24 Burst results for "Weigel"

"weigel" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

04:30 min | 11 months ago

"weigel" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Total is so. We're still small so we have Three full-time engineers were actually hopefully bringing on a fourth engineer very soon Just had an interview last week and We'll actually five counting myself so five. Fulltime engineers is still small team and we have a designer founder. We have someone a fulltime working on community outreach and then we have Some part time people working. So we have someone in the philippines working on site and We're going to try to get some interns as well to help us out with Could really focus on the local community so we really would love to have as many people in the local communities as possible you know potentially working in some sort of affiliate capacity. Yeah so it's like ten people may give or take our part time but you're still pretty swim. Yeah well that's still. I mean that's that's really awesome and i feel like i know when i i used to work at a startup. I was about like the fifteenth person. It was in person. It wasn't remote but that was such a special time. Like i look really like. When i look back on that time i remember very fondly and i loved working at the company when it was that small actually made me realize. I really like well now. I just work by myself. So it's really small just me but it made me really learn a lot about myself and kind of my work preferences and yes. I really liked the small close knit environment. So anyhow yeah. I it sounds like a great size of a company so we have to wrap things up. But is there any final advice that you could just leave listeners. Who are going to code right now. And maybe they're in a situation that you were back in twenty twelve twenty thirteen where things just feel that. They're moving really slow in. Maybe not where they want to be in their lacking confidence would say number one you can do it believe in yourself that that may sound a little cheesy but you definitely will face things that seem insurmountable but keep going do a little bit at a time and you'll gain more confidence and then you'll be able to take on something a little bigger the next time. This is a great industry to be in a. It's an opportunity that's life changing i. I didn't necessarily get in this just for the money. But to be honest i've been i've been able to provide for my family in a way that i never thought possible had i gone. Let's say a safer route more traditional route. You know we would have been fine but now You know. I was able to provide to move my family into a bigger house. A better neighborhood Safer neighborhood you know. This is potentially life changing. It's worth the work. And i would say a lot of people have have come through have felt those feelings of not being enough of not being able to do this and i say you. You can definitely do this my background. I don't have an engineering degree. That wasn't my background. And you know. I was able to do this. I realized that. I probably have privileged. That helped me that you may or may not have if you're listening to this But you you have value you have because of who you are as an individual you have value to this industry and there is going to be a company that is going to recognize that value and in wanna pay good money to be there in into good work so So keep at it awesome. Thank you so much jesse again for coming on. Where can people find you online. So i'm most active probably on my my youtube channel And i'm also on twitter. Jessie are weigel on twitter on instagram. As well jesse dot weigel on on instagram and join me. Join me for a livestream sometime in. Feel free to ask me any questions that you have a semi. Dm on twitter something. I'm i'm happy to answer any questions that anybody has. Whether you're just starting out or you've been in the industry for a while. I love helping people gain confidence and learn how to code So feel free to reach out awesome. Thank you again you welcome. I hope you enjoyed today's episode. If you missed anything or like a recap.

philippines jesse dot weigel twitter weigel jesse Jessie youtube
"weigel" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

02:17 min | 11 months ago

"weigel" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Hey jesse thank you so much for coming on the show. Oh you're welcome. Thanks for having me so. I'm really excited to talk to you because you enter. Wife are the first husband wife duo. I've ever interviewed now. I spoke to your wife about a year ago. She's also a self talk. Kotor which i think is really awesome. And i'm really glad to have this new milestone to have a married couple on two different times but to self-talk odors it's really great. Yeah it's it's awesome to have her be into coding as well. We can talk to each other about our work issues in understand each other. It's been really cool. Yeah so. I think that's a perfect segue into talking about your story in how you started coating yes so. I've always been interested in electronics growing up. I didn't really have a computer access to the internet until i was a teenager. But then at that point. I was fascinated by i would frequently break my parents computer in rush to try to figure out how to fix it before they found out about it. And so that's why. I got into just learning more about computers and how they works in high school. I did some basic html and css in in notepad so i had a class where we did typed everything out in no pat on microsoft windows and was very basic. The made a website about the movie the matrix because that came out around that time and i was very into the matrix. And i didn't really do do much with programming. I went to college and i took a basic programming class. And i actually. I think it was c. Plus plus yes so. I did a c. Plus plus class. And i remember building a calculator and i. I liked it. But i didn't go on with it. My degree was actually in business. So i just. I didn't do much with programming. I had a couple of different various jobs that had nothing to do with programming Manager at a restaurant waiter. I actually taught at a high school. I taught the latin that a high school and after a few years of that i realized my family started to grow. And i said you know what i really can't support my family on the salary and need to find something else

jesse wargo dibella jesse steubenville Jesse pittsburgh youtube Ohio
How Jesse Weigel Pivoted Into Tech

Learn to Code with Me

02:17 min | 11 months ago

How Jesse Weigel Pivoted Into Tech

"Hey jesse thank you so much for coming on the show. Oh you're welcome. Thanks for having me so. I'm really excited to talk to you because you enter. Wife are the first husband wife duo. I've ever interviewed now. I spoke to your wife about a year ago. She's also a self talk. Kotor which i think is really awesome. And i'm really glad to have this new milestone to have a married couple on two different times but to self-talk odors it's really great. Yeah it's it's awesome to have her be into coding as well. We can talk to each other about our work issues in understand each other. It's been really cool. Yeah so. I think that's a perfect segue into talking about your story in how you started coating yes so. I've always been interested in electronics growing up. I didn't really have a computer access to the internet until i was a teenager. But then at that point. I was fascinated by i would frequently break my parents computer in rush to try to figure out how to fix it before they found out about it. And so that's why. I got into just learning more about computers and how they works in high school. I did some basic html and css in in notepad so i had a class where we did typed everything out in no pat on microsoft windows and was very basic. The made a website about the movie the matrix because that came out around that time and i was very into the matrix. And i didn't really do do much with programming. I went to college and i took a basic programming class. And i actually. I think it was c. Plus plus yes so. I did a c. Plus plus class. And i remember building a calculator and i. I liked it. But i didn't go on with it. My degree was actually in business. So i just. I didn't do much with programming. I had a couple of different various jobs that had nothing to do with programming Manager at a restaurant waiter. I actually taught at a high school. I taught the latin that a high school and after a few years of that i realized my family started to grow. And i said you know what i really can't support my family on the salary and need to find something else

Kotor Jesse Microsoft
"weigel" Discussed on TIFFANY

TIFFANY

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"weigel" Discussed on TIFFANY

"These testes could become cancerous one day and so we should remove them when she's super young too young to remember the surgery to avoid unnecessary trauma. Whatever so what you'll find out after from medical studies that continually come out. I'm now thirty one years old of course. Medicine advances light years every decade. We know a lot more now than we did. Then but when you look at the studies the chances of someone with complete injured in infants. Timberlake me to actually get testicular. Cancer are only five percent and so because of a five percent chance that i might get cancer at some point in my life. They decided that it would be good to intervene on me and remove part of my body that not only determined my ability one whether top children but these are my hormone producing organs so they would have produced actually testosterone net because my body does not respond to testosterone. Because i don't respond to enter the hormones my body one of converted it to estrogen. Naturally it's kind of like a superpower that i have as an intersex person and my body developed. Naturally my tessies would have produced hormones. My body would have absorbed them in a way that my body is able to. And i would've develops naturally as a human being but then removing those organs essentially put me into for lack of a better word menopause as a child. Because when you think of someone going through menopause as an adult because the hormone levels start to decrease their body stops producing the amount of hormones that they've been used to for very many years for my body. They removed these organs and so my body basically was at ground. Zero was not producing certain hormones. From when i was a kid and similar things that you think about with menopause mental fog hot flashes depression. Lack of clarity all these things i experienced as a child and also one thing that happens when people go through menopause and i'm careful to say people because it's not just women menopause. It happens regardless of gender. Just happened to do which anatomy are born with. When people go through menopause. They often will have to take calcium or supplemental. Vitamins and minerals. Because when your hormones get affected that also affects your bone density and so when intersex kids when they remove hormone producing organs that also affects our bone density and.

five percent Timberlake one thing thirty one years old one day decade
"weigel" Discussed on Fever Dreams

Fever Dreams

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"weigel" Discussed on Fever Dreams

