that I liked? Cheaper and we actually won DOT com. Also. There you go.

Lodi Old Vines Lodi Clarksburg Lodi Appalachian California San Pablo Bay Levin Norman Lang Rape Central Valley Donna Lodi.
Kindness Kits Spread Love and Draw Positive Returns

Side Hustle School

04:25 min | 3 years ago

Kindness Kits Spread Love and Draw Positive Returns

"My Name Is Jesse Weinberg and I'm based between Seattle Washington Thailand. The side hustle is kindness co and my episode was number four five one kindness. Co is a simple idea with a major goal to you start a movement of kindness. We make innovative kindness. Kits that encourage empower people to create their own ripple effects of kindness a kindness. His Kit consists of a greeting card. That has a bunch of really fun. An innovative ideas for people to commit random acts of kindness With the with the kit comes a few different fund and innovative tools and goodies to help sort of encourage this entire process. It's the side. Hustle was sort of an inspiration from my grandfather who navigated his life with the ultimate kindness so through his his actions not his words he helped each me and many others. You know what true kindness means and I got sort of obsessed with the idea of how powerful kindness as a concept is and. I think it's really interesting. How little effort it takes to do something kind and for someone else but how powerful that can be And how it can really change. Someone's Day or or month or even life So I think it's. It's a kindness as a concept that got me very excited and I wanted to figure out a way to empower others to commit more acts of kindness. My Current Day job is I run a digital marketing agency as well as a travel website. So that's what I spend most of my day to day doing doing but I'm learning that my passion you know is revolving around this kindness project and it's something that I really eventually want to sort of put all my efforts I into so right now. This kindness and Co project is a side Hustle. But I'm hoping to sort of transition out of my agency and into this fulltime I'm eventually chances are if you're passionate about something you probably know a lot about it and probably a decree. You're an expert of some sort of or a thought leader later From there you can create some really special content around that subject matter that you know so much about if you love cooking could compile famous recipe from every state in the USA and turn it into a set of fifty postcards and have that you know that beautiful content designed and turned into a A great product. If you love whisky you could create a whiskey kit containing all the essential whiskey drinking products and recipes. If you love marketing you could create a marketing one. Oh One kit with with your knowledge and from there. I'd recommend finding a great graphic designer to lay out all your content ideas and useful way. And after that you can turn that into some sir physical product of some sort like a postcard kit at e Book Card and the Rezaul is a beautiful saleable product. That would be appealing to anyone in the world who was also interested in that subject matter so fulfilment has been sort of a big headache throughout this whole process originally originally I was doing it all myself from my house and then I would I had friends doing it for me and family doing it for me when I wasn't around and just as recently decided to take a to work with a fulfillment provider someone who can handle all the receiving achieving of the inventory. And then send it out to customers in a effective way awesome. Thank you so much Jesse for those updates and now L. listeners. Jesse actually has a special offer for you. It is the best kind of special offer. It's actually free at least it's going to be free for the first one hundred people. So here's how it works. The the first one hundred people that contact him by email give you that email address in a moment. He's GonNa send you five kindness kits. which sell every? Dan Is website for twenty dollars and Talal he asked. Is that if you find a kind of inspiring you share your story of doing something kind for someone else. That's it so if you're interested the first one hundred people email info at kindness kindness and CO DOT COM to get your free kits that is info at kindness and co dot com so kindness and Co dot com to get your free kits.

Jesse Weinberg Seattle Washington Thailand USA Jesse Talal DAN
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 3 years ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:19 min | 4 years ago

As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything millions of Americans use wearable devices that track how much they move how much they eat how. Well, they sleep how their blood pressure changes many insurance companies offer incentives to use these high tech trackers. But is your better health really what they're buying as they collect your data? Stephanie on Neil reports. Okay. You guys ready? Khaki Clinton Nelson Costa Mesa California is heading out on a walk with her two dogs Kona a boxer and max a small white dog of questionable pedigree ARC's with eager enthusiastic. Okay. But he'll Clooney Nelson says she rarely engaged in regular exercise, especially after a long day at work, but about three years ago, her employer the auto club of southern California made her enter colleagues and offer she couldn't refuse Donna Fitbit. Walk every day and get up to three hundred dollars off her yearly health insurance premiums. I thought why don't I try this? Maybe it will motivate me, and it really did this year. An estimated six million workers worldwide will receive wearable fitness trackers for workplace wellness programs. Many of these voluntary programs offer employees free or discounted wearable trackers and annual financial incentives that range from about one hundred dollars to more than two thousand dollars depending upon the company for Clooney Nelson. The incentive money does the trick. It. Encourage you to get up and move. I mean, how many times do you get to the end of the day? And you think gosh, I didn't really get it from my desk at all today. Encouraging workers to get fit makes financial sense says United Healthcare spokesman, we'll Shanley the health insurance giant offers employer. Sponsored plans that promote three walking goals with an easy to remember acronym. It's called fit frequency intensity and tenacity. Those who each day moved frequently walk with moderate intensity, and log ten thousand steps can earn more than a thousand dollars a year toward healthcare spending. And Shanley says it's not just the already fit who are signing into the program the participation rates for people with chronic conditions. Especially people with diabetes is actually significantly higher than for people without those conditions, but just how much fitness trackers contribute. If at all to better health into lower healthcare spending. Isn't yet known among the studies that cast doubt on their effectiveness is one published by the university of Pittsburgh in two thousand sixteen. It found young adults who use fitness trackers lost less weight than those in a control group. Andrew boy teaches biomedical and health information sciences at the university of Illinois at Chicago. The clinicians are trying to figure out what is the most effective use of this technology in order to engage patients while Boyd urges caution before trading data for dollars. It's important to be aware of the type of information or tracker is revealing about your health. He says and to know exactly how it will be use your incentives could offer a clue if they're offering you two three times the amount of money that every other insurance company is offering you there's something else they value in the data that they're giving you the cash for for instance, he says if the Affordable Care Act is ever repealed. Insurers could use the fitness data that they're collecting today to deny you coverage based on a medical condition. Your tracker picks up United Healthcare's Shanley says his company collects only step data. The same goes for Oscar the tech driven health insurer that serves. The individual market senior. Vice president Sarah Weinberg says fitness tracking is done through Oscars app. Where customers are encouraged to log into other healthcare services that save them in the insure money. When people start engaging in step tracking. They engage in other parts of our product more than others do like Intel medicine, Kathy Clooney, Nelson says while she sometimes does worry about what could happen to the personal data her Fitbit collects she's grateful for the financial incentives that keep her walking at the office and at home. It's just that nudge, you know, get up and walk do something productive. And that kind of has been helpful for me for NPR news. I'm Stephanie O'Neil.

Clooney Nelson Shanley Kathy Clooney United Healthcare Stephanie O'neil Clinton Nelson Costa Mesa Cali Comcast Boyd Diabetes California NPR University Of Pittsburgh Intel Fitbit Vice President
AmEx's forex unit being probed by FBI over pricing practices

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:28 sec | 4 years ago

AmEx's forex unit being probed by FBI over pricing practices

"The company. We should also also circle back on American Express company is down this shares down after a reported the Wall Street Journal, the FBI investing pricing practices at its foreign exchange. Operations shares dropped about one point three percent after that report came out just earlier this afternoon. So clearly that's going to be one to watch as well. And when you see those sorts of stories, those those are not things that go away quickly. No, not

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