"I'm currently working on a book about cunanan and his disastrous impact on our society. I'm also a senior political reporter at the beast and co author of the book sinking in the swamp. I've spent years covering the intersection of entertainment and politics and post trump era. That seems like the only sensible way to cover politics in this beautiful hideously. Stupid country of ours on this podcast. We're gonna take you on deeply reported plunges into sometimes hilarious sometimes scary fanatics in fact in the way that millions of americans view the world and how they vote even in the aftermath of the trump administration. The energy of these conspiracy theorists the grit. Thor's and the influencers is still pushing our mainstream political landscape closer and closer to a breaking point. We're here to help you. Better understand how and why this happening and who in the halls of power are letting it happen along. The way will regularly bring on guests including political pros hard-nosed reporters and some influential voices from hollywood. I'm here all right from from the. Who's but certainly didn't have an interesting time down in dallas. Jesse i was told wills mike was cut and that i would be now the fever dreams after his run in with the law over the weekend anyway. Okay now that plans have been thwarted. Will at the long memorial day weekend. It is indeed good to have you back thank you. Can you please get in for listeners. What happened to you over the long weekend. Yes i went down to dallas because of a coupon convention over the long weekend that was being hosted by a gentleman named cunanan. John checks out. The larry because there was a point where people were like. It's not a cute thing and it's like well the main guys name is kua non john decoding to figure that one out but yeah so i had bought a ticket back in march and this was a thing that was drawing. Like kind of a crazy amount of big deal. Republicans allen west the chairman of the texas. Gb was there. Louie gohmert member congress. Was there michael. Flynn and so. I went down and ahead of time. They had refunded the tickets of some other reporters who were interested in going but mine was not refunded and is sort of walked up. And i said here's my you know my name and i got my placard and so i figured you know at least temporarily. I was guy who is welcome to hang out a coupon but after two days of learning all about the deep state and the nefarious cobol and attending an auction. Where a picture of michael flynn is man. I thought you were going to say what you could buy. Children of kiko this auction and it was a picture of michael. Flynn is amid minute man and it just awful and it sold for seven thousand dollars late on sunday. There was kind of a hunt on. And i was shown out by the dallas police department. Acute crowd went wild people. Want to see footage of this first of all. It's all over it on telegram right now. This is like the biggest news since january. Sex for them sauce. Someone else who was inside under whose maybe not a cute on believer was saying that this was like the news of the weekend for these folks. They were talking about they were recounting it to one another. It was like where were you. When will summer got the boot okay. One of the videos. I watched it showed them doing a standing ovation after the cops. Come and escort you out of the tent revival or whatever it was. Can you paint a scene for our listeners. Exactly what that was like. It seemed and correct me. If i'm wrong that you were having a little bit of fun with it in the video we can talk about the lead up. So con- was being guarded by. There was some dallas police officers in the parking lot but the majority of security was from this group called first amendment. Pretoria sounds a little ironic in their treatment of the press. But these are guys who. I've been interested in for a little while they've been on the scene for like since trump lost is basically and they kind of come off like they're bunch of like real life former operators like spec ops guys the main guy has a real like kinda tough jaw line but i was astounded to see the first pretorious in action. And how if there was a roving band of antifa. I don't think they coupon would have said a chance. They were really like middle aged men and women who did not look. I don't mean to shame people for their bodies but they did not look like they were going to be real tough security guards and the key thing i want to stress about the first amendment portrays as they had a team of dogs and one of the dogs just look really like underfed did not look like he was in great shape and the other dog was a pug and so this is kind of like the lethal force that is. You're the first man portrays but what happened to me was on day to look. I was getting a little bored. I plan to start interviewing people soon. Which i sort of expected booted anyway and i was checking my phone too much. I made the mistake. I logged into twitter and people were really getting into the cunanan stuff. It's sort of some boring ways. And i was on my phone too much and so at the same time another reporter who it's not gonna. I was not making my presence known. They're working on my book but another reporter was for tweeting a lot and sort of like t he is not in which you know kind of spoils it for the rest of us because there was a hunt for him and in his picture. He had a beard now obviously. He had shaved his beard from his twitter profile. I had beard at the time and so they basically became convinced that i was this guy. I don't think they realized that. I was there because i guess they didn't check their guest list and so they became convinced. That was this other guy. And so these first pretoria's are started sitting around me and checking their phones and zooming in on this twitter picture. And that's how i knew. They were after him and they kept like looking at the picture and looking at me and looking at each other. Being like yeah. It's him and then i get up and kind of force the issue and a this guy kinda of me with his dog and i was like what was it the pug scrawny and said look. My name's will summer. I'm here bought a ticket. And that was why i knew. They weren't looking for me because they were like they looked at my. Id and they said this is a fake. Id your name's not well summer. And so they're clearly after him but i think they went to their bosses and said don't worry that guy's will summer and the boss cute on john was like what and so bad i was sitting down elsewhere and they came in the scored at me out. But yeah as i was getting up michael flynn was on stage. There was a lot of like. Oh we gotta get this fake news and there was a big. They were very excited. There are a lot of booze a lot of shame on us and you know. I gave the crowd a big wave. Obviously we'd spent a couple of days together. Learning all that cues felt we had some sort of marauder was leaving and the this was a great a huge content opportunity for a lot of streamers and so there are a lot of people filming me as i was a frogmarch out by the dallas police and various characters but i think my favorite was andrew from the previously show. The youtube show called off gas. No brakes now channel five. Who's who's a great guy. What's videos of political events. He was interviewing a gentleman who had convinced to take his shirt off and this was a kind of a long island maybe looking guy and while the the main cute on promoters are trying to act like this is a very serious event is he's someone later. One of them later claimed that someone was trying to run over cunanan believers with a car. I mean just like these insane lies that was you. I mean that's not claim. That's just a fact. And then the shirtless guy he goes will summer. Oh that's my arch enemy or whatever. Look obviously i've never heard of this guy and he starts he joins the fray and you can see the faces fall on the cunanan people who are looking for the perfect look. How same cunanan is thing. We're now they have this shirtless guy. Who's like yeah get him. So i saw myself out but then you know i was i was staying at the same hotel is all these people for another night and what seemed like a good idea at the time to get a hotel and sort of like see the behind. The scenes action quickly became not ideal as the word was out that will suffer was in town. And so did you get a loud bangs on your hotel room door. Well there was a lot of trying to be very careful about that. Unfortunately no hypic at the hotel notice me but it was not exactly.

Louie gohmert michael flynn michael congress Jesse John youtube seven thousand dollars dallas january Republicans andrew trump twitter march millions Flynn cunanan dallas police department two days
Video games for good

Talking Tech

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Video games for good

"Listeners it's mike schneider and i'm brett molina and welcome back to talking tech. As with many other events canceled due to the covid nineteen pandemic. there is no south by south west festival in austin texas. This year. That is true. But there's a virtual south by southwest going on online through saturday march twentieth. And i got a chance to participate. Let me tell you a little bit about it. I've been scheduled to moderate a panel last year gaming for good but the festival got cancelled entirely when we knew there was going to be a virtual festival this year the company that sponsored the panel skills decided to go ahead and do it so we recorded our discussion over zoom in late february and it was really enlightening and very made me very hopeful about things. Here there's a story. On tech usa today dot com. You can read that if you want. If you really wanna watch the panel and do all the other fun things at south by southwest. Has you can still buy a ticket to the festival. There's a link in my story for that too. But here's the basics. I learned from from the panel. The panelists we had three of them. there's a program called gamers outreach that provides video game carts that means it has like a secure tv and a game console on. It's it's either hook to wireless or however they do in the hospital in two hundred thirty children's hospitals around the us the founder zach. Weigel began the program when he was a high schooler halo tournament. The got cancelled He'd organiz the tournament but public safety official voice concerns about the high school cafeteria being used for a hobby. That was quote corrupting the minds of america's youth in quote. The guy said so to show the gamers from it meant well the next year weigel try it again and raise money for a local children's hospital with that resulting tournament part of that he learned. The hospitals often have trouble keeping kids occupied when they're recovering from treatment in their rooms so that led him to begin having online fundraising to get these. You know cards game carts into hospitals all over the country if you wanna get involved gamers outreach as gamers forgiving event online this weekend and there's a lincoln my story or you can go to gamers forgiving dot org also this weekend skills which is spelled s. k. i. l. l. z has a gaming for good tournament to benefit the american red cross. You might have heard about skills. They they became a publicly traded company in december twenty twenty and last month. They signed a multi year deal with the national football league to create a mobile game in any sports community around the game. That's gonna come out later this year. Basically did a crowd source thing to get developer to find a way to create a cool game. Play on mobile devices Anyway what skills does they connect millions of players all over the world to compete on about five thousand mobile games including solitaire. Cube and blackout bingo. These these are on android devices and they've had passed charity online events. Where your entry fees to compete you know go towards Charities such as american cancer society world wildlife fund and the nwa. You can see information about this weekend's events in the app itself against s k i l l z and it's on ios and android or. You could find the lincoln my stories

Mike Schneider Brett Molina Organiz South West Austin Weigel Texas Zach America American Red Cross National Football League American Cancer Society World NWA
"weigel" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"weigel" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the <hes>, the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad <hes>. So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | 1 year ago

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

Computer Science Club Developer Facebook Himalayas Youtube Ohio Bo Corns Quincy
"weigel" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Mentioned this. But what were you doing before? I think he did say this quickly. But what was your career before for this? I was an adjunct instructor for ten years. Okay, right so at a university so works Johnny from classroom. Okay, so I'm assuming you never went back to that since you start coding. I did so. I also remind drama. Even when I was in the hospital I was still teaching I was teaching online, and then I think I did another semester after and then one of the interesting things is united been doing it so long that I almost forgot what it felt like to really love what you're doing. Because I think at some point, the joy in teaching went away. It was really kind of clouded by school politics. Politics in in things like that, and when I started learning to code, and I'm learning this new skill. I really love this like I. Want to get up everyday and do it, and at that point I think that right about the time I entered flat iron school and I knew this is going to be more than just a hobby for me. This is GonNa be a new chapter in my life, and that's when I stopped teaching. So maybe jumping around here, but I'm just very curious. What was it like when you were learning? Initially end even when you're going through flat iron school because you have four children and I assume they're all pretty young. Right like you had just be given. Birth started learning to code and then went to a coding bootcamp. It was challenging so at the time I had a one year old, a three year old, a six year old, and an eight year old, and we had transitioned them from home schooling into going to school, so two of them were in school, and then the two youngest ones were at home with me, and it was I mean the the whole scenario is challenging because I'm redefining my life I had never imagined that this would be a part of my story. Story so you know people ask you that question what your life can look like in five years and like I never would have dreamt that. This is what my life would have looked like five years ago, not only were they redefining what my career was, but I was redefining who I was as a person coming out of trauma, and so I really had to find for me I find scheduled very comforting and sorry. His working hard to find blocks of time. Time and so eventually that turned into was I was waking up at four thirty in the morning and coating a couple of hours before getting the kids to school now when I started it wasn't that four thirty up because I had a baby that was still waking up at night, and so it was maybe six o'clock in the morning until six thirty I do a little bit, and then at nap time I would do a little bit, and then like after. After four PM I started to go brain dead I can't think straight, and so it's hard for me to go then, but if I if I had to. There were some late nights that are just muscled through it in order to get done what I needed to get done at every possible. Actually it's not unlike now through the pandemic West kids at home, I trying to find all of those bits of time to do the thing that I really enjoyed doing. Yeah Wow, what a story! And when you were chatting I, was just thinking about. There's a lot of folks have had on the show or speaker. People I've spoken to over email. Who are learning to code? Maybe they're few months few years. Whatever and they'll do similar world. They'll wake up really early before anyone else's away, <unk> if they have family and they'll. Learn to code for a few hours and then get on with their day and then got you spoken to people. It's kind of the opposite. They wait till everyone goes to bed. They stay up really late and then that's when they do stuff. When like sort of like the houses? Quiet can actually focus for you know a prolonged period of time. Okay, so you start learning with free co camouflaged iron I assumed that was their remote program because they have the remote learning right right? It was part time self paced, or it was not part time it was self paced. Full Stack? Okay in about. How long were you going through that? It's hooked me eleven months and I think I was pretty proud of the pace that I, said I really had to challenge myself with you know working with the kids, and in having a couple of part time jobs and making it through that so for me, it was. Eleven months I went through a lot of recovery over those eleven eleven

twitter hockey developer
How an English Professor Became a Front-End Web Developer with Bekah Hawrot Weigel

Learn to Code with Me

04:21 min | 2 years ago

How an English Professor Became a Front-End Web Developer with Bekah Hawrot Weigel

"Mentioned this. But what were you doing before? I think he did say this quickly. But what was your career before for this? I was an adjunct instructor for ten years. Okay, right so at a university so works Johnny from classroom. Okay, so I'm assuming you never went back to that since you start coding. I did so. I also remind drama. Even when I was in the hospital I was still teaching I was teaching online, and then I think I did another semester after and then one of the interesting things is united been doing it so long that I almost forgot what it felt like to really love what you're doing. Because I think at some point, the joy in teaching went away. It was really kind of clouded by school politics. Politics in in things like that, and when I started learning to code, and I'm learning this new skill. I really love this like I. Want to get up everyday and do it, and at that point I think that right about the time I entered flat iron school and I knew this is going to be more than just a hobby for me. This is GonNa be a new chapter in my life, and that's when I stopped teaching. So maybe jumping around here, but I'm just very curious. What was it like when you were learning? Initially end even when you're going through flat iron school because you have four children and I assume they're all pretty young. Right like you had just be given. Birth started learning to code and then went to a coding bootcamp. It was challenging so at the time I had a one year old, a three year old, a six year old, and an eight year old, and we had transitioned them from home schooling into going to school, so two of them were in school, and then the two youngest ones were at home with me, and it was I mean the the whole scenario is challenging because I'm redefining my life I had never imagined that this would be a part of my story. Story so you know people ask you that question what your life can look like in five years and like I never would have dreamt that. This is what my life would have looked like five years ago, not only were they redefining what my career was, but I was redefining who I was as a person coming out of trauma, and so I really had to find for me I find scheduled very comforting and sorry. His working hard to find blocks of time. Time and so eventually that turned into was I was waking up at four thirty in the morning and coating a couple of hours before getting the kids to school now when I started it wasn't that four thirty up because I had a baby that was still waking up at night, and so it was maybe six o'clock in the morning until six thirty I do a little bit, and then at nap time I would do a little bit, and then like after. After four PM I started to go brain dead I can't think straight, and so it's hard for me to go then, but if I if I had to. There were some late nights that are just muscled through it in order to get done what I needed to get done at every possible. Actually it's not unlike now through the pandemic West kids at home, I trying to find all of those bits of time to do the thing that I really enjoyed doing. Yeah Wow, what a story! And when you were chatting I, was just thinking about. There's a lot of folks have had on the show or speaker. People I've spoken to over email. Who are learning to code? Maybe they're few months few years. Whatever and they'll do similar world. They'll wake up really early before anyone else's away, if they have family and they'll. Learn to code for a few hours and then get on with their day and then got you spoken to people. It's kind of the opposite. They wait till everyone goes to bed. They stay up really late and then that's when they do stuff. When like sort of like the houses? Quiet can actually focus for you know a prolonged period of time. Okay, so you start learning with free co camouflaged iron I assumed that was their remote program because they have the remote learning right right? It was part time self paced, or it was not part time it was self paced. Full Stack? Okay in about. How long were you going through that? It's hooked me eleven months and I think I was pretty proud of the pace that I, said I really had to challenge myself with you know working with the kids, and in having a couple of part time jobs and making it through that so for me, it was. Eleven months I went through a lot of recovery over those eleven

Instructor Johnny
"weigel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

10:36 min | 2 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Weigel now back to our program it seems is that if you're thinking about sort of where this work touches the humana where it intersects with our lives there like different levels at which to think about intervening they're sort of the the government regulation level at which something like the general data protection regulation intervenes there's the corporate level there's an individual level there's all sorts of like tech worker activism and organizing that's been happening in the past few years and gained a lot more attention to things like tech won't build it recent Amazon actions just in the past few days I think maybe you could say a little bit about I get anyone of these different levels that speaks to you are how you how you would address you know whether it's the government of the corporation or the tech workers get a coalition or the individual person worried about their privacy yeah how do you think about approaching those different kinds of agents and telling them about their agents in the yeah I mean as a social scientist all things to me about the actor incentives and systems of power so maybe my stately controversial opinion here is that I don't think tech workers should have to unionize if they can do a bit of a Twitter debate the other day with someone about this when they retire they but this article about and they were talking about sort of a scorched earth strategy if you join a company and you find an ethical and I'm like you know that is something that a highly privileged person can do because you can go without having a job you can afford to be unemployed you can also afford to potentially have a you know have a negative mark on your employment history in these are all considerations that the a and and frankly it's a massive burden for someone to do you feel the responsibility of the almost single handedly feeling like that they need to push this change I think anyone who's done it has only done so at like very significant like emotional and often financial costs and that doesn't get talked about frankly so like quality that I think the people who can do that shouldn't have missed this Twitter finance some it was it was a very you know there's obviously a very friendly conversation but I I'd like I felt like you know kind of a controversial opinion there and of course I think collective action is important I think the fact that these workers are working collectively is what's important here but this notion of this individual whistle blower this individual person is rarely go all out this is problematic me for a few reasons others is really great Rebecca Solnit peace call out called when the here is the problem and it's been absolutely inspirational to me when thinking about why we need like change in the system and it's not up to these individual actors so what she talks about in in the article is whenever she tries to create a story about like a feminist collective or movement she often gets so he can I can too just like write another story about could attend burger with Peter Ginsberg in which she talks about is when we have these individual heroes what it does is it it and not just absolves the individual the non hero from action but it it also dissuades us through collective action and it makes us think that my little bit that I can do like unless I'm willing to go all out you know like quit my job whistle blow you know it's cetera do something illegal it's not worth it I think collective action has really what's been what's motivated a lot of the change so that's kind of the bottom up from the top down what I find really interesting is hearing lawmakers trying to grapple with how to regulate AI what to do about it and I think especially the lawmaker perspective they're trying to understand what this technology even me right and then also had a cheap regulation around something that seems to be constantly shifting and changing and how important do you think that is I mean I know different people take different positions on this I remember when mark Zuckerberg testified in Congress all sorts of people were clowning the way on a single saying though they say the Facebook they don't know what it is and I found my so for me to my surprise defending the is yeah members of our democracy but it is easy to spending the the the Congress people saying you know like they might not know how the chemicals work but that doesn't we can't regulate drug I mean they don't even know right you need to learn how to code to be able to regulate it yeah where do you come down on this question of how lawmakers are policy makers need to be educated on technology yeah I mean I think it's about a question that I get asked about like media and journalistic asked about you know just the general public I think the important person is and the potential impact of it so you're right you don't need to understand how a particular chemical reaction works need to understand that you know when a particular chemical is in the water it can lead to birth defects right what they need to understand is like the at this if we don't have the right level of explain ability in transparency algorithms harmful things can happen here's how harmful things can happen so it's it's about them understanding how to map out the risk an impact space and regulate or you know past guidelines along that help companies create the right kinds of guard rails not like maybe like a side thought here so I know a lot of that narrative about tack gets dominated by the big tech companies but what I actually find a lot a lot of the clients I work with who are adopting this technology they're they're not to to them technology is not precious it's one way that they can provide their good or service to customers with directions most interested in is providing their widget to customer access and in in doing so like there they're looking to trust in this technology that the two maybe don't know a lot about so they want to be sure that it's going to work the way they want and they're actually looking for basically like a like dot A. guidelines are guardrails for the government or whoever to tell them yeah this is actually appropriate or inappropriate use of this technology is the way you should or shouldn't do this so a lot of my clients actually does a test tech tech averse but they're a little wary at this point and they're very very concerned about the negative impacts this could have on customers because they're ultimately just concerned about the longevity of the organization and using their useful lessons from sort of the business fear our company's and customers to be drawn for policymakers and citizens I think there's a lot of parallels I think companies do tend to get more immediate feedback from customers because they like quarterly revenue etcetera where as a politician kind of you have to wait for your election cycle but there is this like level of responsiveness and I think a lot of lawmakers have gone back to their constituencies have understand like what my problems at home when it comes to this kind of technology and what does it mean to the people who live in my district I think it's actually very compelling if mean one thing I have noticed like the Americans Americanism is active and fast in the last few years is how much more local politics has become I think for a while it was it was quite global for awhile then it became very nationally focused and now it's actually become very very local and people are very concerned at what happens in their district it and I think this also translates with how we think about this technology people are thinking very much about how does that affect my day to day has affect my daily commute or you know how safe my children are and you think that's a product of technology is getting woven into the fabric of everyday local life more apps I think that's part of and the also the other part is this is hyper personalization everything is very very tailored to us now for better or for worse thing is like another hour long conversation we can have on whether or not it's making people sort of more self absorbed in worth selfish this constant inundation of things that are supposed to be made for you but I I do think it does lead to in a positive way people pushing back and saying this is not the way I want this to be and I know this is a bit of a of a non sequitur but I know you do have this critique of the smart city or the idea of the sort of personalized Polaris coming in at us through its through algorithmic systems do you wanna speak a little bit to that again this sort of feeds into some of the thoughts and fears I have about the surveillance state right now we're in the space world a lot of governments want to provide better services to their their citizens by instituting quote smart cities now if you ask anybody what's the difference in a smart students availing state I don't think people to tell you and I can guarantee you within the next year they will be synonymous with each other and fundamentally the problem is in the value proposition when people are sold when lawmakers are sold the idea of a smart city it's always business there to safety and security right we're gonna catch the bad people we're gonna find missing children you know it's always about inherently it's about stopping the the bad people and in doing so just like with these home surveillance technologies there has to be an other to has to be a bad person guess who the bad people are there the people we've always vilified when I can invent new villains which is going to find new ways to be classified people as the old villains we've always had so my my fear actually is that and this one was actually goes back to my dissertation on that day I think about it is that this this value proposition is not how society is for how society works we think about the literature on the social contract on the rule of law we don't adhere to the law because we're so afraid of being caught by the police we adhered to the law because we've all agree that's the best way for society to work we do the right thing because we feel like we should not because we're so worried that some drone is going to pick me up on camera and my concern here is that by over policing we're gonna road that social fabric we're gonna get bystander effect we're gonna get people not wanting to be involved because they'll be worried about maybe liability will be worried about you know being tracked leader and ultimately I'm I'm very concerned that just this concept of a flourishing society will actually be chilled if we are over policing every little action that people do care that's fi taught a class called a people's history of the internet Leicester last year and I did the two units that flow into each other at the Chinese theater the Chinese and it's our it's Google's sidewalk labs and then we do that Chinese surveillance state which is a topic that has gotten even more poignant since I taught the class you know yes ago or whatever it was but a but I hear that are there any practical let's see to put it another way are there ways that the smartness of the.

Weigel government
Bernie Sanders holds a rally after South Carolina primary results

The Sunday Show

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Bernie Sanders holds a rally after South Carolina primary results

"And we're back talking South Carolina primary I'm joined by Jill painter democratic strategist Dave Weigel national reporter covering politics for The Washington Post and Jamie Lovegrove political reporter at the post and courier in South Carolina Dave I wanted to talk about what Bernie Sanders did yesterday which is he didn't spend the day in South Carolina he was up in Boston at a big rally he was in Virginia with a big rally obviously sending the message to voters democratic voters like oh Hey remember I'm the guy who still gets the big rallies I'm the the sort of enthusiasm generator in this race what do you think his strategy is going to be going forward they're still kind of spinning a look he did well with young black voters but he did he did that before it's kind of a strange thing for for Sam's is because this is a guy who kept running after he was basically out of Hillary Clinton but it's been so great the the twin images of inevitability in excitement that you are doing harm if you don't just get behind this candidate however not that X. they're not that explicitly states that they handed this and that no no one is able to draw as many voters as he is mean there's an ad in South Carolina they ran from of a supporter who switched from Biden to Sanders and she argued very explicitly that she wanted to see the same kind of lines you softer rock Obama in twenty twenty the implication being Joe Biden can't do that and and bring Sanders can but yes Sam Biden blew it away without those those big wind standards are still not quite sure what to think of the fact that down trump and Bernie Sanders get these enormous crowds and the other can and find does not mean he's not he's never been able as it canton right to get a big crowd and he didn't South Carolina and it didn't matter it didn't matter the going for that's a big part of your argument is look we're going to come out of this in super Tuesday with a possible popular vote majority with a possible pledged delegate majority it's just that after that point people she should consider whether they really want to go for a establishment candidate who is much weaker than Hillary Clinton was I think that's that might become a bit more explicit that that said they've they've been counting chickens a lot recently the Sanders people if memory member in the debate recently there's a there's a hand show in in Nevada of whether the person with the most played W. should be the nominee so Sanders still has the most like delete after after South Carolina by little the expectation is that he'll do well enough himself and in California to get the most pledged delegates but they keep kind of basing decisions on what the polling says we just saw understate as Jimmy pointed out where the polling actually overestimated him an underestimated Joe Biden so when I talk about California they feel good about it but they talk about California S. is a situation where literally Sanders can get almost every single delegate without because you know you need the fifteen percent threshold and they look at a poll that says thirty Warren fourteen okay looks like no one else across the threshold that's it's not obvious they will so we're so I'm talking a lot to get to this hit to get to the point of how we need to get more vote results to know where they're going they're going to make those that after yesterday Burton it's Joe Biden not Bernie Sanders who has more popular votes in the hunt for the nomination so they've been talking as if no one will be able to catch Bernie Sanders very I think as much as more than more than some other campaigns we're sort of writing the Biden obituary of the made pretty good but just trying to write that obituary in the summer when he said it was down to him and Warren and so I I don't think they have rhetorically prepared for a world in which there is a real competition between them inviting and the issue with find is that he is indeed a a problematic candidate I mean we saw in the last week in South Carolina that he just made up a story where he was the hero during a during a party he has long rambling answers and town halls I mean he is in some way he is in many ways it's not as good as a as a competitor as Hillary Clinton was but you have a democratic electorate that is scrambled and terrified and unsure of who to back you see this in the head of the newspaper endorsements to word Biden would be the candidate normally getting all these newspaper endorsement saying both the most qualified candidate instead it's going to close the shore or in South Carolina when two people to judge the

South Carolina Reporter The Washington Post Jamie Lovegrove Dave Weigel
‘Richard Jewell’ and Olivia Wilde’s Offensive Portrayal of the Late Journalist Kathy Scruggs

The Big Picture

10:04 min | 2 years ago

‘Richard Jewell’ and Olivia Wilde’s Offensive Portrayal of the Late Journalist Kathy Scruggs

"Brian on your podcast with David Shoemaker. The press box talked a lot about the controversies around Richard Jewel. Let's unpack some of those quickly before we start getting into the nitty gritty of the film Maybe you can help us understand specifically what role. A person named Kathy scruggs plays in this. Yeah she plays a problematic role. I think we should say she was a big figure. In in the coverage of Richard Jewel. She was a co byline on the very first story in this movie she is kind of a suggestion of a character. More than character. Actor probably The big news of courses that they in the movie they suggest or I guess more than just right she sleeps with an FBI agent. Yes after he gives her a tip yes that they are investigating Richard Jewell. Yes it literally say. She does not literally say I will now sleep with you because you have given me this information But that happens in rapid succession in the span of thirty seconds. It's kind of like the trump Ukraine call. Oh it's a quid. Pro Quo don't have to say it. We know what happened. It was a perfect bout of sex for information as trump might say and Olivia Wilde. And I think you're talking about the delivery. Wild has suggested that she was a relationship with this. FBI This is. This is again some reporting that none of us were aware of before this. That's not what's Woodson the movie the movie is high. Sure Gimme some information and I will do you a favor and then the FBI agent played by. Jon Hamm mm says Oh so we are doing this. which would suggest that they were not doing this before the exchange of information? Yeah Yeah So. This controversy has swallowed the movie up in a lot of ways and I did not think that was going to be the case. And over the course of the run up to the release of the Movie Warner Brothers released a statement sort of defying the Atlanta Journal. Constitution's rebuttal of the movie. They were very proactive. In identifying the fact that this is a movie and there is some fictionalization traumatisation happening here. I wanted to talk to you guys especially about what happens when a movie takes liberties like this is generally speaking. For Art's sake. I think we should always be doing doing this. There's the movie should always be stretching and redefining and re imagining and re contextualising these stories to tell better stories that it's not the job of movies to make good journalists. It's the job of journalists to make good journalists but this seems to be a situation where cleese would obviously the director and and grandfather grandfather of this film. hasn't very specific points of view about authority in the media and there is an expectation that he brought a lot of those ideas. Do Do you think that the movie suffered greatly because of this conversation or or is this just something that we talk about on podcast. Because we're all in the media. Dave Weigel political writer had a great tweet where he said all this controversy convinced fenced liberals that they didn't WanNa see Richard Jewel but the controversy wasn't big enough to convince conservatives that they could own the lips by seeing Richard Jewel. So it Kinda put Richard Jewel in this weird have state I'm with you. I'm all for historical fiction and broad license to do it. The exception I would make is in a case like like this because you could have just picked a random person but you picked a real life reporter who's not famous and you're telling the world the one thing you should know about this woman other than that. She broke the story. Initially but Richard Jewel being under investigation by the FBI. She slept with somebody to get the information. So I think if you're going to do that and then take the additional step as wild suggested that this is based in reality this isn't billy ray writing the screenplay allow. Let's make something up you owe it to show your work in some way whether it's an op-ed whether it's an interview or something because this is beyond this is not famous people. Having a conversation in the White House is a real person sue. This is a a very pernicious and well-established trope in movies about female journalists female journalists in movies are always sleeping with the sources which you know I should just go on record in case you you are not as involved in the media as we are. That's not what happens in real life. We're not all sleep with our sources just so you know. That's not allowed. But when I saw this movie. It was a couple days before the the kerfuffle started and I was so shocked. I thought that either I assumed assumed that. This journalist Kathy scruggs portrayed in the movie was not a real person and then when i Google that it was she was I was like okay. Either there is. She wrote a memoir where she literally said. This happened and I did this. And this is how I got the story in my involvement or else she's dead and friends it's option B because otherwise I was like how do you get away away from this with from a liable perspective. It's so blatant. And so and it stands out and the other thing is just it really it. It undermines the movie. I don't understand why you have to do this. Because this is a movie about how the media was responsible will in in and ruining rituals life which is like. That's fact right that is that definitely happened But to put in this seemingly fictionalized or unsubstantiated and like gross comment on a female journalists in the movie undermines all the legitimate if if tricky cases that Clint Eastwood and movie wants to make about the media's role in American politics in life I completely agree with this man was trapped in his home mm-hmm with his mom for eight days while people everyone in America thought he was a terrorist who had set a bomb and blown up people and it wasn't a case of some of these cases of guilt or innocence. Where it's Oh? He was a little bit involved but he wasn't no he was completely innocent. And Somehow you've done this and taking him him he's no longer the sympathetic figure and the journalists who was part of a team with the JC that made mistakes in covering him. And we're not skeptical enough of the government's evidence evidence and case you've turned them into the into the sympathetic figures. I just don't get it at all. It's a bit of a confounding thing I think a lot of journalists are struggling with the movie for the exact reason you mentioned. Amanda which is that I. I think it's actually quite a strong film in one of Clint's best movies and last fifteen years and it's been completely cast aside and a lot of ways not the Clinton needs another successful movie had plenty in his career but it's a movie that metastasized as a lot of ideas that he's fascinated by kind of like libertarianism in the pursuit sort of like a single man's pursuit of success in the face of a lot of people working against him the Atlanta Journal Constitution response to this though. I think has been a little little bit curious. The long piece that they that they published a sort of profile. Kathy's life I think in some ways was very helpful in terms of saving her reputation specifically early about these kinds of allegations but also revealed a person who obviously had a lot of struggles in her life. Who who did some things that are I think just on the page people will look at me like Oh? Maybe she didn't do that but she was that it's Actually like I thought hyper generated new conversation around her life and around the movie Brian. What did you think about? The idea of trying to memorialize is her in. Defend her in the pages of the paper like that. Well I thought one is I think you just want to give her an identity. You know she is she's been. She's not really much character as I said in this movie. Clint Eastwood doesn't really care about the media in this movie. Other than as there's this noise in this thing that's happening Richard. You didn't care about the way that story got written was very interesting actually is a bunch of editors editors and writers kind of putting that together imperfectly as often. Journalism is so they were trying to give her an identity. I think we've Kinda gone now over the falls where we've corrected is using this horrible. Oh stereotype that got into this movie and now we're kind of excusing. What the paper did and all the media did and saying? Oh Her story. I saw held up. No they didn't one guy was innocent and two there were actual mistakes in the peace even in the first piece in the paper together which so. It's totally understandable. Hannibal that the paper wants to do this. But to me at some point it becomes okay. You're giving us one identity. You're telling us the real story behind your life and then there's this conversation about what the media did to Richard Jewell. which is it's actually kind of separate one thing? That's a little lost in the conversation around this. I want to get your perspective on an Amanda is when you're making something let's say you're making a podcast or you're working on a story story or you're making media company every day you're collaborating people. And you're interrogating all of the choices they're making on a regular basis. You have questions about things. The Livia Wild Defense of the character is one of those things where you think that at some point you might ask a question. You might not just presume and I guess that's questioning maybe the integrity of what Olivia while saying the defensive. Her character but movies take a long time even even one day Clinton movies take a long time to make. There's a long time in the making so how. How did how was not not everyone on the same page with this? What am I going to say? Movies do take a long time to make but relatively this was like a very quick movie At least in the filming like this was filmed over the summer of two thousand nineteen and it's December and now we're watching it so that's pretty wild and and it does really seem like Olivia Wilde. Got wanted to takes and it's like go okay. This is the performance going with which is it's it's a caricature I think. It's pretty generous and cruel version of a reporter which is fascinating because Libya while the daughter of journalists so i. I wouldn't say that this is a portrayal of empathy eighty and understanding at least from what I've seen Granted you only get to take her to but she the material is not there on also. Her interpretation of the material is pretty pretty intense but it definitely seems like it wasn't examined at the time and it certainly seems like no one anticipated this and no one got on the same page about their talking points because Libya has been all over the map. And I'm you know what I'm not sympathetic. With the fact that she's answering search for somme choices. I like this movie directed by Clint Eastwood. It's written by Billy Ray. But also she knows what she's doing. She read the

Richard Jewel Clint Eastwood FBI Kathy Scruggs Olivia Wilde Atlanta Journal Brian Billy Ray Reporter Amanda Clinton Jon Hamm David Shoemaker Libya Wild Dave Weigel Google Woodson Ukraine Richard Jewell.
"weigel" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

06:14 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"As he included his show. So we'll talk to Rafer Weigel about the latest from the judge. Yes, we will need a special prosecutor Rafer will be here also. We have rainy options, the president held up a little bit, and we're going to talk to who's a terrific columnist on national security for Bloomberg. He'll join us a little bit later on in the program. I'll ask him. I if he thinks the president of the right right thing and holding fire last night. I'm gonna play more of the president's comments. I must warn you ahead of time that I'm playing this off the Westwood One website on my magic box in front of me. And if they refresh, if they decide to refresh the audio stack while on planet, it will cut off. But here is the president who made a very, very wise decision. Mr President, sir. Why did you decide to hold fire? My do it live. I got it. I got it Mr President. Why did you decide to hold fire 'cause they came and they said, so we're ready to go with, like a decision. I said, I want to know something before you go. How many people will be killed? This case uranium. I said, how many people are going to be killed? I'd like to get back in that great people, these generals, they said came back, said, sir. Approximately one hundred fifty you know what I, I must say, give the credit credit where credit is due in my opinion. And he was somewhat of viscera did on certain conservative programs today, not only on cable, but on radio for holding fire. You know, a lot of conservatives say kill them all God sort about not third God. Our god. But the president of wives thing yesterday, number one. We've got these guys as somebody told me the other day. And I don't remember who has said this might have been Kensington, who said this whereas, we refer to, hey, what's up a congressman? He said we have their foot on. We have our foot on their neck. So why do we complicate things with a military strike when they just knocked unmanned drone out of the sky, and number two very, very, very politically astute, whether this was planned or just natural instinctive by the president. But it makes certain voting constituencies. Feel a little better about the guy since he held fire. I thought it was very, very wise. Nothing is green lighted until the very end because things can never gave a final no, no. We had something ready to go subject to my approval, and they came in, and they came in about a half an hour before this is so were about ready to go. I said, I want a better things in the air. We're playing out ready to go. No. But they would have been pretty soon. Don't. Interrupt the president Chuck Todd. But I, I must say, I thought that the president used a very good judgment last night as I was I went home. I made some popcorn sat down on the chair and my clicker ready for the lights over Taran and the president held up on this. I think that's a very, very wise as much as I love traumatic cable news and I'm getting very bored with the political news nowadays. So I was looking for something, but he held up in Donnelly, a smart move militarily in my opinion, and feel free to talk back at three one two five nine one eighty nine hundred thought it was very smart. Politically to today is the first day of summer. Welcome to summers, Chicago. I don't know if you saw on cable news today they had a bit of a mini ride over there in England at Stonehenge. I guess they have this regularly stone courses a monument. Bill on the alignment of the midsummer, sunrise, and midwinter sunset on the summer. Solstice the sun, rises behind the heel stone, which is the ancient entrance to the stone circle rays of sunlight or then channelled into the center of the monument. C E, N, T, R, E Zing Lewis to everything wrong. They drive on the wrong side of their own. They spell them it is believed that these solstices, sece's heaven Cal celebrated on at Stonehenge for thousands of years now, you might believe that there is only six thousand years old, but that was still be thousands. You're covered either way, the summer solstice takes place as one of the earth's poles has its matched them till towards the sun and the sun reaches its highest position in the sky. That's the real sky now Rupert Murdoch's network. This ensures the longest period of daylight north of the equator for the year. Unfortunately, what does that from his spinal tap? That's terrific crate, spinal tap tournament women listed a little head. I said, twelve feet Netflix inches. I said, twelve feet. Police arrested four people at Stonehenge today. One on suspicion of drunk driving a fifteen year old girl for being drunk into sorta only one indecent. Exposure, apparently took his clothes off a nineteen year old male on suspicion of criminal damage. He tried to analyze one of the stone Stonehenge us, and a forty five year old man was arrested on suspicion of common assault. They did that ten thousand people there today. So I think four or five arrests that's not bad. One regular group of visitors to Stonehenge every year. Has been the Neo pagans including people claim to have resurrected, the ancient practices of the Celtic druids in eighteen seventy visitors started going to the monument from nineteen zero five the ancient order of druids carried out modern druid rights at the site. They did today that was permanent and allowed, by the way. In the nineteen seventies, the druids unfortunately were joined by members of the new age movement. Whatever that is. And they held an annual free festival, and then things get out of hand. So then there was a high court injunction than eighty-five, banning anybody from celebrating on the site of Stonehenge six hundred people were turned away the next year prompted violent clashes with the police known as the battle of the bean field wasn't there, a movie here in the states that had the bean field as a title. I don't think.

president Mr President Rafer Weigel Westwood One prosecutor Bloomberg Chuck Todd Netflix Kensington Zing Lewis Taran Rupert Murdoch England Donnelly Chicago assault congressman Bill summers sece
"weigel" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Because because you're his daughter, I guess, is what I could be wrong about this. But I, I think about this, a lot, you know, and maybe that's in my situation, I hang onto the business a little bit because I think my father believes I might owe him something right? And I don't believe I owe him anything, I think, yoed me a lot. I think I'm, I'm feeling that I'm, I'm feeling compelled be just because of who I am, as a human being, you know, I'm I love my friends. I love my family. Yes, he did a horrible things to everyone in my family and myself. But I know what kind of person I am and where my heart is at that, if something were to happen, the guilt of not being who I know, I am would overtake it not because of him, not, because I feel like I have to, but it's just because, you know, that's who I second question, are you setting yourself up for the disappointment, potentially, because that's the second thing you have to consider is yes, you're good person. And yes, you want to be there for him because that's your nature that you're calling. That's what that's what resonates in your mind. But in doing so are you. Exposing yourself to more and further harm. If in fact, you're disappointed in the way he reacts. Well, I, I know how he's gonna react. No expectation. No. Yeah. I expect the worst of his behavior as always. Well, I'm not I'm not looking to get back into his life. Like, you know, hey, let's be cool again. I'm not looking for any of that question. You have to ask yourself is okay. Now, I'm gonna put myself in the line of fire than in my if and when he disappointed in Weigel walkaway from this even more hurt than because if that's the case, then don't do it. I'm like my feelings. As far as that is concerned are so gone. Like there's no there's no part of me that wants to reconcile. This is strictly about, you know, perhaps saying goodbye to the man who had me or made me so. And, and that's where that ends really but it's still like hard. Yeah. Sure to, to think I mean he might fully recover knowing him, he might bio. So, yeah, that's where I'm at to their place. It's a weird place to be a lot. I mean, I think anybody even if you're a strange from your family that if, if you think they're on their deathbed. You least want to, like, I don't know some people don't, but there's a part of me about the yeah. Think about that, too. I don't know. I don't I don't mean to make your situation about mine, but I resonated with me so much, and I think that things that you're going through things I think about all the time, sir, you know, is by would I if I do something about my situation, but before that happens. But if it did happen today, what would I do? I'll know I know I will never get from him what I need ever ever even in his last breath. He would deny that he did anything wrong. But I'll get what I need from laws. You do. Then, then that's what you, then you have to follow that I like, what you said. No expectations. Thanks..

Weigel
"weigel" Discussed on Primary Ride Home

Primary Ride Home

07:46 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on Primary Ride Home

"Please tweet at me picks or it did not happen. Just search for primary ride home on the Spotify app or browse podcasts, under the your library tab and follow me. So you never miss an episode of primary ride home on Spotify. Thanks to Spotify, for sponsoring the primary ride home. And while we're on the topic of people pledging to do a thing here is a quick follow up over the past few weeks. I've reported on various efforts by the primary candidates to get a single debate focused on the issue of climate change. Well yesterday, Joe Biden became the fifteenth candidate to endorse that idea in a story from the Washington Post by David Weigel, we this classic paragraph, quote, that's a we should be doing the former vice president told a Greenpeace activists on a rope line. I'm all in, man. Take a look at what I'm talking about. And by the way, the first climate change plan and the history of the congress, Biden end quote, now that is swagger. There is no other news, yet on this front, the NC canoe by its stance that it will not hold single issue debates in general much less on the issue of climate change. But it is certainly notable at the highest polling candidate is now officially on board with the idea. In the Washington Post yesterday, James Hohmann, went deep on the candidates, so-called walkup songs. These are those songs candidates choose to have played while they walk on stage. And they were on full display on Sunday when we had nineteen candidates in one place, that gave us a great chance to see which songs each candidate shows, if you have any interest in music, I really think you should read this article, there's a Lincoln, the show notes, of course, to get a deeper, look and listen into this. But I do want to highlight a few of the walkup songs stuck out to me. Okay. First off Senator Kirsten gillibrand chose the song good as hell by Liz. Oh, so, look, here's a pro tip from me, if you ever have the chance to see Liz, oh, perform live. You do that. You do what you need to do to get yourself to Eliza show, because it will make you a better person. It happened to me, and that's why I'm telling you all right? Let me read from the peace, a quote from gillibrand. Spokeswoman Meredith Kelly, quote, Liz, oh, is a bad ass time. It again models female. Empowerment, and the beauty and being yourself. We love her music and message of acceptance, and nobody is better at pumping you up before a big speech, and quote, and next up better rock shows, the song, clampdown, by the clash, this was their second single off the Alban London calling from nineteen seventy nine. In other words, a moderately deep cut from very well known punk record from forty years ago, and oddly enough, New York. Mayor Bill de Blasio also picked a track off the same record but he's using the song Rudy can't fail while a person stays music has literally nothing to do with their policy positions. I do think it's kinda funny that there is disproportionate. Representation for one aging punk record in this field, and a few more tracks. That seemed very on brand to me. Senator Elizabeth Warren shows, Dolly Parton classic song. Nine to five Senator comma, Harris shows work that by Mary, J Blige and mayor Buddha. Judge chose high hopes by panic. At the disco. So check out the link in the show notes because the article a good job explaining what these songs are that is really handy. If you're not familiar with a certain genre of music, and also, the article explains why the candidates chose them. There are some historical context to, including a mention of Clinton's use of Fleetwood MAC's song. Don't stop way back in ninety two which actually managed to get the band back together for a while. And last up today over the weekend Hooghly on Castro went to Flint, Michigan rather than attending that giant Iowa event, like most other candidates, by the way, that makes him the first candidate to visit Flint during this campaign cycle while there, he toured farmers markets, churches and spoke to locals about their seemingly endless issues with unsafe drinking water, which is currently still tainted with lead. And then on Monday, he proposed a plan to deal with lead in American homes and water supplies. This makes Castro the first candidate in this field to tackle that particular issue with a policy proposal and that plan is both comprehensive and easy to understand. I Castro says he would quote, convene a presidential task force on lead in communities charged with eliminating lead poisoning. As a major public health threat, and coordinating, the interagency response in partnership with state and local governments, and quote, at the same time, he would ask congress to appropriate five billion dollars. A year for ten years in order to deal with lead remediation, that's in things like paint and soil and lead pipes in communities that are most affected. Obviously Flint would be on that list. But Castro also calls for national assessment of the threat level in various communities. So at least we would all know what we're dealing with Castro also calls for a home lead safety tax credit, which he doesn't offer a bunch of details on, but apparently that would provide tax breaks for people looking to do remediation work in their own homes along the same lines. He calls for stricter laws around the sales of homes built before nineteen seventy eight so that new owners actually have data on whether the home contained substantial amounts of lead paint or lead piping or even lead contamination in the soil around the home, which is by the way, a genuine concern if you have kids playing in your yard or if you were growing food in lead, teen to soil, and beyond all that Castro calls for a variety of specific proposals on testing children's lead level. Nls and providing healthcare and interventions to help kids who have dangerous levels. Okay. So this is policy and has always I ask, what would it cost and how would Castro pay for it? Well, it is unclear what the total cost is there like I said, he does mention having congress appropriate five billion dollars a year for ten years. We're looking at least fifty billion dollars there later in the policy. A different point mentions one hundred million dollars a year on an ongoing basis to help kids he doesn't total up the numbers or give costs for each proposal. He makes I assume those two are the biggest costs involved now on the paying for aside, Castro suggests changing, how federal disaster funding is used, for instance, he says the Flint water crisis should qualify as a disaster and thus at the existing federal budget for natural disasters should be made available to deal with human made disasters. He also talks about public private partnerships to drive innovation. But again, does not offer. Details on what that might. Cost or bring in. So I would like to see some more math here. But to be totally fraying..

Castro congress Senator Kirsten gillibrand Spotify Washington Post Liz Joe Biden Mayor Bill de Blasio David Weigel Senator Elizabeth Warren Flint vice president New York Alban London Eliza NC Senator James Hohmann
"weigel" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

10:33 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Cohan Rafer Weigel from FOX thirty two in for John. How today and news came out yesterday. The governor was all excited that they passed a budget. But comes with a list of taxes, the folks are going to be paying more, it looks like the average several thousand dollars a year. Maybe coming out of your pocket state rep, Chris Welsh nice of you to come in studio and beyond the hot seat on this hot topic today. Marc pleasure. Lorne rafer. Thanks for having me, you know. Yeah, thank you for coming in. So when you take those Welsh yet, explain them. Well, yeah, I mean you guys are doing victory lap over this. But a lot of regular everyday, Illinois answer, not happy about having to pay more for parking cigarettes. Streaming service online. I mean, it's a lot of extra taxes. So why is this good for the state of Illinois? Well, I think first and foremost is good for the state of all annoy because it was done in a bipartisan way, these types of decisions aren't easy, and this isn't something that Democrats, the state or Republicans into the state, we got into this problem. Over the course of Republicans and democratic administrations. And it was gonna take Democrats and Republicans working together to dig us out of this hole. And if you look at the entire budget package, every Bill was a strong, bipartisan support, these bills were heavily negotiated and I to say, this is actually the way governments should work. But what about being held accountable for the fact that there's a lot of spending here, there's higher taxes, and no pension reform? Well, you know, Lauren, the supreme court spoke in my first year in office seven years ago, we voted on a Bill. Senate Bill one where we try to do a of reform of the pension system, and they'll always supreme court said, what we did was unconstitutional, and they said, go back to the drawing board and start with finding some revenue. Because the, the pensions that we have out there are promises that we have to keep, and we have so many that predate all of us in this room, right, that this can cost money and these were deals that were made. With by union bosses with politicians as he said, and they predate us. And so now we're in when you look at the math, it's not sustainable. So if you back then weren't able to move anything forward through the courts constitutional amendment. What now than our lawmakers gonna do to address pension reform and Amy down the road taxpayers can feel a little bit better than all this. Money's coming out of their pocket. Pritzker is put together a ambitious plan. He's had a great great session getting his agenda through. And I think what we did this year is a bridge to getting us to the November twenty twenty flat tax amendment that voters will get to the side, and we're going to make our case at the end of the day, we need additional revenue to comply with that supreme court decision, and that revenue will be dedicated largely to those pension obligations and the, the, the studies have been done. That's what's going to help you get into black is changing this, this archaic outdated tax structure that only seven states in the in the country us. Well, the other thing that would be people are. Hoping we'll, we'll bring more revenue into the state is the legalization of marijuana. So some owed argue will if that's potentially millions of dollars coming in. Why not wait until that goes through first to see what exactly you need to, you know how much money you might have before raising additional taxes? I don't think we have time to wait. And if you look at the things that we accomplished, working together in a bipartisan way last week. I mean, we we hit it on so many different levels, creating revenue, that'll, that'll grow you after year from the gaming expansion, our neighbors. Hey, Indiana, Wisconsin. They're doing it and to stay competitive we had to get in that game gaming expansion, going to create long-term revenue legalization of cannabis or the eleventh state. Right. That's really only going to make a dent if you think about the dollars and sense, the math on this, you brought up the flat tax one tapping another states. But isn't that really disturbed redistribution of wealth? The more you make the more you take, Laura. I come from the position that those much given much as expected. And I'm going to be voting for something. In November, twenty twenty that I'll probably end up paying a lot more in taxes, based on those rates on creating maybe more economic opportunity for people focusing on jobs and economic opportunity, not just focusing on the tax portion of this, and what, you know, if I make more if I'm you know, whatever single or a couple two hundred fifty thousand gonna to pay more in taxes. Why not have the sheer focus beyond economic opportunity? Trying to help other people, get jobs and make more money. I think you do both. I think he'd do both. I think it's been shown that being one of seven states that has a flat tax is working the states that have gone. Progressive tax like our neighbors Minnesota look at what happened in Minnesota when they went to the progressive tax, Wisconsin, Iowa, those states have a progressive tax and they're in Republican hands. And so when you look at that, and it's been proven that the progressive tax work. That's what we have on the federal level. But also, if you look at the package of bills that we ran last week and, and partnership with our Republican colleagues. We pass the blue collar jobs act. We pass the legislation that's going to help bring some data centers into the state of annoy. Some tax credit packages, that'll help downstate Illinois flourish. We, we also cut some of the burns from taxes and regulations on small medium sized businesses. Those are the items brought to us by our Republican colleagues. So we're trying to tackle this thing from multiple approaches, because the whole that has been dug over all these years is just to date, while you also did raise taxes on corporations larger corporations. Did you not a lot of people are thinking that's going to cause business to flee Illinois does that concern you it doesn't concern me because, you know, look, we're in a studio right now. I see a world class view. This is a world class city. This is a place where people want to be do work. They're not fleeing Chicago. They're, they're, they're actually coming to us to do business in this world class city where break in tourism records year after year after year. So beautiful place that we all call. All right for you left. You came back. You know, this is true. And. That's. To say I was about to leave listers of heard my story before I was looking in other cities for job before I came back to WLS full-time because it's, it's really difficult here. And there isn't a lot of job opportunities certain sectors, there is like tech sectors in the financial sector, but in, in our area of broadcasting, or in public relations the jobs aren't paying as much, but because of the cost of living in because of the taxes and because frankly, the politics here, it makes you want to go to other places, but you mentioned something about record tourism, which I give a lot of credits, Rahm Emanuel for that, and bringing people here, do you then think that the whole stuff that's out in the media, then about a mass exodus of people leaving, and that is fake news. I wouldn't go that far because before chair at the executive committee, this session, I was chair of higher education. And, you know, we saw a lot of our students leave and go to other states that were heavily recruiting Illinois students, and I believe that what we did here in this budget with the heavy emphasis on education. Pre K all the way through higher education. Those are the those are the people that we're losing, and those are the ones that we need to focus on getting back because we lose that generation, they're gone. And in the data shows that ninety two percent of those that go to our colleges and universities, smell annoy stay here in the way to lift up this through those young people and get them in our colleges and universities and leading them to K. Like they've been decaying since two thousand one that wasn't the answer. We have to invest in our school, so that takes revenue did put a lot of money into the educational system and looking at this. But you also put, I think what twenty two million nine million dollars into census data. I mean, a lot of people go, well, what's the point of that is that that's going to lead to billions, brought to our state, if work counted properly, we will get money out of the federal government? If we're not counting properly, we're gonna lose money, we may lose congressional seats twenty nine million should have been higher because I think that that's, that's where the game is going to be played as. Making sure every single person is counted, so that on the federal level Illinois continues to grow and doesn't take a step back. So we're speaking with a state rep chriswell tonight. Asked this question on social media to our listeners because it's really important to them. You know, a lot of people have paycheck to paycheck, a lot of us have side-hustle, I'd like to say to three jobs. It's a gig economy. That's very common that people are working as independent contractors. Everybody's looking at us and saying, all right. We'll fight drive to work. And now I've got to pay this much more for gas or have to pay this much more in this tax. Where do I cut you know what advice do you give them to, you know, constituents out there as we sit here and figure out, you know, maybe I can't take the family make ation and recharge my batteries. Maybe I need to ride a bike to work or take a bus and not have a car me what's, what's your advice. Well, my vice is just like it in any situation where it's going to take collective effort on all of us to help our state moving in the right direction. And that's what we're asking everyone to do. That's why we do. Partisan way, we're all going to have to pitch in a little bit to help rebuild on, I'm looking forward to being a process of part of that process and helping to rebuild ally. And I know a lot of my colleagues are pleased with what happened. And this is just Democrats or Republicans around around the state saying the same thing. Now, I think a lot of people think. Well, all right. If if you're able to pass legislation to increase taxes this easily, what's to stop you guys from continuing to do it. I mean is there going to be some relief at some point if this budget does get balanced if the pension crisis does finally get fixed? Do you guys for see an opportunity down the road to lower some of these taxes because obviously, at the end of the day, I'm sure you don't like paying higher taxes, Representative Welsh? Oh, no one likes paying higher property taxes, and I'll tell you one of the biggest events that I have every year is whenever I have the property tax appeal workshop and teach people how to do their own appeals on their homes. You know, this budget contains fifty three point sixty five million dollars. In property tax relief grants to help school districts, you know, lower property taxes. We also have a property tax task force, that's going to be convened this summer to help put some things in place to lower property taxes. This is a real issue. And that's what we gotta tackle the whole thing and Watson that in parts. Well, these are tough questions, a lot of people are asking, so we appreciate state Representative Chris Welch for coming in studio, and, and taking our tough questions. And a lot of our listeners wanna weigh in, so we take in your calls, three.

Illinois state rep Rafer Weigel Chris Welsh Wisconsin Lorne rafer Marc pleasure Minnesota Chicago state Representative Rahm Emanuel FOX John federal government Lauren Pritzker
"weigel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Marianne, vow and movie Weigel in conversation with Greg Dalton. The, the green deals is the face of the green new deal is a Alexandra Cossio Cortez congresswoman from New York. But there's another partner, Ed Markey, who seems to be kind of the silent partner, he was off. Saw Asli part of the Waxman, Markey, ten years ago, establishment Denic democrat kind of on the progressive side, Ben in congress, most of all of his life, virtually how, how do you see the dynamics of those two individuals is kind of the inside veteran, and, you know, the fresh new face who has this is really a social media phenomenon right now? Yes, it's so interesting that pairing because when Alexandria Cossio Cortez was was first elected and really this, this push for the green new deal was going forward. And there was the sit in Nancy, Pelosi's office, and really the, the young advocates of the green new deal were not going to let it beat back, Bernard and one of the things that they talked about was they felt Waxman Markey from a decade ago that that was that was to incremental. We cannot have that kind of just really working at the margins sort of legislation. That's why they're behind green the green new deal because it is a transformational. Legislation that, that's what it's calling for. So talking to them, they were very kind of this. This is an anti Waxman Markey approach to climate change. And then the next thing, you know, Alexandria, Mukasey critise, partnering with Ed Markey. And, and I think that, that shows that she sees the need to reach out to the folks who have been in this battle for, you know, decades at this point. And it also is showing that the folks who have been in this battle for decades are realizing that, you know, these green new dealers are right. We can't be incremental. We have to at this point talk about something that is truly a mobilization that truly is transformational. It doesn't that mean transferring well. Wealth and power, and that some people say that's necessary. We can't just take out Brown energy put in green energy and call it a success that there's issues of wealth and power distribution here. And that's what has the Democratic Party and some people really little concerned that gets threatening to some people Barney. Frank said, it's only so much change American people can swallow at one time. So the, the MVP I certainly see as necessary, but that's also part of what it makes people uncomfortable. I think I will agree with you and definitely the opponents have kind of used that to their advantage, calling it a socialist plot and all that kind of stuff. But if you look at the reality, we can't make transition to cleaner energy with out some sort of, really strong economic policy is. That deals with the needs of these workers who are going to, you know, have their jobs, displaced, there's just no way to do that to make that transition without having some sort of economic policy that addresses workers and the, the supporters of this approach have used the new deal as, as a metaphor, because DEA regional new deal was many, many different programs, kind of packaged together for Megan, the kind of transition, we'll have to make to address climate change. We're going to have to look at all of these aspects of the economy and hopefully, some of the transfer of wealth will be too. Address the needs of those workers and also to reward the, the businesses that have spearheaded the transition and, and have become leaders in that transition rather than holding us back. So it sounds like the Democrats are supporters of the green new dealer, laying the foundation trying to develop support develop a Bill that then gains momentum over the next couple of years. And we really looking at twenty twenty one potentially when they feel like they have a position to an opportunity and a well baked Bill to possibly become law. I think that everyone is looking for twenty twenty one and that's why you see climate change being talked about by all of the presidential candidates because this looks like it will be. The, the opportunity won't present itself. Until we have in the White House, somebody who supports acting on climate and really, we have the opposite. Now, we have a White House that denies the climate change really is an issue, which is, again something you have to you cannot underestimate the impact that, that has we haven't had a White House before that just his out and out denied that climate change is an issue since. Both President Bush's. They, they took the issue seriously and. They, you can definitely quibble with how they've implemented the, you know, policy, and you can criticize. That they didn't act enough that, that President Bush forty three. Got us out of Keough. But he didn't deny the climate change was an issue. And with this White House, I don't think that and I think that the supporters of the green new deal carbon taxes, any kind of climate policy. Don't think that it has a chance under the current administration..

Waxman Markey White House President Bush Alexandra Cossio Cortez Alexandria Cossio Cortez New York partner Marianne Democratic Party Weigel Keough congress Greg Dalton Alexandria MVP Frank
"weigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:38 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Vow and movie Weigel in conversation with Greg Dalton. The, the green deals is the face of the green new deal is a OC Alexander Cossio Cortez congresswoman from New York. But there's another partner, Ed Markey who seems to be kind of the silent partner. He was obviously part of the Waxman, Markey, ten years ago, establishment Denic democrat on the progressive side, Ben in congress, most of all of his life, virtually how, how do you see the dynamics of those two individuals is kind of the inside veteran, and, you know, the fresh new face who has this is really a social media phenomenon right now? Yes, it's so interesting that pairing because when Alexandria Cossio Cortez was was first elected and really this, this push for the green new deal was going forward. And there was the sit in at Nancy, Pelosi's office, and really the, the young advocates of the green new deal were not going to let it beat back, Bernard and one of the things that they talked about was they felt Waxman Markey from a decade ago that that was that was to incremental. We cannot have that kind of just really working at the margins sort of legislation. That's why they're behind green the green new deal because it is a transformational. Legislation that, that's what it's calling for. So talking to them, they were very kind of this. This is an anti Waxman Markey approach to climate change. And then the next thing, you know, Alexandria, Mukasey critise, partnering with Ed Markey. And, and I think that, that shows that she sees the need to reach out to the folks who have been in this battle for, you know, decades at this point. And it also is showing that the folks who have been in this battle for decades are realizing that, you know, these green new dealers are right. We can't be incremental. We have to at this point talk about something that is truly mobilization that truly is transformational. It doesn't that mean transferring well. Wealth and power, and that some people say that's necessary. We can't just take out Brown energy put in green energy and call it a success that there's issues of wealth and power distribution here. And that's what has the Democratic Party and some people really little concerned, you know, that gets threatening to some people, Barney Frank said, it's only so much change American people can swallow at one time. So the, the MVP I certainly see as necessary, but that's also part of like it makes people uncomfortable. I think I will agree with you and definitely the opponents have kind of used that to their advantage, calling it a socialist plot and all that kind of stuff. But if you look at the reality, we can't make transition to cleaner energy with out some sort of, really strong economic policy is. That deals with the needs of these workers who are going to, you know, have their jobs, displaced, there's just no way to do that to make that transition without having some sort of economic policy that addresses workers and the, the supporters of this approach have used the new deal as, as a metaphor, because de original new deal was many, many different programs, kind of packaged together for kind of transition will have to make to address climate change. We're going to have to look at all of these aspects of the economy and hopefully, some of the transfer of wealth will be too. Address the needs of those workers and also to reward the, the businesses that have spearheaded the transition and, and have become leaders in that transition rather than holding us back. So it sounds like the Democrats are supporters of the green new dealer, laying the foundation trying to develop support develop a Bill that then gains momentum over the next couple of years. I really looking at twenty twenty one potentially when they feel like they have a position to an opportunity and a well baked Bill to possibly become law. I think that everyone is looking for twenty twenty one and that's why you see climate change being talked about by all of the presidential candidates because this looks like it will be. Hit the, the opportunity won't present itself. Until we have in the White House, somebody who supports acting on climate and really, we have the opposite. Now, we have a White House that. Denies the climate change really is an issue, which is again something you have to you cannot underestimate the impact that, that has we haven't had a White House before that just his out and out tonight. That climate change is an issue since. It note both president bushes. They, they took the issue. Seriously? And they, you can definitely quibble with how they've implemented the, you know, policy, and you can criticize. That they didn't act enough that, that President Bush forty three. Got us out of Keough. But he didn't deny the climate change was an issue. And with this White House, I don't think that and I think that the supporters of the green new deal carbon taxes, any kind of climate policy. Don't think that it has a chance under the current administration. They're.

Waxman Markey White House Alexandria Cossio Cortez Alexander Cossio Cortez New York partner President Bush Weigel Democratic Party Keough Barney Frank Greg Dalton congress Alexandria MVP Pelosi
"weigel" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Third voice stadium the stripers and the PawSox or nothing. Nice double-play turn by Janssen Whitman Brock Holt, seeing his first action in the field of this rehab is silent making that play with these at second base. Come to bat against Patrick Weigel third was sit down the side in order walk last inning to seem Travis. But that was a race to end the inning after Josh Octavian lines, right back to them into a double play. So it's seventy nine for production here in the third Ortiz Hernandez, Janssen, witty and Jake romance ski but Jim looks like we're going to have a little bit of a delay here. Alex Jackson has a issue at the webbing of his glove. I think there might have been full of one of the dots. Wasn't fully tied. So he's going back to the dugout to get a new mid. Veep backups. You have catches. Thank you have maybe three ceiling. It takes for the catcher, actually come back out. And now here he is trust back out from the dugout. And if you're the PawSox Gibb, you hope that double play turned to the top of the ending is able to kinda get Stankiewicz propelled, the right direction. Sixty four pitches through three certainly could be better. So digging in for the right side is Gorky Hernandez against atoll. Right hander pitch swung on popped up back behind us for strike one. We mentioned in the pre game show. Gorky Hernandez snapped at for eighteen skid with a pinch hit single in the ninth inning last night. And he pinch hit for Brock bowl. One offering swinging a chopper down to third fielded on the forehand by Lopez and his throw on the run is in time. Will read and as I out of the third inning as you and I talked about on the post game show yesterday at felt like the poss were down larger than they were yesterday. And they were able to bring the tying runs not only to the play put on bass. Thanks Gorky for that. Hit in the ninth inning. Both bullpens was splendid yesterday. Out. Here's Janssen Woody. Weigel as the fastball doubted on the outside black for strike one. When he comes in hitting twenty five with one lone home run that came in the ball game last night, as twelve RBI's. Why goal sets steps kicks and fires. Swing foul back to the backstop for strike, too. The home run for Woody traveled four hundred fourteen feet into the bleachers in right center field. Johnson had a good series down equipmet last week. And he was six for twelve. He's off to a good start in this series here at McCoy. The oh to pitch from Weigel is off the plate away. Ball one. Janson hitting even four hundred over his last ten games, fourteen thirty five with the home run. Seven runs knocked in these walked six times. Why goal gets his signed from Jackson. His set and is one to pitch. A breaking ball lying down the right field line and hooking foul. Allowed strike off the bat, a witty, and he'll have to come back to the box for another one to pitch. Yeah, no doubt. And you just outlined, it, they're not only kind of digging deeper into abilities recently of witty. But some of those at bats yesterday is able to work a walk. He's able to force the pitch count to escalate a little bit. The opposition has had a bad at that. A lot of pitches last night. Another one to swing a mistake. Three. That's a good off speed pitch from Weigel that drifted down in catch up to it. And that's his first strikeout of the night. We also talked about this yesterday to the prowess, depth of this Braves organization. I mean this is a guy that. Fag -nificant breaking ball. Strong fastball. Shona pension to be able to spot it as well. There's a lot to like the near future for praise fans to down. Here's shake romance sqi goes after the first pitch and it's bouncing ball down to third gloves by Lopez, and he will throw in plenty. Get the PawSox catcher final out of the inning. It's another one two three frame for Weigel. And we head to the fourth with striper stripers leading.

Patrick Weigel Ortiz Hernandez Alex Jackson Janssen Woody Lopez Janssen Whitman Brock Holt Josh Octavian Gorky Travis Janssen Braves Gibb Shona Janson Stankiewicz Brock bowl Johnson Jim Jake
"weigel" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Oil money the drunk driving fleeing the scene Apocalypse Now. The corrupt El Paso city council member with the billionaire father-in-law voting with his father-in-law to bulldoze the Brown people and yet rich white people in they're tearing down the wall. He loves abortion, the burglary charge, and now Dave Weigel points out that the picture of beta on the cover of Vanity Fair by any liebowitz which mirrors the anti liebowitz picture of John Edwards with his dog in his pickup truck and another Conde nast cover with a story written by the same person photographed by the same person, John Edwards launched his political as bid for the presidency, and now Dave Weigel at the post points out at the doctor evil post that the pos- that struck on the cover of Vanity Fair and the clothing that he's wearing doubtless staged by any liebowitz, excuse me, any Li Vits is exactly. The same. As Ronald Reagan on time magazine man of the year cover wearing a denim shirt. Blue jeans with both his hands kind of tucked in his back pockets of his jeans posed Baidoa Rourke exactly the same way. And now so they're trying to make him look Reaganesque. I guess is the effort here, and it's a propaganda factory. As the world has never seen. Also, the the good people at the free beacon have put together. Some great stuff beta or work in high school, and he went to a high school, a private exclusive high school in Virginia and somebody already found his yearbook and areas with his yearbook and he's got some punk rock stuff. He's got some of this. But then there are pictures from his yearbook of the students posing with their big.

Baidoa Rourke Dave Weigel Vanity Fair John Edwards El Paso Ronald Reagan Conde nast Li Vits burglary Virginia time magazine Reaganesque
"weigel" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"He's he seems very very irked a lot of the time. Okay. And he's really hung up on how much like in the cafeteria. The like there is like a porn hub cafeteria. That it costs more for hot food than hold from the Salom. Okay. So that could be why you said that your searched every day. He is smuggling in food not allowed to bring food in that's wall. So that's what I say. Do they search your mouth? Two. Yes. Okay. Uh-huh. Mine. I've seen other people not get their mouth searched. Okay. I get mine. Search how do you see somebody knock at their mouth search? It's just the lack of them searching. Okay. And then they sometimes will say to me it's like, and we let that guy through going to search twice. And then wait. Why would you go? See these are the kind of stories honestly, Doboy she's just fucking like stories and shit like that. It's just like what happened that day, basically. Yeah. Or like once in a while what happened in middle school or yes. And then what happened today? And then it's like pretend to get mad Weigel read some reason to get all worked up. Yeah. And then next does sort of who me routine. Tends to really know. What's riley? Mitch. It's so easy. And if you combined your patriot numbers. Yeah. How many how many subscribers are you guys at now, we're at just a shade under seven k seven k. Okay. I can I can bring up the number right now. Don't you like where it's we? We have six thousand eight hundred eighteen patrons right now. Okay. That's pretty good. Would you say no to to ten more? You know, you go your take all your guys over. I mean, look, I just lay my cards on the table. Now. I've been so jealousy. You guys. You got you talk about the secret sauce. You guys figured out the secret sauce of making money on patriae. We've never really talked about the secret sauce general. Saving. Sure, I heard when we talked you guys you listen to your fan of the show. Every episode. I have. Yeah. Wow. That's my secret..

Weigel Doboy Salom Mitch seven k
"weigel" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

05:21 min | 3 years ago

"weigel" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"The. Personally owned by the president. Oh one. Oh, wow. John about. Power really started getting questions when he called fired. They weren't fired. That's like the first time he'd done that at think. But. Well. Your name in the president's mouth. A lie about the crowd size. Find the president's rallies. What do the peop- states bidding that that was like a weird night because I found so the president's hacked me for tweeting something snarky and actually it was great because I've learned to really hate reply guy culture, where the president says something, and you do it you, sir. I don't care anymore. I mean, it's a statement. He makes it I had seen a photo of this rally that wasn't filled in yet. But you could see Trump like scouting in the background. I thought it was him walking into some that wasn't full. And he does like say like it's great crowd, and there's twenty thousand people outside and there aren't there like no people outside. So I just snark once and didn't really think about it. And then actually the Leded in hours later, six hours, seven hours later, a friends Christmas party and people to start texting me, but just like, you know, Twitter insufferable and football game says like damn shit. Oh shit. I was this. And it was weird. Because my check does like, hey, I'd already lead tweet. I do anything wrong. And they said, well don't tweet things that are wrong. But it doesn't seem like the worst thing in the world. But the key thing is you were wrong about the rally. Don't bring down the president. Yes. That's true. It wasn't classic Trump moving the goal post. Because the first he said he believed this they haven't even retracted this. And then he said, yeah. Sorry about that. And he hasn't been fired. Like any bed will be met by another demand. Which is why you can't give them any time. Speaker the house realize. Yeah, that was the first time he said somebody should we have fired and they didn't fire. Well, and that is the beginning of the end of his power. I guess the lesson here is, you know, never snark without thinking or if you start better not this never tweet benefited from tweeting this much I'm here now that helped. Yeah. Benefiting materially from sweetie. Absurd. We'll is pending. And the links cat that I just bought from. No. Without further ado, I should formally introduce our guest for this week its political reporter for the Washington Post, Dave Weigel s good to be here. Much scoops Weigel. Yeah. Got a hat with. S card in the brim. I feel bad because there's this reporter Jimmy V Elkin that the daily news actually does that. And I pointed a photo. No, no insult. It was like a photo of Jilib renouncement Evren looks like crap is wearing a shell suit and a t-shirt and there's one guy who's like, hey, this news and Jimmy and he's a good reporter. And I think he took it personally. I didn't mean that would do that. I would never ever criticize someone for doing the press the press badge thing that rules, and everyone should do it instead of having a fucking Lanier. That's we're so cool. We instead have a neon lanyard with like a big picture. It's like your driver's license with blurrier and like a chip on it that's cooler than a hat. I what oh you've got a badge near rakishly cocktail at I'd much rather. You have a fucking giant necklaces like a Boehner medicine on it. A trade show, that's way, cooler. Dave political reporter was listless talk. Some. Let's talk some politics, man. Oh, man. There's been a lot of politics going on this week, so many there's so many politics folks, check this out. It's only January did, you know, this believe it. I used to be one people who do believe it's Thursday still on Friday. And it's just it's so exhausting now that I'm gonna try it's everyone feels like how all the time some people who would be feeling a little less like hell all workers. All right into see those paychecks into trickle. And as we now have a temporary reprieve longest government shutdown in history. Trump announced saying he would reopen the government for thirty days to give some breathing room. I guess for the negotiations but bottom line, no, no money for the wall. Pelosi basically just she for his slaying. She slayed we'd do not question the character. She has she's Kurt right now..

Trump president reporter John Jimmy V Elkin Dave Weigel Pelosi Twitter Jilib renouncement Evren Washington Post Lanier Boehner seven hours thirty days six hours
Bumpy road for California Democrats targeting Republican House seats

The Bob Siegel Show

01:32 min | 4 years ago

Bumpy road for California Democrats targeting Republican House seats

"The beltway where promises actually not to rain today for a couple of our good to be with you thank you for joining us i was just reading the washington post story on the goings on in my old home of orange county california where i lived until two thousand fifteen in in california they have a primary a week what was coming tuesday and california's primaries because it's california are different from everywhere else the top two winners in the primary advance to the general not one republican and one democrat the top two it's called the jungle primary that creates hard for the democrats they need to capture a bunch of seats in california they want to retake the house of representatives and give nancy pelosi back the speaker's gavel and if you vote for democrat you're voting for nancy pelosi it's that simple in any event in three of those districts california's thirty eighth congressional district to republicans are ahead bob hyphen sean nelson in the forty eighth congressional district to republicans are ahead scott bah and dana rohrabacher and in the forty ninth congressional district to republicans are ahead rocky chavez and diane hockey now that's the story the washington post dave weigel at road very long story now democrats are trying to get their act together to pick once too late they've got like a hundred candidates on everyone and that's the story that's an in a nutshell three races in california's thirty eight bob house in sean nelson going to advance to the finals in.

Beltway California Sean Nelson Dave Weigel Bob House Washington Post Orange County Nancy Pelosi Scott Bah Dana Rohrabacher Rocky Chavez Diane Hockey Washington